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Nursing Intervention in Disaster the Possibility of
Words: 1365 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3266108
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Nursing Intervention in Disaster

The possibility of occurrence of disasters is a reality. With this in mind there should be efforts made to prevent any upcoming or potentially disastrous events. These efforts are what are known as disaster prevention. Disaster prevention therefore refers to efforts put in place to ensure that adverse effects of events that are potentially disastrous are prevented even when the disaster cannot be controlled. Disaster prevention is done at various levels of the society and is undertaken so as to prevent all types of disasters. Nurses are involved to a large extent when it comes to the prevention and mitigation of disasters. Nurses are involved in institutions that can influence change and due to the unique skills that they posses they can make interventions in disasters. To perform efficiently, a nurse must be always prepared to make changes in plan actions at any time and at…

References

Harden, E.G., (2004). The role of nursing in disasters. Retrieved march 22, 2013 from  http://helid.digicollection.org/en/d/Jdi018e/2.html 

Rittenmeyer, L., (2007). Disaster preparedness: Are you ready? Retrieved march 22,2013 from  http://www.nursingcenter.com/prodev/ce_article.asp?tid=726331 

Wolters Kluwer Health, (2007). LWW Journals - Beginning with A. Retrieved March 22, 2013, from  http://journals.lww.com/smajournalonline/fulltext/2007/09000/spiritual_issues_in_the_aftermath_of_disaster.32.aspx

Nursing Intervention
Words: 1138 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38934720
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Eating Right and Grtting Excercise in Prison
Introduction
Preventive care is the best care and one of the best methods of preventive medicine is physical activity—i.e., exercise (Loprinzi, 2015). That is because exercise keeps the body humming like a well-used vehicle: nothing gets rusty; muscles, organs, arteries, heart and lungs all work together to give the body what it needs. Can exercise alone address all health-related issues or prevent one from getting the influenza virus? No—but exercise is a good start because it can help keep the immune system operating at a high level. The body’s immune system is the first line of defense, and if it is weakened by lack of exercise, the flu virus could be far more devastating on a body. As Boergeling and Ludwig (2017) note, “the immune system needs to be delicately balanced between immune response and tolerance to protect the host from pathogens while…

Nursing and Health Breakdown Pre-Operative
Words: 1497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 9327391
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(Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007)

Assessment data is reported to enable the clear communication among clinicians about the wound and in making the provision for "continuity in the plan of care" as well as allowing for "evaluation of treatment modalities." (Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007) Wounds that are classified as red, yellow and black are those that require examination of deep tissue involvement. (Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007) The wound must be monitored during the healing process since monitoring provides the means of "checking the wound on a regular and frequent basis for "signs and symptoms that should trigger a full reassessment, such as increased wound exudate or bruising of the adjacent or periwound skin. Included in monitoring is the "gross evaluation for signs and symptoms of wound complications, such as erthema (change in color) or periwound skin and pus, which is indicative of infection." (Sussman and Bates-Jensen, 2007) Included as well should…

References

Aseptic Technique (2008) Aseptic Technique. Section G. NHS Foundation Trust. Online available at:  http://www.cht.nhs.uk/fileadmin/departments/infection_control/policies/Section_G_-_Aseptic_Technique_Issue_2.pdf 

Burney, R.E. et al. (1997) Core Outcomes Measures for Inguinal Hernia Repair. Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Vol. 185, Issue 6. Online available at:  http://www.journalacs.org/article/S1072-7515%2897%2900108-7/abstract 

Issues in Wound Care: Appropriate Use of Dressings. Report from a Wound Academy Expert Forum. Sponsored by the Molnlycke Health Care Wound Academy. September 2007. Online available at:  http://www.molnlycke.com/Global/Wound_Care_Products/UK/Wound%20Academy/IssuesAppropriateusefinalSept07.pdf 

Khan, Y. And Fitzgerald, P. And Walton, M. (1997) Assessment of the postoperative visit after routine inguinal hernia repair: A prospective randomized trial. Journal of Pediatric Surgery. Vol. 32, Issue 6. June 1997. Online available at:  http://www.jpedsurg.org/article/S0022-3468%2897%2990644-8/abstract

Nursing Clinical Placement Report -
Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94611128
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Studies suggest that more computerized order entry of medications helps reduce errors by limiting interpretation errors due to handwriting (Meadows, 2003). Thus more order entry is involving computers to protect patients. A culture that supports safety and safe practices has also been adopted to provide nursing staff and patients information about drug therapy and medication to ensure that everyone is aware of the need for safe practices when utilizing and dispensing medications.

Describe the strategies used to ensure nursing practice is performed within legal requirements and ethical frameworks

Nurses now "live and work in a world where there is no single reality but many coexisting realities among which they must choose" (Johnston, 1999:1). Given that through more and more nurses are forced to make legal and ethical decisions and take steps that will determine the best processes to adopt to ensure that moral and legal processes are adopted and followed.…

References

Campbell, D.W. & Sigsby, L.M. (1995). "Nursing interventions classification: A content analysis of nursing activities in public schools." Journal of Community Health Nursing, 12(4): 229.

Caretto, V.A. & McCormick, C.S. (1991). "Community as Client: A Hand's on experience for baccalaureate nursing students." Journal of Community Health Nursing, 8(3): 179.

Johnston, M.J. (1999). Bioethics: A nursing perspective. Sydney: Harcourt Saunders.

Lumby, J. & Picone, D. (2000). Clinical challenges: Focus on nursing. St. Leanords:

Nursing Case Study
Words: 1425 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 93800722
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Nursing Case Study

Managing a possible Case of Gastroenteritis: A Nursing Case Study

The effective delivery of optimal nursing care requires a comprehensive treatment plan that addresses both the patient's symptoms and the security of the immediate environment. This report presents a case study of appropriate evidence-based nursing practices in treating an elderly female patient presenting with abdominal discomfort in a residential care setting.

The client presents with new onset faecal incontinence, diarrhoea and increasing abdominal discomfort and cramps. These symptoms suggest a possible gastrointestinal disturbance (Crisp & Taylor, 2009) and present a number of possible diagnoses. While the client's nursing care plan indicates that she is normally continent, her confidential disclosure to the nurse suggests that her symptoms may be more prolonged. Another relevant client characteristic is her advanced age of 85 years.

The client's proximity to the dirty utility room in the aged care facility and the report…

References:

1. Crisp J, Taylor C. (2010). Potter & Perry's fundaments of nursing (3rd ed.). Chatswood, N.S.W.: Elsevier, Australia.

2. Kirk MD, Hall GV, Veitch MGK, Becker N. (2010). Assessing the ?incidence of gastroenteritis among elderly people living in long-term care facilities. Journal of Hospital Infection, 76, 12.

3. Australian Government: Department of Health and Ageing. (2007). Retrieved from- http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/content/icg-guidelinesindex.htm .

4. Andrew E, Simor MVD. (2010). Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of Clostridium difficile Infection in Long-Term Care Facilities: A Review. The-Americans Geriatric Societ, 58(8), 1557-1593.

Nursing Why Should Nurses Revise
Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: A-Level Outline Answer Paper #: 41683472
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Also, nurses can ignore patient advice as far as medical procedures are concerned because they obviously don't have the medical expertise to being advice on such matters (Street 2005). It is important that patient's are able to lend their discretion because every decision made by a medical staff member in their regard effects their life and ultimately their life as a whole (Street, 2005). A healthy relationship between patient and nurse yields positive outcomes and allowing patients to participate in their own care leads to a better relationship (Andrews 2008). Nurses need to keep in mind the balance that exists between letting patients participate and voice their opinions about their care and not allowing patients to dictate the entirety of their stay in the care facility.

Explain why patients do not wish to be actively involved in their care, and how nurses can help with this situation

Patients do not…

Reference List

Andrews M.M. And Boyle J. (2008). Transcultural Concepts in Nursing. England:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Street L.R., Gordon S.H., Ward M.M., Krupat E., & Kravitz L.R. (2005). Patient

Participation in Medical Consultations: Why Some Patients Are More Involved

Nursing Case Studies Thomas and
Words: 2380 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 69474902
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Cae plan

Nusing poblem 1: May's pain must be contained so she does not injue heself.

Because childen cannot always expess thei sensations of pain, thei pain may go unnoticed until it becomes sevee and fightening.

Nusing poblem 2: Vomiting and the possibility of choking.

Anxiety and pain can cause childen to vomit, making teatment of pain and administeing pope nutition difficult.

Nusing poblem 3: May is attempting to emove he oxygen mask.

A lack of knowledge on the pat of the child as to why cetain teatments ae administeed can esult in noncompliance.

Nusing poblem 4: The need fo social suppot when May's mothe is not pesent.

The unfamiliaity of the hospital envionment is exacebated by May's lack of paental cae.

Expected outcomes

Diagnosis 1: Pain management

Outcome: The FLACC: a behavioual scale fo scoing postopeative pain in young childen that can be helpful in detemining how to teat…

references

Almond, C. (1998). Children are not little adults. Australian Nursing Journal, 6(3), 27 -- 30.

Bruce, E., & Franck, L. (2000). Self-administered nitrous oxide (Entonox () for the management of procedural pain. Paediatric Nursing, 12(7), 15 -- 19.

Manworren R. & Hynan L.S (2003) Clinical validation of FLACC: preverbal patient pain scale. Paediatric Nursing 29(2):140-146.

