Muscular System Essays (Examples)

Filter results by:

 

View Full Essay

Tissue Maturation Body System Effects

Words: 1400 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40406059

e. hypertrophy). In the elderly, this process is reverse. Hence, the functional reserve capacities of the skeletal muscles decline with age, largely due to diminished levels of physical activity. As a result daily tasks once taken for granted become progressively more difficult, and eventually impossible, to perform. In illustration, a great deal of muscle force is required to simply stand up or to climb stairs. Therefore, skeletal system is relying upon the reserve capacity of the heart to provide the endurance needed to perform such activities. If an elderly person does not engage in some sort of endurance-based activities, he or she will not have the cardiac reserve capacity needed for daily tasks. More importantly, diminished capacity may not counteract illnesses or diseases. Although strength-based activities help the cardiac reserve, it may not benefit the skeletal system. "While resistance exercise promotes fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscles, the explosive power of…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, R. (2011). Muscle tissue. About.com Guide. Retrieved from http://biology.about.com/od/anatomy/a/aa022808a.htm

Carpi, A. (1999). Basic anatomy - tissues & organs. Retrieved from http://web.jjay.cuny.edu/~acarpi/NSC/14-anatomy.htm

Lakatta, E.G. (1994). Cardiovascular reserve capacity in healthy older humans. Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science, Gerontology Research Center, National Institute on Aging, 6(4): 213-23.

Courtesy of Musculartory System BlogSpot
View Full Essay

Main Systems of Human Body

Words: 3828 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37436002

The circulatory or cardiovascular system is responsible for moving nutrients, wastes and gases between body cells, transporting blood across the whole body and battling disease (Circulatory System). Its principal elements are the heart, numerous blood vessels, and blood.

The heart forms the circulatory system's core. This 2-sided, 4-chambered pump which distributes blood to various arteries comprises of the right and left ventricles, and right and left atria. The ventricles, situated within the heart's lower half, are responsible for pumping blood to the whole body (away from our heart), whilst the atria, situated within the heart's upper half are in charge of receiving blood from different parts of the human body. The right and left ventricles pump de-oxygenated and oxygenated blood, respectively; de-oxygenated blood is pumped to lungs while oxygenated blood is pumped to the remainder of the human body (smith, 2013). These 4 chambers are connected to one another by…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Skeletal System Purpose and Functions

Words: 1351 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41575906

Calcium is needed in blood clotting, stability and permeability of the membrane, nerve conduction, muscle contraction, cellular secretion, enzyme activity, and cell growth. Magnesium is needed for the metabolism of potassium and calcium and for the mobilization of calcium from bones. Phosphorus plays and important role in the development and maturation of the bone. Its chief role in bone resorption, mineralization and collagen synthesis makes it essential in calcium homeostasis (Michael's).

Diseases and disorders of the skeletal system include leukemia, bursitis, osteoporosis, sprains, fractures, spina bifida, scurvy, arthritis, scoliosis, talipes equinovarus or clubfoot, tendonitis, kyphosis and poliomyelitis (Family Shock 2001). Leukemia is also called cancer of the blood where abnormally large numbers of white blood cells multiply at an uncontrolled manner so that they interfere with the body's production of red blood cells. The cause is still unknown. ursitis is a painful condition, which most commonly affects the hips and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discovery Kids. Skeletal system. Discovery Communications, Inc., 2000. Retrieved May 30, 2007 at http://yucky.discovery.com/flash/body/pg000124.html

Family Shock. Diseases and Disorders. The Shock Family, December 21, 2001. Retrieved May 30, 2007 at http://www.shockfamily.net/sksleton/DISEASE.htmL

Michael's. Skeleton Factors. Michael's Naturapathic Programs: Inner Health Group, Inc., 1996 Retrieved on May 30, 2007 at http://www.michaelshealth.com/pdf/skeletalfactors.pdf

ThinkQuest. Skeletal System. Think Quest USA: Oracle Education Foundation, 1999. Retrieved on May 30, 2007 at http://library.thinkquest.org/5777/sked.htm
View Full Essay

Cardiovascular and Gastrointestinal Systems Integrated

Words: 2173 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56960433

Integration of Cardiovascular/Gastrointestinal Systems

Integration of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems within the human body

The integration of the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems allow for nutrients to be introduced, broken down, and absorbed by body to maintain and promote healthy bodily functions. Independently, these systems serve separate functions, but when working in conjunction, help to transport necessary nutrients throughout the body, while maintaining and promoting homeostasis within the systems. Any imbalance within these systems will greatly affect the body, as a whole, and can lead to potentially fatal results.

Integration of gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems within the human body

The gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems of the human body help to breakdown and transport items that are ingested, such as food and medication, to the necessary parts of the body, expelling wastes that are not needed. Separately, the gastrointestinal and cardiac systems have different functions, but when the systems work in conjunction…… [Read More]

References:

Bowen, R 2002, Salivary glands and saliva, Colorado State University, viewed 14 September 2011,  http://www.vivo.colostate.edu/hbooks/pathphys/digestion/pregastric/salivary.html 

Cleveland Clinic 2005, The structure and function of the digestive system, viewed 29 September 2011, http://www.cchs.net/health/health-info/docs/1600/1699.asp?index=7041

Cotterill, S 2000, The cardiovascular system (heart and blood): medical terminology for cancer, Department of Child Health, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, viewed 14 September 2011,  http://www.cancerindex.org/medterm/medtm8.htm 

Gregory, M n.d., The circulatory system, Clinton Community College, State University of New York, viewed 15 September 2011, http://faculty.clintoncc.suny.edu/faculty/michael.gregory/files/Bio%20100/Bio%20100%20Lectures/Organ%20Systems/Circulatory%20System/Circulatory%20System.htm
View Full Essay

Adrenal Gland Keeping the Body

Words: 2250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25520423

S. Congress that the prospects of stem cell research were so vast that it could touch all the realm of medicine (Connor 2000). An unlimited source of embryonic stem cells will solve the problem of shortage of transplants. Embryonic stem cells will save lives by curing generative diseases of the brain, hepatitis, diabetes, leukemia, rheumatoid arthritis, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis and diseases of the heart and kidneys. ut current laws restrict the use of stems cells on embryos less than 14 days old and for correcting fertility, reproduction or congenital disorders. The restriction is grounded in the belief that the embryo is a potential human being from the moment of conception. It thus possesses a soul and a dignity just like any other viable person (Connor). Previous scientific research presented evidence that genetically engineering cells could partly repair a defective immune system (Travis 2002). Two new studies bolstered this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bauer, D.G. (2005). Review of the endocrine system. MedSurg Nursing: Jannetti Publications, Inc.

Connor, S. (2000). Science: the miracle cure with a catch. The London Independent: Newspaper Publishing PLC

Degen. D (2008). Body organization and homeostasis. 1 page. Bones, Muscles and Skin. Pearson Education, Inc.: Pearson Prentice Hall

Farabee, M.J. (2006). Animal organ systems and homeostasis. 18 web pages. Estrella Mountain Community College. Retrieved on February 1, 2006 at http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/BioBookMUSSKEL.html
View Full Essay

Anterior Cruciate Ligament or ACL

Words: 2193 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30046943

esearchers believe that incorporating evidence-based prevention methods can decrease the incidence of ACL ruptures, but an understanding of the etiology and mechanisms of sports injury are a necessary to do this (Posthumus, 2009).

The highest prevalence of extrinsic ACL injuries tends to occur in organized sports especially adolescents participating in pivoting type sports such as football, basketball, and team handball (Bahr & Krosshaug, 2005). In addition to any intrinsic factors and adolescent may have, or predisposing factors, environmental factors surrounding organized sports can also play a role in injury. For example, weather conditions (slippery surface), type of surface sport is played on (grass vs. pavement), proper footwear, and protective bracing (Posthumus, 2009).

A growing concern regarding these injuries and the populations that incur them is that these injuries increase the risk of osteoarthritis (Bahr & Krosshaug, 2005). In fact, after ten years, around half of all people that have suffered…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ageberg, E., Thombe, R., Neeter, C., Gravare Silbernagel, K., Roos, EM. Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Treated With Training and Surgical Reconstruction or Training Only: A Two to Five-Year Followup. Arthritis Care & Research. 2008; 59(12):1773-79.

Bahr, R., Krosshaug, T. Understanding injury mechanisms: a key component of preventing injuries in sport. Br J. Sports Med. 2005; 39:324 -- 329.

Grindstaff, TL., Hammill, RR., Tuzson, AE., Hertel, J. Neuromuscular Control Training Programs and Noncontact Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Rates in Female Athletes: A Numbers-Needed-to-Treat Analysis. Journal of Athletic Training. 2006; 41(4):450 -- 456.

Health Information Publications (2011). What is the anterior cruciate ligament? eHealthMD retrieved from  http://ehealthmd.com
View Full Essay

What Happens When I Get Burned

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8974263

Burned

There are specialized cells called receptors that receive information about the environment and changes in that environment. Each kind of receptor reacts to a different kind of stimulus. For example, the receptors on the retina in the eye detect light. Receptors are all connected to nerve cells, and the nerve cells carry information from the receptor to the brain, where the signal is processed. The brain makes the decision about what to do with the information, such as move a part of the body to cause a reaction based on the information the receptors sent. However, in the case of an emergency situation, this normal interpretation process takes too long even though it is extremely fast, and instead another emergency plan is followed by the nervous system. When burned the body will experience a reflex reaction.

