Nursing Care Essays (Examples)

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Nursing -- Caring Empathy and Ethics The

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21631061

nursing -- caring, empathy and ethics. The author (Lachman, 2012) uses numerous examples, each of which show the positive impacts of caring. Along with examples of ethical decisions that must be made, and with theories on caring and empathy put forward by scholars, the paper examines morality, competence, and the "reciprocal" relationships between nurses and their patients. That is, caring for a patient is reciprocal because if the needs of the patient are met, there is reciprocity -- the giving of care and the receiving and acknowledgement of that care giving.

Summary of Key Points

On page 113 Lachman references several leading theorists and scholars that have provided important research and results on nursing ethics and the caring concepts alluded to in the Introduction. Dr. Jean atson has a caring theory (112) that has three main components: a) carative factors; b) the "transpersonal caring relationship"; and c) the "caring occasion/caring…… [Read More]

Works Cited

French, Peter. (1999). The development of evidence-based nursing. Journal of Advanced

Nursing, 29(1), 72-78.

Lachman, Vicki D. (2012). Applying the Ethics of Care to Your Nursing Practice. Ethics, Law,

and Policy, 21(2), 112-115.
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Nurse-Care Analysis of Sheepshead Bay the Area

Words: 3471 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58690886

Nurse-Care Analysis of Sheepshead Bay

The area is 4,074 square miles. Its population is 123,178. The people density of people who live in Sheepshead Bay compared to general inhabitants of Brooklyn of people per square mile is 30,233 to 34,917 (City-data.com; web).

On my visits there, I was astounded by the mass of people rubbing shoulders one with the other. The streets seemed dense and crowded with a great number of apartment buildings, more than those in the more laid back areas such as Flatbush and Queens, and also more than those in the vicinity of Coney Island. There were also a lot of immigrant offices and lawyers specializing in immigration services that was telling of the area.

In fact, involvement with immigrants who had been seeking service with bureaucracy involved with obtaining a Green card revealed that many of them, although living in other parts of Brooklyn (sometimes far…… [Read More]

References

Berke, N. (2009). Crime Prevention and Safety Workshop. Sheepshead Bites. Retrieved on 3/6/2011 from:  http://www.sheepsheadbites.com/2009/06/crime-prevention-and-safety-workshop/# 

Chan, S. (2006). Fatal Construction Accidents in the City Rise Sharply Over 12 Months New York Times. p. C13.

Chiswick, Barry R., (1991). Speaking, Reading and Earnings among Low-Skilled Immigrants, Journal of Labor Economics, 9, 149-170.

City-data.com. Sheepshead Bay. Retrieved on 3/6/2011 from:  http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Sheepshead-Bay-Brooklyn-NY.html )
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Watson's Nursing Caring Theory the

Words: 3295 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16302880

Jean Watson and in reality "belonging becomes an ethic in itself and guides how we sustain our being in the world." Dr. Watson emphasizes the fact that the practices of nursing have experienced evolution and this has allowed certain distortions in the nursing practices. Dr. Watson brings to attention 'Palmer's epistemology as ethics' yet the epistemology, in the view of Palmer to be 'informed by cosmology' has great power in that it may either "form of deform the human soul" and thereby also form or deform the nurse's "way of being/becoming more human and humane (Palmer 1993; as cited by Watson, 2005)

III. rief Analysis of Watson's Caring Mode

The model of caring in nursing model as proposed by Dr. Jean Watson is one that is fairly simplistic in nature that has as its key concepts the factors of love, kindness and empathy. In making an identification of the applications…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Levinas, E. (2000) Totality and Infinity. Pittsburgh, PA; Duqesne University Press (Original work published in 1969)

Fawcett, Jacqueline (2005) Contemporary Nursing Knowledge: Analysis and Evaluation of Nursing Models and Theories. Davis Company, Philadelphia. Online available at  http://www.fadavis.com/related_resources/1_2042_618.pdf 

Watson, J. (2005b) What, May I Ask is Happening to Nursing Knowledge and Professional Practices? What is Nursing Thinking at this Turn in Human History? Journal of Clinical Nursing, 14.

Palmer, P. (1987). Community, conflict and ways of knowing. Magazine for Higher Learning, 19, 20-25.
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Nursing How Can Nurses Use

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44106968



Why should nurses recognize nursing expertise varies with education, experience and context of practice?

Nurses should recognize nursing expertise differs from person to person because of varying experience levels, forms of education, and context of practice. This is substantial knowledge for nurses to remember for several reasons. For one, it will help nurses better understand their colleagues (Husted, 2008). For example, a nurse who attended a better school than their colleague, will be more understanding if their colleague under performs or is hesitant in comparison because he or she had a higher quality education (Husted, 2008). Conflicts between colleagues are less likely to arrive when there is an understanding that performance among each other may differ due to varying circumstances. (Benner, 2009).

In addition, nurses should retain that their coworkers expertise will most likely not be the same due to the varying routes everyone takes to the medical field and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Apker J., Propp K.M., Ford W.S.Z., Wallac N., Serbenski M., & Hofmeister N. (2006).

Collaboration, Credibility, Compassion, and Coordination: Professional Nurse

Communication Skill Sets in Health Care Team Interactions. Journal of Professional Nursing 22 (3), 180-189.

Benner P.E., Tanner C.A., Chelsa C.A. (2009). Expertise in Nursing Practice: Caring,
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Nurse-Patient Relations the Main Focus of This

Words: 2161 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77240679

Nurse-Patient Relations

The main focus of this essay is going to concern the nurse-patient relationship idea, and why it is important. This was chosen because the researcher desired to achieve a better accepting of how a helpful nurse-patient relationship can be advanced and even from different theorists who have discovered this idea. In this essay, the researcher sets out to demonstrate what they have learnt regarding the nurse-patient relation concept and how this connection can utilized in the clinical practice setting. T The nurse patient connection, according to a study done by Press Gamey Associates Inc., creates the quality of the care experience and generates an influential influence on patient gratification. Nurses will a lot of their time with patients. Patients see nurses' relations with people among the care team and make their own conclusions about the hospital founded on what they are observing. Furthermore, nurses' approaches toward their vocation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berdes, C. & . (2001). Race relations and caregiving relationships: A qualitative examination of perspectives from residents and nurses aides in three nursing homes. Research on Aging, 23(1), 109-126.

Biering, P. (2002). Caring for the involuntarily hospitalized adolescent: The issue of power in the nurse-patient relationship. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing, 16(2), 65-74.

Heijkenskjold, K.B. (2010). The patients dignity from the nurses perspective. Nursing Ethics, 6(3), 313-24.

