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Nursing Shortage Review on Nurses Shortage the

Words: 2703 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86492519

Nursing Shortage

eview On Nurses Shortage

The supply of professional nurses relative to the increase in demand for their services has been on a general decline over the years. As a career choice, nursing has been facing perennial shortage of professionals. Most healthcare organizations will affirm that their daunting tasks were recruiting fresh nurses and retaining the ones already in practice. The 2008 projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed that the demand for professional nurses would increase from the then two million to three million, which represents sixty percent increment. In ideal situations, the number of those who have enrolled in nursing will be sufficient to supply the rise in their number. Nevertheless, this would not be the case if nothing were done to salvage the worrying trend of most students not graduating or resorting to other careers. According to Benjamin Isgur of PWHC Health and esearch Institute,…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009, September, 28). Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet. USA: AACN.

Buerhaus, P.I., Staiger, D., & Auerbach, D.I. (2009). The future of the nursing workforce in the United States: Data, trends, and implications. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Blakeley, J., & Ribeiro, V. (2008). Early Retirement among Registered Nurses: Contributing Factors. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(1), 29 -- 37

Cummings, G., et al. (2008). The Relationship between Nursing Leadership and Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Canadian Oncology Work Environments. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(5), 508 -- 518.
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Nursing Knowledge Patterns of Knowing in Nursing

Words: 839 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58863827

Nursing Knowledge

Patterns of Knowing in Nursing

There is a great abundance of information available to us in the universe. Every second, we are bombarded with thousands if not millions of tiny facts arriving through the unbidden working of our sensory organs, each of which is quietly and usually subconsciously processed by the brain; active study engages other parts of our grey matter, and quickly creates a store of facts and associations; and ultimately all information is judged against the framework that is continuously being constructed from previous information. In addition to these different processes for analyzing, categorizing, and associating information, there are also different types of knowledge, several if not all of them working on subconscious and unconscious levels, that help to inform the way in which the world is perceived and responded to. These are both different subject areas and different ways of viewing the world and receiving…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. & Kramer, M. (2008). Integrated knowledge development in nursing. St. Louis: Mosby.

Lafferty, P. (1997). "Balancing the curriculum: promoting aesthetic knowledge in nursing.." Nurse education today 17(4), pp. 281-6.

Milligan, F. (1999). "Beyond the rhetoric of problem-based learning: emancipatory limits and links with andragogy." Nurse education today 19(7), pp. 548-55.
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Nursing Problem Shortage of Nurses in Healthcare at Local Hospitals

Words: 2710 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 45327903

Nursing Problem: Shortage of Nurses in Healthcare

Nursing Shortage

The researcher works at Phoebe Memorial Hospital, where there is an extreme nursing shortage. Without an adequate amount of nurses, patient care and safety may turn out to be compromised, while nurses themselves may be stunned, upset, and dissatisfied. At the researcher's workplace, high patient-to-nurse ratios has been displaying that there is a lot of frustration and job burnout, which is linked to higher yield. At Phoebe, there is an inadequately staffed nursing force which has been discovered to play a negative part in patient results. In difference, studies have confirmed that hospitals like Phoebe Memorial Hospital with low nurse turnover are the ones that have the lowest rates of risk-adjusted death and severity-adjusted span of stay.

There is no very exact way of describing the concept of nursing shortage at the Phoebe Memorial Hospital Phoebe, but a report of this…… [Read More]

References

NURSING PROBLEM: SHORTAGE OF NURSES
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Curriculum of Nursing Education

Words: 1355 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71152410

Dynamic curriculum offers diversity, growth, caring, self-care, development, adaptation, the nursing process, evidence-based practice, and a way in which relevance for future practice can be identified. By including all the important concepts, the curriculum is better able to provide exactly what is needed for nurses who want to provide the best care to their patients. The competencies that are studied and the knowledge that is required are both centered around how nurses get their education and what they do with their knowledge once they have acquired it. There are several current trends in health care that affect the development of curriculum and the outcomes of the programs nurses must take. These include understanding the increasing severity of patient illnesses in both community-based and acute care settings, along with the rising demand for affordable prices and good care. Quality assurance and safety for the patients is another area where emphasis is…… [Read More]

References

Billings, D., & Halstead, J. (2009). Teaching in nursing: A guide for faculty (3th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Saunders.

Billings, D., & Halstead, J. (2012). Teaching in nursing: A guide for faculty (4th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders.

Faison, K., & Montague, F. (2013). Paradigm shift: Curriculum shift. ABNF Journal, 24(1), 21-22.

Morris, T.L., & Hancock, D.R. (2013). Institute of medicine core competencies as a foundation for nursing program evaluation. Nursing Education Perspectives, 34(1), 29-33. Retrieved from http://web.a.ebscohost.com.proxy.devry.edu/ehost
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Nursing and the Modern Curricula

Words: 997 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31941852

curriculum development must be a dialogue between its designers and the affected stakeholders: if a curriculum is imposed upon students and faculty members, they will inevitably resist it. Common agreement amongst faculty members also fosters greater agreement in regards to shared standards between teachers when grading. I also agree that it is important that students feel they are being evaluated fairly and that certain standard classes used to meet requirements are not substantially easier or harder than the same classes taught by different teachers. In particular with a nursing education, uniformity is desirable since nurses are taking classes to attain professional qualifications and pass licensure exams.

However, although getting people 'on board' with the curriculum is important, it is also vital that the curriculum is flexible enough and able to change with today's needs. The nursing curriculum cannot be static and mired in outdated standard operating procedures. "Today's educators are…… [Read More]

References

Sprang, S. (2010). Making the case using case studies for staff development. Journal for Nurses

in Staff Development, 26 (20): E6-E10. Retrieved from:  http://www.nursingcenter.com/lnc/static?pageid=1071277 

Q4. Technology has proven to be a great asset in improving healthcare delivery. It has also proven to be an asset in the education of new nurses, expanding the range of ways in which nurses can be exposed to the profession. As well as hands-on simulations with computers, large portions of nursing education have been shifted online. Nurses can engage in continuing education, bolstering their credentials as the market demands by going to school online at night while still working during the day.

Online learning allows nurses to experience simulated stressful environments without endangering real patients. Given the risks posed by lawsuits to institutions, the need for a safe space for students to make mistakes is critical. Of course, "a major limitation of simulation is the fidelity; no matter how high the fidelity is, it is not real .It is often impossible to imitate actual physiological signs or symptoms" (Hicks et al. 2009: 4). Particularly in the later years of nursing education, no high-fidelity simulation can replicate clinical experiences. However, high-fidelity simulation can act as an important preparation for a residency's rigors, as well as the first year of the nurse in actual practice. Although the technology may be costly, the costs of an unprepared nurse are even greater.
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Curriculum Issues in Healthcare

Words: 1059 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21868055

changes affecting healthcare in the next five to 10 years. There are two specific areas, though, that will be the focus of these changes. These are the number of older adults who need care and the advances in technology. The idea that technology is important does not come as a surprise, because it is continuously evolving and reaching new levels throughout the world. As technology gets better, the way healthcare is delivered will also see improvement. Technology changes and new options emerge, and then in the blink of an eye there is another new technology option behind it. Healthcare is tied to technology now, and will need to find ways to keep the population better served as the needs of that population continue to change. The number of older adults requiring healthcare is also important to address, because it can cause difficulties in the healthcare system with having enough doctors,…… [Read More]

References

Billings, D., & Halstead, J. (2012). Teaching in nursing: A guide for faculty (4th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Saunders.

Stanley, J. (2007). Chapter 16: AACN shaping a future vision for nursing education. In Nursing Education: Foundations for Practice Excellence (pp. 299-311). Philadelphia, Pennsylvania F.A. Davis Company

The Millennium Project. (2009). Global futures studies & research. Retrieved from  http://www.millennium-project.org/ 

Verdon, D.R. (2013). Technology stands poised to transform. Dermatology Times, 34(12), 64-68.
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Nursing Licensure

Words: 5773 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31916341

1997, the average pass rate for first time test takers on the NCLEX-RN was 93%. Since 1997, the national average pass rate on the NCLEX-RN has declined to 83.8% (National Organization for Associate Degree Nursing, 2002). The pass rate for the state of North Carolina and many other states has also declined in recent years.

Community colleges are the prime educators of new registered nurses in the United States. In 1997, 701 community colleges awarded 41,258 associate degrees in nursing (National Center for Education Statistics 1997). The combined ADN graduate pool constituted 60% of the U.S. graduates who took the NCLEX-RN exam in 2000,and these graduates represent the largest group of nurses entering the profession (National Council of State oards of Nursing 2001). On the other hand, baccalaureate programs graduated 37% of the total; and diploma or hospital-based educational programs, graduated 3%.(Teich, et al.)