The skin has receptors that detect both pressure and temperature. In the case…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Edwards Syndrome Trisomy 18 8 Sources

Words: 1372 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77979310

Edwards Syndrome, Trisomy 18 8 sources ( 4-5 Print Sources 3-4 online Sources) All questions answered essay ( mandatory): -What ? (Discription genetic disorder) -What genes chromosomes linked disorder? -Describe populations affected Edwards Syndrome (Include gender, age & number affected USA wordwide.

Edwards syndrome which is also known as Trisomy 18 is a genetic disorder that is caused by the presence of a third copy of chromosome 18 instead of the normal two copies. The extra 18th chromosome comes as a result of nondisjunction of the chromosomal material during meiosis. As a result of failure in the segregation of a chromosome to the daughter cells, there can be errors in the meiotic division leading to an extra chromosome. This extra chromosome usually occurs before conception and it is the second most common autosomal trisomy that carries to term after Down syndrome though it is more common in females than males…… [Read More]

References

Buyse, M.L. (Ed.). (1990). Birth Defect Encyclopedia Cambridge, Massachusetts: Blackwell Scientific Publications.

Canfield, M.A., Honein, M.A., Yuskiv, N., Xing, J., Mai, C.T., Collins, J.S., . . . Kirby, R.S. (2006). National estimates and race/ethnic-specific variation of selected birth defects in the United States, 1999-2001. . 2006 Nov;76(11):747-56. Birth defects research. Part A, Clinical and molecular teratology, 76(11), 747-756.

HealthStar PR. (2012). First Peer-Reviewed Data For New Noninvasive Prenatal Test Published By Aria Diagnostics. Medical News Today. Retrieved from  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/240123.php 

Merritt, T.A., Catlin, A., Wool, C., Peverini, R., Goldstein, M., & Oshiro, B. (2012). Trisomy 18 and Trisomy 13: Treatment and Management Decisions. NeoReviews, 13(1), e40-e48. doi: 10.1542/neo.13-1-e40
View Full Essay

Electromyography Biopac Exercise Discussion This

Words: 1205 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33751831

The authors were trying to develop a system of estimating and indexing muscle fatigue rates during static muscle contraction. The results of this study indicated that estimations were reasonably successful with some limitations that were noted. One limitation was that the study neglected muscle recovery since the experiment was performed in a lab under controlled conditions and the muscles were able to fully recover. However, in the real world muscles move in a dynamic environment thus making muscle recovery rates a challenge in producing an accurate estimate of fatigue.

Another study looked at the efficacy of treatments in patients who suffer from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). The study conducted research using 111 patients who suffer from CTS. They compared the standard conservative treatment (SCT) with other forms of treatment available that also propose to alleviate symptoms associated CTS. They found that SCT, which includes local steroid injections, was effective as…… [Read More]

References:

Yewguan Soo; Sugi, M.; Nishino, M.; Yokoi, H.; Arai, T.; Kato, R.; Nakamura, T.; Ota, J.;, "Quantitative estimation of muscle fatigue using surface electromyography during static muscle contraction," Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2009. EMBC 2009. Annual International Conference of the IEEE, vol., no., pp.2975-2978, 3-6 Sept. 2009

doi: 10.1109/IEMBS.2009.5332521

URL: http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=5332521&isnumber=5332379

Ay-e N. Bardak, Mehmet Alp, Belgin Erhan, Nurdan Paker, Betul Kaya and Ay-e . Onal,;, "Evaluation of the clinical efficacy of conservative treatment in the management of carpal tunnel syndrome," Advances in Therapy, Publisher Springer Healthcare Communications, ISSN 0741-238X (Print) 1865-8652 (Online), Issue Volume 26, Number 1 / January, 2009
View Full Essay

Biology Function of the Metabolic

Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64208353

d.).

The primary organ that is accountable for regulating metabolism is the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is situated on the brain stem and forms the floor and part of the lateral walls of the third ventricle of the cerebrum. The main functions of the hypothalamus is to control and integrate activities of the autonomic nervous system (ANS), production and regulation of feelings of rage and aggression, regulation of body temperature and regulation of food intake (Graham, 2005).

BM goes down with age and with the loss of lean body mass. Increased muscle mass and cardiovascular exercise can help to increase BM, even when the body is at rest. Measured in calories, metabolic rates vary with exertion, recent food ingestion, muscle exertion, environmental temperature, emotional state, body temperature, pregnancy, menstruation, level of thyroid hormones stress hormones (epinephrine and norepinephrine), fear and illness. The human body requires energy in order to stay alive…… [Read More]

References

Basal Metabolic Rate. (2010). Retreived July 22, 2010, from Buzzle Web site:

 http://www.buzzle.com/articles/basal-metabolic-rate.html 

Basal metabolic rate. (2010). Retreived July 22, 2010, from Wellness.com Web site:

http://www.wellness.com/reference/fitness/basal-metabolic-rate/practice-theory-and-evidence
View Full Essay

Market Driven Management

Words: 25695 Length: 75 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32150042

Pharmaceutical industries have to operate in an environment that is highly competitive and subject to a wide variety of internal and external constraints. In recent times, there has been an increasing trend to reduce the cost of operation while competing with other companies that manufacture products that treat similar afflictions and ailments. The complexities in drug research and development and regulations have created an industry that is subject to intense pressure to perform. The amount of capital investment investments required to get a drug from conception, through clinical trials and into the market is enormous. The already high-strung pharmaceutical industry is increasingly investing greater amounts of resources in search of the next "blockbuster" drug that can help them gain market position and profits. Laws, regulations and patents are important to the industry while spending billions of dollars in ensuring the copyright of their products.

It is the intention of this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ansoff, H.I. (1957). Strategies for diversification. Harvard Business Review, 35(5), 113-124.

Ansoff, H.I. (1965). Corporate Strategy. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Ashour, M.F., Obeidat, O., Barakat, H., & Tamimi, A. (2004). UAE Begins Examination of Patent Applications. Tamino.com. Retrieved January 18, 2004, from the World Wide Web: http://www.tamimi.com/lawupdate/2001-01/intprop.htm

Bain, J.S. (1954). Economies of scale, concentration, and the condition of entry in twenty manufacturing industries. American Economic Review, 44, 15-36.
View Full Essay

Unique Preventable Disease

Words: 2104 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26553310

FIBOMYALGIA OUTLINE and PAMPHLET

Introduction to Fibromyalgia

Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

Effects of the symptoms on the body.

isk factors and preventive steps.

(1) Demographics.

Diagnosis and Treatment for fibromyalgia.

Therapeutic and diagnostic methods for fibromyalgia.

Prognosis.

Treatment for fibromyalgia.

Fibromyalgia

Having many physical and clinical symptoms, Fibromyalgia is a syndrome whose effects are felt in form of extreme musculoskeletal pain. It is believed that many environmental, genetic and biological factors are responsible for the start and progress of this infection although its etiology is undermined. In many industrialized countries, its rate of occurrence is 0.7-4.7% amongst the general population. It is incidentally seen more in women than men and the general female-to-male ratio being 9-1. Due to the diverse nature of its symptoms, those infected experience major difficulties adapting to their working environment, family or their life. It also subjects the sufferers to use consultative health services and social resources…… [Read More]

References

Arthritis and Fibromyalgia.Plos ONE, 9(2), 1-9. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0088740

Derrer, David, T.,2014, understanding fibromyalgia symptoms, webmdmd,2014,understanding fibromyalgia symptoms, retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/fibromyalgia/understanding-fibromyalgia-symptoms.

Fibromyalgia | University of Maryland Medical Center http://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/fibromyalgia#ixzz3HSyCkaXF

KengenTraska, T., Rutledge, D., Mouttapa, M., Weiss, J., & Aquino, J. (2012). Strategies used for managing symptoms by women with fibromyalgia. Journal Of Clinical Nursing, 21(5/6), 626-635. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2702.2010.03501.x
View Full Essay

Lungs What Are the Lungs

Words: 3387 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31909477

However, it was 1953 that the formation of serotonin was from the lungs was substantiated. It is also observed that detoxification of the blood takes place in the lungs. Later, it was observed that one of the important activities of the lung is to provide chemical filtration by shielding the regular circulation of blood from the attack of vasoactive mixtures and other exogenous compounds present in the arteries. The physiology of the lungs and its location makes the lung exclusively suitable to perform these activities. (Wet; Moss, 1998)

The total output from the cardiac system is obtained by the lungs whereas other organs acquire only a very small quantity of output. The blood that circulates the lungs is subject to the vast capillary endothelial plane of the body which is of seventy square meters. This aspect of output and circulation enable the lung to perform the efficient function of biochemical…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, Taylor. B. (1996) "Essentials for Animal Research: A Primer for Research Personnel"

Diane Publishing.