LaSala, C.A.-B. (2007). The role of the clinical nurse specialist in promoting evidence-based practice and effecting positive patient outcomes. The Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 38(6), 262-70.
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Nursing and Health Breakdown Pre-Operative

Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9327391

(Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007)

Assessment data is reported to enable the clear communication among clinicians about the wound and in making the provision for "continuity in the plan of care" as well as allowing for "evaluation of treatment modalities." (Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007) Wounds that are classified as red, yellow and black are those that require examination of deep tissue involvement. (Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007) The wound must be monitored during the healing process since monitoring provides the means of "checking the wound on a regular and frequent basis for "signs and symptoms that should trigger a full reassessment, such as increased wound exudate or bruising of the adjacent or periwound skin. Included in monitoring is the "gross evaluation for signs and symptoms of wound complications, such as erthema (change in color) or periwound skin and pus, which is indicative of infection." (Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007) Included as well should…… [Read More]

References

Aseptic Technique (2008) Aseptic Technique. Section G. NHS Foundation Trust. Online available at:  http://www.cht.nhs.uk/fileadmin/departments/infection_control/policies/Section_G_-_Aseptic_Technique_Issue_2.pdf 

Burney, R.E. et al. (1997) Core Outcomes Measures for Inguinal Hernia Repair. Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Vol. 185, Issue 6. Online available at:  http://www.journalacs.org/article/S1072-7515%2897%2900108-7/abstract 

Issues in Wound Care: Appropriate Use of Dressings. Report from a Wound Academy Expert Forum. Sponsored by the Molnlycke Health Care Wound Academy. September 2007. Online available at:  http://www.molnlycke.com/Global/Wound_Care_Products/UK/Wound%20Academy/IssuesAppropriateusefinalSept07.pdf 

Khan, Y. And Fitzgerald, P. And Walton, M. (1997) Assessment of the postoperative visit after routine inguinal hernia repair: A prospective randomized trial. Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Vol. 32, Issue 6. June 1997. Online available at:  http://www.jpedsurg.org/article/S0022-3468%2897%2990644-8/abstract
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Nursing Conceptual Model Develop Your

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77625252

Nurses may feel as if they do not have anyone who understands them: even their non-nursing partners may not seem to truly comprehend what they deal with on a regular basis, day in and day out at the hospital. Nurses may be isolated from one another in the hospital, too busy to 'talk shop' in a positive way with like-minded colleagues, or deal with doctors who are not sympathetic to the unique demands of nursing. Nurses may also find it difficult to have an appropriate work and life balance, as increasingly they are pressured to do more and more at work, to make up for declining numbers of caregivers at the facilities where they work. They may be called upon to perform many additional duties traditionally performed by doctors and physician's assistants that strain at the traditional definitions of nursing.

Nurses may feel as if their unique insights as nurses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burnout: Warning signs. NurseWeek. 97.2.

Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.nurseweek.com/features/97-2/burn2.html

Gelinas, Lillee. (2003, October 1). Addressing nurse burnout - Changing culture is the cure

Staffing the Suite. Endonurse. Retrieved July 9, 2009 at  http://www.endonurse.com/articles/3a1staffing.html
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Nursing Concepts and Theory Conceptual-Theoretical Structure Paper

Words: 1674 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18218062

Nursing Concepts and Theory

Conceptual-Theoretical Structure paper

Personal belief about nursing theory and knowledge development process for nursing practice

All nursing theories play an important role in defining nursing and giving the roles that nurses need to play. Originally, the role of nurses was simply to carry out activities as instructed by doctors, however, over the years, this role has been changed to include more responsibilities as the nursing world has evolved. Nursing theories describe, predict and explain the various phenomena in nursing practice and thus create foundations for nursing practice. They also help to generate knowledge in the field of nursing and to point the direction which the field should develop in future. This view is supported by Carper (1978)

who states that nursing theories elaborate nursing practice and create professional boundaries for the profession. Nursing knowledge comes from research that has been conducted on nursing which forms scientific…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, A.M. (2005). Nursing Leadership, Management, and Professional Practice for the LPN/LVN (3rd ed.). Philadelphia: F.A. Davis Company.

Carper, B. (1978). Fundamental patterns of knowing in nursing. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(1), 13-23.

Clark, M.J. (2003). Community health nursing: Caring for populations (Fourth ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Dayer-Berenson, L. (2010). Cultural Competencies for Nurses: Impact on Health and Illness. Burlington, Massachusetts: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
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Nursing There Are Several Pros and Cons

Words: 1168 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23400210

Nursing

There are several pros and cons to requiring a nurse to have a BSN to enter nursing practice. The most obvious advantage is that it would standardize practice and ensure excellence. Today, healthcare has been under the spotlight for potential pitfalls and difficulties in areas of care and excellence. If nurses have the same or similar qualifications before entering practice, there is less potential for error (Santina, 2012).

Furthermore, the course requires three years of not only theory, but also of hands-on practice, both in the classroom and in real-time environments such as clinics and hospitals. There are few teaching methods that offer as much in terms of personal and educational development as practical experience. This is particularly true of nursing and other healthcare practice arenas. Hence, more years of hands-on experience is a major advantage of requiring this kind of qualification before allowing nurses to enter practice (Santina,…… [Read More]

References

Miller, C.D. (2007). A Comparison of Skill Perofrmance of the and BSN Prepared Nurse at Three and Four-Year Post-Graduate Level. Retrieved from: http://gradworks.umi.com/1446281.pdf

MomMD (2012). How to become an advanced practice nurse. Retrieved from:  http://www.mommd.com/advanced-practice-nursing.shtml 

Orsolini-Hain, L. (2008). What's all the Fuss? Working Towards a Baccalaureate or Graduate Degree in Nursing. NSNA. Retrieved from:  http://www.nsna.org/careercenter/fuss.aspx 

Santina, J. (2012). The BSN: A Higher Degree of Nursing Care. Health Care Career. Retrieved from:  http://www.worldwidelearn.com/healthcare/healthcare/the-bsn-a-higher-degree-of-nursing-care.php
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Nursing Mentor Scenario Introduction- Just as the

Words: 1501 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24655154

Nursing Mentor Scenario

Introduction- Just as the theoretical and practical backgrounds of nursing have changed over the past several decades, so has the nursing education environment itself. . Students now entering the field are diverse in culture, educational background, and most especially age and experience. Traditional undergraduates coming directly from High School or Junior College often interact with more mature and experienced students. In addition, nursing instructors remain challenged to recognize different learning needs and styles, and respect that adaptive scenarios might be necessary to further the learning opportunities for many students. e thus see that the most effective way of teaching in the modern nursing classroom is to adjust one's pedagogical paradigm outward and to actively find new and innovative ways of reaching each student, rather than expecting each student to completely bend to the tried and true curriculum of previous generations (Young, L., Petson, B., eds., 2006). Too,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bradshaw, M., & Lowenstein, A. (Eds.). (2011). Innovative Teaching Strategies in Nursing and Related Health Professions. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Bulman, C. And Schutz, S. (1998). Reflective Practices in nursing. Sudbury, MA: Jones

And Barlett Publishers.Epp, A., & Price, L. (2011). Designing Solutions Around Customer Network Identity Goals. Journal of Marketing, 75(1), 36-54.