In addition to educating the majority…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, Carolyn, Valiaga, Theresa, Murdock, Jane. McGinnis, Susan & Wolfertz, Joanne (2002). Trends in Registered Nurse Education Programs: A Comparison Across Three Points in Time. In National League for Nursing (Ed.), pp. 1-10).:.

American Association of Colleges of Nursing (1999). Temporary Nurses Called A Serious Risk Threat At Hospitals. In (Ed.), p.).: American Association of Colleges of Nursing.

American Health Care Association.(1999).Facts and Trends, The Nursing Facility Sourcebook.Washington, D.C.:American Health Care Association.

American Hospital Association.1999.Trendwatch:RN Shortages in Hospitals. Washington, D.C.: American Hospital Association.
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How to Improve Nursing Education

Words: 521 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60329728

Nursing Curriculum

Healthcare is changing so rapidly, there will be a need to profoundly alter the nature of nursing education to address the needs of providers and patients. "Nurse researchers are calling for curricular changes that emphasize how, along with what, students learn. Educators are bringing classroom and clinical teaching together by integrating knowledge acquisition and situated knowledge use in the classroom and clinical practice. The health care system and the patient population have undergone dramatic changes in the last half-century, but many nurse educators teach their students in the same way that they were taught decades ago" (A new dawn in nursing education, 2012, WJF). A number of innovations have been instituted, both technological and pedagogical in nature. For example, simulation technology allows nursing students to have an experience more accurate to the 'real world' of the nursing environment very early in their education, even before their residency. Also,…… [Read More]

References

The future of nursing: focus on education. (2011). IOM. Retrieved from:

http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/The-Future-of-Nursing-Leading-Change-Advancing-Health/Report-Brief-Education.aspx
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Curriculum Foundations in Recent Years

Words: 753 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47270542

The political climate within the United tates is one moving away from conventional medical practices and moving toward alternative medicine. With President Obama's healthcare reform bill, it was made clear that costs within healthcare and the liability from certain procedures is unacceptable. Educating nurses in natural birthing techniques saves hospitals the excessive expenses associated with interventions and results in a happier and less likely to complain patient. Very few hospitals within the United tates open support natural birth techniques. In fact, most nurses at the hospital were unaware of different birthing positions, the advantages of walking while in labor, or the advantages of water during labor. This ignorance will only result in a loss of patients who will seek out those hospitals with educated staff. Finally, the demographics within the hospital I observed demand better care. The families entering the labor and delivery floor were educated upper-class families who expected…… [Read More]

Sargent, Carolyn & Stark, Nancy (2009). Childbirth Education and Childbirth Models: Parental Perspectives on Control, Anesthesia, and Technological Intervention in the Birth Process. Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Vol 3.1 (36-51)

Simkin, Penny (2007). Just Another Day in a Woman's Life? Women's Long-Term Perceptions of Their First Birth Experience. Birth. Vol 18.4 (203-210)

Zwelling, Elaine (2006). Childbirth Education in the 1990s and Beyond. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing. Vol 25.5 (425-432)
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Nursing in the Rural Area a Well-Deserved

Words: 2307 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32606725

Nursing in the Rural Area

A WELL-DESERVED SECOND LOOK

Rural nurses are particularly endangered by the current and worsening shortage in nurses. As it is, rural nursing is already beset with issues that range from a lack of professional practice system, the need for larger incentives for nurses to work in the rural areas, a general unwillingness to live in these areas among the nurses and the foreseen depletion of the supply of rural nurses. Possible solutions and approaches have been proposed.

Approximately 20% or 54 million U.S. residents live in locations categorized as rural (ushy, 2006). These residents are distributed across 80% of the nation's total land area. About 99 or fewer residents occupy every square mile in these areas and experience the shortage of nurses more acutely than in urban areas. Moreover, they have generally lower annual income, less education and poorer health status than urban residents. Local…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Arnaert, A. et al. (2009). Homecare nurses' attitudes towards palliative care in a rural community in western Quebec. 11 (4) Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing:

Medscape. Retrieved on October 17, 2011 from  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/715133 

Blaauw, D. et al. (2010). Policy interventions. World Health Organization. Retrieved on October 18, 2011 from  http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/5/09-072918/en 

Bushy, A (2006). Nursing in rural and frontier areas: issues, challenges and opportunities. Vol 7 # 1 Harvard Health Policy Review: University of Harvard.
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Nurse Educator Strategic Plan

Words: 1008 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84346085

Nurse Eduactor Strategic Plan

Nurse educator strategic plan

A strategic plan for a nurse educator

At present, I would say that my greatest strength as a nurse educator is my willingness to challenge myself in the pursuit of excellence. Within the next year, I will obtain my MSN with a specific concentration in education. Previously, I obtained certification as a Basic Life Support instructor (BLS). Also within the next year I intend to seek out certification in Advance Cardiac Live Support (ACLS) and Pediatric Life Support Instructor (PAL) with the intention of becoming both an ACLS and PALS instructor. These will enhance my capabilities as a nurse educator and provide greater specificity in the range and types of teaching I will be able to convey.

My second great strength as a nurse educator is the compassion I have for my patients and my genuine love of teaching. A nurse is…… [Read More]

References

Covey, S. (2012). 7 habits of highly effective people. Franklin Covey.

Gardner, H. (2007). Frames of mind: The theory of multiple intelligences. New York: Basic

Books.

Professional Nurse Educator's Group. (2013). Official Website. Retrieved from:
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Nurse's Role as Researcher the Nurse Plays

Words: 1671 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77211857

Nurse's ole As esearcher

The nurse plays a unique role as a researcher. This involves them focusing on the latest treatment options, how they affect patients and the best times specific techniques should be utilized. Moreover, they must understand the numerous side effects of different therapies and how this will affect the patients they are working with. These areas help them to serve as confidant in comprehending how and when to apply certain procedures. (Allan, 2005)

At the same time, the nurse will understand the psychology, customs, behavior and biological factors which are contributing to a host of conditions. This enables them to comprehend the challenges patients are going through and the lasting impact this is having on them. When this happens, they can reduce suffering and improve their ability to cope with the issues they are facing. These insights will help patients to make a full recovery with reduced…… [Read More]

References

Allan, J. (2004). Clinical prevention and population health. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27(5), 470-481.

Allan, J. (2005). Clinical prevention and population health curriculum framework: The nursing perspective.

Allen, D. (2002). The Changing Shape of Nursing Practice. New York, NY: Routledge.

American Academy of Nurses. (2009). Nurses transforming health care using genetics and Genomics. Washington, DC: Author.
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Curriculum Design the Course I

Words: 631 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38872427

By the end of this portion, I had gained confidence in the processes and the procedure and could remember all the requirements.

The learning outcome of the course was to educate nurses on the new protocols and technology to complete this procedure on difficult patients. I feel that the curriculum attended very well to these goals. It was always on task and efficient in its training. I'm guessing that it was so efficient because it was through the hospital to train the staff and they did not want to waste time.

After the training I was certified and expected to use this technique on difficult patients. The only lacking competency was using this technique on children. I had not had any previous experience of inserting lines into children and was unaware of protocols or strategies to ease the child's nervousness. This was addressed by more senior nurses in the pediatric…… [Read More]

References

Brannam, Larry (2008); et al. Emergency Nurses' Utilization of Ultrasound Guidance for Placement of Peripheral Intravenous Lines in Difficult-access Patients. Academic Emergency Medicine. Vol 11.12, 1361-1363.

Overton, David (2005). Ultrasonography-Guided Peripheral Intravenous Access vs. Traditional Approaches in Patients With Difficult Intravenous Access. Annals of Emergency Medicine. Vol 46.5, 456-461.
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Nursing Mentor Scenario Introduction- Just as the

Words: 1501 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24655154

Nursing Mentor Scenario

Introduction- Just as the theoretical and practical backgrounds of nursing have changed over the past several decades, so has the nursing education environment itself. . Students now entering the field are diverse in culture, educational background, and most especially age and experience. Traditional undergraduates coming directly from High School or Junior College often interact with more mature and experienced students. In addition, nursing instructors remain challenged to recognize different learning needs and styles, and respect that adaptive scenarios might be necessary to further the learning opportunities for many students. e thus see that the most effective way of teaching in the modern nursing classroom is to adjust one's pedagogical paradigm outward and to actively find new and innovative ways of reaching each student, rather than expecting each student to completely bend to the tried and true curriculum of previous generations (Young, L., Petson, B., eds., 2006). Too,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bradshaw, M., & Lowenstein, A. (Eds.). (2011). Innovative Teaching Strategies in Nursing and Related Health Professions. Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Bulman, C. And Schutz, S. (1998). Reflective Practices in nursing. Sudbury, MA: Jones

And Barlett Publishers.Epp, A., & Price, L. (2011). Designing Solutions Around Customer Network Identity Goals. Journal of Marketing, 75(1), 36-54.