De Reuck, a.V. S; O'Connor, Maeve. (1962) "CIBA Foundation Symposium on Pulmonary

Structure and Function" a. Churchill Ltd.: London.
View Full Essay

Galectin-1 in the Regulation of

Words: 4060 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10094274



The success was remarkable, according to the researchers: Even muscles that had already lost half of its mass, recovered visible. (Leppanen et al. p5549-65) At the same time, the mice survived for several weeks longer than their untreated counterparts and also developed a healthy appetite again. (Mantovani, p296) The new study is therefore interesting in two respects: First, it demonstrates that the muscle loss at least in animal models in fact, affects the chances of survival, and secondly, it shows a way, may be how to prevent this degradation, and even reversed. (Bruera et al. p857)

Muscle atrophy

Muscle atrophy is a medical term that refers to the decrease in the size of skeletal muscle, losing muscle strength because of the strength of muscle is related to its mass. (Burnfoot, p323-34)

All changes in cell morphological character may affect isolated cells or groups of them, therefore the modification of a…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Cardiac Arrest

Words: 3253 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91083108

Heart Disease

elationship between cardiac arrest and coronary cardiac disease

The heart is an essential organ in the human body, it keeps the individual alive. Understanding how the heart operates and functions is essential to help protect your heart from heart disease. Cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease are significant heart related illness that has a high mortality rate. It is important for individuals with pre-existing heart disease to understand the symptoms of cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease, since these are both leading causes of fatality in the United States. Understanding how the heart works, the individuals risk for heart disease, and how to prevent or delay heart disease is essential. In this paper I will address the relationship between cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease. I will also explain how the heart functions and discuss some ways of preventing cardiac arrest and coronary heart disease.

Cardiac Arrest

Cardiac…… [Read More]

References

Antonini-Canterin et. al. (2009). Association between carotid and coronary artery disease in patients with aortic valve stenosis: an angiographic study. Angiology 60 (5) 596-600

CDC. (2010). Heart disease. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/ 

Dewey et. al. (2004). Coronary artery disease: new insights and their implications for radiology. European Radiology. 14 (6) 1048-1054

Escolar et. al. (2006). New imaging techniques for diagnosing coronary artery disease. Canadian Medical Association Journal. 174 (4) 487-495
View Full Essay

Phylum Annelida

Words: 601 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44160429

Phylum Annelida

Annelids are members of the Superphylum Lophotrochozoa. The division of the Phylum is in three classes Hirudineans (leeches), Oligochaetes (earthworms) and Hirudinean (Polychaetes and leeches). They inhibit marine aquatic with Parapodia, like nereis Meglitsch P, 1972()

They are worm like animals that have muscular body walls that elongate. They are also circular in cross section. The major difference between Phylum Annelida and other worm like creatures is that, they have segmented bodies (also known as metameric). Each segment has its own particular function. Phylum Annelida include different types of earthworms, leeches and marine polychaetes. There are those that live in fresh water, marine also terrestrial. Some of them live as parasites. Annelids are skilled in swimming, creeping and burrowing Badea, Gagyi-Palffy, Stoian, & Stan, 2010

( ADDIN EN.CITE )

Meglitsch P (1972)

, said that Annelids are connected to Molluscs and seem to have arisen from flatworms. Given…… [Read More]

References

Badea, A.B., Gagyi-Palffy, A., Stoian, L.C., & Stan, G. (2010). Preliminary studies of quality assessment of aquatic environments from Cluj suburban areas, based on some invertebrates bioindicators and chemical indicators. [Article]. Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society (AACL Bioflux), 3(1), 35-41.

Meglitsch P. (1972). Invertebrate Zoology. Oxford University Press.
View Full Essay

Michelangelo and the Sistine Chapel

Words: 2833 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14497113

Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam

The Creation of Adam (1512) as conceived and depicted by Michelangelo represents a significant moment in art history because it brings a humanistic style of expression and sense of realism to the art world that had not existed prior. The work is focused almost exclusively on the Body as a subject. The two figures—God the Father and Adam—represent the majesty of the human anatomy in its ideal form: muscular, flexible, unique, authentic, poised, admirable, beautiful and proportional. In the painting, God is mostly draped with a thin cloth; Adam is completely nude and his position (reclined with one knee propped up while he stretches backwards and reaches forward languidly) suggests one of royalty being wakened after a long slumber. Indeed, the idea that Adam is like royalty is one that Michelangelo infuses into the scene giving the painting its high-minded rapturous quality, which is much in…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Perioperative Nurse's Role in Caring for Pregnant Patients With Aortic Dissections

Words: 1915 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83299405

Aortic dissection is a disease of the wall of the aorta in which the aortic blood bursts into the muscular layer of the great artery, thus forming a blood filled channel along the planes of the muscularis layer. This false lumen can re-rupture back into the true lumen, through a second distal intimal tear, creating a biluminal or double barrelled aorta. Due to weakened walls, there is threat of rupture into the surrounding tissue with fatal consequences. (Boon, , Colledge, Walker, & Hunter, 2010)

The pathophysiology behind the condition is often a spontaneous or iatrogenic tear in the intima. However, in about five to ten percent of patients, these tears are absent. An intimal tear can occur anywhere along the aorta, although a vast majority of tears are found within ten centimeters of the aortic valve. The dissection may extend towards the heart, affecting the coronary arteries, or it may…… [Read More]

REFERENCES:

Duranki. (n.d.). Type an aortic dissection - the silent killer. Retrieved from http://duranki.hubpages.com/hub/Beware-High-Blood-Pressure-It-will-Kill-You -- You-Wont-See-It-Coming

Erbel, R., Alfonso, F., Boileau, C., & Dirsch, O. (2001). Diagnosis and management of aortic dissection*.European Heart Journal, 22(18), 1642-1681. Retrieved from http://www.escardio.org/guidelines-surveys/esc-guidelines/GuidelinesDocuments/guidelines-aortic-dissection-FT.pdf

Multum, C. (2012, Feburary 12). Morphine injection. Retrieved from  http://www.drugs.com/pro/morphine-injection.html 

Nicholas A. Boon, Nicki R. Colledge, Brian R. Walker, John A.A. Hunter.(2010). Davidson's Principles and Practice of Medicine . India, Elsevier.
View Full Essay

Journey Begins as We Enter

Words: 1067 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22172212

The blood in which we are traveling in is composed of red blood cells called hemoglobin, plasma, platelets, and white blood cells. Blood is transported through the body by the heart's pumping action. As we continue, we will enter the hepatic portal vein, which delivers blood from the gastrointestinal tract to the liver, into the ascending aorta, up towards the heart. As we approach the heart, it's pumping will pull us up into its chambers and through to the lungs where we will get oxygen and continue our journey to the kidneys. As we return to the heart, we will pass through the aortic arch and descend through the thoracic aorta continuing past the descending abdominal aorta until we reach the renal artery. We will make a left turn and pass through the glomeruli through the kidney's tubules and conclude this phase of our journey into the left kidney.

The…… [Read More]

Reference List:

Thibodeau, G. (1992). Structure and Function of the Body. Chicago: Mosby Year Book.
View Full Essay

Performance of the Company Annual Reports Statements

Words: 3293 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96968599

Performance of the Company

Annual reports

Statements of corporate goals

SWOT analysis of United Health Group

9A PESTEL Analysis

In this paper, we present a systematic analysis of the United Health Group through a SWOT and PESTEL analysis. The analysis is aimed at the identification of an internal problem within the company's environment and then prescribing a suitable solution to it. The identified problem is poor Ergonomics. This is then explored and then recommendations provided.

The creation of a better health care system has been one of the key drivers of change in the American social, economic and political reform agenda. Quality health care to al citizens has been a piped dream for many. In this paper we presents an analysis of the effectiveness of United Healthcare in the provision of quality health care. Our focus is on its environmental analysis with the aim of isolating the genesis of the…… [Read More]

References

Amick, B., Robertson, M., Moore, A, DeRango, K and Mendez, CC .The Impact of Two Ergonomic Interventions on Health and Productivity: A Quasi-Experimental Field Study

Amick III, BC, Robertson M, DeRango K, et a (2003) Effect of office ergonomics intervention on reducing musculoskeletal symptoms. Spine 2003;28:2706-2711.

Amick., B., Roberson, M., DeRango, K ., Palacios, N., Rooney, T and Bazzani, L (2002).The Health Consequences of an Office Ergonomics Training Coupled with an Ergonomically Designed Chair: Preliminary Results.Proceedings of the Conference WWDU 2002 World Wide Work - May 22-25, 2002 - Berchtesgaden pg 371-373

Bergqvist U.(1995) Visual display terminal work -- a perspective on long -- term changes and discomforts. Int J. Ind Ergon.;16:201 -- 9.
View Full Essay

Living Things Are Characterized by the Following

Words: 4492 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61564004

living things are characterized by the following seven characteristics namely mobility, respiration, excretion, sensitivity or response to external stimulus, growth, feeding, and reproduction. Though there may be variations between animal and plant kingdom (ex, plants take in carbon dioxide and prepare their own food), these characteristics are commonly observed among all living things.

iology is a very broad field that encompasses the study of characteristics of living things. It includes botany, zoology and all other sub-disciplines that range from microbiology to evolution and ecology.

Evolution is the branch of biology that deals with the study of natural development of living organisms and the changes in them over time. Evolution refers to the heritable changes that occur in a population over a period of time. All the diversity that is observed currently in plant and animal kingdom can be ascribed to evolution over a long period of time.

Atoms are the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Mark Rothery, "Cells," Accessed on Sep 20th 2005, Available from  http://www.mrothery.co.uk/cells/cellnotes.htm
View Full Essay

Houdini Was Able to Modulate His Normal

Words: 1748 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33544989

Houdini Was Able to Modulate His Normal Physiology During His Stunts

The objective of this study is to examine how Houdini was able to modulate his normal physiology during his stunts.