Cramer, C., Davidhizar, R. (2008). Helping At-Risk Nursing Students Succeed on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse. The Health Care Manager.27 (3): 269-76.
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Nursing Concept Theoretical Background One of the

Words: 3582 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46011406

Nursing Concept

Theoretical Background

One of the complexities of 21st century medicine is the evolution of nursing care theories in combination with a changing need and expectation of the stakeholder population. Nurses must be advocates and communicators, but must balance these along with an overall philosophy of ethics while still remaining mindful of budgets and the need for the medical institution to be profitable. It seems as if these issues comprise a three-part template for nursing: respect for patient value & individuality, education of patients, and cognition and respect for the realities of contemporary medicine. In many ways, too, modern technology has advanced further than societal wisdom, especially when confronting the issue of death. The modern nurse's role is to create a nurse-patient culture that encourages the individual to take responsibility for their healthcare and, in partnership with the nurse, to be involved in their recovery. The modern complexities of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Basford, L. And O. Slevin. (2003). Theory and Practice of Nursing: An Integrated Approach to Caring Practice. New York: Nelson Thomas.

Beckstead, J. And Beckstead, L. (2004). A multidimensional analysis of the epistemic origins of nursing theories, models and frameworks. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 43

(1): 113-22.

Cohen, J. (1991). Two portraits of caring: a comparison of the artists - Leininger
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Nurse Patient Ratios

Words: 2236 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6147

Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care

This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political and fiscal demands from all sectors of society; rising costs internally and externally combined with a rising number of under-insured; and the conundrum of nursing ethics and the ability to foster excellence in care and patient advocacy. We note that there remains an issue about hiring more nurses -- where will these nurses come from if the nursing schools do not increase their recruitment efforts and broaden their curriculum. In addition, we note that the large majority of patients and stakeholders primarily want two things when admitted to a healthcare facility: better paid nurses and more highly-trained professionals who are satisfied with their vocation.

Introduction

Modern nursing is, by necessity, a mixture of complex balance: patient care vs. staffing; procedures…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

More Nurses Make the Difference. (February 2012). The Lamp. 69 (1): Retrieved from: http://search.informit.com/au/documentSummary;dn=045435426132502;res=IELHEA

Safe Nurse Staffing: Looking Beyond the Numbers. (2009). Vantage Point, CNA. Retrieved from: https://www.nso.com/pdfs/db/newsletters/Safe_Nurse_Staffing_-_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_20094.pdf?fileName=Safe_Nurse_Staffing_ -_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_2009-pdf&folder=pdfs/db/newsletters

Aiken, L. (2001). The Hospital Nurse Workforce: Problems and Prospects."Draft

For the Council on the Economic Impact of Health System Change. Retrieved from: http://council.brandeis.edu/pubs/hospstruct  / Council-Dec-14-2001-Aiken-paper.pdf
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Nursing Model Theory Application a Nurse's

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12125618

"From an historical standpoint, her concept of nursing enhanced nursing science this has been particularly important in the area of nursing education." ("Virginia Henderson's Need...," 2008) Principles of Henderson's theory, published in numerous primary nursing textbooks utilized from the 1930s through the 1960s, along with principles embodied by the 14 activities continue to prove vital in evaluating nursing care in thee21st century, not only in cases such as Keri's, but in a myriad of others benefiting from nursing.

eferences

Kearney, Kathleen M., the Nurse's Duty to eport Child Abuse vs. The Attorney's Duty of Confidentiality: The Nurse Attorney's Dilemma Journal of Nursing Law. Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.; January 25, 2007. etrieved September 25, 2007, at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1256366.

esuggan, ay N;PN;MN. (Last Modified: August 17, 2008). "Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info. etrieved September 25, 2007, from: http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm.

Singleton, Joanne K. "Nurses' perspectives of encouraging clients' care-of-self in a short-term rehabilitation unit within…… [Read More]

References

Kearney, Kathleen M., the Nurse's Duty to Report Child Abuse vs. The Attorney's Duty of Confidentiality: The Nurse Attorney's Dilemma Journal of Nursing Law. Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.; January 25, 2007. Retrieved September 25, 2007, at  http://ssrn.com/abstract=1256366 .

Resuggan, Ray RN;RPN;MRN. (Last Modified: August 17, 2008). "Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info. Retrieved September 25, 2007, from: http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm.

Singleton, Joanne K. "Nurses' perspectives of encouraging clients' care-of-self in a short-term rehabilitation unit within a long-term care facility," Rehabilitation Nursing, January 1, 2000. Retrieved September 25, 2007, from:  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P348282208.html .

Trail Ross, Mary Ellen. (1993). "Linking Ethical Principles With Community Practice." Journal of Community Health Nursing, Vol. 10. Retrieved September 25, 2007, at  http://www.questia.com/read/95780716?title=Linking%20Ethical%20Principles%20W%20Community%20Practice .
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Nursing in the Media Not

Words: 2210 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54993298

The author quotes Gary Zukav as emphasizing that if a nurse perceives herself as powerless and her image as negative, the idea can sink to the subconscious level and realize itself. She will be drawn to those who will reinforce the idea. Practitioner Pauline Robitaille's stresses impact each nurse has on others. Her influence on people she comes in contact at the peri-operative setting cannot be overstated. She found the published feedbacks of registered nurses in nursing journals as very positive while others were very negative. Those who gave positive feedbacks described the efforts of preceptors to teach and support them. Thus the intended learning flowed smoothly. However, other nurses reported the negative, punitive and critical behavior of their preceptors. The nurses described the difficulty of working with these preceptors. Hence, the nurses did not benefit from their experience with the preceptors.

Ulmer emphasizes that those in the profession must…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gonzales, L. (2005). A mission for the center for nursing advocacy. 3 pages. Nevada RN Foundation: Nevada Nurses Association

Nursing BC (2002). How to create community media coverage for nursing. 2 pages. Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia: ProQuest Information and Learning Company

Ulmer, B.C. (2000). The image of nursing. 4 pages. AORN Journal: Association of Operating Room Nurses, Inc.

Willging, P (2005). it's time to take the politics out of nursing home quality. 5 pages. Nursing Homes: Medquest Communications, LLC
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Nursing Most Scholars Are in

Words: 2627 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36022230

" (1) What does the phrase "concept inventing" mean to you?

2) Does the process of concept inventing add clarity to a unique lived experience that aides in individualizing patient care? - or - Does the process of concept inventing add unnecessary jargon to the profession of nursing which creates barriers in collaboration with other disciplines? (3) State your stance on this issue and create a logical argument to defend your thoughts.

C. (1). "Concept inventing" can be thought of as a way to analyze situations in such a way as to contemplate their meaning to create understanding. Using both the aspects of science, including logic, rationality, and empirical analysis, and art, including intuition, emotion, integrity, honor, and compassion, nurses can process information in such a way as to create a complete conceptual picture of both the abstract aspects and concrete facts of a situation. In doing so, nurses can…… [Read More]

References

Chen, K.M. (2000, January.) The focus of the discipline of nursing: Caring in the holistic human health experience. Nursing (Graduate Research), 2(1). Retrieved Dec 3, 2006 from Graduate Research. Website: http://www.graduateresearch.com/kueimin2.htm.