McInerney, M. (2000). Paediatric pain. Pulse Information Sheet of Royal College of Nursing,

Nursing Critique Today's Nurses Have
Words: 2498 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 377117
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The data gathered is subjected to statistical analysis using statistical methods of linear regression and chi square testing.

The main purpose of the study was to confirm the hypothesis that consultation with CNS or RN in a drug-monitoring clinic has a significant positive impact on the well being of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study involved a single blinded randomized controlled trial over a period of three years. Subjects were chosen from the rheumatology out patient setting in a district general hospital with a drug monitoring service. A total of 71 subjects who were starting out on anti-rheumatic therapy were randomly assigned to either the interventional or the control group. While the interventional group was supervised by the CNS to assess patient needs (using Pendelton's framework) alongside drug safety evaluation, the control group was seen by an outpatient staff nurse purely for drug safety concerns. oth the groups were assessed…

Bibliography

Teri Britt Pipe; Kay E. Wellik; Vicki L. Buchda; Carol M. Hansen; Dana R. Martyn, 2005, "Implementing Evidence-Based Nursing Practice," Urol Nurs. 25(5): 365-370, Available at,  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/514532 

Ryan, S, Hassell, a.B, Lewis, M, & Farrell, a. (2006). Impact of a Rheumatology Expert Nurse on the well-being of patients attending a drug monitoring clinic. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 53(3), 277 -286.

Considine, J. & Botti, M. (2004) Who, when and where? Identification of patients at risk of an in-hospital adverse event: Implications for nursing practice. International Journal of Nursing Practice. 10: pp. 21-31

Other references

Nurse Case Manager Case Management in the
Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84835461
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Nurse Case Manager:

Case management in the nursing field is basically described as the functions and activities carried out by the nurse case manager within a specific care setting. In some cases, these functions and activities are usually performed by a self-governing practitioner, especially in private case management practices and community nursing facilities (Cohen & Cesta, 2005, p.278). Generally case management responsibilities are provided by the nurse case manager in acute care, primary care, home care, and managed care organizations. Nonetheless, these activities may be offered to particular patient populations and communities like the elderly. Some of the most case management activities include patient identification and intake, problem identification and assessment, patient outreach, development and implementation of plan of care, and coordination of care.

oles and Functions of Nurse Case Manager:

In acute care organizations, the roles and functions of the nurse case manager includes coordinating the care provided to…

References:

Blancett, S.S. & Flarey, D.L. (2006). Case studies in nursing case management: health care delivery in a world of managed care. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen Publishers, Inc.

Cohen, E.L. & Cesta, T.G. (2005). Nursing case management: from essentials to advanced practice applications (4th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Meadows, P. (2009, January). Community Health Nursing. American Journal of Nursing,

109(19). Retrieved from  http://journals.lww.com/ajnonline/fulltext/2009/01001/community_health_nursing.5.aspx

Nursing Role Chronically Ill and
Words: 1130 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 53422951
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[Roberta S. Rehm]. Thus, the need for nurses to upgrade their skills in handling assistive technical gadgets becomes more pronounced. The most frustrating and stressful situation for parents is when school authorities fail to show an active interest in the needs and care requirements of the technologically dependent children. Here again, school nurses, as health care deliverers in the school, can exhibit a proactive approach. Increased parent- nurse rapport is one way to reduce the parental concern for children with special needs. Clearly, nurses are central in delivering quality medicare for dependant children and in promoting it in the school setting. They have to play a coordinated role with parents and school administration to ensure that required level of care is delivered to the dependent children. [Roberta S. Rehm]

It needs to be highlighted here that schools nurses may not be always available as in many cases they are entrusted…

Bibliography

Barbara A Montagnino, Rizalina V Mauricio, "The Child with a Tracheostomy and Gastrostomy: Parental Stress and Coping in the Home -- A Pilot Study," Pediatric Nursing, Sept 2004 v30, p373

Roberta S. Rehm, "Creating a Context of Safety and Achievement at School for Children who are Medically Fragile / Technology dependant," Advances in Nursing Science, March 2002, v24, p71

3) Louis Dixon, "Tracheostomy: Easing The Transition From Hospital to Home," Accessed on 23rd Oct 2005, available at  http://www.perspectivesinnursing.org/v1n3/dixon.html

Nursing and Its Objective
Words: 2470 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37429490
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Nursing Objectives

By synthesizing knowledge from the natural and behavioral sciences, as well as the humanities, into nursing practice, a nurse can provide much more value when it comes to the proper level of care for all patients (Fitzpatrick & Kazer, 2011). In order for nurses to synthesize the knowledge from all of these areas, though, nurses must first obtain this knowledge. One of the best ways to do that is through continuing education. Nurses who go back to school to obtain bachelor's degrees and higher are helping themselves, but they are also helping their current and future patients (Judd, 2009). It is generally never a bad thing to gain knowledge, and being good at nursing is more than just focusing on the physical aspects of patient care. There is also a significant mental aspect of the career.

With that in mind, nurses must learn more than just nursing skills.…

References

Fitzpatrick, J.J. & Kazer, M. (eds.). (2011). Encyclopedia of nursing research (3rd ed). NY: MacMillan.

Longe, J. (ed.). (2013). Gale Encyclopedia of Nursing and Allied Health. NY: Gale Group.

D'Antonio, P. (2010). American nursing: A history of knowledge, authority, and the meaning of work. NY: Penguin.

Judd, D. (2009). A history of American nursing: Trends and eras. NY: Macmillan.

Nursing -- Issues in Aging
Words: 615 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33544213
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Similarly, calorie restriction is known to be associated with longevity, but studies documenting the benefits of calorie-restricted diets in terms of longevity suggest that those benefits require long-term lifestyle changes whose benefits would be difficult to duplicate in the much shorter term (Yates, Djousse, Kurth, et al., 2008). Nevertheless, volumes of empirical contemporary research confirm the health benefits of ideal weight maintenance, reduction in body fat, and reduction of triglycerides, blood glucose concentrations, and blood pressure through dietetic changes consistent with the types of dietary norms detailed in the video (Yates, Djousse, Kurth, et al., 2008).

The video also provides independent anecdotal confirmation of empirical data documenting the tremendous importance of maintaining moderate levels of physical activity in the later years and of maintaining a purpose to life, such as productive work or other forms of community involvement (Yates, Djousse, Kurth, et al., 2008). Moreover, the video also confirms the…

Reference

Yates, L.B., Djousse, L., Kurth, T., Buring, J.E., and Gaziano, J.M. "Exceptional

longevity in men: modifiable factors associated with survival and function to age

90 years." Archives of Internal Medicine. Vol. 168, No. 3; (2008): 284 -- 290.

Nursing Theory Practice Setting Provide an Overview
Words: 1696 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85539740
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nursing theory practice setting.

Provide an overview of the theory

Myra Estrin Levine is known as the most important Nursing theorist for developing "The Conservation Model." Levine got a diploma in 1944 and obtained her B.S in 1949 and finished M.S.N in 1962 from Wayne State College. She acted as a specialist to healthcare facilities and colleges of nursing. Furthermore, she offered a teaching format for the medical or surgical sector of nursing and developed "The 4 Conservation Fundamentals." "She clearly connected wellness to the procedure of conservation design and viewed wellness as one of its necessary elements" (Levine, 1991).

The 3 significant ideas of the Conservation Model are 1) wholeness, 2) adaption, and 3) conservation. "Whole, wellness, hale all are sourced from the Anglo-Saxon word hal" (Levine, 1973, p. 11). Myra Levine formulated her take of wholeness as an open system, which meant checking out the components of the…

References

Alligood, Martha Raile (2010). Nursing theory: Utilization and application. Toronto: Mosby Elsevier.

Chinn, P.L., & Kramer, M.K. (2011). Integrated knowledge development in nursing (8th ed.). St. Louis: Mosby.

Current Nursing (2010). Levine's four conservation principles. Retrieved from  http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/Levin_four_conservation_principles.html .

Levine, M.E. (1973). Introduction to Clinical Nursing (2nd Ed.). Philadelphia F.A. Davis.

Nursing Research Critique Provision of Acute Nursing
Words: 821 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 70560215
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Nursing esearch Critique

Provision of acute nursing care is impacted by complex needs of hospitalized patients suffering from dementia. Despite of the gains that have been made in the realms of medical care, older adults have had to contend with progressive cognitive decline, functional decline, and challenging behaviors that impact the quality of their lives. Quality of life of patients suffering from dementia is further eroded by suboptimal healthcare. Elderly patients suffering from dementia are at risk group because the healthcare providers lack understanding of the etiology of the cognitive impairment and misrepresentation of the condition (Joosse, Palmer & Lang, 2013).

The purpose for carrying out the research is explicitly stated. The research seeks to address the challenges in providing care to hospitalized patients suffering dementia and delirium superimposed on dementia. The research also seeks to outline nursing assessments, problem identification, and interventions for dementia and delirium that can promote…

References List

Joosse, L.L., Palmer, D. & Lang, N.M. (2013). Caring for the Elderly Patients with Dementia:

Nursing Interventions. Nursing: Nursing Research Reviews, 3, 107-117.