Harry Houdini caused the world to marvel at his skill in escaping the bondage of handcuffs and was referred to as the 'handcuff king' and as well Houdini performed many other magic tricks that required more than merely illusion but instead required that he be able to alter his own body's physiology. The modulation of physiology enabled Houdini to accomplish great feats and to capture the imagination and attention of a large base of fans across many years. Houdini is well-known for having spent a great deal of time and effort to invalidate individuals who were so-called mediums communicating with the dead because he detested this type of trickery.

Modulation of Physiology

The modulation of physiology is similar to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Randi, James (2001) My Heroes, The Pale Blue Dot, Houdini's Last Stunt. SWIFT. Online Newsletter of the JREP. 28 Dec 2001. Retrieved from: http://www.randi.org/jr/122801.html

Shermer, Michael (2001) Houdini's Skeptical Advice: Just Because Something's Unexplained Doesn't Mean It's Supernatural. Scientific American. 4 Feb 2011. Retrieved from: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=houdinis-skeptical-advice

Seabourne, Tom Dr. (nd) Breathing and Heart Rate Control. Universal Nutrition. Retrieved from:  http://www.universalnutrition.com/features/breathingheartrate.html
View Full Essay

HSMS Gap analysis Hazard identification and Risk assessments

Words: 14774 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45172476

HSMS Gap Analysis and Hazard Identification Risk Assessments

Description of APM Terminals

Legal Environment

Review of the Health and Safety Management System

Description

Gap Analysis

Hazard Identification

Physical Hazards

Health and Welfare Hazards

Risk Assessment

Physical Hazard -- Working at Height - Scaffolding

Health & Welfare Hazard -- Noise

Action Plans

Action Plan 1 - Management System

Action Plan 2 -- Hazards and Risks

Barbour Checklist: BS OHSAS 18001 Audit Checklist

Occupational health and safety management has numerous benefits for business, not only an employer's duty of care, a legal and moral obligation but also critical part of business equal in importance to other business functions like finance, marketing and production. When health and safety is embedded as part of business, results would be, good company image and reputation, better employee motivation and morale, improved efficiency and ultimately increased profitability.

The implementation of a sound health, safety and environment (HSE)…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Human Stem Cell Medical -

Words: 4660 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11610140

This bill was sent to the U.S. Senate and set for vote mirroring a bill previously passed by the House during the Summer of 2003 which failed to pass the Senate because of vehement disagreement that was even "within the parties over the prohibition of therapeutic cloning.(National Legislation Concerning Human and Reproductive Cloning, 2004; paraphrased) As of the date of the report on legislation eight U.S. states had passed laws that explicitly prohibited reproductive cloning using human embryos and another five U.S. states have placed a prohibition on cloning for any purpose whatsoever with 22 other U.S. states introducing bills outlawing the reproductive cloning of humans. (Ibid; paraphrased) Patenting laws for genetics allow inventors to patent genetics but only specific genetic factors may be patented and inventors are required to:

1) Identify novel genetic sequences;

2) Specify the sequence's product, 3) Specify how the product functions in nature --i.e. its…… [Read More]

Bibliography

O'Connor, Sean M. (nd) Intellectual Property Rights and Stem Cell Research: Who Owns the Medical Breakthroughs?

Kadereit, Suzanne & Hines, Pamela J. (nd) Overview of Stem Cell Research New England Law Journal 2005 Mar 28. Online available at http://www.nesl.edu/lawrev/vol39/3/13%20Kadereit%20Final.pdf.

Chadwick, Ruth et al. (2004)HUGO Ethics Committee Statement of Stem Cells (2004) November

Legal Protection of Digital Information (2006) Chapter 5: Software-Based Inventions Online available at:.  http://digital-law-online.info/lpdi1.0/treatise63.html
View Full Essay

Genetics Affects Child Development Genetic

Words: 1598 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30958971

The following images show certain disorders that result due to mutation. Children born from the same family members' shows higher similarity index regarding the genetic disorder number inclusive of the Indian community (Cummings, 2010, pg 333).

Curbing gene disorders

Stoppage of varying types of disorders is possible through learning in consideration of human development the number of genes contained in a single genome, their respective location and the establishment of functions or roles in the various genetic processes. This is achievable through strategized genetic mapping, where the establishment of specified genes having same linkage involved. The mapping establishes the respective linkages between genes and as a result of their location in the same gene, the crossing over frequency with the existing distance amid them is notable (Cummings, 2010, pg 333). esearch on the various risks factors involved can also be considerable as beneficial. This enables the development of certain preventive…… [Read More]

References

Benson, B. (2012). Advances in Child Development. London: Academic Press.

Bowden, V.G. (2009). Children and Their Families. Atlanta: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Cummings, M. (2010). Human Heridity; Principles and Issues. New York: Cengage Learning.
View Full Essay

Neurotransmitters Are Chemicals Endogenously Produced in the

Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94018370

Neurotransmitters are chemicals endogenously produced in the body for the purpose of sending stimulus across from one neuron to the other through the synapse. Neurotransmitters, packaged in synaptic vessels, are clustered beneath the inner membrane of the axon terminal of the presynaptic membrane. The neurotransmitters upon stimulus are released into the synaptic cleft where they diffuse and attach to their particular receptors on the post synaptic membrane. The flow of action potential is the main stimulus to the release of the neurotransmitters. The main function of the neurotransmitters is to excite or inhibit certain kinds of receptors. Thereby the behavioral effect of the neurotransmitters depends on the kinds of receptors on the post synapse. Noradrenaline, an important neurotransmitter is involved in arousal and dopamine controls motor movements and cognition (Webster, 2001, p. 55).

Synapse consists of dendrites of one neuron and terminus of the other neuron. No physical connection is…… [Read More]

References

Jankovic, J. (2008). Parkinson's disease: clinical features and diagnosis. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 79:368 -- 376.

Neve, A.K. (2009). The Dopamine Receptors, The Receptors. Edition 2. Springer.

Webster, R. (2001). Neurotransmitters, Drugs and Brain Function. John Wiley and Sons.
View Full Essay

Senior Fitness

Words: 2521 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66413783

* The effects on normal aging and metabolism is that after the age of forty, metabolism usually decreases by about 5% every ten years. That does not mean that metabolism cannot be controlled to some extent; it can. Metabolism is loosely defined as the chemical workings within our bodies that help us to maintain a certain level of energy use, calorie burning and general energy (even at rest). As we age, our metabolism rate slows down, meaning that we burn less calories and the ones we do burn are burned at a slower rate. It also means that we may have less energy and our overall health slows as well.
* As individuals grow older their muscle mass is less likely to maintain its composition. Bill Sonnemaker, the 2007 IDEA Health and Fitness Personal Trainer of the year states that building muscle mass at any age provides a number of…… [Read More]

References
American College of Sports Medicine (1995) Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription, 5th Ed. Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins, pp. 1-373
American Diabetes Association (2011) Hyperglycemia, accessed on May 5, 2011 at http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/blood-glucose-control/hyperglycemia.html
Van Dusen, A. (2011) Tips to build your muscle mass at any age, accessed on May 1, 2011 at: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20515088/ns/health-forbescom/

View Full Essay

Etiology of Gastroparesis

Words: 1119 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34961776

Gastroparesis

Digestive System Disorder Case Study: Gastroparesis

The paper opens with an introduction and definintion of Gastroparesis and its association to damaging of vagus nerves along the intestines and stomach muscles. This reduces their ability for function properly. People living with diabetes have a higher likelihood of advancing Gastroparesis against sequential Diabetic Gastroparesis. More persons are contracting Gastroparesis during surgical operations. The paper illustrates that more patients are yet to find a cause linking their illnesses with Gastroparesis because it triggers Idiopathic Gastroparesis. The scope of Gastroparesis has a close link to diseases of connective tissue such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as well as scleroderma. The neurological conditions worsen along Parkinson's disease. The paper concludes with proposals of Gastroparesis diagnosis through tests carried out on gastric emptying scans, x-rays, and manometry. Clinical Gastroparesis takes the definition of stomach emptying complications. There are beneficial adjustments to insulin dosage among diabetic people who…… [Read More]

References

Ellenburg, M.A., (2012). Gastroparesis: Causes, Tests and Treatment Options. New York: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform

Parkman, H.P., & McCallum, R.W. (2011). Gastroparesis: Pathophysiology, Presentation and Treatment. New York: Springer

Sethi, A.K., & Murthi, R.K., (2011). Bowl Care and Digestive Disorders. New York: V&S Publishers
View Full Essay

Transfer of Maxillomandibular Relationship From

Words: 9027 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93499892

The understanding of TMJ anatomy as well as its function is very important to generate stable as well as healthy intercuspation. TMJ consists of condyle, disk, muscles and ligaments. It connects the lower jaw to the temporal bone in the skull in both sides and has two movements (osenstiel and Land, 2001). The TMJ along with muscles stabilization is the starting point to get the ideal maxilla-mandibular relationship in the centric relation. There is no way to register and transfer an accurate interocclusal record if patient has TMJ or muscles dysfunction. The patient with this dysfunction should be treated first before final restoration, cementation or construction. The conservative management of unstable joints and muscles via appliance therapy is the most common modality of management (Capp and Clayton, 1985).