Cramer, C., Davidhizar, R. (2008). Helping At-Risk Nursing Students Succeed on the National Council Licensure Examination-Registered Nurse. The Health Care Manager.27 (3): 269-76.
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Nursing Definitions Autonomy in the Nursing Profession

Words: 3242 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47314806

Nursing Definitions

Autonomy

Autonomy in the nursing profession states the importance of the client's role in making decisions that reflect advocacy for the client (Wade, 1999, p.310). Ultimately, this includes taking care of the patient physically as well as mentally and emotionally, developing a relationship with the patient that is beneficial to his care and actively advocating for the patient's rights and care. This type of autonomy, it is important to note, is not the same as individual or work autonomy, yet it must be considered that empowerment in nursing autonomy will inevitably lead to better professional and personal autonomy and should also lead to increased job satisfaction (Wade, 1999, p.310).

Typical definitions of autonomy would include the idea of complete independence for the person making the decisions. However, in the case of the nursing profession, the client's needs and desires must be heavily weighed and, in fact, become central…… [Read More]

References Cited

Wade, G.H. (1999). Professional nurse autonomy: Concept analysis and application to nursing education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 30(2), 310-8.

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics, 2(1),

11-18.

White, L. (2004). Foundations of nursing: Second edition. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Learning.
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Nursing Conceptual Model Develop Your

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 77625252

Nurses may feel as if they do not have anyone who understands them: even their non-nursing partners may not seem to truly comprehend what they deal with on a regular basis, day in and day out at the hospital. Nurses may be isolated from one another in the hospital, too busy to 'talk shop' in a positive way with like-minded colleagues, or deal with doctors who are not sympathetic to the unique demands of nursing. Nurses may also find it difficult to have an appropriate work and life balance, as increasingly they are pressured to do more and more at work, to make up for declining numbers of caregivers at the facilities where they work. They may be called upon to perform many additional duties traditionally performed by doctors and physician's assistants that strain at the traditional definitions of nursing.

Nurses may feel as if their unique insights as nurses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burnout: Warning signs. NurseWeek. 97.2.

Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.nurseweek.com/features/97-2/burn2.html

Gelinas, Lillee. (2003, October 1). Addressing nurse burnout - Changing culture is the cure

Staffing the Suite. Endonurse. Retrieved July 9, 2009 at  http://www.endonurse.com/articles/3a1staffing.html
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Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model

Words: 3386 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 64933693

Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005
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Nursing Ba vs Associates Nursing Competencies --

Words: 744 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84521106

Nursing BA vs. Associates

Nursing Competencies -- Associates vs. Baccalaureates

The difference competencies between nurses prepared at the associate-degree level nursing vs. The baccalaureate-degree level are significantly different on many levels. Today's nurses work in a healthcare environment that is undergoing a constant evolution at a speed never before imagined (NLN Board of Governers, 2011). Patient needs have become more complicated; nurses must implement requisite competencies in leadership, health policy, system improvement, research, evidence-based practice, and teamwork and collaboration in order to deliver high-quality care. Furthermore, nurses are also required to master different technologies that are also evolving extremely rapidly.

There are basically three different alternative paths to becoming a registered nurse. Some hospitals offer a three-year program that is administered in the hospital setting. Another option is a two to three-year program in which graduates receive an associate's degree and can be administered at a community college or any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mahaffey, E. (2002, May 2). The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Retrieved from The Relevance of Associate Degree Nursing Education: Past, Present, Future:  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume72002/No2May2002/RelevanceofAssociateDegree.aspx 

Moltz, D. (2010, January 7). Nursing Tug of War. Retrieved from Inside Higher Ed:  http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2010/01/07/nursing 

NLN Board of Governers. (2011, January). Transforming Nursing Education: Leading the Call to Reform. Retrieved from NLN Vision: http://www.nln.org/aboutnln/livingdocuments/pdf/nlnvision_1.pdf

Rosseter, R. (2012, April 2). The Impact of Education on Nursing Practice. Retrieved from American Association of Colleges of Nursing:  http://www.aacn.nche.edu/media-relations/fact-sheets/impact-of-education
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Nursing Leader

Words: 896 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83567924

Nursing Sills

Grayce Sills and Nursing Leadership

Brief Biography:

Grayce Sills dedicated her life's work to improving conditions for psychiatric health patients, both through reforms in the area of psychiatric nursing and through education of future generations of nurses. During the era succeeding orld ar II, the psychiatric nursing profession was making its first forays into mainstream treatment orientation. Grayce Sills would emerge into the profession during this time and, in the late 1950s and 1960s, would observe that the conditions to which psychiatric patients were often treated at this juncture were abhorrent, inhumane and inconsistent with the standards otherwise sought in general patient treatment. As a student of Hildegard Peplau, whom she refers to as the mother of psychiatric nursing, Sills would come to appreciate the need for greater demonstration of caring and compassion in this subsection of the nursing profession. (Barker, p. 79) Earning a Bachelor's Degree from…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Barker, P.J. (1999). The Philosophy and Practice of Psychiatric Nursing. Elsevier Health Sciences.

Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Shultz, C.M. & Aiken, T.D. (2010). Giving Through Teaching: How Nurse Educators Are Changing the World. Springer Publishing Company.

Houser, B. & Player, K. (2007). Pivotal Moments in Nursing: Leaders Who Changed the Path of a Profession. Sigma Theta Tau International; 1st edition.

Murray, A. (1995). OHIO STATE HONORS NURSING PROFESSOR AT WINTER COMMENCEMENT. Ohiostate.edu.
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Nursing Associations the Benefits of

Words: 4670 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31671067

In the emergency room, this distinction can have a determinant impact on the ability of the staff to preserve life and diminish pain and suffering.

The introduction of a bioethical perspective into this dialogue invokes a question as to the primacy of an interest in pursuing to the utmost the well-being of the patient. This speaks to one of the core values associating the principles of the ANA with the treatment outcomes desired in patiences. An examination of the ANA's Code of Ethics reveals that a theoretical basis exists to contend a direct correlation between the nurse's self-interest and that which is best for any given patient. There exists an essential obligation for such healthcare practitioners to "examine the conflicts arising between their own personal and professional values, the values and interests of others who are responsible for patient care and health care decisions, as well as those of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

American Nurse's Association (ANA). (2004). The Nurses Code of Ethics. The Center for Ethics and Human Rights. Online at .

The American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE). (2009). AONE Resource Center. www.aone.org.

Dimaria, R.A. & Ostrow, L. (2004). West Virginia University School of Nursing Makes the Move to Web-Based Learning. Technological Horizons in Education Journal, 31.

Emergency Nurses Association (ENA). (2008). Vision/Mission Statements and Code of Ethics. www.ena.org.
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Nursing the Impact of Elsevier

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85832419

Other sources will include data from educational institutions and healthcare facilities identifying the percentage of students that benefited from other educational models compared with the results of students participating in the Elsevier Reach standardized case studies

Primary sources that may be available for contemplation will include actual test results, graduation rates and successful placement of nursing candidates at healthcare facilities. These resources may be available through testing and educational centers and from employers including health facilities that hired a percentage of nursing graduates in any given year in the years proceeding use of the Elsevier Reach standardized cases. Primary sources may also come from personal testimonials from nurses in contemporary society as well as nurses that worked previous to the inception of the standardized case studies. These interviews can be conducted using questionnaires or during focus groups where nurses are provided the opportunity to share their experiences and successes or…… [Read More]

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Nursing Theory Personal Approach

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 26235578

Nursing theory chosen, which best aligns with my personal theory of nursing, is Neuman's System Model. This model was created by Betty Neuman, and designed to be holistic in nature (Memmott, et al., 2000). The focus of the model is on the whole person (patient), the environment surrounding that person, the overall health of the person, and the nursing care that person is provided with during his or her illness. While it might seem obvious that all of these areas should be considered, many models of nursing practice today ignore too many important factors regarding a person and why he or she may be ill (Barnum, 1998). With that in mind, it is very important to use a theory like Neuman's Systems Model in order to address more than just a set of symptoms (Memmott, et al., 2000). When nurses and other medical professionals take a look at a chart…… [Read More]

References

Barnum, B. (1998). Nursing theory: Analysis, application, evaluation. NY: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Memmott, R.J. Marett, K.M. Bott, R.L. & Duke, L. (2000). Use of the Neuman Systems Model for interdisciplinary teams. Online Journal of Rural Nursing and Health Care, 1(2).
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Nurse Training in Cardiac Procedures

Words: 9322 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74651339

The procedure itself and the hospital stay associated with it is only one small chapter in the patient's life. They will eventually go home and will have many years after the procedure. It is important for the nursing staff to make a positive impact on how they feel about the procedure. The procedure will represent a lasting memory to the patient. If the patient perceives this to be a time of strength and care from nurturing individuals then it will help them to be able to develop the coping mechanisms necessary to learn to live with the after-effects of the procedure.