Nursing Two Practice Concepts Specific to Nursing
Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63031424
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Nursing

Two practice concepts specific to nursing:

Culturally-informed care for the 'person' and 'environment'

Two practice concepts specific to nursing:

Culturally-informed care for the 'person' and 'environment'

As a clinical nurse specialist (CNS), an advanced practice nurse "whose care focuses on a specific patient population," the concept of multicultural care is integral to my daily practice (CNS, 2011, career overview). "A CNS can specialize in certain types of diseases (such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease), can work in many different medical environments (such as operating room, emergency room or critical care), and can focus on a variety of procedures (such as surgical or clinical)" (CNS, 2011, career overview). egardless of the specialty of the CNS the care he or she dispenses must be culturally appropriate and take into consideration the patient's daily environment. A CNS must often be even more conscious of the social implications of nursing care than nurses…

References

Clinical nurse specialist (CNS). (2011). Career overview. Retrieved March 5, 2011 at  http://www.allnursingschools.com/nursing-careers/clinical-nurse-specialist/cns 

Diabetes and women's health. (2011). Centers for Disease control (CDC).

Retrieved March 5, 2011 at  http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/women/index.htm 

Nursing theories: An overview. (2011, March 1). Current Nursing. Retrieved March 5, 2011 at  http://www.currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/nursing_theories_overview.html

Nursing Supervised Smoking Cessation Plan
Words: 2766 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4187897
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Developmental perspective was the concept that the nursing students participating in this study were typically younger than they patients they were caring for. This made it difficult for them to ask the "older" patient questions about a lifestyle they had been practicing for many years.

Environmental constraints were noted that prevented the participants in the study from fully implementing best practice guidelines. The primary of which was time. They noted that because of other duties and paper keeping requirements, they had little time to properly present the best practice guidelines. Some noted that they had little time to do expected things such as breathing, much less introduce the patient properly to best practice guidelines.

During their third year of training the nurses were introduced to a comprehensive program concerning cigarettes and cessation programs. In addition they had already been taught more efficient time management training. With these new tools they…

10) Sanders, D., Fowler, G., Mant, D., Fuller, a., Jones, L., & Marziller, j.

Randomized controlled trial of anti-smoking advice by nurses in General practice. Journal of the Royal College of General

Practitioners, 1989, 39, pp 273-276.

Creative Nursing Leadership and Management
Words: 2704 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34142187
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Nursing Theories Practices

Nursing Theories

Sister Callista oy initiated the Adaptation Model of Nursing in 1976. The theory has since then evolved to be one of the prominent nursing theories. The nursing theory defines and explains the nursing care provisions. The model by oy sees an individual as a composite of systems with an interrelationship (including biological, social, and psychological). According to Haaf (2008), a person strives towards retaining a balance across the systems and the outside world, although absolute balance levels do not exist. Individuals work towards living in unique bands that they can adequately cope. The model has four major concepts of environment, person, nursing, and health and its application has six steps.

According to Kraszeski & McEwen (2010), a person is a representation of societal standards, principles, or focus. oy's model positions the individual as the bio-psychosocial being throughout a continually changing environment. The person allows for…

References

Butts, J.B., & Rich, K., (2012). Nursing Ethics: Across the Curriculum and Into Practice. New York: Jones & Bartlett Publishers

Clark, C., (2008). Creative Nursing Leadership and Management. New York: Jones & Bartlett Learning

Clarke, V., & Walsh, A., (eds) (2009). Fundamentals of mental health nursing. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

Cowen, M. Maier, P. Price, G. (2009). Study skills for nursing and healthcare students. Harlow: Pearson Longman.

Analyzing Nursing Leadership and Management Field Experience
Words: 2697 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 31541505
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Nursing Leadership and Management and Field Experience

Nursing Leadership and Management Field Experience

Problem Identification

The problem identified concerns about patient safety and satisfaction arising out of shortage in nurse staffing. In the contemporary times, staffing has become a major issue concerning nurses, generally, and in this paper we attend to the issue in outpatient clinical settings. This problem of under-staffing of nurses has assumed significant importance and needs to urgent attention, as it has an influence on the satisfaction of the patients and more significantly their safety. An outpatient clinic cannot run if the patients have no desire or wish to go there. In addition, it becomes hazardous in risking the lives of the patients. The purpose of this research is to research the cause of understaffing on outpatient clinics together with the influences it has on patient safety and care. Additionally, the project encompasses examining the perspective of…

References

Gardner, J., & Walton, J. (2011). Striving to Be Heard and Recognized: Nurse Solutions for Improvement in the Outpatient Hemodialysis Work Environment. Nephrology Nursing Journal, 38(3), 239-253 15p.

Haas, S. A. (2016). Developing Staffing Models to Support Population Health Management and Quality Outcomes in Ambulatory Care Settings. Nursing Economic$, 34(3), 126-13

Halbesleben, Jonathon, Bonnie Wakefield, Douglas Wakefield, and Lynn Cooper. "Western Journal of Nursing Research." Western Journal of Nursing Research. 30(5) (2008): 560-577.

Kalisch, B., Tschannen, D., & Hee Lee, K. (2012). Missed nursing care, staffing, and patient falls. Journal of Nursing Care Quality, 27(1), 6-12.

What Are the Asthma Nurse Interventions
Words: 1144 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63549647
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asthma and the methods of prevention. The writer explores the interventions that nurses can use to help patients avoid being hospitalized. The writer also discusses preventative measures that nurses can use to educate their patients who have asthma. There were five sources used to complete this paper.

To the uninitiated, asthma is a common chronic disorder of the airways, resulting in recurrent attacks of breathlessness, generally accompanied by wheezing, chest tightness and cough. It predominantly affects five per cent of the adult population and 10-15 per cent of children (Anadarajah, 2000)."

In the medical profession, nurses are often charged with the intervention and education of their patients. People who have asthma are often looking for ways to avoid hospitalization for their asthma. Being hospitalized can interfere with school schedules, work schedules and other life events. Asthma is a chronic condition and without proper care and treatment patients can begin to…

References

Medicine for the mind; Meditation has never been more popular - and not just as a stress- buster. Research shows it can also lower blood pressure and help to fight disease. JULIA STUART meets some converts.(Features)

McKesson Corporation's Asthma Disease Management Program Cuts Hospitalizations by 35% for Children and Adolescents.

Your Article:

Failure to follow doctors' orders costs nation's economy big-time.(Flair)

Nursing in the Rural Area a Well-Deserved
Words: 2307 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32606725
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Nursing in the Rural Area

A WELL-DESERVED SECOND LOOK

Rural nurses are particularly endangered by the current and worsening shortage in nurses. As it is, rural nursing is already beset with issues that range from a lack of professional practice system, the need for larger incentives for nurses to work in the rural areas, a general unwillingness to live in these areas among the nurses and the foreseen depletion of the supply of rural nurses. Possible solutions and approaches have been proposed.

Approximately 20% or 54 million U.S. residents live in locations categorized as rural (ushy, 2006). These residents are distributed across 80% of the nation's total land area. About 99 or fewer residents occupy every square mile in these areas and experience the shortage of nurses more acutely than in urban areas. Moreover, they have generally lower annual income, less education and poorer health status than urban residents. Local…

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Arnaert, A. et al. (2009). Homecare nurses' attitudes towards palliative care in a rural community in western Quebec. 11 (4) Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing:

Medscape. Retrieved on October 17, 2011 from  http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/715133 

Blaauw, D. et al. (2010). Policy interventions. World Health Organization. Retrieved on October 18, 2011 from  http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/88/5/09-072918/en 

Bushy, A (2006). Nursing in rural and frontier areas: issues, challenges and opportunities. Vol 7 # 1 Harvard Health Policy Review: University of Harvard.

Nursing Shortage Review on Nurses Shortage the
Words: 2703 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86492519
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Nursing Shortage

eview On Nurses Shortage

The supply of professional nurses relative to the increase in demand for their services has been on a general decline over the years. As a career choice, nursing has been facing perennial shortage of professionals. Most healthcare organizations will affirm that their daunting tasks were recruiting fresh nurses and retaining the ones already in practice. The 2008 projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed that the demand for professional nurses would increase from the then two million to three million, which represents sixty percent increment. In ideal situations, the number of those who have enrolled in nursing will be sufficient to supply the rise in their number. Nevertheless, this would not be the case if nothing were done to salvage the worrying trend of most students not graduating or resorting to other careers. According to Benjamin Isgur of PWHC Health and esearch Institute,…

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009, September, 28). Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet. USA: AACN.

Buerhaus, P.I., Staiger, D., & Auerbach, D.I. (2009). The future of the nursing workforce in the United States: Data, trends, and implications. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Blakeley, J., & Ribeiro, V. (2008). Early Retirement among Registered Nurses: Contributing Factors. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(1), 29 -- 37

Cummings, G., et al. (2008). The Relationship between Nursing Leadership and Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Canadian Oncology Work Environments. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(5), 508 -- 518.

Nurse Training in Cardiac Procedures
Words: 9322 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74651339
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The procedure itself and the hospital stay associated with it is only one small chapter in the patient's life. They will eventually go home and will have many years after the procedure. It is important for the nursing staff to make a positive impact on how they feel about the procedure. The procedure will represent a lasting memory to the patient. If the patient perceives this to be a time of strength and care from nurturing individuals then it will help them to be able to develop the coping mechanisms necessary to learn to live with the after-effects of the procedure.