4.2 Occlusal vertical dimension:

Perhaps one of the toughest and most intricate recuperative experiments for dentists in today's world is directly related…… [Read More]

References

Bansal S. Critical evaluation of various methods of recording centric jaw relation. J of india prosthet society2008;8(4):185-191

Boudrias, P. Anterior Guidance: Some Important Points. Journal dentaire du Quebec Volume 42 Janvier, 2005.

CP Owen. Occlusion in complete dentures. Available at: http://web.wits.ac.za/NR/rdonlyres/4E1BC14E-9BC1-4221-AA4D-15A337579384/0/occlusion.pdf

Capp N.J., and Clayton J.A. Technique for evaluation of centric relation tooth contacts. Part II: Following use of an occlusal splint for treatment of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. J Prosthet dent 1985;54 (5): 697-705.
View Full Essay

Alzheimer's Disease According to the

Words: 1127 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2571036

One of the most common mental disorders linked to Alzheimer's is depression which according to Elwood Cohen manifests itself in three important ways. First, "There are higher rates of depression among Alzheimer's patients than among non-demented adults;" second, "Having a depressive episode is associated with an increased risk for developing Alzheimer's," and third, Depressive symptoms can be confused with dementia in older adults" (1999, 214).

In a recent study conducted by the Cardiovascular Health Initiative, based in Washington, D.C., more than one-third of 400 dementia patients and more than one-fifth of 300 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) had experienced symptoms of depression during a one-month period prior to the study. Similar results were reported by the Multi-Institutional esearch in Alzheimer's Genetic Epidemiology (MIAGE) which discovered that "In the year prior to a patient being diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, the same patient was almost five times more likely than their…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, Elwood. (1999). Alzheimer's Disease. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Coughlin, Patricia B. (1993). Facing Alzheimer's. New York: Ballantine Books.

Powell, Lenore S. (1993). Alzheimer's Disease: A Guide for Families. New York: Addison-Wesley Publishers, Inc.

A and Katie Courtice. (1993). Alzheimer's Disease. New York: Addison-Wesley Publishers, Inc.
View Full Essay

Dangers Outweigh Benefits of Genetic

Words: 1111 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95587717

Researchers at Cornell University discovered that Monarch butterfly caterpillars died when they ate plants dusted with the pollen of Bt corn that was growing in nearby fields, and many scientists worry that with so much insecticide in the corn plants, insects might develop a resistance to it (Dyer 2002). These fears and concerns are echoed by Francis Fukuyama who believes that genetic enhancement will undermine the system of human rights by disrupting the boundary that encloses all humans in a single group, thus believes society should limit genetic science to allow therapy but prohibit enhancement, such as genetically altered food crops, and non-therapeutic procedures (Tobey 2003). In other words, enhancement will allow society to increase genotypic and phenotypic diversity, yet such diversity will press society to the point of losing its shared humanity (Tobey 2003).

orks Cited

Adams, endy a. (2002, January 01). Reconciling private benefit and public risk in…… [Read More]

Welsh, Whitney. (2005, March 01). Brave new worlds: philosophy, politics, and science in human biotechnology. Population and Development Review. Retrieved July 09, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site: http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?DOCID=1G1:132710930&num

9&ctrlInfo=Round14%3AProd%3ASR%3AResult&ao=&FreePremium=BOTH

This article discusses the ethics and political landscape concerning genetic engineering, particularly the current White House administration. It includes some twenty references.
View Full Essay

Fantastic Voyage

Words: 1379 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44263757

Fantastic Voyage

[hs130, section: ____ ]

Today, on the twentieth of August, I will take you on a trip inside the gastrointestinal tract, and beyond in the human body to observe the process of digestion and excretion. As simple as it may seem, this process is more than just moving down a hollow tube. To understand this more deeply, let's begin our journey!

EVIEW OF THE VIDEO TAPE:

Being reduced to eight microns in a hamburger holds the possibility of being chewed, grinded and dissolved in gastric acid. Even though I used special shield defenses, the slight possibility can still be a scary thought. Despite the risk, I felt motivated enough to allow myself to be amazed by the human body.

In about a moment, I was in the mouth of a 55-year-old man. Mixed with me, were fries, meat, lettuce, cheese, burgers and bear. Staying away from the teeth…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Barrett, K., Heddwen, B., Boitano, S., & Barman, S. (2010).Ganong's review of medical physiology. (23 ed., pp. 451-489). Philadelphia: McGraw Hill.

Hansen, J.T., Koeppen, B.M., & Netter, F.H. (2002). Netter's atlas of human physiology. (5th ed., p 246 -249) Teterboro, N.J: Icon Learning Systems.

Kumar, V., Abbas, A., & Fausto, N. (2010) Robbins Basic Pathology. (8th ed., p 25-60) Philadelphia: Saunders.

Leonard, R., & Kendall, K. (2008). Dynamic swallow studies: Measurement techniques. (2 ed., pp. 292-294). San Diego: Plural Publishing.
View Full Essay

Effects of Massage on Depression in Newly Widowed Elderly Females

Words: 1789 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77031574

Therapeutic Massage on Elderly, Grieving Widows

The prosperity of a country is in accordance with its treatment of the aged," states an ancient Jewish Proverb ("Massage for the Mature Adult," 2001). This is an honorable and true statement. Too often many of our elderly people's needs are not noticed or attended to by family, friends, or medical practitioners. This is especially true for older women whose husbands have died.

Widowhood can have a tremendous impact on the health of older women (Ferraro, 1989; owling, 1987; Gass & Chang, 1989). The death of a spouse or partner has been described as the most disruptive and difficult role transition that an individual confronts throughout the life course (Lopata, 1987). In the United States, over 49% or 8.4 million women over the age of 65 are widows (radsher, 2000). Houdin (1993) states that "although the literature abounds with subjective pieces concerning bereavement, little…… [Read More]

Bibliography for Chapters One and Two

Barry, Kasl, and Prigerson

Tran, 2003

Turvey, 1999 (Parkes, 1998).

Janice Strubbe
View Full Essay

Factors Influencing Human Mate Selection

Words: 4285 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81713534

Evolutionay Undestanding of Physical Attaction and Mate Selection

Item Page

Financial stability

Physical attactiveness

Fequency Statistics

Oveall Analysis of Pefeences Effect

Factos Influencing Mate Choices

Financial stability

Physical attactiveness

Evolutionay Undestanding of Physical Attaction and Mate Selection

What factos would usually dive a peson to pefe one peson as a mate, to anothe? Ae thee any obsevable diffeences between the mate selection stategies employed by men, and those employed by women? A numbe of theoies have been put fowad to povide answes to these questions. Buss and Banes (1986), while making specific efeence to the Evolutionay Theoy, posit that the qualities women look fo in a potential mate diffe consideably fom those that men look fo. These diffeences, they suggest, manly accue fom the biological systemic diffeences between men and women, as well as the common belief that women age faste than men.

Women's fetility has been obseved to decease…… [Read More]

references influence your mate choices. Your cooperation is well appreciated. Thank you.

1. What is your gender? (Please circle one) (GENDER)

a. Male = 1

b. Female = 2

c. Transgender = 3
View Full Essay

What Is the Best Exercise

Words: 307 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63667160

Tai Chi is a series of postures and exercises developed in China as a system of self-defense and as an aid to meditation. It focuses on graceful movements that resemble a slow-moving dance routine combined with deep breathing throughout the routine. The result is a moving meditation that nourishes and balances both the body and mind.

Research studies of the benefits of tai chi show a significant decrease in the incidence of stroke and stroke mortality, as well as an increase in bone density. Studies also show a decrease in blood pressure in hypertension patients and an increased sense of well-being.

Because of the low heart rate routines, tai chi offers a safe alternative to aerobic type exercises for those prone to cardiovascular disease.

Tai Chi strengthens the joint musculature and increases the range of motion and flexibilty. Although a weight-bearing exercise it allows stimulation of bone growth without the…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

The David Zwirner Galley and the Guggenheim

Words: 906 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61272933

Art is something that can be appreciated in several ways. Thanks to the various museums cities have to offer, one can visit numerous places and see exhibitions from various artists. Two such places are the David Zwirner Galley and The Guggenheim. Both places have introduced audiences to interesting and thought-provoking works of art. Four of which will be featured here. The artists of the four works are Robert Crumb and Paul Cezanne.

David Zwirner Gallery is a modern art gallery located in New York City, offering another location in London. Owned by David Zwirner it features of collections of artists like Robert Crumb. For twelve years from 2000-2012, the Gallery was known as Zwirner & irth Gallery.

The R. Crumb Art & Beauty exhibition which opened April 15th and ends June 2nd, 2016, is an exhibition featuring various sketches. Lined up in a stark, white room, these black and white…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Guggenheim, "Still Life: Plate of Peaches." Guggenheim. N.p., 1879. Web. 18 May 2016.
View Full Essay

Shin Splints From Ecs Conditions

Words: 4210 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40062881



Practical esearch Finding Implementation and Experimentation Stage -- Phase I

The experimenter did not set out to determine specifically which of the various contributing factors (or combinations of factors) identified by the empirical research of medial tibial stress syndrome was most responsible for the experimenter's symptoms. However, since the initial attempts to resolve the symptoms incorporated changes to all of the external variables except a change in running surface, the experimenter immediately sought a softer running surface and temporarily abandoned running on any hard surface that magnified instead of minimized the physiological trauma associated with running on harder surfaces.