If the patient sees this as a negative experience, then it could produce unwanted effects such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other emotional problems that could have an effect on their ability to cope with the life changes. Those that develop appropriate coping mechanisms will be more likely…… [Read More]

References

Knoll, N., Rieckmann, N., & Schwarzer, R. (2005). Coping as a mediator between personality and stress outcomes: A longitudinal study with cataract surgery patients. European Journal of Personality, 19, 229-247.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2004). Initiation and maintenance of physical exercise: Stage-specific effects of a planning intervention. Research in Sports Medicine, 12, 221-240.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2004). Behavioral intentions and action plans promote physical exercise: A longitudinal study with orthopedic rehabilitation patients. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 26, 470-483.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2005). Stage-specific adoption and maintenance of physical activity: Testing a three-stage model. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 6, 585-603.
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Nursing Practice Changes

Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39815924

Nursing: Today and Throughout History

The occupation of nursing has been around for almost all of history in some form or another. In the ancient Roman Empire are found records of the nursing practice, where nurses provided care to in-patients at local Roman hospitals. In Constantinople—the Rome of the East—nurses were “known as hypourgoi” (Kourkouta, 1998). These nurses (both male and female) were tasked with jobs much like today’s nurses: they provided a wide variety of services to patients. Kourkouta (1998) states that the main tasks of the hypourgoi (male nurses) and hypourgisses (female nurses) were to give “psychological support of patients, everyday care of patients’ bodily needs and elementary comfort, cleaning of patients and providing them with proper food, the administration of medicines according to a doctor’s instructions, supervising wards when the physicians were not present, the performance of enemas, cuppings and bloodletting, the main therapeutic means used at…… [Read More]

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Nurse Patient Ratios

Words: 2236 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 6147

Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care

This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political and fiscal demands from all sectors of society; rising costs internally and externally combined with a rising number of under-insured; and the conundrum of nursing ethics and the ability to foster excellence in care and patient advocacy. We note that there remains an issue about hiring more nurses -- where will these nurses come from if the nursing schools do not increase their recruitment efforts and broaden their curriculum. In addition, we note that the large majority of patients and stakeholders primarily want two things when admitted to a healthcare facility: better paid nurses and more highly-trained professionals who are satisfied with their vocation.

Introduction

Modern nursing is, by necessity, a mixture of complex balance: patient care vs. staffing; procedures…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

More Nurses Make the Difference. (February 2012). The Lamp. 69 (1): Retrieved from: http://search.informit.com/au/documentSummary;dn=045435426132502;res=IELHEA

Safe Nurse Staffing: Looking Beyond the Numbers. (2009). Vantage Point, CNA. Retrieved from: https://www.nso.com/pdfs/db/newsletters/Safe_Nurse_Staffing_-_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_20094.pdf?fileName=Safe_Nurse_Staffing_ -_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_2009-pdf&folder=pdfs/db/newsletters

Aiken, L. (2001). The Hospital Nurse Workforce: Problems and Prospects."Draft

For the Council on the Economic Impact of Health System Change. Retrieved from: http://council.brandeis.edu/pubs/hospstruct  / Council-Dec-14-2001-Aiken-paper.pdf
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Nursing Consideration for Patients With

Words: 4208 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 56689240

Behavioral approaches alone or combined cognitive behavior therapy may be used. Behavioral techniques might include simply not buying trigger foods or avoiding certain shops; that is, building up new habits to replace existing ones. Another example would be modifying eating behavior such as eating in the same place each day, or concentrating solely on eating and not watching television at the same time (Fiona Mantle, 2003)."

It is worth noting here that research has shown that people will change and transform their eating habits, once they learn the advantages and disadvantages of their eating behavioral patterns. However, at the same time, it is also worth noting here that since eating habits can be transformed through learning, they can also be unlearned, however, the process of unlearning may take place through a lengthy passage of time. As Fiona Mantle (2003) writes, "Eating behaviors are learned behaviors therefore they can be unlearned,…… [Read More]

References

Abraham S, Llewellyn-Jones D (2001) Eating Disorders: the facts. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Bruch H (1973) Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa and the Person Within. New York, Basic Books.

Bunnell, D.W., Shenker, I.R., Nussbaum, M.P., Jacobson, M.S., & Cooper, P. (1990). Sub-clinical vs. formal eating disorders. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 9, 357-362.

Cathie E. Guzzetta. (2001). Developing and implementing a comprehensive program for children and adolescents with eating disorders. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing.
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Nursing Line-Item Budget Nursing Magnet

Words: 2444 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 75025030

The authors describe findings from a survey designed to gather baseline data about changes organizations experience after implementing the Clinical Practice Model framework, and report how the Clinical Practice Model Resource Center staff used the survey findings to build the capacity of individuals accountable for implementing this integrated, interdisciplinary professional practice framework into the organization's operations." (2002) The following model has been created for monitoring the progress of the nursing staff at the MD Anderson Cancer Center MEDVACM specifically checking progress in Years 1,3, and 5.

MD ANDERSON CANCER CENTER MEDVAMC

Job Performance Review Guide

EMPLOYEE

Employee Name

Review Period

Department

Manager

PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OJECTIVES

YEAR 1

YEAR 3

YEAR 5

ecome familiar with your department's business goals.

Work with your manager to define and document your goals. Include what you are expected to produce by your first review, activities needed to accomplish results, and success criteria.

Make certain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Magnet Designation (2006) Inside UVA Online Vol. 36, Issue 14 August 26, 2006. Available at  http://www.virginia.edu/insideuva/nursing_excellence.html .

Bailey, F. Amos (2000) Balm of Gilead Center, Cooper Green Hospital Pioneer Programs in Palliative Care: Nine Case Studies - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Milbank Memorial Fund October 2000. Online available at  http://www.milbank.org/pppc/0011pppc.html#foreword .

Forrow, Lachlan (2000) Palliative Care Program, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/CareGroupPioneer Programs in Palliative Care: Nine Case Studies - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation - Milbank Memorial Fund October 2000. Online available at
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Nursing Teaching as if the

Words: 1197 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 32619146

In essence, the authors are forcing all nursing students and those who practice nursing today to understand that because of overblown "materialistic values, environmental sustainability, technology, clashes between societies" and global conflicts, the role of nurses has changed drastically, thus requiring some type of instruction on these and other topics (2005, pg. 153).

In addition, the authors maintain that nursing students of today and in the near future must extend their empathy "from a relatively passive, cognitive level to one of active, affective engagement" which in the end will result in engendered caring and move "the consideration of global conflict and war into a personal, relational context" (2005, pg. 154). One important way to accomplish this goal in relation to a classroom setting would be to compose a personal narrative on the events of September 11, 2001, when the World Trade Center was destroyed by an alleged terrorist organization, being…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Johnston, Nancy, Rogers, Martha, Cross, Nadine & Anne Sochan. (May/June 2005). "Global and Planetary Health: Teaching as if the Future Matters." Nursing Education

Perspectives. Vol. 26 no. 3. 152-56.
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Nursing Personal Improvement Plans Learning Is an

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22370175

Nursing Personal Improvement Plans

Learning is an essential part of nursing in modern practice. As such, it is important even to keep learning while working within the professional field. Planning for particular stages in one's career and breaking down a realistic time model for strategies to meet those goals help fuels a career that is ripe with development and success.

Personal improvement objectives are a crucial part to any nursing position, whether it is from a brand new employee, to one that is working towards a future advancement in his or her career. The professional development portfolio can help secure that a strong strategic solution is reached to fulfill future objectives. The research states that "since a portfolio is developed over time, it is also provides a way of monitoring professional development" (Oermann, 2002, p 73). The nursing professional gets to continue learning from their actual clinical practice, just as…… [Read More]

References

Cerbin, W. (1994). The course portfolio as a tool for continuous improvement of teaching and learning. Journal on Excellence in College Teaching, 5(1), 95-105.

Feldman, Harriet. (2005). Educating Nurses for Leadership. Springer Publishing Company.

Oermann, Marilyn H. (2002). Developing a professional portfolio in nursing. Orthopedic Nursing, 21(2), 73-80.
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Nurse Lesson Plan Nursing Lesson

Words: 2472 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 77423753

Though the lesson plan cannot project what distribution of critical thinking and reasoning abilities will define the classroom, it will be appropriate to shape the lesson plan with the capacity for flexibility in its presentation.