If the patient sees this as a negative experience, then it could produce unwanted effects such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, or other emotional problems that could have an effect on their ability to cope with the life changes. Those that develop appropriate coping mechanisms will be more likely…

References

Knoll, N., Rieckmann, N., & Schwarzer, R. (2005). Coping as a mediator between personality and stress outcomes: A longitudinal study with cataract surgery patients. European Journal of Personality, 19, 229-247.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2004). Initiation and maintenance of physical exercise: Stage-specific effects of a planning intervention. Research in Sports Medicine, 12, 221-240.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2004). Behavioral intentions and action plans promote physical exercise: A longitudinal study with orthopedic rehabilitation patients. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 26, 470-483.

Lippke, S., Ziegelmann, J.P., & Schwarzer, R. (2005). Stage-specific adoption and maintenance of physical activity: Testing a three-stage model. Psychology of Sport & Exercise, 6, 585-603.

Nurse Satisfaction in Magnet Hospitals Which Three
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Nurse Satisfaction in Magnet Hospitals

Which three databases will you use?

CINAHL

Academic Search

Nursing & Allied Health Collection

Search each database, using key words, for relevant research on this subject. What key words did you use in the Search Strategy fields? Include all attempts and limitations used to refine your search.

Magnet hospital

Nurse + contentment

Nurses + satisfaction

Report the number of citations identified from each database in the number of articles found field.

,200; 15,01; 15,991

,000; 29,000; 29,000

562,000; 526,000; 499,000

Select one article from a peer-reviewed nursing journal published within the last three years -- or a germinal article which may contain an earlier publication date -- and provide the citation in APA format.

Lavoie-Tremblay, M., Paquet, M., Marchionni, C., & Drevniok, U. (2011). Turnover Intention among New Nurses, Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 27, 39-45

Answer the following questions using your selected research…

Nurse Theorist the Roy Adaption Model
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Nursing Theorist: Sr. oy Adaptation Model

The oy Adaptation model for Nursing had its beginning when Sister Callista oy happened to get admitted in the Masters Program of pediatric nursing in the University of California, Los Angeles, in the year 1964. At that time, Sr. Callista was familiar with the idea of 'adaptation' in nursing, and it must be mentioned that Sr. Callista's adviser at that time was Dorothy E. Johnson, who believed firmly in the need to define nursing as a means of focusing the development of knowledge, for the practice of nursing. When Sr. Callista oy started working with children in the pediatric ward of the hospital, she was quite impressed with the basic resiliency of the small children who had been admitted into the wards for treatment. This was why when the first seminar in pediatric nursing was called for; Sr. Callista oy proposed that the basic…

REFERENCES

"Callista Roy's Adaptation Model" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/callistaroy Accessed 28 October, 2005

'Case Study" Retrieved From

http://www.geocities.com/ninquiry2002/casestudy.html Accessed 28 October, 2005

Nursing Admin Controlling
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Nursing Administration -- Controlling

Nursing Admin-Controlling

Situation analysis

The FOCUS model requires the nursing administrator to find out what the main problem is, obtain information about this problem, communicate effectively with the nurses and patient, understand the needs of the nurses and the patient, and finally summarize these findings for the patient and nurses Dlugacz, 2009.

In this scenario, the process to be improved is responsiveness and willingness of the nurses to help the patient's situation.

Using the FOCUS model, the nursing leader should identify and clearly define the problem. To do this, they must recognize the role of the patient and the nurses in the situation and prioritize the potential improvements in the process Kreitner, 2008.

They also need to draft this problem statement in a clear way. The problem statement for this scenario is that the nurses feel inadequate in responding to the situation where the patient needs…

References

Dlugacz, Y.D. (2009). Value-Based Health Care: Linking Finance and Quality. New York: Wiley.

Kleespies, P.M., & Association, A.P. (2009). Behavioral Emergencies: An Evidence-Based Resource for Evaluating and Managing Risk of Suicide, Violence, and Victimization. Washington, D.C., DC: American Psychological Association.

Kreitner, R. (2008). Management. Mason, OH: Houghton Mifflin Company.

Zun, L.S., Chepenik, L.G., & Mallory, M.N.S. (2013). Behavioral Emergencies for the Emergency Physician. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.

Nursing Model Theory Application a Nurse's
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"From an historical standpoint, her concept of nursing enhanced nursing science this has been particularly important in the area of nursing education." ("Virginia Henderson's Need...," 2008) Principles of Henderson's theory, published in numerous primary nursing textbooks utilized from the 1930s through the 1960s, along with principles embodied by the 14 activities continue to prove vital in evaluating nursing care in thee21st century, not only in cases such as Keri's, but in a myriad of others benefiting from nursing.

eferences

Kearney, Kathleen M., the Nurse's Duty to eport Child Abuse vs. The Attorney's Duty of Confidentiality: The Nurse Attorney's Dilemma Journal of Nursing Law. Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.; January 25, 2007. etrieved September 25, 2007, at http://ssrn.com/abstract=1256366.

esuggan, ay N;PN;MN. (Last Modified: August 17, 2008). "Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info. etrieved September 25, 2007, from: http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm.

Singleton, Joanne K. "Nurses' perspectives of encouraging clients' care-of-self in a short-term rehabilitation unit within…

References

Kearney, Kathleen M., the Nurse's Duty to Report Child Abuse vs. The Attorney's Duty of Confidentiality: The Nurse Attorney's Dilemma Journal of Nursing Law. Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc.; January 25, 2007. Retrieved September 25, 2007, at  http://ssrn.com/abstract=1256366 .

Resuggan, Ray RN;RPN;MRN. (Last Modified: August 17, 2008). "Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info. Retrieved September 25, 2007, from: http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm.

Singleton, Joanne K. "Nurses' perspectives of encouraging clients' care-of-self in a short-term rehabilitation unit within a long-term care facility," Rehabilitation Nursing, January 1, 2000. Retrieved September 25, 2007, from:  http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P348282208.html .

Trail Ross, Mary Ellen. (1993). "Linking Ethical Principles With Community Practice." Journal of Community Health Nursing, Vol. 10. Retrieved September 25, 2007, at  http://www.questia.com/read/95780716?title=Linking%20Ethical%20Principles%20W%20Community%20Practice .

Nursing With the Intention of
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This is one of the many reasons I look forward to being able to work within my own community. Nurses are at the forefront of community outreach and community betterment. As I get to know the local physicians, administrators, and program leaders, I can become a more effective member of the health care community.

In the future I intend to serve my community in a position of leadership, as a coordinator for healthcare services. I want to apply family systems theory to my nursing practice, because I see a growing demand for more collaborative methods of intervention that support rather than deny the role of family systems. With a great sensitivity to diversity in terms of religion and culture, I will be of great service to the local patient population.

While with the Post Masters Nurse Practitioner Program, I will improve my communications and networking skills because I believe in…

Nursing Science the Nursing Profession
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As such, a nurse is primarily to recognize herself as an individual in the world, with certain responses to this world. When a patient enters the hospital, such a patient is also to be seen as a unique individual who responds to the world and his or her environment in a certain way.

Humanistic nursing is then primarily experiential rather than experimental. This means that new knowledge is gained with every new patient that arrives for treatment. In giving treatment, responses are observed and noted for future reference in similar situations. It is not however assumed that a treatment will work because it did in the past and in similar conditions. Instead, hypotheses are based upon experiences of the past. The recognition that hypotheses may prove incorrect helps the nurse to be open to new experiences. Each human being is then seen as a "world," as it were, with the…

Sources

Cody, William K. & Kenney, Janet W. (2006). Philosophical and Theoretical Perspectives for Advanced Nursing Practice. Jones & Bartlett.

Collaboration for Academic Education in Nursing. (2009). Foundational Perspectives.  http://www.caen.ca/content/view/46/133/ 

Current Nursing (2009, March 16). Nursing Theories. http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/development_of_nursing_theories.htm

Kleinman, Susan (2009). Humanistic Nursing Theory.  http://www.humanistic-nursing.com/faq.htm

Nursing Law and Ethics Name
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The death of a child is significant and in this case avoidable and a plaintiff has the right to seek compensatory damages as is allowed by law.

Case Study 1 Part B

At the end of the night shift, Nurse Brown took a verbal handover and then noticed the observation chart had not been filled in. To assist her friend, Nurse Harvey, whom she knew had a busy night, filled in the observation chart and fluid balance chart for the hours from 0200-0600 hrs.

Overcome by the events of the last 24 hrs, Nurse Harvey and Nurse Brown go to the local tavern for a few drinks before Nurse Harvey goes on duty. They discussed Mr. Spencer and his son. John, a friend of Mr. Spencer, overheard the conversation and joined them. He was also upset by the events of the day and was most keen to discuss the accident…

References

Hall, J. (1960). General Principles of Criminal Law (2nd ed.). Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill.

Markesinis, B.S., & Deakin, S.F. (1999). Tort Law (4th ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press.

ANCI Competency Standards for the Enrolled Nurse at http://www.anmc.org.au/docs/Publications/Competency%20standards%20EN.pdf

Scope of Nursing Practice Decision Making Framework, 2006 at  http://www.nursingboardtas.org.au/nbtonline.nsf/attachment/SoPDMFFinal/$File/Scope%20of%20Nursing%20Practice%20Decision%20Making%20Framework.pdf

Nursing Retention it Is True
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It is thus possible for the institution to retain nurses by strengthening the interpersonal leadership and management skills that lead to empowerment within the healthcare environment. This is especially supported by studies that found that despite the fact that a nurses' pay is important, it is not as critical in enhancing retention as a positive work place or an empowered environment that promotes teamwork and encourages ongoing learning, trust, and respect. (Chan, 2001).