Because the empirical research also implicated poor running stride mechanics and excessive vertical elevation, the experimenter devoted considerable attention to making the following specific changes to the running stride: (1) shorter strides to minimize travel of the body while neither foot is in contact with the running surface; (2) conscious attempts…… [Read More]

References

AOS. (2007). Shin Splints. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Retrieved October 20, 2009, from:  http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00407 .

Braver, R. "How to Test and Treat Exertional Compartment Syndrome: Why the ECS

Diagnosis Is Often Missed" Podiatry Today; Vol. 15 (May 1, 2002). Retrieved

October 20, 2009, from: http://www.podiatrytoday.com/article/382
View Full Essay

Ergonomics Repetitive Movement Ergonomics Injuries

Words: 545 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80023776



Repetitive Motion Injuries can be prevented through a proper workplace setup. Once a worker makes these adjustments to the work area, it is possible to feel more natural about working and be more productive. In addition to exercise, a person should do the following:

• Take short, frequent breaks from computer work. Suggested 10-15 minutes break away from the computer for every hour on the computer.

• Get up and move around whenever feeling symptoms

• Give input when the department is purchasing furniture and computer equipment

Here are other suggestions for repetitive syndrome in a work setting:

If it is not possible for someone to get down to the work load, he/she should bring the work load up. Then, when standing, he/she should not over reach and maintain an upright posture. The longer the handle, the more force it takes to use and lift that tool. Position oneself so…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

Words: 2724 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59820068

Epidemiology

Liegl-tzwanger, Fletcher and Fletcher (2010) pointed out that the exact incidences of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the United States and Europe is not easy to determine. This is attributed to the fact that GISTs got proper recognition as well as diagnosis from the late 1990s.Studies carried out in Iceland ( Tryggvason et al.,2005), Sweden (Nilsson et al.,2005), as well as Holland (Goettsch,2004) have indicated that close to 11,14.5 and 12.7 cases per million people per year respectively.Incidences if GISTs have been shown to be higher as a result of the fact that most patients live with it for several years and it gets detected only during gastrectomy or autopsy all of which are usually performed for other reasond. study by gaimy et al.,(2007) which was performed consecutively on autopsies indicated that small GISTs having between 1-10 mm in about 22.5% of the individuals aged above 50 years.These small GISTs…… [Read More]

About 50% of the GISTs exhibit a loss of gene off the arm of chromosome 22. This discovery is associated with the progression of the malignant GIST (Fukasawa et al.,2000;Bergmann et al.,1998;Kim et al., 2000;Lasota et al.,2007). There are however some losses that are less frequent on the chromosomes 9q,17q,1p and 11p.Gains are however noted on chromosomes 17q and 8q all of which have a strong association with malignant behavior (El-Rifai et al.,2000;Schurr et al.,2006).

Clinical features

Extant literature has been dedicated to the study of the clinical features of GISTs.GISTs are mentioned by Liegl-Atzwanger, Fletcher and Fletcher (2010) to occur in almost every part of the GI tract.They are however more common in the stomach regions ( about 60%), ileum and jejunum (close to 30%), colorectum (about 4%) and duodenum (about 5%).GISTs are rarely seen in the appendix and esophagus (Miettinen et al.,2006;Miettinen, Sobin and Lasota,2005;DeMatteo eat al.,2000). Tumors that lack any form of association with the wall of the bowel are given special name- extragastrointestinal stromal sarcomas are noted to occur in the mesentery, omentum and retroperitoneum (Miettinen et al.,1999;Reith et al.,2000). The clinical symptoms that are associated with GIST are abdominal pain, dysphagia, obstruction, fatigue and satiety.It has been noted that patients may be presented with chronic bleeding to from their GI (Causes anemia). The patient may also present acute bleeding to GI ( as a consequence of the erosion via the gastric or the bowel mucosa). There could also be a rupture into the patient's abdominal cavity thus causing a life-threatening condition called intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Nilsson et al. (2005) indicated that a population-based research indicated that close to seventy percent of GISTs were related to clinical symptoms while twenty percent were not. 10% were detected at the time of autopsies.
View Full Essay

Orthopedic Nursing Current Trends in

Words: 1903 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89391660

The ability to resolve conflicting patients is also an appreciable quality. esearch is an integral aspect of every subject that requires quality improvement. esearch on Orthopedic nursing is required for overall development in the care and assistance provided to improve health conditions of orthopedic patients. ("Orthopedic Nursing Standards," 2007)

Orthopedic nurses currently require developing their knowledge on relevant issues regarding neuro-muscular and skeletal challenges of a patient and the response of patient to medication and assistance. Various questions may arise in the course of care provided to orthopedic patients. An orthopedic nurse who is very closely monitoring a patient is the best person to assess such challenges and bring a platform for research to find better answers. An orthopedic nurse need to work with the patient to find out the quality improvement required in nursing assistance in terms of managing medication, dealing pain and trauma felt by the patient if…… [Read More]

References

Clark, Sally. (2007) "Changes in Clinical Care in the Orthopedic Patient"

Retrieved 7 December, 2007 at http://www.archi.net.au/e-library/health_administration/awards06/safety/changes_in_orthopaedic

Houghton, Kerry; Peregrina, Michael; Gillies, Donna; Herden, Justine. (2003, Nov) "A small trial of the nursing care of patients immobilized with a Thomas splint" Journal of Orthopedic Nursing, vol. 7, no. 4, pp: 201-204.

Mauer, Karen a; Abrahams, Elizabeth B; Arslanian, Chris; Schoenly, Lorry; Taggart, Helen M.
View Full Essay

Charcot-Marie Tooth Syndrome Definition and

Words: 2666 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66269973

In the third trimester of pregnancy, caution must be taken concerning congestive heart failure, hypertension and decreased renal and hepatic function, interstitial nephritis, hyperkalemia, hyponatremia and renal papillary necrosis, anticoagulation abnormalities, leucopenia, granulocytopenia and thrombocytopenia. The use of Celecoxib is aimed primarily at suppressing pain and inflammatory stimuli, but it may contribute to NSAID gastrointestinal toxicity. The lowest possible dose of celecoxib should be prescribed and taken. On the whole, NSAIDs can mask the usual signs of infection, therefore, caution must be taken in the presence of existing controlled infection. The physician should investigate symptoms and signs, which suggest liver dysfunction or abnormal liver lab results.

On September 30, 2004, Merck and Company voluntarily withdrew rofecoxib from the American and world markets because of its association with an increase in cardiovascular incidence (Keldaya 2005). A major Food and Drug Administration study linked the medication to a three-fold rise in the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Avicena. (2005). Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome. Disease Targets. Avicena Group. http://www.avidenagroup.com/disease_targets/neuromuscular/cmt_php?print=on

Kedlaya, D. (2005). Charcot-Marie=Tooth Syndrome. eMedicine.com, Inc. http://www.emedicine.com/arthoped/topic43.ht

National Center for Biotechnology Information (2005). Charcot-Marie-Tooth Syndrome. Genes and Diseases. U.S. National Library of Medicine. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv_fcgi?call=bv.view.ShowSection&rid=gnd.section.197

National Human Genome Researc Institute. (2004). Learning About Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease. National Institutes of Health. http://www.genome.gov/11009201
View Full Essay

Flexibility Training

Words: 1656 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2632254

flexibility training has to offer in everyday life of people by helping them to function more effectively. Moreover I shall discuss constructing a class specifically for this kind of training and also shed some light on the ways music can help motivate and improve the performance of the people undergoing the flexibility training.

BENEFITS OF FLEXIBILITY TAINING:

Flexibility comprises full range motion of the various joints of the body and encompasses all components of the musculoskeletal system and specific neuromuscular pathways of the body. Flexibility varies from person to person depending on his age, gender, body temperature and the type of joint to be moved. It helps in the reduction of low back pain and injury (Bach, Green, & Jensen) and also helps improve the posture and muscle symmetry. (Corbin, C.B., & Noble, L). In addition to all this it decreases severity due to injury, delays the onset of muscular…… [Read More]

References:

1) Bach, B.K., Green, D.S., & Jensen, G. M- Article Title: A comparison of muscular tightness in runners and non-runners and the relation of muscular tightness to low back pain in runners. Publication Year: 1985.Journal Title: Journal of Orthopedic Sports Physical Therapy. Volume: 6.Page Number: 315+.

2) Corbin, C.B., & Noble, L-Article Title: Flexibility: A major component of physical fitness. Publication Year: 1980.Journal Title: The Journal of Physical Education and Recreation. Volume: 51.Page Numbers: 23-24, 57-60.

3) Anonymous-Flexibility training. Posted on: 15/11/2005.Available from:  http://www.mamashealth.com/exercise/flextrain.asp  [Accessed on: 16/11/2005]

4) Lee Crust-Ergogenic aids. Posted on: 2005. Available from: http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0951.htm [Accessed on: 16/11/2005]
View Full Essay

Acclimatization Ascending to Higher Altitudes

Words: 1766 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71284850

(1989). These researchers investigated skeletal muscle adaptations in response to acclimatization at high altitude. Samples of muscle extracted before reaching high altitude and after returning to sea-level showed that maximal activities of enzymes, such as those representative of beta-oxidation, were unchanged. However, after exposure to extremely high altitude hypoxic conditions, reductions were observed in succinic dehydrogenase, citrate synthetase and hexokinase. The findings of this study did not support the researchers' hypothesis that extremely hypoxic conditions elicit changes that are adaptive toward maximizing oxidative function at the intracellular level (Green et al., 1989).

eference

Donoghue, S., Fatemian, M., Balanos, G.M., Crosby, A., Liu, C., O'Connor, D., Talbot, N.P., obbins, P.A. "Ventilatory Acclimatization in esponse to Very Small Changes in PO2 in Humans." Journal of Applied Physiology 98 (2005): 1587-91.