Content Outline:

A note, upon entering into the content breakdown on this subject; the material covered here is of a diverse and nuanced range, with each subject singularly requisite of its own course of investigation. e would therein set a range of learning objectives for each aspect of the subject. However, given the limitation of the course time to just three hours, we have outlined six overarching learning objectives, with each of the above identified domains represented twice.

Cognitive Learning Objectives

Our first learning objective will be to help familiarize learning with H.I.M. application modules, placing a particular emphasis on the most current IT tools at our disposal. Here, learners will use their application skills…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA). (2007). Homepage. www.ahima.org.

Bastable, S.B. (2003). Nurse as Educator: Principles of Teaching and Learning for Nursing Practice. Sudbury, MA Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Duphome, R & C.N. Gunawardena. (2005). The effect of three computer conferencing designs on critical thinking skills of nursing students. The American Journal of Distance Education, 9(1)

Johns, M. (2002). Health Information Management Technology: An Applied Approach. American Health Information Management Association.
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Regulatory Influences on Curriculum

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71391016

Regulatory Influences on Curriculum

Curriculum development and learning drivies learning in the nursing discipline. In this vein, the NLNAC and the National League of Nursing (NLN) do this in the various states. By using case studies, their impact upon curriculum development/revision within the nursing discipline will be analyzed by the author in this short essay. These regulatory agencies will be analyzed and the author will explore which of their subcomponents set policy and standards related to required curriculum content and development.

Unfortunately, the impact is not always positive. Indeed, there have been many bureaucratic barriers that have been erected in the way of effective curriculum development. In this essay's literature review, the importance of graduate education will noted and seconded. However, what disturbs this author is the lack of emphasis upon basic nursing education, especially in the LPN and four-year nursing ranks. This issue will also be addressed.

The mission…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shultz, C.M. (2011). Embrace diverse pathways to advanced nursing practice:

let's not throw out the baby with the bathwater. Nursing Education

Perspectives, 32(3), 145.

Holly, C. (2009). The case for distance education in nursing. MERLOT Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 5(2), 506-510.
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Rufaida The Pioneer of Nursing in Islam

Words: 5104 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 23865806

Future of Nursing Education in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

The primary objective of this book is to provide the reader with evidence-based nursing education and practice principles. The goal of this work is to help nursing educators and nurse practitioners develop evidence-based nursing education standards and curriculum while providing nurses with effective examples of patient-centered care that is both high quality and cost effective. Patients and family members in Saudi Arabia have needs and expectations that nurses should seek to meet and fulfill. To that end, this book aims to support nurses and nurse educators.

The cultural values of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia are also an important component of this work, as it is the culture of this country that supports and advances the aims of the nursing profession. This is seen in every aspect of the nursing profession -- from the earliest days of the first nursing…… [Read More]

References

Aldossary, A., While, A., Barriball, L. (2008). Health care and nursing in Saudi Arabia.

International Nursing Review, 55(1): 125-128.

Al-Hashem, A. (2016). Health education in Saudi Arabia. Sultan Qaboos University

Medical Journal, 16(3): e286-e292.
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Dorothea Orem Nursing Theory Analysis

Words: 2299 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 47962252

This will give her a good idea of the level of understanding the patient has and then she can tailor her teachings to fit the patient's level of understanding.

It is also a good idea for the nurse to give the patient as much printed information on the topic as she can because the patient can always use these materials as a reference in case the nurse is not readily available. If he teaching is about following a menu plan that will assist the patient in a speedy recovery, the nurse can have the patient keep a food journal of what he ate for a week or so and they can go over it together to determine what is working and what isn't. The same goes for the patient needing to be educated on any type of physical activities he must perform in order to improve and maintain his health.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baker, Lois K. And Denyes, Mary J. (2008). Predictors of self-care in adolescents with cystic fibrosis: A test of Orem's theories of self-care and self-care deficit. Journal of Pediatric Nursing, 23(1), 37-48.

Cleary, Michelle and Freeman, Adele. (2006). Enhancing nurse care partnerships: A self-

directed learning approach. Nurse Education in Practice, 6, 224-231.

Griswold-Pierce, Anne and Smith, Jennifer A. (2008). The ethics curriculum for doctor of nursing practice programs. Journal of Professional Nursing, 24(5), 270-274.
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Regulation in Nursing Regulatory and Accreditation Body

Words: 935 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55307418

egulation in Nursing

egulatory and Accreditation Body Paper

egulatory and accrediting bodies and how they impact nursing education

What is the difference between regulation and accreditation? Because regulatory and accreditation bodies are often spoken of in the same breath, it is easy to confuse the two. Both are pertinent to the role of nursing faculty, given that a nursing educator must prepare her students to conform to the standards of the nursing profession, including obtaining licensure. The nursing profession is regulated in the sense that there are barriers to entry even after a nurse has completed a course of study, and faculty must keep this in mind when designing instructive materials. Additionally, nursing programs themselves must receive accreditation from an outside source to ensure they meet specific curriculum standards in terms of the education they provide. There is widespread acknowledgement for the need for both regulation and accreditation to ensure…… [Read More]

References

Barnum, B. (1997). Licensure, certification, and accreditation. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing Available 2(3)1. Retrieved:  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol21997/No3Aug97/LicensureCertificationandAccreditation.html 

CCNE Accreditation. (2013). CCNE. Retrieved:

 http://www.aacn.nche.edu/ccne-accreditation 

FAQ. (2013). AAAC. Retrieved:
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Art of Nursing According to Virginia Henderson

Words: 1537 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 39459880

Art of Nursing According to Virginia Henderson

Virginia Henderson has tremendously helped to bring a new perspective of the art of nursing. For this reason, her biographical sketch together with educational and professional details earned her the name the Modern-day Mother of nursing and the Nightingale of modern nursing. Virginia Henderson's theory was a major stride in the field of nursing and in the art of nursing. The theory has also been used by the theorist to come up with another definition of nursing. The art of nursing according to Virginia Henderson has had major implication on nursing and is of relevance to the current nursing practices. This paper will give a biographical sketch of Virginia Henderson. In addition to this her educational and professional overview will be analyzed also. Henderson's theory and its applications will then be reviewed where the four major concepts constituting it will be looked at.…… [Read More]

Reference

Henderson, V. (1955). Harmer and Henderson's Textbook of the principles and practice of nursing. New York: Macmillan

Henderson, V. (1956). Research in nursing practice: when? Nursing research, 4 (3), 99

Henderson, V. (1960). International council of nurses basic principles of nursing care ICN,

Geneva
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Growth of Nursing Practice

Words: 1458 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 90796871

Growth in the Practice of Nursing and Patient Care Delivery Models

The practice of nursing is expected to continue growing and changing given the reform initiatives that are taking place in the healthcare system. Some of the factors that are contributing to these changes and growth in nursing practice include the restructuring of healthcare delivery system, increased healthcare costs, increase in demand for nurses, nursing shortage, and increase in the patient population. Given these factors, nurses are expected to continue assuming a wide range of healthcare responsibilities because of the complexities in patient care delivery or caring for the sick (Tiffin, 2012). It is expected that as nursing practice continues to change and grow, new models of patient care delivery will emerge. As nurses, we need to understand these changes/growth and the emerging patient delivery models in order to enhance our practice.

One of the patient care delivery models that…… [Read More]

References

Gulliford, M., Naithani, S. & Morgan, M. (2006, October). What is "Continuity of Care"? Journal of Health Services Research & Policy, 11(4), 248-250.

Haney, C. (2010, June 9). New Care Delivery Models in Health System Reform: Opportunities for Nurses & their Patients. Retrieved December 3, 2016, from  http://nursingworld.org /Mainmenucategories/Policy-Advocacy/Positions-and-Resolutions/Issue-Briefs/Care-Delivery-Models.pdf" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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Patient Negligence and Nursing Malpractice

Words: 1859 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91885317

Responsibilities of Nurses to Patients

Why is it important

The role of nurses has a direct implication on the patients. For example, nurses observe and provide direct care to the patients. The physicians give orders and thus are the role of the nurses to implement (Aiken et al., 2014). Often, the work of the physicians is not complete without the help of the nurses. The nurses are responsible for changing clothes and giving the medications to patients. Often, the patients are unable to do basic tasks, and therefore the roles of nurses become very important. Nurses keep medical records for the patients and therefore give medications to the patients in time and monitor their progress.

Another important role of the nurse is assessing the response of the patients to medications. Keep the records for the progress of patients is an invaluable practice. The records help the nurses to monitor how…… [Read More]

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Benefits of Joining Professional Nursing Associations

Words: 533 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 46275425

Professional Nursing Organization Comparison

Choose two professional organizations. These can be organizations you are a member of or that are known in the nursing profession.

Create a table comparing the two organizations.