Nagai-Jacobson, M.G., & Burkhardt, M.A. (1996). Viewing persons as stories: A perspective for holistic care. Alternative Therapies, 2(4), 54-58.

Rogers, M.E. (1990). Nursing: Science of unitary, irreducible, human beings: In E.A.M. Barrett (Ed.), Rogers' Science-Based Nursing. New York, NY: National League for Nursing.

Wainwright, P. (1999). The art of nursing. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 36, 379-385.
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Nursing for an Associate Degree

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81080660

Technology-based teaching strategies can greatly accelerate the how both teaching and learning occur and therefore often reduce traditional issues and concerns faced by students and instructors. This approach changes the conventional way of thinking about how quality nursing programs are assessed and changes the levels of requirements to better suit student learning with better access to libraries, counseling and tutoring services, computing equipment, tuition, and financial aid to name a few.

But where this Associates Degree approach will benefit the profession most is in the healthcare system where it is needed most. New nurses will be better acclimated to the needs of sophisticated logging processes, medical billing and inventory as well as scheduling and other tasks now all handled via digital processing and computer. A modern day nurses are more technologically sophisticated, the overall patient care process also gets better as more available free time is offered back to the…… [Read More]

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Nursing Definitions Autonomy in the Nursing Profession

Words: 3242 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47314806

Nursing Definitions

Autonomy

Autonomy in the nursing profession states the importance of the client's role in making decisions that reflect advocacy for the client (Wade, 1999, p.310). Ultimately, this includes taking care of the patient physically as well as mentally and emotionally, developing a relationship with the patient that is beneficial to his care and actively advocating for the patient's rights and care. This type of autonomy, it is important to note, is not the same as individual or work autonomy, yet it must be considered that empowerment in nursing autonomy will inevitably lead to better professional and personal autonomy and should also lead to increased job satisfaction (Wade, 1999, p.310).

Typical definitions of autonomy would include the idea of complete independence for the person making the decisions. However, in the case of the nursing profession, the client's needs and desires must be heavily weighed and, in fact, become central…… [Read More]

References Cited

Wade, G.H. (1999). Professional nurse autonomy: Concept analysis and application to nursing education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 30(2), 310-8.

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics, 2(1),

11-18.

White, L. (2004). Foundations of nursing: Second edition. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Learning.
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Nursing Science the Nursing Profession

Words: 2643 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30541149

As such, a nurse is primarily to recognize herself as an individual in the world, with certain responses to this world. When a patient enters the hospital, such a patient is also to be seen as a unique individual who responds to the world and his or her environment in a certain way.

Humanistic nursing is then primarily experiential rather than experimental. This means that new knowledge is gained with every new patient that arrives for treatment. In giving treatment, responses are observed and noted for future reference in similar situations. It is not however assumed that a treatment will work because it did in the past and in similar conditions. Instead, hypotheses are based upon experiences of the past. The recognition that hypotheses may prove incorrect helps the nurse to be open to new experiences. Each human being is then seen as a "world," as it were, with the…… [Read More]

Sources

Cody, William K. & Kenney, Janet W. (2006). Philosophical and Theoretical Perspectives for Advanced Nursing Practice. Jones & Bartlett.

Collaboration for Academic Education in Nursing. (2009). Foundational Perspectives.  http://www.caen.ca/content/view/46/133/ 

Current Nursing (2009, March 16). Nursing Theories. http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/development_of_nursing_theories.htm

Kleinman, Susan (2009). Humanistic Nursing Theory.  http://www.humanistic-nursing.com/faq.htm
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Nursing the Differences Between a

Words: 973 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91153825

("Summary of the LPN Declaratory Ruling, 2003)

The selected tasks and shared responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse define such nurses as responsible for being adequately prepared for the nursing responsibilities they assume because they have obtained the validation of completion of an approved preparatory program and have evidence of the successful completion of a nursing licensing examination. A registered nurse, however, as the title conveys, must be registered as a specific health care professional, within a professional organization, rather than merely possess evidence of having a license, and has passed the necessary coursework to obtain his or her master's in the nursing profession. The LPN's validation documents state that he or she has reached the achievement of mastering all theoretical and nursing skill competencies required of an entry level practical nurse in caring for individuals in any age group. It states that the licensed practical nurse has the sufficient…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carter, Melodie R. (Jun 2004) "ABCs of Staffing Decisions." Journal of Nursing Management. Retrived 2 Sept 2005 at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3619/is_200406/ai_n9425719 

Nurse Practice Act. (2004) Retrived 2 Sept 2005 at  http://www.arsbn.org/pdfs/practice_act/2004/nursepracticeact_2004.pdf 

Summary of the LPN Declaratory Ruling." (Feb 2003) Connecticut Nursing Journal. Retrived 2 Sept 2005 at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3902/is_200212/ai_n9305171
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Nursing Is One of Those Professions That

Words: 786 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85517325

Nursing is one of those professions that provides the opportunity not only to further oneself on a professional level, but also on a personal level. It provides the individual with the opportunity to connect with others by providing a platform of health care, while also providing a helping hand that promotes not only short-term healing, but also long-term well-being. This makes nursing one of the most caring professions, as it provides the nurse with the opportunity to use his or her skills, and also to lend a hand above the duties of simple physical health care. In this way, nursing extends to caring for the whole person rather than the physical being alone. This is one of the major factors that has attracted me to the profession throughout my life.

According to Limon (2001), there are four central concepts that are central to the metaparadigm of nursing, including the person…… [Read More]

References

Kocisko, D. (2010, Jan 23). Counselor, patient advocate, researcher, teacher -- and nurse: A Nurse's Journal. Retrieved from:  http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2010/01/counselor_patient_advocate_res.html 

Limon, C. (2007). The Components of the Metaparadigm for Nursing. Nutrition and Health Hub. Retrieved from:  http://smalldogs2.com/NutritionHealthHub/The_Components_of_the_Metaparadigm_for_Nursing.html
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Nursing in 2021

Words: 576 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62324686

Nursing Future in 2021

Nursing has not changed greatly for decades. Nurses now have more freedom than they did two decades ago, but nurses still provide the same care they have for the past century. This has been changing with the advent of nursing master's programs that are allowing registered nurses the opportunity to become more specialized in fields of their choice. A nurse can choose from many different nurse practitioner specialties to become more engaged in their field. Nurse practitioner programs allow nurses to be more involved in decisions that are made regarding patient care, so that the nurse becomes more responsible. The position of neonatal nurse practitioner is explained more fully in the following essay.