Green, H.J., Sutton, J.., Cymerman, A., Young, P.M., Houston, C.S. "Operation Everest II: Adaptations in Human Skeletal Muscle." Journal of Applied Physiology…… [Read More]

Reference

Donoghue, S., Fatemian, M., Balanos, G.M., Crosby, A., Liu, C., O'Connor, D., Talbot, N.P., Robbins, P.A. "Ventilatory Acclimatization in Response to Very Small Changes in PO2 in Humans." Journal of Applied Physiology 98 (2005): 1587-91.

Green, H.J., Sutton, J.R., Cymerman, A., Young, P.M., Houston, C.S. "Operation Everest II: Adaptations in Human Skeletal Muscle." Journal of Applied Physiology 66.5 (1989): 2454-61.

Hoppeler, H., Vogt, M. "Muscle Tissue Adaptations to Hypoxia." The Journal of Experimental Biology 204 (2001): 3133-9.

Hoppeler, H., Vogt, M., Weibel, E.R., Fluck, M. "Response of Skeletal Muscle Mirochondria to Hypoxia." Experimental Physiology 88.1 (2003): 109-19.
View Full Essay

Diathermy Uses Benefits and Risks as One

Words: 2031 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38505994

Diathermy: Uses, Benefits, And isks

As one of the oldest treatment modalites, the therapeutic effects of heat have been experienced for several hundred years. In order to use heat in the treatment of deep muscle injury, diathermy treatment is the therapy of choice. Diathermy uses high-frequency electrical currents to heat deep muscular tissues. This heating results in pain relief, increased blood flow, and increased flexibility. esearch has demonstrated evidence both for and against the effectiveness of diathermy treatment. Attention must be given, however, to risk factors predisposing some patients to serious adverse effects due to diathermy treatment.

Diathermy: Uses, benefits, and risks

Diathermy refers to the use of high-frequency electrical currents to heat deep muscular tissues. This heat increases the flow of blood to the area, which in turn, speeds up recovery. The term diathermy is a derivative of the Greek words therma, meaning heat, and dia, meaning through. Therefore,…… [Read More]

References

Frick, L. (2001). Diathermy. Gale Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine. http://www.findarticles.com/g2603/0003/2603000326/p1/article.jhtml.

Peres, S., Draper, D., Knight, K., Ricard, M. (2002). Pulsed shortwave diathermy and prolonged long-duration stretching increase dorsiflexion range of motion more than identical stretching without diathermy. Journal of Athletic Training, 37(1), 43-50.

Draper, D., Miner, L., Knight, K., Ricard, M. (2002). The carry-over effects of diathermy and stretching in developing hamstring flexibility. Journal of Athletic Training, 37(1), 37-42.

Diathermy. http://www.orthoteers.co.uk/Nrujp~ij331m/Orthdiathermy.htm
View Full Essay

Ergonomics Also Known as Human

Words: 2338 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6948547

Use tools and equipment that are properly designed to reduce the risk of wrist injury, (Zieve & Eltz 2010)

Workstations, tools and tool handles, and tasks can be redesigned to enable the worker's wrist to maintain a natural position during work, (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 2010).

Ergonomic aids, such as split keyboards, keyboard trays, typing pads, and wrist braces, may be used to improve wrist posture during typing, (Zieve & Eltz 2010)

Training and awareness; the encouragement of frequent breaks; yoga classes offered for free at the workplace; job rotation.

Employers can develop programs in ergonomics, the process of adapting workplace conditions and job demands to the capabilities of workers, (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 2010)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as aspirin, ibuprofen, and other nonprescription pain relievers, may ease symptoms that have been present for a short time or have been caused by strenuous…… [Read More]

"Tension Neck Syndrome" (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www.rsi.org.uk/text_only/conditions/tension_neck_syndrome.asp

Zieve, D. & Eltz, D.R. (2010). Carpal tunnel syndrome. National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved online: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001469

Carpal tunnel
View Full Essay

Colgan Air Flight 3407 Accident

Words: 3090 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98523956

On the hand, some plans may be slow to respond to the pilot's commands; complicating the piloting process, much like a sports car, for example, that under steers or a truck that over steers (Personal Communication, 2010). Bay contends that training on more than one plane of a particular model would prove to be a positive practice for airlines to implement.

Bay asserts that the following questions need to be answered regarding the cause of the crash of Flight 3407.

How much training and experience did the pilot/s have with this particular aircraft?

How many hours experience did the pilot/s have flying this particular craft?

Did a matter of pilot fatigue play a part in the incident?

Could alcohol have been a factor in the pilot's inability to "do the right thing"?

Were there any known defects with the plane?

Did any type mechanical malfunction occur?

On what date was…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Alcohol and Flying. (N.d.). Federal Aviation Administration. Retrieved February 13, 2010

from www.faa.gov/pilots/safety/pilotsafetybrochures/media/alcohol.pdf

Baron, R. (2005). The Cockpit, the Cabin, and Social Psychology. Airline Safety.com. Retrieved February 13, 2010 from  http://airlinesafety.com/editorials/CockpitCabinPsychology.htm 

Black, H.C.(1990). Discovery. Black's Law Dictionary West Publishing: St. Paul, MN.
View Full Essay

Cleft Palate and Cleft Lip

Words: 2961 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15691615

Cleft lip / Cleft palate

Introduction to the disorder

When the upper lip and top of the mouth do not join successfully early in the pregnancy, a strange condition known as cleft lip/palate is said to have occurred. The lip and palate grow independently, so it is feasible for an infant to be conceived with just a cleft lip, or just a cleft palate, or a blend of both. When there is a gap or opening reaching out from the lip as far as up as the nose then it is a complete cleft lip. In some cases, some tissue stays underneath the nose, leaving a piece of the lip joined beneath the nose - this is referred to as an incomplete cleft lip. The roof of the mouth is comprised of two principle parts - a bony segment called the hard palate and a soft tissue / muscular part…… [Read More]

References

Dixon, M., Marazita, M., Beaty, T., & Murray, J. (2011). Cleft lip and palate: understanding genetic and environmental influences. Nature Revies Genetics, 12, 167-175.

Mendoza, M., & Perez, A. (2013). Anatomical closure technique of the nasal floor for patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate. J Plast Surg Hand Surg, 47, 196-199.

Nyberg, J., Peterson, P., & Lohmander, A. (2014). Speech outcomes at age 5 and 10 years in unilateral cleft lip and palate after one-stage palatal repair with minimal incision technique - A longitudinal perspective. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology, 1663-1668.

Paniagua, L., Signorini, A., Selaimen, S., & Collares, M. (2013). Velopharyngeal dysfunction: a systematic review of major instrumental and auditory-perceptual assessments. Int. Arch. Otorhinolaryngol, 17(3), 251-256.
View Full Essay

Physiological Effects of Endurance Training

Words: 2589 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97922192

Physiological Effects of Endurance Training

Endurance training produces many physiological changes, both during training and after the training period is complete. These changes are biochemical and also involve changes in the cardio-pulmonary system. The correct way to perform endurance training has been a subject of controversy in recent years. There are many differences in training methods. These differences and the effects of endurance training will be the subject of this research. The jury is still out as to what constitutes the perfect duration and intensity of training program.

Studies have shown that a focused training program can increase maximum oxygen intake by 15-30% over a three-month period (7) and that can increase to 50% if the training is sustained for over 2 years. The body makes many metabolic adaptations as well. These adaptations drop rapidly in the first few weeks after training is stopped (1).

Duration and Intensity of Different…… [Read More]

References

1. Acevedo EO, Goldfarb AH. Increased training intensity effects on plasma lactate, ventilatory threshold, and endurance. Med and Sci in Sports Exercise, (21), 563-568, 1998

2. Finn, C, Effects of High-Intensity Intermittent Training on Endurance Performance. Sportscience (5)(1), sport sci.org. Jour. 1-3, 2001.

3. Foss M.L., and Keteyian S.J. Fox's Physiological Basis for Exercise and Sport. WCB Boston, Mass., McGraw-Hill. 1998.

4. Hawley JA, Myburgh KH, Noakes TD, and Dennis, SC. Training Techniques To Improve Fatigue Resistance And Enhance Endurance Performance. Jour of Sports Sci, (15), 325-333, 1997.
View Full Essay

Fibromyalgia One Might Consider Fibromyalgia to Be

Words: 6457 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37868620

Fibromyalgia

One might consider fibromyalgia to be one of the most confounding conditions around today. It is debilitating. It results in several quality of life issues. The confounding aspect of this condition is that it is difficult to diagnose. It is also difficult to treat. Most treatment modalities today recourse to treating one or more specific symptoms -- but there is no treatment that can comprehensively treat all the symptoms. (NIAMS, 2004) More holistic treatment modes however, are being researched, explored and considered. Fibromyalgia often presents symptoms of other diseases. Essentially therefore, fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain that cannot be localized to any part of the body. It is also associated with fatigue and other specific (though not necessarily widespread) symptoms that will be discussed later in this work.