It must always be remembered that nursing retention is the result of a combination of factors. There is no easy solution, and managers and leaders need to choose the combination of approaches that will be effective in their specific organization, since there is no one range or combination of strategies that will fit all.

eferences

Buerhaus, P., Staiger, D.O. & Auerbach, D.I. (2003) Is the Current Shortage of Hospital Nurses Ending? Health Affairs 22: 191-198.

Chan, C.C.A.…

References

Buerhaus, P., Staiger, D.O. & Auerbach, D.I. (2003) Is the Current Shortage of Hospital Nurses Ending? Health Affairs 22: 191-198.

Chan, C.C.A. (2001). Implications of organizational learning for nursing managers from the cultural, interpersonal and systems thinking perspectives. Nursing Inquiry, 8(3), 196-199.

Faulkner, J., & Laschinger, H. (2008). The effects of structural and psychological empowerment on perceived respect in acute care nurses. Journal of Nursing Management. 16(2): 214-221.

Kanter, R.M. (1979). Power failure in management circuits. Harvard Business Review, 65-75.

Nursing Elizabeth Kerr Porter Elizabeth Kerr Porter
Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78113810
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Nursing

Elizabeth Kerr Porter

Elizabeth Kerr Porter "was a leader in nursing education and an advocate for nurses' rights," (ANA 2011). Porter advocated for nurses' labor rights in terms of the right to collective bargaining and professional organization. Her work helped improve working conditions for nurses and also lobbied against racial discrimination in the nursing professions. Porter served for many years as the president of the American Nurses Association and also as the Dean of the nursing graduate degree program at Case Western eserve University. Therefore, Elizabeth Kerr Porter promoted the interests of nursing education, enhanced the image of the profession, and also championed the labor rights interests of professional nurses.

Dorothea Dix

Dorothea Dix worked as both an educator and a nurse, but never actually combined her two careers. Dix devoted most of her career to raising awareness about mental illness. Dix advocated for the humane treatment of both…

References

American Nurses Association (ANA 2011). Elizabeth Kerr Porter. Retrieved online:  http://www.nursingworld.org/ElizabethKerrPorter 

Buckwalter, K.C. & Church, O.M. (2009). Euphemia Jane Taylor: An Uncommon Psychiatric Nurse. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care 17(3):125-131

Bumb, J. (n.d.). Dorothea Dix. Retrieved online:  http://www.webster.edu/~woolflm/dorotheadix.html 

Lewis, J.J. (n.d.). Clara Barton biography. About.com. Retrieved online:  http://womenshistory.about.com/od/bartonclara/a/clara_barton.htm

Nursing Theory Nursing Is a
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A person's health is an ever-changing state of being resulting from the interaction with the environment. Optimum health is the actualization of both innate and obtained human potential gained through rewarding relationships with others, obtaining goals and maintaining expert personal care. Adaptations can be made as required to maintain stability and structural integrity. A person's state of health can vary from wellness to illness, disease, or dysfunction. Professional nursing is founded on the need to promote wellness practices, the attentive treatment of persons who are acutely or chronically ill or dying, and restorative care of patients during convalescence and rehabilitation. It also includes the education and measurement of those who perform or are learning to perform nursing responsibilities, the support and communication of research to enhance knowledge and practice, and the management of nursing in healthcare delivery systems. Nursing practice centers on the application of a body of knowledge in…

Johnston, N., Rogers, M., Cross, N. And Sochan, a.(2007) Global and planetary health:

teaching as if the future matters. Nursing Education Perspectives 26(3), 152

Nyatanga, L. (2005) Nursing and the philosophy of science. Nurse Education Today 25(8), 670-675

Nursing Philo
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Nursing Philosophy

Concept Synthesis on Personal Nursing Philosophy

Nursing Autobiography

My interest in nursing peaked at an early age when I attended Clara Barton High School for health professions in Brooklyn NY and graduated in 1991. I first worked as a nurse's aide and home health aide for about two years and found this position to be quite rewarding. I subsequently moved to North Carolina where I took the CNA course in 1995 and began working as a CNA at various nursing homes and hospitals in the regional area. My experience as a CNA certainly helped me in my journey and provided the foundation for the later developments in my career.

Later I moved to Las Vegas in 1997 where I got married in 1998. After forming this union I went back to school for my BSN in 2002 while working as a CNA. I finished my BSN from Nevada…

Works Cited

Andrews, H., & Roy, C. (1991). The Adaptive Model. Norwalk: Appleton and Lange.

Denler, H., Wolters, C., & Benzon, M. (2013). Social Cognitive Theory. Retrieved from Education:  http://www.education.com/reference/article/social-cognitive-theory/ 

Farlex. (2011). The Medical Dictionary. Retrieved from Farlex:  http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/adaptation+model 

Nursing Theory. (2011). Sister Callista Roy. Retrieved from Nursing Theory:  http://nursing-theory.org/nursing-theorists/Sister-Callista-Roy.php

Nurse Patient Ratios
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Nurse Patient atios and Quality of Care

This study reviews the broad level of issues that surround the nurse/patient ratio: a critical shortage of trained and experienced nurses; increased political and fiscal demands from all sectors of society; rising costs internally and externally combined with a rising number of under-insured; and the conundrum of nursing ethics and the ability to foster excellence in care and patient advocacy. We note that there remains an issue about hiring more nurses -- where will these nurses come from if the nursing schools do not increase their recruitment efforts and broaden their curriculum. In addition, we note that the large majority of patients and stakeholders primarily want two things when admitted to a healthcare facility: better paid nurses and more highly-trained professionals who are satisfied with their vocation.

Introduction

Modern nursing is, by necessity, a mixture of complex balance: patient care vs. staffing; procedures…

REFERENCES

More Nurses Make the Difference. (February 2012). The Lamp. 69 (1): Retrieved from: http://search.informit.com/au/documentSummary;dn=045435426132502;res=IELHEA

Safe Nurse Staffing: Looking Beyond the Numbers. (2009). Vantage Point, CNA. Retrieved from: https://www.nso.com/pdfs/db/newsletters/Safe_Nurse_Staffing_-_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_20094.pdf?fileName=Safe_Nurse_Staffing_ -_Looking_Beyond_the_Raw_Numbers_2009-pdf&folder=pdfs/db/newsletters

Aiken, L. (2001). The Hospital Nurse Workforce: Problems and Prospects."Draft

For the Council on the Economic Impact of Health System Change. Retrieved from: http://council.brandeis.edu/pubs/hospstruct  / Council-Dec-14-2001-Aiken-paper.pdf

Nursing Changes in Nursing Discuss
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In what ways did the wave of the nursing shortage in the 1980's and in 2000 support or constrain theoretical thinking? Why? Are there ways to influence the cycle of shortage and theoretical thinking? Identify one nursing theorist that would support your discussion/views. Provide rationale for selection of theorist.

Nursing shortages have been a problem in this country for a long time. It has been found that because of these shortages there needed to be a better way to incorporate theoretical thinking into nursing education so that nurses are better prepared to be the best that they can be. The accomplishment of critical thinking abilities has been recognized as an essential product of undergraduate nursing teaching. It has been found that nursing scholars learn best by way of experiential education. Kolb's experiential learning theory is the basis for a practice incorporation technique intended to offer critical thinking skills in undergraduate…

References

Experiential Learning (Kolb). (2008). Retrieved September 30, 2010, from Web site:

 http://www.learning-theories.com/experiential-learning-kolb.html 

Kim, Hesook Suzie. (2010). The Nature of Theoretical Thinking in Nursing. Retrieved September 29, 2010, from Web site:

 http://www.springerpub.com/samples/9780826105875_chapter.pdf

Nursing Knowledge Without a Doubt
Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 90605561
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The nurse is often expected to act and react only with empirical information, however personal knowledge is considered equally as important by many nurse educators and researchers (Chinn & Kramer 2004). This also helps to explain why "health" and "environment" are considered distinct major components in the metastudy of nursing; both can be understood on highly subjective terms, with the concept of "good health" changing from patient to patient, or "person" to "person." Environment, too, has a major effect on the practice of nursing and the growth of the nursing body of knowledge.

3)

My personal philosophy of nursing centers on the belief that each individual person under my care deserves full attention and the unique application of my knowledge in addressing their immediate and long-term needs and concerns. That is, each person should benefit as much as possible from the full extent of my nursing knowledge, while still being…

References

Chinn, P. & Kramer, M. (2004). Integrated knowledge development in nursing. St. Louis: Mosby.

Fawcett, J. (2006). "Commentary: Finding patterns of knowing in the work of Florence Nightingale." Nursing outlook 54(5), pp. 275-7.

Nursing - Spirituality Spirituality Prayer
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In addition to lecture-based introduction to religious differences, video and/or live presentations from religious leaders and clergy from different faiths and role play exercises, the proposed implementation of training in this area should also include presentations from more experienced nurses who have already successfully negotiated the delicate issues involved.