American Nurses Association

When Established

The organization has roughly 490 chapters throughout 85 countries.

American Nurses Association was established in 1896 as the Nurses Associated Alumnae and was renamed the American Nurses Association in 1911.

Support of Nursing Leadership

STTI provides opportunities for nurses to participate in leadership programs and mentoring opportunities, and take advantage of career development resources.

The ANA provide programs and offerings for nurses, nursing leaders, and all stages of the nursing career trajectory.

Leadership Opportunities

Members can ask career-related questions and get responses from STTI volunteer Career Advisors.

More than 900 nurse researchers, students, clinicians and leaders attend the International Nursing esearch Congress to learn from evidence-based research presentations. The theme of the 26th…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Foundation. Retrieved from  http://www.anfonline.org 

American Nursing Association. Retrieved from  http://nursingworld.org 

Sigma Theta Tau International School of Nursing. Retrieved from  http://www.nursingsociety.org/Pages/default.aspx
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Educational Curricula or the Educational Environment Influenced

Words: 967 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38699585

educational curricula or the educational environment influenced by news media? By attitudes or activities of educators and facilitators? By community events or expectations? By regulatory or accrediting agencies?

The most recent example of the effect of the news media on educational curricula that comes to mind was the way that American business schools began increasing their attention to business ethics and ethics-related topics after the public disclosure of the major scandals in American big business. After the infamous Enron, Tyco, and WorldCom scandals, MBA programs began increasing the number of courses devoted to business ethics to prevent today's graduates from falling into the same traps as those that resulted in the highest-profile business scandals reported so widely in the media. omething similar seemed to have happened in healthcare education curricula in connection with problems like transmission of blood-borne pathogens throughout the 1980s and 1990s to prevent HIV transmission during routine…… [Read More]

Sources Consulted

Billings, D.M. And Halstead, J.A. (2009). Teaching in Nursing: A guide for Faculty.

(3rd edition).

Duffy, F.M. "Paradigms, Mental Models, and Mindsets: Triple Barriers to Transformational Change in School Systems: PART 1." International Journal of Educational Leadership Preparation, Vol. 4, No. 3 (July - September, 2009).

Lloyd, S. (2005). "Evidence-based educational methods." Educational Psychology in Practice, Vol. 21, No. 3: 252-253.
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Advance Nursing Practices in the

Words: 2098 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73429250

This help in solving conflicts between patients in a hospital.

In nursing practice, there are quite different in between clinical nursing specialist and nurse practitioner in the scope of operation. Therefore, a clinic nurse specialist works under the legislated scope of practice for a registered nurse but has advanced education. While nurse practitioner works under a separate scope of practice and can perform certain functions and tasks that are outside of the scope of practice of registered nurse, including clinical nurse specialist. However, nurse practitioner generally provide primary care, and clinical nurse specialists act more a s consultants in their roles as expert clinicians, clinical leader, educators, collaborators and researchers.

Many researches have written that emotions sometimes can influence ethical decision making in a health care system. Therefore, nurses are equipped with knowledge to make decision without any kind of influence. The model demonstrates that certain emotional states influence the…… [Read More]

References

Royal of nursing college (2010). Advanced nurse practitioners, an RCN guide to the advanced

Nurse, Practitioner role, competences and program accreditation

Marie-Laure Delamaire, Gaetan Lafortune (2010). Nurses in Advanced Roles

A description and evaluation of experiences in 12 developed countries
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Basics of Nursing Education

Words: 2989 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63290247

nursing program to a BSN program

Over the years, promotion of nurses' higher education has been a focus of national reports. One of several reasons for this is growing evidence tying improved performance with continued education. Another factor is that nurses taking Master's programs often focus on education; this ensures a good supply of nurse educators as well as clinical nurse specialists and midwives (Scott & Brinson, 2011).

Factors influencing the need for a BSN program.

Education

esearchers and policymakers continue to point out that education is a key determinant of nurses' performance in our medical facilities. Bachelor's degree programs provide more content than diploma programs do. They also tend to be more thorough. It has been noted that those institutions that have more baccalaureate degree registered nurses reported less fatalities. This inverse relationship shows that education level is a key determinant of performance and competency (Johnston, 2009).

Disasters, Violence…… [Read More]

References

Aliakbari, F., Parvin, N., Heidari, M., & Haghani, F. (2015, Febuary 23). Learning theories application in nursing education. Retrieved from www.ncbi.nih.gov:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4355834/ 

Amerson, R. (2006). Energizing the Nursing Lecture: Application of the Theory of Multiple Intelligence Learning. Nursing Education Perspectives, 194-196.

ANA. (n.d.). Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements. American Nurses Association.

Armstrong, T. (2009). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom, 3rd Edition. ASCD.
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Need for Critical Thinking in Vocational Nursing Courses

Words: 2654 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 16093271

Critical Thinking in Nursing Education

For far too long nursing has been seen as a profession that requires compassion along with obedience to the orders of doctors who were traditionally considered to be the "real" medical professionals. Nurses were until recently inside and outside of the profession seen as sort of helpmeets to the doctors, a form of junior wife to the male doctor. Of course nurses were always more than this, but it has become true only relatively recently that the medical profession as a whole has begun to acknowledge that critical thinking is as important for nurses as it is for doctors and other medical professionals.

This paper examines the ways in which the teaching of critical thinking can be incorporated more fully (and more deeply) into the teaching curricula and praxis of nursing. Focusing on the importance of critical thinking from the first day that nursing students…… [Read More]

References

Duchscher, J.E. (1999). Catching the wave: understanding the concept of critical thinking. Journal of Advanced Nursing 29(3): 577-583.

Fowler, L.P. (1998). Improving critical thinking in nursing practice. Journal of Nurses Staff Development 14(4): 183-7.

Kuhar M.B. (1998). Critical thinking: A framework for problem solving in the occupational setting. AAOHN Journal 46(2): 80-81.

Simpson, E. & Courtney, M. (n.d.). Critical thinking in nursing education: A literature review. Retrieved from http://eprints.qut.edu.au/263/1/SIMPSON_CRITICAL_THINKING.PDF.
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Nursing Responses Maslow's Pyramid

Words: 787 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95078649

Accreditation

According to the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), "accreditation is a nongovernmental process conducted by representatives of postsecondary institutions and professional groups. As conducted in the United States, accreditation focuses on the quality of institutions of higher and professional education and on the quality of educational programs within institutions" (Standards of accreditation for post-baccalaureate nurse residency programs, 2008, CCNE). Accreditation is a source of objective evidence from an outside entity that a program meets certain quality and content standards. This is essential for both students and patients. Students make a considerable financial and time investment in their education and need to expect that they can emerge with real skills as well as a diploma upon graduation. They do not have to tools to vet a program before they are accepted. Patients have a right to expect that the nurses who oversee them graduated from high-quality programs. Accreditation serves…… [Read More]

References

Maslow's hierarchy of needs. (2014). R.N. Retrieved from:

 http://www.rnpedia.com/home/notes/fundamentals-of-nursing-notes/maslow-s-hierarchy-of-basic-human-needs 

Q4. "The strongest predictor of nurse job dissatisfaction and intent to leave a job is stress in the practice environment" (Paris & Tehaar 2011). Not only is Maslow's hierarchy of needs extremely useful for nurses to better understand their patients: it is also useful for nurses to better understand themselves. Burnout is very common in the nursing profession because nurses do not attend to their own, personal needs. The nurse must recognize that she has physiological and safety needs that must be addressed before accessing the higher needs of social and personal fulfillment on the hierarchy. It is vital that nurses engage in appropriate self-care, ensuring that they get adequate enough healthy food and sleep to be able to treat their patients in a compassionate manner. It is also important that healthcare organizations address the human needs of nurses and do not ignore the need for nurses to take care of their mental and physical health.

Reference
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Nursing Knowledge A Controversy the Scope of

Words: 1742 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26357332

Nursing Knowledge: A Controversy

The scope of the nursing profession has increased dramatically over the last thirty years. The demarcation between medical and nursing tasks is quickly dissolving as the nursing profession is becoming increasingly multidisciplinary and complex. In 1996, nurse practitioners were mandated to obtain master's degrees to address their changing role in medical care (Nicoteri & Andrews, 2003). In this multidisciplinary and evolving healthcare environment, adaptation is paramount to providing effective patient care. Currently, there is a controversy in nursing regarding the direction that the development of nursing knowledge should take. There are many critics who believe that developing new nursing theories is an effective way to promote this development. However, theories are often abstract and not adaptable to specific healthcare settings. The belief that the knowledge base for nursing should evolve entirely from theory has important implications for nursing as an academic discipline and by extension the…… [Read More]

References

Attree, M. (2001). Patients' and relatives' experiences and perspectives of 'good' and 'not so good' quality care. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 33, 456 -- 466.