Neonatal care refers to the hospital department that takes care of an infant at the earliest stages of life. A neonatal nurse practitioner "frequently reports directly to a neonatologist or other specialists who…… [Read More]

Reference

Ellis-Christensen, T. (2011). What is a neonatal nurse practitioner? Retrieved from  http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-a-neonatal-nurse-practitioner.htm
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Nursing One Need Only Read the Newspaper

Words: 1837 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99718284

Nursing

One need only read the newspaper "Classified" ads to realize that employers are trying many clever marketing tactics to attract prospective nurses into their organizations. Many are offering sign-on bonuses, extra benefits and other amenities to attract a limited supply of nurses. As both the general population and the elderly population grow, the number of nurses needed to care for them increases proportionally as well. The number of people choosing to pursue nursing as a career has been on the decline, mainly due to long working hours, low pay, high job stress and other factors. These factors will not resolve themselves if the nursing deficit continues to increase. In addition, graduate nurses find it difficult to enter the workforce due to their lack of experience and a shortage of mentors to teach them. The solution is simple, more nurses are needed, and soon. Novice nurses are fresh graduates who…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Durkin, Barbara.(2002) Reliving Hospital Mistake: Mom recalls overdose case February

24, 2002. Newsday, Inc.

Lang, Susan. (1996) Lack of nursing assistants is an impending crisis, says Cornell gerontologist. Cornell University. Cornell University.  http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/May96/nursingassistants.ssl.html . Accessed June, 2002.

National League for Nursing (NLN). (2000). Unpublished Data. New York, NY. http://nursing.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nln.org%2Faboutnln%2Fnews_tricouncil2.htm. Accessed June, 2002.
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Nursing Teaching Ethics in Nursing

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50542776



It is saddening to note that as hospital stays grow more expensive, patients are getting less care and families must resort to the private sector and pay still more money to feel as though their loved ones are being treated competently. The problems are rife, legally in terms of liability and medically in terms of nursing conflicts over patient treatment. There is also the ethical issue that the poor are getting less decent care than the rich, because poor families cannot provide private nurses. Clearly, hiring private nurses or assistants is not the solution to an overburdened medical system, but families will continue to do so to protect their loved ones until a better solution is achieved by policy makers.

Poststroke Rehabilitation

Deutsch, Anne, Rodger C. Fielder & Kenneth J. Ottenbacher. Stroke. 37 (Jun

006):1477-148.

Rehabilitation after a stroke is a critical part of the healing process. The article attempts…… [Read More]

2006):1477-1482.

Rehabilitation after a stroke is a critical part of the healing process. The article attempts to assess differences in outcomes between patients treated at inpatient rehabilitative facilities (IRF) versus skilled nursing facilities (SNF). Overall, it was discovered that most patients, except for those patients who had suffered the most minor motor disabilities, had better quality of care and improved general outcomes when they went to the more expensive IRFs. Yet, although IRF payments for Medicare patients were higher, the stays were shorter than the SNF stays and this ultimately might result in lower costs overall to the health care system, when patient treatment is viewed in a long-term fashion.

This article highlights the problems of patients who have similar conditions, yet have vastly different insurance policies. Policymakers and health insurance assessors must ask, what incurs more long-term costs, and how should the value of rehabilitation be calculated? The article provides a compelling case for the superiority of IRFs as well as the difficulties of putting a price on rehabilitation, when more intensive rehabilitation can result in better outcomes for the patient later on.
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Nursing Knowledge Patterns of Knowing in Nursing

Words: 839 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58863827

Nursing Knowledge

Patterns of Knowing in Nursing

There is a great abundance of information available to us in the universe. Every second, we are bombarded with thousands if not millions of tiny facts arriving through the unbidden working of our sensory organs, each of which is quietly and usually subconsciously processed by the brain; active study engages other parts of our grey matter, and quickly creates a store of facts and associations; and ultimately all information is judged against the framework that is continuously being constructed from previous information. In addition to these different processes for analyzing, categorizing, and associating information, there are also different types of knowledge, several if not all of them working on subconscious and unconscious levels, that help to inform the way in which the world is perceived and responded to. These are both different subject areas and different ways of viewing the world and receiving…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. & Kramer, M. (2008). Integrated knowledge development in nursing. St. Louis: Mosby.

Lafferty, P. (1997). "Balancing the curriculum: promoting aesthetic knowledge in nursing.." Nurse education today 17(4), pp. 281-6.

Milligan, F. (1999). "Beyond the rhetoric of problem-based learning: emancipatory limits and links with andragogy." Nurse education today 19(7), pp. 548-55.
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Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model

Words: 3386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64933693

Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005
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Nursing Before and After 1945

Words: 689 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25843175

Nursing Jobs History

Nursing has changed much since the time before 1945 to now. In the Middle Ages, nursing duties and hospital jobs were sponsored by the Catholic Church, which was popular throughout all Europe and which supported the building of hospitals and the care of the sick in communities. This support fell apart during the Protestant eformation. Monasteries, hospitals and inns were taken from the Church. Also, the study and technique of developing and applying medicine were removed from monasteries and placed in Universities. The art of nursing which had been passed on for centuries in the monasteries was now cut off from the nurses who had practiced it. Protestant society considered nurses to be among "the lowest level of human society" (Sundstrom, 1998). Over the course of the next 200 years, the public approach to nursing changed. A charitable institution in the Middle Ages, suppressed under the Protestants,…… [Read More]

Reference List

BMJ Quality and Safety. (2013). Registered nurses often lack time for nursing care activities. News Medical. Retrieved from  http://www.news-medical.net/news/20131111/Registered-nurses-often-lack-time-for-nursing-care-activities.aspx 

Rinehart, M. (1931). Beyond Bed Pans. History Matters. Retrieved from  http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/60/ 

Sundstrom, A., H. (1998). From the Decline/Dark Ages to the Rebirth/Renaissance of Nursing. Angelfire. Retrieved from  http://www.angelfire.com/fl/EeirensFaerieTales/NursingDeclineHistory.html
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Nursing Organization the Nurses Organization of Veterans

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26712421

Nursing Organization

The Nurses Organization of Veterans Affairs (NOVA)

Purpose, Mission and Vision

NOVA exists to fulfill a very important function in the United States: Providing healthcare services to the nation's war veterans. To be able to do this, the organization's mission is to "shape and influence healthcare in the Department of Verterans Affairs (NOVA Foundation, 2012).

NOVA's vision has six components:

To provide high quality nursing care.

To provide nurses with an optimal work environment.

To keep nurses informed on relevant issues regarding VA health care and nursing.

To create opportunities for VA nurses to function at the leadership level.

To recruit all VA nurses for NOVA membership.

Advantages of Membership

The most obvious benefit of membership is the ability to connect with other members, who can offer support for specific challenges related to the professions. This opportunity to work with others also strengthens the ability of the VA…… [Read More]

References

Meyers, S. (2003, Oct. 2). Nurse Shortage: Recruitment and Retention. Statement of The Nurses Organization of Veterans Affairs (NOVA) Before the House Committee on Veterans Affairs, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. Retrieved from: http://democrats.veterans.house.gov/hearings/schedule108/oct03/10-2-03/smyers.pdf

Nova Foundation (2012). Nurses Organization of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved from: http://www.vanurse.org/

United States Department of Veterans Affairs. (2012, Jun. 4). NOVA Foundation Scholarship. Retrieved from:  http://www.va.gov/NURSING/nova.asp
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Nursing Summaries Ember Benson Bn

Words: 388 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49084858



FCER Points Out Error to erck; erck Confirms Change"

This commentary illustrates the issue of problematic wording within the medical community. A Doctor of Chiropractic expressed concern to the Foundation for Chiropractic Education and Research over improper phrasing written in the erck anual.