Fibromyalgia syndrome is often referred to in its abbreviation FMS. Some of the symptoms (though not all) enjoy significant overlap…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adiguzel, O., Kaptanoglu, E., Turgut, B., & Nacitarhan, V. (2004). The possible effect of clinical recovery on regional cerebral blood flow deficits in fibromyalgia: a prospective study with semiquantitative SPECT. South Med J, 97, 7, 651-655

Baldry, P. (1993). Complementary medicine. The practice of acupuncture needs tighter safeguards. Bmj, 307, 6899, 326

Baumgartner, E., Finckh, A., Cedraschi, C., & Vischer, T.L. (2002). A six-year prospective study of a cohort of patients with fibromyalgia. Ann Rheum Dis, 61, 7, 644-645

Bennet, Robert. (2000). The Scientific Basis for Understanding Pain in Fibromyalgia. Myalgia.com. Retrieved August 21, 2004, from the World Wide Web: http://www.myalgia.com/Scientific%20basis.htm
View Full Essay

Perception How Does Depth Perception Occur in

Words: 4390 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77917272

Perception

How does depth perception occur in a person who gains sight after being congenital blind?

Depth perception is necessary for the ability to perform many tasks including driving, and many other activities. The ability to perceive the distance of objects is a complex process. hen people are born blind in one eye, regardless of the reason, they do not develop the ability to perceive depths. Their world is flat compared to that experienced by the rest of the world. hen that person undergoes surgery or other procedures to restore sight to the blind eye many of these patients are able to perceive depth. The ability to do this defies commonly held views on the connection between visual acuity, depth perception and motor development.

This research explores current research on depth perception and the development of depth perception. Studies in this area are limited to animal studies and those involving…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bushnell, E. & Boudreau, P. "Motor development and the mind: the role of motor abilities as a determinant of aspects of perceptual development." Child Development. August 1993.

64.4: 1005-1021. Web. 21 October 2012.

Deregowski, J. "Difficulties in Pictorial Depth Perception." Africa British Journal of Psychology. August 1968. 59.3: 195-204. Web. 21 October 2012.

Fulcher. E. "Gibson's theory of direct perception." Crucial, a division of Learning Matters Ltd.
View Full Essay

Exercise and Gymnast Injuries to

Words: 1079 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98332302

And a way to avoid injuries to the elbow, that is fairly obvious, is to use thicker landing mats, and to get expert training in how to fall properly. For males, injuries to the wrist have been identified as being caused by training on the pommel, because "the wrist is exposed to repetitive forces of up to twice body weight during this activity."

Exercises using the plyometric strategy are very useful for gymnasts; plyometric exercises are the "rapid deceleration and acceleration of muscles" that in turn help create a stretch-shortening cycle," according to www.specialolympics.org.These kinds of exercises train the muscles, and train the nervous system to carry out in an effective way the stretch-shortening cycle, which can improve the performance of a gymnast. Drills using plyometrics also help the athlete develop "rhythm, speed, power and even muscular endurance," the Special Olympics site explains. All plyometric exercises must be carried out…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Daly, R.M., & Bass, S.L., & Finch, C.F. (2001). Balancing the risk of injury to gymnasts: how Effective are the counter measures." British Journal of Sports Medicine. Vol. 35, 8-19.

Mayo Clinic. (2006). Core exercises strengthen abs and other core muscles. Retrieved 9 March, 2007 at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/core-strength/sm00047.

Micheli, Lyle J. (1996). Types of Sports Injuries and How They Can Be Prevented. Retrieved March 2007 from Conference Notes / Massachusetts Department of Public Health, Bureau of Family and Community Health, Division of Prevention, Injury Prevention and Control

Program
View Full Essay

Cardiac Cycle Diastole and Systole Phases and

Words: 1411 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90976222

Cardiac Cycle: Diastole and Systole Phases and Heart Disease

The objective of the research in this study is to examine the cardiac cycle from the anatomy and physiology perspective. Toward this end, literature in this area of inquiry, which for the purpose of this study is the cardiac cycle, is examined and reported.

Two Phases of the Cardiac Cycle

The work of Klabunde reports that the single cycle of cardiac activity may be divided into two primary phases stated to be those of: (1) the diastole phase; and (2) the systole phase. (Klabunde, 2012, p.1, p.1) Diastole is representative of the span of time when the "ventricles are relaxed…blood is passively flowing from the left atrium (LA) and right atrium (RA) into the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV), respectively." (Klabunde, 2012, p.1) The mitral and triscuspid or atrioventircular valves are reported to "separate the atria from the ventricles…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chute, RM (2012) Chapter 19: The Cardiovascular System: Blood Vessels. Retrieved from:  http://www.apchute.com/ap2chap/chapt19.htm 

Fukuta, H. And Little, W.C. (2008) The Cardiac Cycle and the Physiological Basis of Left Ventricular Contraction, Ejection, Relaxation, and Filling. Heart Fail Clin. 2008. Jan 4(1):1-11. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2390899/ 

Klabunde, R.E. (2012) Cardiac Cycle. Cardiovascular Physiology Concepts. Retrieved from:  http://www.cvphysiology.com/Heart%20Disease/HD002.htm 

Limacher, MC (2004) Understanding the Impact of Abnormal Cardiac Activation on Cardiac Function. J Am Cardiol 2004;43(9): 1532-1533. Retrieved from: http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleid=1135544
View Full Essay

Senior Fitness

Words: 3628 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28047071

Senio Fitness

Descibe the effect of execise on blood suga levels. How will this effect you execise ecommendations fo both insulin dependent and non-dependent clients food intake?

Execise cetainly helps to monito and assue healthy blood suga levels. It can help to decease cuent glucose levels in the blood as well as buning stoed blood suga, which is a leading facto in helping individuals lose weight. Moeove, execise can incease muscle mass and cadiovascula enduance. The addition of muscle can futhe help in egulating blood suga levels and glucose usage duing execise sessions.

When making ecommendations fo execise schedules fo clients with diabetes and othe insulin elated disodes, I would cetainly begin with a solid examination of the individual's specific backgound. While I would cetainly be inteested to know about any potential poblems even with non-diabetic clients, I would like to know about the seveity and specificity of the diabetic…… [Read More]

references - Each client has a preferential learning style involving a dominant sensory channel. The trainer should take an active approach to learning style of each participant.

29) Give an example of each rule of professional conduct for teachers of older adults.

1. Professionalism -- Trainers should do their best to maintain the utmost levels of professionalism during sessions. An example of a commonly made mistake would be perhaps taking a cell phone call during a session.

2. Punctuality -- Knowing that many older adults are chronically early, it is critical for trainers to be on time and ready to begin their sessions.

3. Appropriate Language and Terminology -- Being that many older clients will not likely recognize most modern fitness terminology, it is important for trainers to convey their messages in a clear and understandable way. Failure to do so could potentially result in injury.
View Full Essay

Steroid Use Controversies of the

Words: 5176 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32219224

e., their use of anabolic steroids (and whether they had ever been offered steroids), their involvement in power sports, appearance and eating problems, and problem behavior. Background information about the participants included their degree of urbanization, parental socioeconomic status and the region to which they belonged.

Analyses of the study's results show that the prevalence of steroid use among Norwegian youth was lower (lifetime use was 0.8% and 12 months prevalence was 0.3%) than in several other Western societies such as the U.S. (2.5% to 7%) and in Australia, Canada, Sweden and South Africa (2% to 3.5%). It also showed that AAS use was first and foremost associated with problem behavior (i.e., drug [marijuana] involvement and aggressive-type conduct problems). Its relation with power sports and appearance came in at second and third place respectively.

The study is, therefore, significant in highlighting the hitherto largely ignored area of problem behavior in…… [Read More]

References

Admissions before BALCO grand jury detailed." (2004, December). ESPN.com. Retrieved on November 1, 2005 at http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/news/story?id=1936592

Anabolic Steroid Abuse." (2000, April). National Institute on Drug Abuse: Research Report Series. Retrieved on November 1, 2005 at http://www.drugabuse.gov/PDF/RRSteroi.pdf

Langone, J. (1995). Tough Choices A Book about Substance Abuse. Boston: Little, Brown and Company.

Miller, R.W. (1987, November). Athletes and Steroids: Playing a Deadly Game. FDA Consumer, 21, 16+.
View Full Essay

Anabolic Steroid and Performance Enhancing Drug Use

Words: 3144 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41892521

¶ … Anabolic Steroid and Performance Enhancing Drug Use

Among High School Athletes

Anabolic steroid use has, at least in the past, been prevalent among major college and, especially, professional sports. Major League Baseball implemented a drug testing regimen very recently after backlash from fans made it an issue that the sport believed it had to listen to. The National Football League has a testing program that has been in place since 1989, and other sports have also begun programs to test for anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing drugs (PED) to ensure that there is a level playing field among all of their athletes. Unfortunately this testing has led to consequences for some athletes.

Some notable case of athletes being either stripped of honors or not being selected for honors because they acknowledged PED or steroid use have occurred in recent times. Lance Armstrong was recently stripped of all…… [Read More]