Conclusion:

Spiritual support undoubtedly provides measurable benefits in the hospital environment where it is well received by patients. In American society, religious pluralism requires the exercise of extreme sensitivity when it comes to offering patients spiritual support. While it is certainly possible to provide beneficial spiritual support such as prayer even where nurse and patient do not share the same religious beliefs, doing so dramatically increases the possibility of offending patients rather than benefiting them.

Maximizing the potential benefit of spiritual support while minimizing negative consequences requires vocational training designed to increase awareness of the full variety of religious belief systems…

References

Campbell CL, Reed-Ash C. (2007). "Keeping Faith." Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing. Vol. 9, No. 1.

Cavendish R, Konecny L, Krayuyak-Luis B, Lanza M. (2004). "Nurses Enhance Performance Through Prayer." Holistic Nursing Practice. Vol. 18, No. 1.

Galek K, Flannelly KJ, Vane a, Galek RM. (2005). "Assessing a Patient's Spiritual Needs: A Comprehensive Instrument." Holistic Nursing Practice. Vol. 19, No. 2. Grant D. (2004). "Spiritual Interventions: How, When, and Why Nurses Use Them."

Holistic Nursing Practice. Vol. 18, No. 1. Johnston-Taylor E. (2003). "Prayer's Clinical Issues and Implications." Holistic Nursing Practice. Vol. 17, No. 4. Nuss-Kotecki C. (2002). "Developing a Health Promotion Program for Faith-Based Communities." Holistic Nursing Practice. Vol. 16, No. 3.

Nursing Patient-Centric Communication There Are
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ibliography

Mendes, IA, Trevizan, MA, Noqueira, MS, Mayashida, M. (2000) Humanistic Approach to Nursing Communication: The Case of hospitalized Adolescent Female.

Rev ras Enferm (2000) Jan-Mar, 53(1):7-13.

Williams, Carol A. & Gossett, Monette T. (2001) Nursing Communication: Advocacy for the Patient or Physician" Clinical Nursing Research Vol. 10 No. 3 332-340 (2001) Online available at http://cnr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/10/3/332.

Colon-Emeric, Cathleen (2006) Patterns of Medical and Nursing Staff Communication in Nursing Homes: Implications and Insights From Complexity Science. Qualitative Health Research Vol. 16 NO. 2, 1713-188 (2006)

Vaartio, H. et al. (2006)Nursing Advocacy: How is it Defined by Patients and Nurses, What does it Involve and How is it Experienced? Scand J. Caring Sci 2006 S. ept;20(3):282-92.

Tfouni, LV; de Carvalho, EC; Scochi, CG (1991) Discourse, institution, power: an analysis of the nurse patient interaction 0 Rev Gaucha Enferm 1991 Jan;12(1):20-5.

Jarrett, N. And Payne, S. (1995) A Selective Review of the Literature…

Bibliography

Mendes, IA, Trevizan, MA, Noqueira, MS, Mayashida, M. (2000) Humanistic Approach to Nursing Communication: The Case of hospitalized Adolescent Female.

Rev Bras Enferm (2000) Jan-Mar, 53(1):7-13.

Williams, Carol A. & Gossett, Monette T. (2001) Nursing Communication: Advocacy for the Patient or Physician" Clinical Nursing Research Vol. 10 No. 3 332-340 (2001) Online available at  http://cnr.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/10/3/332 .

Colon-Emeric, Cathleen (2006) Patterns of Medical and Nursing Staff Communication in Nursing Homes: Implications and Insights From Complexity Science. Qualitative Health Research Vol. 16 NO. 2, 1713-188 (2006)

Nurse Self-Care Nurses as Primary
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739, p=0.009, e?=0.727). This study clearly highlighted that sleep shortage and work fatigue poses a threat to patient safety and that nurse self-care is warranted.[Dorrian et.al, (2006)]

Nurse Support Services

An earlier Australian study by Moore KA (2001) which observed 201 nurses working in three different hospitals had concluded that organizational restructuring policies and the consequent work overload was a high stressor for nurses and this was made worse by the poor communication style (top -- down approach instead of consultative style) that only contributed more to nurse burnout. [Moore KA, (2001)]. Given the high levels of occupational stress and burnout among nurses, it is important that nurse self-care interventions are prioritized. A recent literature review on the subject of work stress and coping methods among Australian nurses revealed that 'work load ', 'role conflict' and 'expression of aggression' were the three main stressors. The literature study also revealed 'seeking…

Bibliography

1) Linda H. Aiken, 'Image of Nursing Global Trends', retrieved Sep 4th 2010, from,  http://www.fpnl.co.za/downloads/Presentations/Presentations/Prof%20Linda%20Aiken%20-%20Image%20of%20Nursing%20-%20Global%20Trends.pdf 

2) Jillian Dorrian, Nicole Lamond & Cameron Van del Heuvel et.al (Oct 2006), 'A Pilot study of the Safety Implications of Australian Nurses' Sleep and Working Hours', Chronobiology International, Vol 23, Issue 6, pg 1149-1163

3) Lim J, BOGOSSIAN F. & AHERN K. (2010), ' Stress and coping in Australian nurses: a systematic review. International Nursing Review 57, 22-31

4) Moore KA, (2001), 'Hospital restructuring: impact on nurses mediated by social

Nursing Utilization Review Preparation Scientific
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Resources needed include manpower and positional aids mentioned previously in this report. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the change would be accomplished through data collection related to the frequency of pressure ulcer occurrence in patients and nurse compliance in the four hours supine positional rotation of patients. Questionnaires will also be administered to nursing staff in order to gain insight as to their attitudes, behaviors and perceived barriers to pressure ulcer prevention.

Phase V: Transplantation and Application

This study concludes that positional rotations of every four hours has been shown to be the most effective prevention of pressure ulcer formation in older patients in elderly care homes and further that that attitudes, behaviors and perceptions of barriers in the view of staff nurses predicts the effectiveness of the implementation of such a prevention program for pressure ulcer care. (Moore and Price, 2006)

Exact Nature of Practice Implications

____ Change the…

Bibliography

Moore, Z. And Price, P. (2004) Nurses' Attitudes, Behaviors, and Perceived Barriers Towards Pressure Ulcer Prevention Journal of Clinical Nursing 13, 2004.

Vanderwee, K.; Grypdonck, D.; Bacquer, De and Defloor, T. (2006) Effectiveness of Turning with Unequal Time Intervals on the Incidence of Pressure Ulcer lesions. JAN Original Research 10 July 2006.

Nursing: Utilization Review

Nursing Diagnosis Plan Assessment Analysis- Patient Cm
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Nursing Diagnosis Plan

Assessment Analysis- Patient, CM., is a 60-year-old female African-American, married and a factory worker. CM is complaining about difficulty breathing, dyspnea. She indicates she is completely compliant with her medication regimen, naps and sleeps 7 hours a day. She is active, has a positive attitude, and regularly exercises. She does admit that sometimes she waits to seek medical attention, believing she should trust in God for minor issue. She does not take OTC or herbal medications and her immunizations are up-to-date. She denies use of alcohol, tobacco, or illicit drugs. Her pharmaceutical regimen consists of control of heart issues (aneurysm, artery disease, COPD, vein thrombosis, hypertension, aortic aneurysm; arthritis, seizures, and diabetes). She is emotionally stable, plans to continue working for at least 7 more years, and has a positive attitude.

Areas for Focused Assessment- CM has visited the hospital four times in the last two weeks.…

REFERENCES

Treatment with Daliresp. (2012). Forest Pharmaceuticals. Retrieved from:  http://www.daliresp.com/TreatmentWithDALIRESP.aspx?WT.srch=1&guid=363952239 

Sarkar, S. And Amelung, P. (2006). Evaluation of the Dyspneic Patient in the Office. Primary Care. 33 (3): 643-57.

Nursing Consideration for Patients With
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Behavioral approaches alone or combined cognitive behavior therapy may be used. Behavioral techniques might include simply not buying trigger foods or avoiding certain shops; that is, building up new habits to replace existing ones. Another example would be modifying eating behavior such as eating in the same place each day, or concentrating solely on eating and not watching television at the same time (Fiona Mantle, 2003)."

It is worth noting here that research has shown that people will change and transform their eating habits, once they learn the advantages and disadvantages of their eating behavioral patterns. However, at the same time, it is also worth noting here that since eating habits can be transformed through learning, they can also be unlearned, however, the process of unlearning may take place through a lengthy passage of time. As Fiona Mantle (2003) writes, "Eating behaviors are learned behaviors therefore they can be unlearned,…

References

Abraham S, Llewellyn-Jones D (2001) Eating Disorders: the facts. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Bruch H (1973) Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa and the Person Within. New York, Basic Books.

Bunnell, D.W., Shenker, I.R., Nussbaum, M.P., Jacobson, M.S., & Cooper, P. (1990). Sub-clinical vs. formal eating disorders. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 9, 357-362.

Cathie E. Guzzetta. (2001). Developing and implementing a comprehensive program for children and adolescents with eating disorders. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing.

Nursing Woc Et Approach to
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2004: 45).

ecommendations

Many recommend use of minimally invasive techniques including SEPS to treat and address problems related to chronic venous insufficiency (Kalra & Glovisczki, 2002). Multiple studies confirm the safety and efficacy of SEPS when used early, especially resulting from its low complication rates compared with other procedures including the formerly popular Linton procedures (Kalra & Gloiscki, 2002; Lee, et al. 2003; Tenbrook, et al., 2004; Bianchi, et al. 2003).

