Nursing Profession Essays (Examples)

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The Demands of a Graduate Level Nurse Practitioner Program

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81200990

A Graduate-level nurse Practitioner program is very demanding. How do you intend to address the demands?
The American healthcare system has been increasing in complexity, with future nursing professionals set to face an extremely challenging care delivery framework. Researchers hint at a continued rise in professional nursing staff shortage, with the nation’s aging population progressively increasing healthcare system demands (American Organization of Nurse Executives, 2008). Healthcare facilities will be hard-pressed to be more cost- and resource- efficient owing to financial pressures (National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, 2006). This paper will examine a few potential impacts of such demands that result in nursing staff burnout, followed by exploring potential triggers and coping plans.
Nursing Burnout Triggers and Coping Strategies
Nursing staff, indeed, demonstrates high burnout rate, resulting largely from emotional and physical exhaustion and a demanding work setting. An AMA (American Medical Association) journal-published research work revealed that…… [Read More]

References
American Organization of Nurse Executives. (2008, May). AONE’s guiding principles for future patient care delivery; Nursing care across provider settings. Presented at the 118th meeting of the National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice, Rockville, MD.
National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice. (2006). Meeting the challenges of the new millennium: Challenges facing the nurse workforce in a changing health care environment. Sixth Annual Report to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Congress. Rockville, MD: Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
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Nursing in the Contemporary World Nurses as

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13117825

Nursing in the Contemporary World

Nurses as the Most Highly Trusted Health Professional

ecent studies indicate that nurses are the most highly trusted health professional group.

ecent studies indicate that nurses are the most highly trusted health professional group.

Discuss the components of nursing's contemporary image that places nurses in this position of trust

Nursing profession has undergone tremendous development to attain the respect and valuation within the society. The current trend states that nursing ranks as the highly trusted health professional group. One of the components for this development is the tremendous efforts put by women to wrestle the profession from men in the historic periods. This struggle towards development of the profession reflects on different perspectives: environmental, political, cultural, and social. Extensive nursing education in the contemporary world supplements the efforts of nurses in their service provision (Im & Ju, 2012). This helps to put nursing professional group…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, B., & Jacob, S.R. (2011). Contemporary nursing: Issues, trends, & management. St.

Louis, Mo: Elsevier/Mosby.

Im, E., & Ju Chang,, . (2012). Current Trends in Nursing Theories. Journal of Nursing

Scholarship, 44(2), 156-164. doi:10.1111/j.1547-5069.2012.01440.x
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Nursing Shortage Review on Nurses Shortage the

Words: 2703 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86492519

Nursing Shortage

eview On Nurses Shortage

The supply of professional nurses relative to the increase in demand for their services has been on a general decline over the years. As a career choice, nursing has been facing perennial shortage of professionals. Most healthcare organizations will affirm that their daunting tasks were recruiting fresh nurses and retaining the ones already in practice. The 2008 projections from the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed that the demand for professional nurses would increase from the then two million to three million, which represents sixty percent increment. In ideal situations, the number of those who have enrolled in nursing will be sufficient to supply the rise in their number. Nevertheless, this would not be the case if nothing were done to salvage the worrying trend of most students not graduating or resorting to other careers. According to Benjamin Isgur of PWHC Health and esearch Institute,…… [Read More]

References

American Association of Colleges of Nursing. (2009, September, 28). Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet. USA: AACN.

Buerhaus, P.I., Staiger, D., & Auerbach, D.I. (2009). The future of the nursing workforce in the United States: Data, trends, and implications. Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Blakeley, J., & Ribeiro, V. (2008). Early Retirement among Registered Nurses: Contributing Factors. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(1), 29 -- 37

Cummings, G., et al. (2008). The Relationship between Nursing Leadership and Nurses' Job Satisfaction in Canadian Oncology Work Environments. Journal of Nursing Management, 16(5), 508 -- 518.
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Nursing Is a Challenging Profession

Words: 954 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1591636



The nursing coursework I have taken so far focuses in particular on the second and fifth competencies, regarding information and technology. Courses like anatomy and physiology are fundamental information-gathering classes that provide a firm foundation for aspiring nurses. Thorough knowledge of the human body, its functions, and its diseases, plus knowledge of medicine are imparted through nursing classes. Furthermore, nursing instructors also demonstrate how technology plays a role in the profession. We use computers to access medical databases, for example. Therefore, the second and fifth competencies are related to one another. In addition to their use as information technology, computers also provide the backbone of almost all electronic medical equipment. Nursing courses also show how sophisticated machines such as CAT scans are implemented in hospitals.