Burman, M.E., Hart, A.M., Conley, V., Brown, J., Sherard, P., Clarke, P.N. (2009). Reconceptualizing the core of nurse practitioner education and practice. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 21, 11-17.

Hart, A.M., Macnee, C. (2007). How well are NPs prepared for practice: Results from a 2004 survey. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 19, 35 -- 42.

Mantzoukas, S., Jasper, M. (2008). Types of nursing knowledge used to guide care of hospitalized patients. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 62, 3, 318-326.
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Nursing Is a Rewarding but

Words: 1153 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 88749711

If nursing students are being asked to absorb 30-40% more information during undergraduate years, it is logical to see that they do so early in their academic career -- almost as a prerequisite for more advanced practicum.

Then, of course, there is the matter of the learning curve in professional education. If one compares schooling for registered nurses with that of physician's assistants or physicians, one often sees a growing gap between the clinical abilities of nursing staff and actual patient care needs. This cause has been attributed to deficiencies in some skill sets of new graduates -- which has the effect of pushing nursing schools and curriculum toward more robust materials (Berkow, Virkstsis, Sewart, and Conway, 2008). However, is the solution simply adding more materials to memorize and read, or might it be more efficient to take a look at the time frame of the educational experience and ask…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Berkow, Virkstsis, Sewart, and Conway. (2008). Assessing New Graduate Nurse Performance. Journal of Nursing Administration, 38(11), 468-74.

Burritt and Steckel. (2009). Supporting the Learning Curve for Contemporary Nursing Practice. Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(11), 479-84.

Heller, Oros, and Durney-Crowley. (2009, July 30). The Future of Nursing Education: Ten Trends to Watch. Retrieved September 20, 2010, from http://www.nln.org/nlnjournal/infotrends.htm

Holzmer, W. (2006). Quality in Graduate Nursing Education. Nursing Education Perspectives, 26(4), 236-43.
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Nursing Research in Future Hallberg I R 2006

Words: 3307 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28418653

Nursing Research in Future

Hallberg, I.R. (2006). Challenges for future nursing research: Providing evidence for health-care practice. International Journal of Nursing Studies. 43: 923-927

Nursing research has become a question of practicality. Is it prudent for funding to go into Nursing research when there is so much funding getting cut from everything and anything that is involved in health care. This article goes into the usage of nursing research and examines its need for society, from both a sociological perspective, as well as a medical and health perspective. The idea is to get nursing research into a more mainstream type of environment in which its practicality is more valued and it can be seen as something that can be used in future studies outside of nursing.

Nursing research tends to lean more towards the qualitative side of research. Although this in itself has brought plenty of contribution into the medical…… [Read More]

Macnee, C.L. & McCabe, S. (2008). The role of research in nursing. In Understanding nursing research in evidence-based practice. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams, & Wilkens. 271-286.

Knowing the history of nursing research allows one to know that the challenges that currently faces it now have always been present. Its role within the health field has always been questionable because of its believed lack of applicability and practicality, and the use of it has always been determined practically non-existent. Having all this in mind, the future of this discipline in greatly discussed in this section and it is this that brings to mind its usefulness. If nursing research is compared head to that of a more scientific nature, or research conducted by medical doctors, than it could be viewed as coming in second, or lacking importance, but when reviewed by itself and broken down in terms of what it actually covers, nursing research can be as useful in any health discipline.

The challenges of nursing research in the future still does involve its lack of practicality and applicability, but since it is now shifting more towards health policy nature and it seems to have more practicality in the politics behind health care, that in itself has become the new challenge. Nursing research is being redefined to the point that it has lost what it once was. The way in which the nursing research being done now is conducted, its human side is being lost and more administrative applications are being put forth upon it. This is a challenge that has been overwhelming the discipline and having veterans of nursing research come face-to-face with what nursing research is slowly becoming. Having to enable this part of nursing research in order to redefine an entire concept has become something of concern that will only keep growing in the future. The challenges of nursing research can be defined as one of a constant battle.
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Nursing Mission and Philosophy Statements Finding the

Words: 1690 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44533713

Nursing Mission and Philosophy Statements

Finding the mission and philosophy statements of nursing programs is not complicated. They are generally listed on their websites so that students who are considering them can find what they are looking for. It is important to have a nursing school that matches well with a student's personal philosophy of nursing, so learning about several schools is a good idea. That helps the student make the right choice. Where LSU nursing school and UAB nursing schools are concerned, there are many differences in how the information is presented. Addressing these differences - as well as the similarities - is vital to form a clear understanding of the missions and philosophies of both schools.

One of the largest differences between the two schools is the length of their mission statements. The mission statement of LSU is much longer than the statement provided by UAB. The main…… [Read More]

References

Csokasy, J. (2009). Philosophical foundation of the curriculum. In D.M. Billings & J.J. Halstead (Eds.), Teaching in Nursing: A guide for faculty. (3rd ed.). (pp. 105-18). St. Louis, MO: Saunders-Elsevier.

Louisiana State University Nursing School (2011). Retrieved from  http://nursing.lsuhsc.edu/ 

University of Alabama. (2011). Retrieved from  http://www.uab.edu/nursing/
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Nursing Burnout Issue at a Facility

Words: 2669 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17877825

North Mountain Medical is a super sniff facility as they specialized in high acuity level patient. The patient structure is respiratory, with staff trained in tracheostomy care and ventilator management. In house hemodialysis, in house physical therapy. This facility has been in operation since 2004. Patients in this facility do not self-diagnose. Patient diagnoses are from Medical doctors and Nurse Practitioners that work on site. Patient in the facility are cared for by interdisciplinary team. Certified nursing assistants that care for patient will normally report a Change in patient’s condition to the nurse. Nurse completes an assessment and report changes immediately to the doctor. In the event of an emergency patients are send to emergency room for further evaluation and treatment. Health is a right in this facility. Yes, most of the patient’s life style has impacted the health of the patient. Noncompliance with medication regimen and diet changes. Patients…… [Read More]

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Nursing Shadow Experience

Words: 1911 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 17776892

As a student who had only just completed the first semester of the course, I had no experience with pediatric patients prior to the shadowing task. Thus, the nurse shadowing task was a rather exciting experience for me, exposing me to several new aspects of pediatric care (Burkitt et.al 2001). However, its most heart- rending element was congenital patient care – seeing babies being born with an illness was a rather touching experience.
While a few of my peers were fairly well- informed on the subject of pediatric care, I wasn’t. Most of the information I gleaned and things I saw in the course of my nurse shadowing assignment were new to me. The nurse practitioner I was tasked to shadow provided me with detailed information about appendicitis, which is apparently a widely- occurring pediatric issue and, at times, may take long to diagnose (Gaydos et.al 2005). Further, I gained…… [Read More]

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Nurse and Non-Nurse Leader Leadership

Words: 2188 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 21835166



Their leadership role deals with service to their clients, hence, they are their leadership role are similar in a way. However, they differ in that; Florence has the attribute of being autocratic, whereas Clinton is persuasive. Florence showed aspects of commanding whereas Clinton worked by means of winning the trust of others to support his initiative. Secondly, it is notable that nightingale is a nurse while Clinton is a politician. Additionally, they lived in different times, hence the level of development explains their difference in the way they approached issues. They both are holistic; however, Clinton is more open-minded as compared to Nightingale.

Self-analysis of myself as a leader

As a leader, a person works with a group. Therefore, the leadership skills that a person exercises should focus on establishing effective working relations and the environment. A quality leader has multidimensional traits, making him or her appealing and effective in…… [Read More]

References

Parakala, K. (2012). Leadership - the Clinton style. Retrieved from  http://www.itsmyascent.com/web/itsmyascent/career-advice/ -

/asset_publisher/W3x7/content/leadership-the-clinton-style

Yoder-Wise, P. (2011). Leading and managing in nursing (5th ed.). St. Louis, MO:

Elsevier. ISBN: 978-0-323-06977-9.
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Nursing & 8226 WHAT Type Organizational Culture Facilitate Innovative

Words: 612 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62116480

nursing •What type organizational culture facilitate innovative successful curriculum change?

There are almost as many different varieties of organizational cultures as there are different types of organizations, industries, and organizational objections. The type of organizational culture that is most likely to facilitate innovative and successful curriculum change -- which can be a "complex problem" (Mackenzie and Lawler, 1948, p. 273) -- is one which embraces change in general. Therefore, cultures in which transformational leadership theory is readily deployed and which value a dynamic, evolving organizational culture to account for the changes in the world and the way it operates today will most readily seek innovations in the way its curriculum changes.