The bothersome statement written in the erck anual was thought to have originated from medical data derived over 30 years ago. This article points the importance of knowing one's own specialty, and having a thorough knowledge of medical terminology so as to correct and prevent medical mishaps.

ackechnie C, Simpson, R (2006) "Traceable Calibration for Blood Pressure and Temperature onitoring" Nursing Standard 21, 11, (2006): 42-47

Correct diagnosis and monitoring largely depend on accurate pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and body temperature measurements. any measurement errors can be minimized by confirming that instruments are calibrated. This article emphasizes to need for instruments to be traceably calibrated to national…… [Read More]

Mackechnie C, Simpson, R (2006) "Traceable Calibration for Blood Pressure and Temperature Monitoring" Nursing Standard 21, 11, (2006): 42-47

Correct diagnosis and monitoring largely depend on accurate pulse, respiration, blood pressure, and body temperature measurements. Many measurement errors can be minimized by confirming that instruments are calibrated. This article emphasizes to need for instruments to be traceably calibrated to national standards.

Nurses are responsible for taking measurements, so it is imperative that nurses be aware of the issues of measurement precision. Unreliable instruments (due to lack of traceable calibration) can lead to inaccurate measurements resulting in misdiagnosis and poor patient care.
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Nurse Implementation Plan Implementation Plan it Is

Words: 858 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84434897

Nurse Implementation Plan

Implementation Plan

It is important to understand that plans do not simply manifest themselves into existence and a specific implementation effort is needed to ensure that the evidence presented in research efforts can be used to practical ends. Although the solution appears to be clear and succinct, putting into this plan into action requires a plan of its own. To do this effectively, Lewin's model of change theory can assist in describing "how" this plan will be put into action and significantly complement "what" needs to be done in order to realize success.

The plan itself is simple and revolves around and addresses Lewin's trinity of components in his change Model. Lewin essentially proposed that change occurs in three distinct stages where an old idea is "unfrozen," then processed and eventually "refrozen." This simple model of understanding the mental processes apply both at a collective level and…… [Read More]

References

Jansson, I. et al. (2010). Factors and Conditions that Influence the Implementation of Standardized Nursing Care Plans. The Open Nursing Journal, 10 Oct 2010. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3024554/ 

Jeanes, A. (2009). Improving hand hygiene compliance. Nursing Times, 18 Feb 2009. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingtimes.net/Journals/2012/10/04/g/p/i/030218Improving-hand-hygiene-compliance.pdf 

Knutsen, R. (2013). Nurses, Hand Hygiene and Infection Control. Advanced Health Care Network, 6 Feb 2013. Retrieved from  http://nursing.advanceweb.com/Features/Articles/Nurses-Hand-Hygiene-Infection-Control.aspx
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Nursing Critique Today's Nurses Have

Words: 2498 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 377117

The data gathered is subjected to statistical analysis using statistical methods of linear regression and chi square testing.

The main purpose of the study was to confirm the hypothesis that consultation with CNS or RN in a drug-monitoring clinic has a significant positive impact on the well being of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study involved a single blinded randomized controlled trial over a period of three years. Subjects were chosen from the rheumatology out patient setting in a district general hospital with a drug monitoring service. A total of 71 subjects who were starting out on anti-rheumatic therapy were randomly assigned to either the interventional or the control group. While the interventional group was supervised by the CNS to assess patient needs (using Pendelton's framework) alongside drug safety evaluation, the control group was seen by an outpatient staff nurse purely for drug safety concerns. oth the groups were assessed…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Teri Britt Pipe; Kay E. Wellik; Vicki L. Buchda; Carol M. Hansen; Dana R. Martyn, 2005, "Implementing Evidence-Based Nursing Practice," Urol Nurs. 25(5): 365-370, Available at,  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/514532 

Ryan, S, Hassell, a.B, Lewis, M, & Farrell, a. (2006). Impact of a Rheumatology Expert Nurse on the well-being of patients attending a drug monitoring clinic. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 53(3), 277 -286.

Considine, J. & Botti, M. (2004) Who, when and where? Identification of patients at risk of an in-hospital adverse event: Implications for nursing practice. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 10: pp. 21-31

Other references
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Nursing Case Study

Words: 1425 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93800722

Nursing Case Study

Managing a possible Case of Gastroenteritis: A Nursing Case Study

The effective delivery of optimal nursing care requires a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses both the patient's symptoms and the security of the immediate environment. This report presents a case study of appropriate evidence-based nursing practices in treating an elderly female patient presenting with abdominal discomfort in a residential care setting.

The client presents with new onset faecal incontinence, diarrhoea and increasing abdominal discomfort and cramps. These symptoms suggest a possible gastrointestinal disturbance (Crisp & Taylor, 2009) and present a number of possible diagnoses. While the client's nursing care plan indicates that she is normally continent, her confidential disclosure to the nurse suggests that her symptoms may be more prolonged. Another relevant client characteristic is her advanced age of 85 years.

The client's proximity to the dirty utility room in the aged care facility and the report…… [Read More]

References:

1. Crisp J, Taylor C. (2010). Potter & Perry's fundaments of nursing (3rd ed.). Chatswood, N.S.W.: Elsevier, Australia.

2. Kirk MD, Hall GV, Veitch MGK, Becker N. (2010). Assessing the ?incidence of gastroenteritis among elderly people living in long-term care facilities. Journal of Hospital Infection, 76, 12.

3. Australian Government: Department of Health and Ageing. (2007). Retrieved from- http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/content/icg-guidelinesindex.htm .

4. Andrew E, Simor MVD. (2010). Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Review. The-Americans Geriatric Societ, 58(8), 1557-1593.
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Nursing Line-Item Budget Nursing Magnet

Words: 2444 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75025030

The authors describe findings from a survey designed to gather baseline data about changes organizations experience after implementing the Clinical Practice Model framework, and report how the Clinical Practice Model Resource Center staff used the survey findings to build the capacity of individuals accountable for implementing this integrated, interdisciplinary professional practice framework into the organization's operations." (2002) The following model has been created for monitoring the progress of the nursing staff at the MD Anderson Cancer Center MEDVACM specifically checking progress in Years 1,3, and 5.

MD ANDERSON CANCER CENTER MEDVAMC

Job Performance Review Guide

EMPLOYEE

Employee Name

Review Period

Department

Manager

PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OJECTIVES

YEAR 1

YEAR 3

YEAR 5

ecome familiar with your department's business goals.

Work with your manager to define and document your goals. Include what you are expected to produce by your first review, activities needed to accomplish results, and success criteria.