More randomized clinical trials are necessary however to answer additional questions related to the efficacy of new procedures including SEPS, though this procedures remains important for patients with advanced CVI secondary to PVI or with patients who do not demonstrate other complications including DVT (Kalra & Gloiscki, 2002; Bianchi, et al. 2003).

Wagner-Cox (2005) also notes that it is important for nurses to be considerate, knowledgeable and compassionate toward patients with acute and chronic illnesses, especially when caring for…

References

Baranoski, S. & Thimsen, K. (2003, Aug). "Oasis Skin and Wound Integumentary

Assessment Items: Applying the WOCN Guidance Document." Home Healthcare Nurse, 21(8): Supplement 3-13.

Baron, H.C., Wayne, M.G., Santiago, C.A. & Grossi, R. (2004, Sep-Oct). Vasc

Endovascular Surg. 38(5): 439-42.

Nursing and Issue of Falls Are Responsible
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Nursing and Issue of Falls

Falls are responsible for considerable morbidity, immobility, and mortality among older persons, especially those living in nursing homes. Falls can occur in a home, community, long-term rehabilitation, or acute care Setting (Laurence Z.. et.al, 1994). The risk of falls can be related mostly to mobility status, exposure to hazardous environments and risk-taking behaviors such as climbing ladders for seniors living in the community setting. Factors for a fall in hospitalized adults are greatly influenced by acute illness that often has a marked, albeit temporary, impact on physical and cognitive function compounded by care provided in unfamiliar surroundings in the long-term care setting, the risk factors for falls are influenced by impaired cognition, wandering or impulsive behavior, use of psychotropic medications, incontinence and urgency, lack of Exercise, unsafe environments, and low staffing levels. Patient falls are serious problems

In acute care hospitals and are used as…

References

Anuradha Thirumalai, (1998). Nursing Compliance with Standard Fall Prevention

Protocol Among Acute Care Hospital Nurses. Retrieved September 26, 2012 from  http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1191&context=thesesdissertations&sei-redir=1&referer=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.google.co.ke%2Furl%3Fsa%3Dt%26rct%3Dj%26q%3Dnursing%2520compliance%2520with%2520standard%2520fall%2520preventionprotocol%2520among%2520acute%2520care%2520hospital%2520nurses%26source%3Dweb%26cd%3D1%26ved%3D0CCAQFjAA%26url%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fdigitalscholarship.unlv.edu%252Fcgi%252Fviewcontent.cgi%253Farticle%253D1191%2526context%253Dthesesdissertations%26ei%3Dg-NiUPW8CuLB0QW_r4DgAw%26usg%3DAFQjCNE6__5zNu8vjRxc-jIFBXbBfKVIng#search=%22nursing%20compliance%20standard%20fall%20preventionprotocol%20among%20acute%20care%20hospital%20nurses%22 

Dykes, P.C., Carroll, D.L., Hurley, A.C., Benoit, A., & Middleton, B. (2009). Why do patients in acute care hospitals fall? Can falls be prevented? Journal of Nursing Administration, 39(6), 299-304. doi:10.1097/NNA.0b013e3181a7788a

Laurence Z. Rubenstein, Karen R. Josephson & Alan S. Robbins, (1994). Falls in the Nursing

Nursing Assessment Taking the History of a
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Nursing Assessment

Taking the history of a patient is a crucial aspect of patient assessment and treatment. A good history can mean the difference between a successful patient outcome and unsatisfactory outcomes. However, taking a complete and useful history is a skill that is developed by means of training and practice; it is not some talent that is innate (Bickley & Szilagyi, 2007; McKenna et al., 2011). According to Craig (2007) nurses are increasingly being asked to take patient histories. Given these growing responsibilities nurses need training and guidelines to taking an adequate patient history. The following is a summary and critique of Craig, L. H, (2007), A "Guide to Taking a Patient's History" in Nursing Standard, volume 22, issue 13, pages 42-48.

Craig (2007) takes a comprehensive approach to explaining the interview and history taking process. This approach is applicable for most any patient population; however, Craig does not…

References

Alarcon, R.D. (2009). Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: Review and projections. World Psychiatry, 8, 131 -- 139.

Bickley, L.S. & Szilagyi, P.G. (2007). Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History

Taking. 9th ed. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Craig, L.H. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22 (13), 42-48.

Nursing Case Study Family Nursing Diagnosis Is
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Nursing Case Study

Family nursing diagnosis is a holistic process that involves a thorough and complete family assessment to establish both curative and preventive concerns in a given family. The assessment from the participating family established a number of diagnostic issues. One of the family members suffers from obesity. D.K. who is ten years old and in second grade took two years to complete first grade. Obesity is a condition whereby the Body Mass Index (BM1) is over 30kg/m2. This is because of excess fat accumulation in a person's body. The Body Mass Index BM1, is the measure for obesity, and it is calculated by dividing a person's weight in kilograms by his/her height in square meters.

Obesity may be associated with the several of medical conditions like heart attack, type 2 diabetes, osteoarthritis and some types of cancer (Domino, 2007). Major causes of obesity are lack of physical exercises…

References

Domino, Frank J, (2007). 5-Minute Clinical Consult. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Karch. A.M. (2007). Lippincott's Nursing Drug Guide. Philadelphia: New York: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Katz, David L.; Friedman, Rachel S.C. (2008). Nutrition in Clinical Practice: A Comprehensive, Evidence-Based Manual for the Practitioner. 2nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Nursing theory Research and Practice
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Nursing theory, research, and practice
Scenario in which theory, research, and practice interact to create good patient outcomes
Imogene King’s theory
Functional Status
Nurse-Patient Relationship
Using the Imogene King’s theory to enhance Nurse-Patient Relationship
Enhanced Patient care
narrative explanation of your visual representation following the diagram.
Nursing theories have been developed as a way of trying to explain the fundamental importance of clinical practice (INSCOL, 2014). Even though these theories are used to guide practice, it is true to claim that most of them have not been put to the test as a way of determining whether the proposed nursing actions produce the claimed effects. If nursing asserts itself as the professional practice it is a professional practice environment must be supported and practiced. In order to enhance the outcome of patients and nursing staff then the professional nursing practice must be supported (INSCOL, 2014). There exist several nursing theories…

Nursing Obesity Prevalence Is Alarmingly High in
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Nursing

Obesity prevalence is alarmingly high in the United States, especially among young people. About 20% of American youth are obese (Ogden, Carroll, Kit, & Flegal, 2014). Being overweight or obese in childhood has been shown in empirical studies to lead to premature death and physical morbidity in adulthood (eilly & Kelly, 2011). Therefore, it is critical to prepare a health plan of lifelong learning for this population. A health care intervention program targeting young people in America will include schools and other stakeholders, who can participate in broad public awareness and intervention campaigns. This is because schools play an integral role in the lives of children, and can help parents and communities make choices that support health and a lifetime of learning about healthy eating and lifestyle factors.

The risk factors associated with childhood obesity include parental obesity, early body mass index rebound, more than eight hours per week…

References

"Guidelines for School Health Programs to Promote Lifelong Healthy Eating," (1996). CDC. June 14, 1996.

Ogden, C.L., Carroll, M.D., Kit, B.K. & Flegal, K.M. (2014). Prevalence of childhood and adult obesity in the United States, 2011-2012. Journal of the American Medical Association 311(8): 806-814.

Reilly, J.J., Armstrong, J., Dorosty, A.R., Emmett, P.M., Ness, A, Rogers, I, Steer, C & Sheriff, A. (2005). Early life risk factors for obesity in childhood: cohort study. BMJ 2005(330): 1357.

Reilly, J.J. & Kelly, J. (2011). Long-term impact of overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence on morbidity and premature mortality in adulthood: systematic review. International Journal of Obesity (2011) 35, 891 -- 898.

Nursing Policy Issue Analysis The
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" (Allen 2008) This means that nursing educators are also a key stakeholder.

Other stakeholders include healthcare facility administrators, corporate trustees and public office holders, who will often have entangled or competing interests relating to the profitability of operations and the political expediency of policy orientation. This will also be true of the various professional advocacy groups, nursing associations and lobby groups that will vie for influence in the discussion on any legislation relating to the nursing shortage.

Policy Objective:

A primary policy objective is to endorse any legislation that would aggressively enforce better recruitment of nursing students, better training of existing nurses, improvements in working conditions for nurses and mandated nurse-to-patient ratios. These objectives are underscored by evidence of the opportunities to save lives facilitated by mandated ratios. According to the text by Health Services Research (HSR) (2010), "key findings of the study reportedly include that 10-13% 'fewer surgical…

Works Cited:

Allan, L. (2008). The nursing shortage continues as faculty shortage grows. Nursing Economics, 26(1), 35-40.

Berkowitz, B. (2012). The Policy Process. .

Cullen, E.; Ranji, U. & Salganicoff, A. (2010). Addressing the Nursing Shortage. Kaiseredu.org.

GovTrack. (2010). S. 1031: National Nursing Shortage Reform and Patient Advocacy Act. govTrack.us.