There are some organizational cultures that are based on tradition, and which merely seek to continue doing processes as they have before. Advancements in technology and the trend towards globalization, as well as a number of different socio-economic factors…… [Read More]

References

Mackenzie, G.N., Lawler, M.R. (1948). Curriculum: change and improvement. Review of educational Research. 18(3), 273-281.
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Curriculum for Medical Training Intervention

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 24921450

Medical trauma triage management requires skillful curriculum development, which in turn depends on an assessment of needs and an anticipation of potential barriers to implementation. The initial needs assessment has revealed required resources of about four or five medical services providers such as physician assistants and nurse practitioners. Support personnel may be provided, but an additional challenge will arise when implementing the curriculum in a real world setting such as a trauma center, emergency room, or intensive care unit. Adequate space and time must be carved out for the curriculum implementation, without disturbing standard operating procedures. At the same time, improving trauma triage management will ultimately facilitate patient service delivery and maximize care outcomes, goals that should continually be communicated to the institutional administration as well as all participants in the program.

Each phase of the ADDIE model, an industry benchmark for curriculum development, "requires constant evaluation," (Allen, 2006, p.…… [Read More]

References

Allen, W.C. (2006). Overview and evolution of the ADDIE training system. Advances in Developing Human Resources 8(4): 430-441.

Bass, E.B. (n.d.). Step 1: Problem identification and general needs assessment.

Swanson, R.A. & Holton, E.F. (2009). Training and development practices. Chapter 12 in Foundations of Human Resource Development.
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Nursing Education Learning Styles

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94737000

Student success a - endeavor. The student give 100% instructor provide students a 100%. The student responsibility prepared learn material assigned, turn assignments time, pay attention taught discussed, questions needed.

I agree that the process of education is a dialogue, not a monologue. Although an educator may have a plan about what he or she wishes to teach, the teacher must respond to student input. The students may not understand the material in the manner in which it is initially presented; they may be bored or ill-prepared; they may have probing and unexpected questions; or they may have different learning styles.

Using different approaches is particularly essential in healthcare education, given that new scientific knowledge builds upon old knowledge. emediation is successful because it ensures students have knowledge of the foundational concepts early on, before the student becomes completely left behind. Given the nursing shortage the nation is facing, finding…… [Read More]

References

Smith, A. (2010). Learning styles of registered nurses enrolled in an online nursing program.

Journal of Professional Nursing, 26(1):49-53. doi: 10.1016/j.profnurs.2009.04.006.
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Curriculum for Healthcare

Words: 1185 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16741165

Curriculum Design

ISSUES AND TRENDS IN CURRICULUM DESIGN

The obj3ective of this study is to review and research issues and trends in curriculum design relating to healthcare and to elaborate on recommendations dealing with the issues and in view of the trends.

Gone are the days in education when the issues were simple and the lessons followed course since in today's society there are healthcare issues such as AIDS, premarital sex and needed birth control measures as well as other non-sexually related diseases including cancer and other health issues. The curriculum for healthcare education is a touchy issues because of the various religion, political, social, and familial values that exist in a diverse society with many races, ethnicities, and backgrounds. For this reason, the educator in healthcare must understand the volatile ground on which curriculum design may tread and the various view of parents, communities, as well as religious and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Albert LJ (2010) Curriculum Design: Finding a Balance. The Journal of Rheumatology. Retrieved from:  http://www.jrheum.com/subscribers/07/03/458.html 

McKimm, J. (nd) Curriculum Design and Development. Retrieved from:  http://www.faculty.londondeanery.ac.uk/e-learning/setting-learning-objectives/Curriculum_design_and_development.pdf 

Olsen, LK (1994) Trends and Issues in Health Education Curriculum. Liberty University. 1994. Department of Health Professions. Retrieved from:  http://digitalcommons.liberty.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1010&context=health_fac_pubs 

Stevenson, KR (201) Educational Trends Shaping School Planning, Design, Construction, Funding and Operation. National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities. Retrieved from:  http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED539457.pdf
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nursing critique of quantitative research

Words: 899 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90566073

health care centers (PHCC) in Stockholm County, 40 of them were randomly selected using an old-fashioned, non-probability method of basically drawing names from a hat. The author notes, "every PHCC was given a unique number that was written on a paper card and placed in a pot. For transparency, two colleagues independently drew 20 paper cards each, a total of 40." Of these 40, one declined to participate. Therefore, 39 PHCCs were selected, and one nurse from each PHCC served as contact person. The sample size is adequate and actually fairly large for the study. Although unconventional, bias was not introduced by using this method of sample selection, and the sample can be considered representative of the population given the randomness of the PHCC selection procedure. Eligibility criteria are also clearly identified, as the contact person nurse needed to comply with the study design, namely to distribute anonymous questionnaires to…… [Read More]

References

Sundborg, E.M., Saleh-Stattin, N., Wandell, P. & Tornkvist, L. (2012). Nurses' preparedness to care for women exposed to Intimate Partner Violence: a quantitative study in primary health care. BMC Nursing 11(1). Retrieved online:  http://bmcnurs.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1472-6955-11-1
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nursing manuscript revision edits

Words: 2291 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Paper #: 88457460

Manuscript Discussion

The Grade Experience of Online Nurse Practitioner Students Who Took More Than One Clinical Course Per Quarter

The shortage in primary care physicians has increased the demand for nurse practitioners (NPs). Online NP programs are of interest to working students with other personal and professional life demands. This study examines grade experience differences for students of an online NP program who took more than one clinical course per quarter (OCCPQ) as compared to those who did not take more than OCCPQ. This retrospective study consisted of 3,760 NP students who graduated between fall 2013 through spring 2016. Those who took more than OCCPQ had a greater percentage of clinical course failures at first attempt as compared to those who did not take more than OCCPQ (2.1% versus 0.8%, p=0.001). Multivariate logistic regression adjusting for relevant covariates maintained these results with increased odds for clinical course failures for those…… [Read More]

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Comparing Nurse Practice Acts

Words: 1444 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52660010

Nursing

The Nevada Nurse Practice Act is similar to the Indiana State Board of Nursing in that the two documents cover definitions of terms (such as Board of nurses, advanced practitioner, and accredited school). In addition to defining terms clearly to remove ambiguity in their application, the two documents also outline provisions for nurse practitioners and registered nurses.

The Indiana State Board of Nursing oversees nurse licensing, including issues related to education. Moreover, the State Board of Nursing in Indiana outlines the role of continuing education in the nursing profession. The Indiana State Board of Nursing's Licensure and Administrative ules include an administrative code for both registered and licensed practical nurses. Ancillary practices and areas of specialization are also included, such as nurse-midwives.

Number of members in the Indiana State Board of Nursing is something that is covered in the document related to licensure and administration. In IC 25-23-1-2, the…… [Read More]

REferences

Indiana State Board of Nursing (2005). Licensure Statutes and Administrative Rules

Nevada Nurse Practice Act.
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Reason for Choosing Nursing as a Career

Words: 838 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Admission Essay Paper #: 79705697

Nursing

Personal Statement

Choosing Nursing

My life has centered upon answering a central question. This question has been a in my mind since I was 10 years old. At that age, my first image of medicine was largely influenced by the doctors and nurses who were always helping my grandfather battle a rare form of brain cancer. His illness was a life changing experience for me, as, at that age, I watched his condition gradually deteriorate over a period of three months, and I detested I could do nothing to help. This thought, however painful then, has motivated my entire life, and has led to my choosing of nursing as a profession,

Though some did not approve of this particular career path, I never gave up my dreams. For this reason, I began studying and volunteering so as to combine education in theory with education in practice. Giving back to…… [Read More]

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Creative Nursing Leadership and Management

Words: 2704 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34142187

Nursing Theories Practices

Nursing Theories

Sister Callista oy initiated the Adaptation Model of Nursing in 1976. The theory has since then evolved to be one of the prominent nursing theories. The nursing theory defines and explains the nursing care provisions. The model by oy sees an individual as a composite of systems with an interrelationship (including biological, social, and psychological). According to Haaf (2008), a person strives towards retaining a balance across the systems and the outside world, although absolute balance levels do not exist. Individuals work towards living in unique bands that they can adequately cope. The model has four major concepts of environment, person, nursing, and health and its application has six steps.

According to Kraszeski & McEwen (2010), a person is a representation of societal standards, principles, or focus. oy's model positions the individual as the bio-psychosocial being throughout a continually changing environment. The person allows for…… [Read More]

References

Butts, J.B., & Rich, K., (2012). Nursing Ethics: Across the Curriculum and Into Practice. New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

Clark, C., (2008). Creative Nursing Leadership and Management. New York: Jones & Bartlett Learning

Clarke, V., & Walsh, A., (eds) (2009). Fundamentals of mental health nursing. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Cowen, M. Maier, P. Price, G. (2009). Study skills for nursing and healthcare students. Harlow: Pearson Longman.