Make certain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Magnet Designation (2006) Inside UVA Online Vol. 36, Issue 14 August 26, 2006. Available at  http://www.virginia.edu/insideuva/nursing_excellence.html .

Bailey, F. Amos (2000) Balm of Gilead Center, Cooper Green Hospital Pioneer Programs in Palliative Care: Nine Case Studies - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Milbank Memorial Fund October 2000. Online available at  http://www.milbank.org/pppc/0011pppc.html#foreword .

Forrow, Lachlan (2000) Palliative Care Program, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/CareGroupPioneer Programs in Palliative Care: Nine Case Studies - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Milbank Memorial Fund October 2000. Online available at
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Nurse Case Manager Case Management in the

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84835461

Nurse Case Manager:

Case management in the nursing field is basically described as the functions and activities carried out by the nurse case manager within a specific care setting. In some cases, these functions and activities are usually performed by a self-governing practitioner, especially in private case management practices and community nursing facilities (Cohen & Cesta, 2005, p.278). Generally case management responsibilities are provided by the nurse case manager in acute care, primary care, home care, and managed care organizations. Nonetheless, these activities may be offered to particular patient populations and communities like the elderly. Some of the most case management activities include patient identification and intake, problem identification and assessment, patient outreach, development and implementation of plan of care, and coordination of care.

oles and Functions of Nurse Case Manager:

In acute care organizations, the roles and functions of the nurse case manager includes coordinating the care provided to…… [Read More]

References:

Blancett, S.S. & Flarey, D.L. (2006). Case studies in nursing case management: health care delivery in a world of managed care. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers, Inc.

Cohen, E.L. & Cesta, T.G. (2005). Nursing case management: from essentials to advanced practice applications (4th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Meadows, P. (2009, January). Community Health Nursing. American Journal of Nursing,

109(19). Retrieved from  http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/fulltext/2009/01001/community_health_nursing.5.aspx
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Nursing Theory Nursing Is a

Words: 883 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65138438



A person's health is an ever-changing state of being resulting from the interaction with the environment. Optimum health is the actualization of both innate and obtained human potential gained through rewarding relationships with others, obtaining goals and maintaining expert personal care. Adaptations can be made as required to maintain stability and structural integrity. A person's state of health can vary from wellness to illness, disease, or dysfunction. Professional nursing is founded on the need to promote wellness practices, the attentive treatment of persons who are acutely or chronically ill or dying, and restorative care of patients during convalescence and rehabilitation. It also includes the education and measurement of those who perform or are learning to perform nursing responsibilities, the support and communication of research to enhance knowledge and practice, and the management of nursing in healthcare delivery systems. Nursing practice centers on the application of a body of knowledge in…… [Read More]

Johnston, N., Rogers, M., Cross, N. And Sochan, a.(2007) Global and planetary health:

teaching as if the future matters. Nursing Education Perspectives 26(3), 152

Nyatanga, L. (2005) Nursing and the philosophy of science. Nurse Education Today 25(8), 670-675
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Nursing Why Should Nurses Revise

Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41683472

Also, nurses can ignore patient advice as far as medical procedures are concerned because they obviously don't have the medical expertise to being advice on such matters (Street 2005). It is important that patient's are able to lend their discretion because every decision made by a medical staff member in their regard effects their life and ultimately their life as a whole (Street, 2005). A healthy relationship between patient and nurse yields positive outcomes and allowing patients to participate in their own care leads to a better relationship (Andrews 2008). Nurses need to keep in mind the balance that exists between letting patients participate and voice their opinions about their care and not allowing patients to dictate the entirety of their stay in the care facility.

Explain why patients do not wish to be actively involved in their care, and how nurses can help with this situation

Patients do not…… [Read More]

Reference List

Andrews M.M. And Boyle J. (2008). Transcultural Concepts in Nursing. England:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Street L.R., Gordon S.H., Ward M.M., Krupat E., & Kravitz L.R. (2005). Patient

Participation in Medical Consultations: Why Some Patients Are More Involved
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Nursing Leaderships Role Key' Factors

Words: 1075 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64106071

It has been shown through research to be critical that the organization make the provision of support for the nursing staff in terms of their education and provisioning career support as well through making time and financial allocations to provide the necessary support system in which the nursing staff may advance their education and hence their career. (Cook, Horz & Mildon, 2006; paraphrased citing the work of: Robinson, (2001 and Hinshaw (2002) Additionally falling within these provisions of support are time and financial allocations for "research, special projects and publications (Kramer & Schmalenberg, 1988; as cited by Cook, Horz, & Mildon, 2006) the research fact sheet includes the necessity for organizations to "Support a 'bias toward action' (Kramer & Schmalenberg, 1988; as cited by Cook, Horz, & Mildon, 2006); and to "Enhance nurse-staffing rations (Hinshaw, 2002; as cited by Cook, Horz, & Mildon, 2006) and lastly to provide encouragement among…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cook, a. Hiroz, J. And Mildson, B. (2006) Strategies and Outcomes Associated Magnet Hospitals Fact Sheet II of II - Nursing Health Services Research Unit 2006 September Online available at  http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:wmmvrr7kMqUJ : www.nhsru.com/factsheets/Magnet%2520factsheet%2520Part%2520II%2520of%2 520II%2520-%2520Strategies.FINAL.pdf+Nursing+Leadership:+Healthcare +organizational+analysis&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=79.

Quality First: Core Values and Concepts for Quality Leadership (2006) American Health Care Association - Provider Guidelines. Online available at  http://www.ahca.org/quality/qf_corevalues.htm .

Alexander, Jeffrey; Bloom, Joan; and Nichols, Beverly (1991) Nursing Turnover and Hospital Efficiency: An Organizational Level Analysis (1991) Institute of Industrial Relations University of California Berkley

Nursing Leaderships Role: 'Key' Factors in Organizational Analysis
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Nursing Theory Personal Approach

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26235578

Nursing theory chosen, which best aligns with my personal theory of nursing, is Neuman's System Model. This model was created by Betty Neuman, and designed to be holistic in nature (Memmott, et al., 2000). The focus of the model is on the whole person (patient), the environment surrounding that person, the overall health of the person, and the nursing care that person is provided with during his or her illness. While it might seem obvious that all of these areas should be considered, many models of nursing practice today ignore too many important factors regarding a person and why he or she may be ill (Barnum, 1998). With that in mind, it is very important to use a theory like Neuman's Systems Model in order to address more than just a set of symptoms (Memmott, et al., 2000). When nurses and other medical professionals take a look at a chart…… [Read More]

References

Barnum, B. (1998). Nursing theory: Analysis, application, evaluation. NY: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Memmott, R.J. Marett, K.M. Bott, R.L. & Duke, L. (2000). Use of the Neuman Systems Model for interdisciplinary teams. Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care, 1(2).
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Nursing Knowledge Without a Doubt

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90605561

The nurse is often expected to act and react only with empirical information, however personal knowledge is considered equally as important by many nurse educators and researchers (Chinn & Kramer 2004). This also helps to explain why "health" and "environment" are considered distinct major components in the metastudy of nursing; both can be understood on highly subjective terms, with the concept of "good health" changing from patient to patient, or "person" to "person." Environment, too, has a major effect on the practice of nursing and the growth of the nursing body of knowledge.