Intervention of Diabetes and Hypoglycemic Control
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Intervention for the Improvement of Hypoglycemic Control

Diabetes complication is one of the top health problems in the United States, and the ADA (American Diabetes Association) recommends that people suffering from diabetes should control their hypoglycemic and maintain A1C to < 7% to avoid diabetes complications. To achieve this objective, the "diabetes self-management education (DSME)"(Ni coll, aiser, Campbell, ET AL. 2014 p 207) is an effective tool to enhance hypoglycemic control and improve patients' outcomes. The DSME is an on-going educational process to facilitate the skill, knowledge, and ability of patients to carry out a diabetes self-care. I am a diabetic educator working in the diabetic outpatient clinical setting. My experience has made to understand that patients struggle to manage and control their diabetes after being educated because patients are not allowed to set their goals in order to manage their diabetes. (American Diabetes Association; 2013).

Objective of this paper…

Reference

American Diabetes Association (2013). Standards of medical care in diabetes -- 2013. Diabetes Care 36 (Suppl. 1):S11 -- S66, .

Funnell, M.M. Brown, T.L. Childs B.P. Et al. (2010). National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education. Diabetes Care. 33: 589-596.

Nicoll, K.G. Ramser, K.L. Campbell, et al. (2014).Sustainability of Improved Glycemic Control After Diabetes Self-Management Education. Diabetes Spectrum 27 (3): 207-211.

Norris, S.L., Lau, J., Smith, J.,et al. ( 2002). Susan Sundae, N.L Norris elf-Management Education for Adults with Type 2 Diabetes meta-analysis of the effect on hypoglycemic control.

Nursing Estella Case Study
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Nursing: Estella Case Study

Which models of health are most applicable to Estella and his family? Why?

It appears that the action model is the model for health that is most applicable to Estella's family, largely due to the comprehensive nature of this model. It includes assessment, interventions, and dissemination of information that can actuate these people to make changes in their health and in their lives to greater ensure their wellness.

Which Healthy People 2020 (website) Objectives are of greatest importance to Estella's family? All of the objectives that pertain to weight loss and a reduction in the rate of obesity for children and adults pertain to Estella and her family. So do all of the ones that encourage a diversified diet in which fruits and vegetables are encouraged. The two related to a reduction in solid fats and saturated fats applies as well.

What effect do the leading…

Nursing Journal Community Health and
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As a result, it becomes more difficult to ascertain exactly what mode of intervention would best be suited for helping children overcome health matters that are at least to some degree beyond their control.

That said, a defining strength of the research is its chosen method of intervention. The perspective that the health of the children at the center of this study cannot be improved without effectively improving the health habits of their respective families is a centering position and one that endows the study with a significant value to the public health. As the study finds in its conclusion, "social and structural environments in which Hispanic children are reared may play an important role in determining their risk for obesity and related behaviors." (Arredondo et al., p. 30) Even lacking any empirical validity and lacking the capacity to be replicated, it does offer an array of correlations that can…

Works Cited:

Arredondo, E.M.; Elder, J.P.; Campbell, N.; Baquero, B.; Duerksen, S.; Ayala, G.; Crespo, MPH, Slymen, D. & McKenzie, T. (2010). Individual, Family, and Community Environmental Correlates of Obesity in Latino Elementary School Children. Journal of School Health, 80, No.1, pp. 20-30.

Nursing Home Resident Agitation Predictors and Interventions
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Nursing Home esident Agitation: Predictors and Interventions

To critically review selected articles investigating and discussing predictors of nursing home resident agitation, and recommended interventions.

Burgio et al., (2007, p. 642) provides a working definition of nursing home resident agitation "… as verbal, vocal, and motor activities that are repetitive, outside of social standards, and considered inappropriate by staff." Agitation can often involve physical and/or verbal aggression, which can increase the risk of harm to residents and staff, disrupt activities, divert precious resources, and lead to staff burnout and high turnover.

Critical literature review.

Medical literature databases were searched using the keywords 'agitation, nursing home, and demetia' and a limited number of articles published within the last 10 years were selected for review.

Inclusion Criteria. Articles investigating and/or reviewing the etiology of agitation in geriatric nursing home residents suffering from dementia were selected, as were articles recommending interventions.

Exclusion Criteria. Only…

Results

The two cohort studies reviewed here used computer assisted behavioral observation systems (CABOS) to identify predictors of agitation in geriatric nursing home residents suffering from dementia. One study monitored 78 nursing home residents (Burgio, Park, Hardin, and Sun, 2007, mean age = 82.2) and the other 123 (Vance, Burgio, Roth, Stevens, Fairchild, and Yurick, 2003, mean age = 82.3), but neither study used a normal control population. The experimental strategy involved assessing various physical and mental criteria periodically to determine if they predicted agitation behaviors within this population. Both studies found a statistically significant correlation between cognitive functioning and agitation (p < 0.01). Burgio et al., (2007) was unable to find a significant correlation between agitation and gender, age, and daily activities, but the earlier study (Vance et al., 2003) reported significant, but weak correlations between agitation and gender (r = 0.21), visual impairment (r = -0.21), and hearing impairment (r = 0.42). The inverse relationship between visual impairment was attributed to residents being unable to notice staff walking by, which can otherwise trigger outbursts. Only in the latter study was retrospective nursing staff reports able to predict agitation behavior based on assessments of cognitive functioning, suggesting variability in the ability of nursing home staff to correctly assess resident cognitive status. The authors of both studies recommend the use of CABOS-like systems of measurement to determine activity levels for future studies, because staff reports aren't a reliable predictor of agitation behavior.

For more than 60 years it has been recognized that agitation worsens in Alzheimer's patients in late afternoon and early evening, a phenomenon accordingly termed Sundowning Syndrome (reviewed by Bachman & Rabins, 2006). Volicer et al. (2001) used body temperature to track circadian rhythms in inpatient Alzheimer patients with a mean age of 71 and suffering from different levels of dementia. It was discovered that individuals within the

Nursing Critique Comparison of the Effect of
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Nursing Critique

Comparison of the Effect of isk and Protective Factors on Suicide Attempts in a Group of Triethnic Adolescents Divided According to ace, Gender and Age.

This is an critique on a research paper about self-reported suicide attempts in a triethnic group of adolescents. 2 references are given.

The purpose of the following paper is to evaluate and critique a study performed on a group of students pertaining to adolescent suicide. This study attempts to examine the multiple factors affecting recent suicide attempts in adolescents from three different ethnic backgrounds. The resilience model is used to describe and analyze the relationships between these variables categorized according to sex, age and race. A group of 10,059 school children from the 7th, 9th, and 11th grade in Connecticut were surveyed in 1996 and data from the African-American, Hispanic Latino and American Caucasian respondents was analyzed using bi -- and multivariate methods.…

References

1. Rew et al., 2001, Correlates of Recent Suicide Attempts in a Triethnic Group of Adolescents, Journal of Nursing Scholarship.

2.Oquendo MA, Ellis SP, Greenwald S, Malone KM, Weissman MM, Mann JJ, 2001.: Ethnic and sex differences in suicide rates relative to major depression in the United States, Am J. Psychiatry 158(10): 1652-1658

Nursing Recent Research Shows That Mental Health
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Nursing

ecent research shows that mental health problems can manifest in early childhood. As many as one in ten Australian children under five exhibit symptoms of social, emotional, and mental disorders including temper tantrums, difficulty adapting to new surroundings, problems relating to peers, and hyperactivity (Edwards & Martin, 2012). Although psychological diagnoses like clinical anxiety or depression are not typically made on populations under five, researchers do identify early childhood behaviors as risk factors for developing mental health disorders later in life. Thus, being withdrawn or inhibited has been identified as "one of the best identified risk factors for later anxiety disorders," (apee, Kennedy, Ingram, Edwards & Sweeney, 2005, p. 488). Early childhood behaviors can reveal to parents and counselors the warning signs of childhood and adolescent psychiatric problems such as Depressive Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (Sawyer, Arney, Baghurst, et al., 2008). It is important to…

References

Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.; van IJzendoorn, M.H. & Juffer, F. (2003). Less is more: Meta-analyses of sensitivity and attachment interventions in early childhood. Psychological Bulletin, Vol 129(2), Mar 2003, 195-215.

Duncan, G.J., Brooks-Gunn, J. & Kato Klebanov, P. (2008). Economic deprivation and early childhood development. Child Development 65(2): 296-318.

Edwards, V. & Martin, S. (2012). Preschool mental health toll at 10pc. The Australian. 24 Dec, 2012.

Felner, R.D.; Stolberg, A. & Cowen, E.L. (1975). Crisis events and school mental health referral patterns of young children. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol 43(3), Jun 1975, 305-310.

Nursing State a Project Objective
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In fact, nursing staff should have access to mobile technologies that allow for decisions to be made instantaneously at the bedside. For example, a PDA would allow nurses to access the literature directly from the bedside without leaving the patient's care. This would help integrate the caring aspects of nursing with the more objective aspects of evidence-based practice.

3) Discuss methods and specific plan to revise an unsuccessful project solution

If the project is unsuccessful, it could be because of insufficient opportunities for application. It may be better to implement the proposed solution in specific departments in which a large number of preventable errors had been tabulated. In this way, more dramatic changes to nursing practice might have been observed. It might also be helpful to survey the various departments in the healthcare institution and discover the specific areas of concern. Then, researchers can target these areas and encourage mentors…