3)

My personal philosophy of nursing centers on the belief that each individual person under my care deserves full attention and the unique application of my knowledge in addressing their immediate and long-term needs and concerns. That is, each person should benefit as much as possible from the full extent of my nursing knowledge, while still being…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. & Kramer, M. (2004). Integrated knowledge development in nursing. St. Louis: Mosby.

Fawcett, J. (2006). "Commentary: Finding patterns of knowing in the work of Florence Nightingale." Nursing outlook 54(5), pp. 275-7.
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Nursing What Area's of the Cultural Assessment

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40404983

Nursing

What area(s) of the cultural assessment would you focus on?

Jarvis urges the use of cultural assessment in conjunction with other types of assessment including family and community assessments. An understanding of culture can inform strengths and weaknesses that can be applied to the development of a treatment plan. During the assessment in this case, I would focus on language, lifestyles, and values. Values might include the patient's value of money, relationships, time, health, education, beauty, and spirituality. I would ask about family background and history to ascertain relational issues. Her communication styles would be important to understand. Cultural values related to food and food beliefs could be influencing the client. Furthermore, the client's culture might impact her attitudes towards the healing process.

b. Discuss the rationale for selecting this.

It is important to know if the client's financial condition is precluding her from seeking care. With regards to…… [Read More]

References

Boyle JS, Andrews MM (1989): Transcultural Concepts in Nursing Care. Glenview, IL, Scott, Foresman/Little, Brown College Division, 1989

Jarvis, C. (2000). Physical Examination. Saunders.
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Nursing Evidence-Based Practice & Applied

Words: 3411 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29918686

This is one of the most common forms of research and, for some research questions is clearly a strong design (Ethics in Critical Care Nursing Research, 2005).

The research that was done in this article would be considered a non-experimental type. There were two types of observation that were conducted. The first type was that of focus groups and the second being the file audit, both of which are observational in nature. In this case this was the most appropriate type of research design to use. Since they were simply trying to see what was actually going on in this area and how that was affecting patients the only real way to tot this was by observation. From this article a nursing care issue that can be raised is that of how palliative care nurses manage family involvement with end of life issues. Are there any standard procedures that are…… [Read More]

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Nursing and Religion Practice Religion and Nursing

Words: 2267 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 452423

Nursing and eligion Practice

ELIGION AND NUSING PACTICE

Nursing success depends on the ability to put the patient in a state of rest and comfort as much as it is about administering the prescriptions of the doctor. To secure the rest of the patient, nurses need to understand their needs and show respect to their beliefs and values. This requires courteous and open communication with the patient and adopting a patient-centric orientation. Along with other factors, the religious background of the patient makes a lot of difference to their values and expectations. eligious doctrines and practices may differ across religions and denominations such as Jehovah's Witnesses, Muslims, Seventh Day Adventists and Scientologists and may impose restrictions on certain kinds of interaction between nurse and patient or on certain forms of treatment. Moreover, people with a different religious background are not usually aware of such differences. Therefore, it is necessary for…… [Read More]

References

Banja, J.D. (2010). Overriding the Jehovah's Witness patient's refusal of blood: A reply to Cahana, Weibel, and Hurst. Pain Medicine, 10(5), 878-882. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00648.x.

Charles, C.E., & Daroszewski, E.B. (2012). Culturally competent nursing care of the Muslim patient, Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 33(1), 61-63. doi: 10.3109/01612840.2011.596613.

Cort, M., & Cort, D. (2008). Willingness to participate in organ donation among Black Seventh-Day Adventist college students. Journal of American College Health, 56(6), p. 691-697. Retrieved from EBSCO Academic Search Primer.

Effa-Heap, G. (2009). Blood transfusion: Implications of treating a Jehovah's Witness patient. British journal of nursing, 18(3), 174-177.
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Nursing Argument Getting Old Is Not Fun

Words: 1604 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98284970

Nursing Argument

Getting old is not very fun when considering the opinions of the elderly. This is true because many hard and difficult decisions must be made in terms of health and health care. Two options immediately arise when one is not able to take care of themselves and seek the assistance of others. The first option is home health care and the other is nursing home health care. The purpose of this essay is to examine, weigh and discuss these two options. This essay will then conclude on when it is best to choose nursing home care and when it is not wise or advisable to do such a thing.

Home Health Care

What exactly is home health care and what does it entail? Home health care helps seniors live independently for as long as possible, given the limits of their medical condition. It covers a wide range of…… [Read More]

References

Berger, Joseph, (2012). A Shift From Nursing Homes to Managed Care at Home. The New York Times, 23 Feb 2012. Web.  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/24/nyregion/managed-care - keeps-the-frail-out-of-nursing-homes.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Bojorquez, Manuel, (2013). Eleven states get failing grades for nursing home care. CBS News, 9 Aug 2013. Web .  http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18563_162-57597944/eleven-states - get-failing-grades-for-nursing-home-care/

Friedland, R. (2009). Home Care vs. Nursing Home Care. Care, 25 Nov 2009. Retrieved from http://www.care.com/senior-care-home-care-versus-nursing-home-care-p1017- q14698.html

Klauber, M. (2001). The 1987 Nursing Home Reform Act. Public Policy Institute, Feb 2001. Retrieved from  http://www.aarp.org/home-garden/livable-communities/info - 2001/the_1987_nursing_home_reform_act.html
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Nursing Case Studies Thomas and

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Cae plan

Nusing poblem 1: May's pain must be contained so she does not injue heself.

Because childen cannot always expess thei sensations of pain, thei pain may go unnoticed until it becomes sevee and fightening.

Nusing poblem 2: Vomiting and the possibility of choking.

Anxiety and pain can cause childen to vomit, making teatment of pain and administeing pope nutition difficult.

Nusing poblem 3: May is attempting to emove he oxygen mask.

A lack of knowledge on the pat of the child as to why cetain teatments ae administeed can esult in noncompliance.

Nusing poblem 4: The need fo social suppot when May's mothe is not pesent.

The unfamiliaity of the hospital envionment is exacebated by May's lack of paental cae.

Expected outcomes

Diagnosis 1: Pain management

Outcome: The FLACC: a behavioual scale fo scoing postopeative pain in young childen that can be helpful in detemining how to teat…… [Read More]

references

Almond, C. (1998). Children are not little adults. Australian Nursing Journal, 6(3), 27 -- 30.

Bruce, E., & Franck, L. (2000). Self-administered nitrous oxide (Entonox () for the management of procedural pain. Paediatric Nursing, 12(7), 15 -- 19.

Manworren R. & Hynan L.S (2003) Clinical validation of FLACC: preverbal patient pain scale. Paediatric Nursing 29(2):140-146.

McInerney, M. (2000). Paediatric pain. Pulse Information Sheet of Royal College of Nursing,