I am particularly weak in particularly those competency areas that the nursing courses cover: information and technology. Regarding resource allocation, interpersonal skills, and systems understanding,…… [Read More]

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Nursing as a Profession and Its Status

Words: 1719 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 146636

Nursing profession is among the oldest in history. Currently, there is much debate that surrounds the profession because of the need for more trained nurses. In recent years the nursing shortage has become a major problem for the medical profession and has resulted in poor patient care and slower patient recover. The purpose of this discussion is to provide an in depth examination of the nursing profession. We will discuss the current state of the nursing profession, including the causes for the shortage and the solution. We will also explore the status of the nursing profession in Australia. Let us begin our discussion by providing a comprehensive definition of what is means to be a nurse.

Definition of a nurse

According to the American Heritage Dictionary, a nurse is defined as " a person trained to care for the sick or disabled under the supervision of a physician." (American Heritage…… [Read More]

References

American Heritage Dictionary. (1982) Second Edition.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5000534396

Bashford, A. (1997). Starch on the collar and sweat on the brow: self sacrifice and the status of work for nurses. Journal of Australian Studies, (52), 67+. Retrieved August 24, 2003, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5001774259

Caines, E. (1999, September 6). How to end the nursing shortage. New Statesman, 128, 23. Retrieved August 24, 2003, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=5000779782
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Nurse Jackie the Politics of Nurse Jackie

Words: 966 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19382795

Nurse Jackie

The Politics of Nurse Jackie

Kathleen McHugh's 2012 article entitled "Nurse Jackie and the Politics of Care" offers an analytical discussion on the portrayal of nurses and the nursing profession in popular culture. The discursive assessment of nursing as seen in mass media centers less on the content of the media itself than on the sociological implications of common portrayals in relation to such critical issues as prescribed gender roles and the dynamics of care. The discussion here provides a deconstruction of the McHugh article, identifying its perspective, its primary arguments and the approach taken to delivering said argument. Specifically, the discussion will focus on the ways that the complex portrayal of the title character in the television series Nurse Jackie casts distinction in a way that the author considers positive to the public image of the profession.

McHugh composes this article for members of the nursing profession…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

McHugh, K. (2012). Nurse Jackie and the Politics of Care. Nursing Outlook, 60, 12-18.
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Nursing and Money Entering the

Words: 405 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6686201

The fact that the nurse only has a monetary motivation will mean that the nurse will lack the necessary patience and ability to give care to those who need it on a daily basis, as the nurse will not feel rewarded by the act of giving care.

For those who enter and stay in the nursing profession, a surprisingly small number cite salary as their prime motivation: In one study of nurses' motivations: "Money or salary was fourth, which was surprising to those administering the survey" (Nursing 2010, 2009, RLC). But perhaps it should not be so surprising: nursing has many rewards, but if the nurse is not interested in his or her patients, the long hours, night shifts, backbreaking work, and heartache are hardly worth salaries that are relatively high, but far from astronomical.

orks Cited

Nursing 2010: More men. (2009, Jul 2). Rend Lake College. Press release.

Retrieved…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Nursing 2010: More men. (2009, Jul 2). Rend Lake College. Press release.

Retrieved July 14, 2009 at http://www.rlc.edu/pressroom/newsstory.php?id=3766

Some hard questions about entering nursing (2008, July 26). Men in Nursing. All Nurses.

Message posted to http://allnurses.com/men-nursing-forum/some-hard-questions-320792.html
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Nursing History of the 1960s

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26713505

During this era, however, nurses continued to gain a foothold within the field of care as important elements to patient recovery and success.

This was further echoed in the era directly following such a tumultuous times as the 1960s. During the 1970s, the idea of a much more solid and accredited education began to pick up further speed (Burns 2004:19). Schools were now responsible to the State and national standards, such as the ones put forth by the National League for Nursing. Another major improvement seen in nursing education was the creation of specified nursing programs which offered advanced degrees within specialized fields of nursing. It opened up the opportunity for many nursing students to gain an unprecedented expertise on various specialties not seen before in earlier generations. In the professional field, the implementation of "participatory nursing" which allowed for nurses to embody greater roles within the context of care…… [Read More]

References

Burns, Nancy. (2004). The practice of nursing research. Elsevier Health Sciences.

Carter, Laura Stephenson. (2009). Beyond nightingale. Dartmouth Medicine. Retrieved April 9, 2009 at  http://dartmed.dartmouth.edu/fall05/html/beyond_nightingale.php .

Kalisch, Philip a. (1995). The advance of American nursing. 3rd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Kirkpatrick, S.M. (1990). Participatory nursing research: a promise in third world countries. Western Journal of Nursing Research. Jun; 12(3):282-92.
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Nursing Phil Throughout My Life I Have

Words: 1349 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36251920

Nursing Phil

Throughout my life, I have exemplified core Christian values like faith and temperance. Christian role models have helped me to shape a character and identity that is conducive to a life of selfless service, which I view the nursing profession to be. I want nothing more than to participate in a Christian nursing community, with the goals of making the world a better place one patient, and one community, at a time. Effective nurse education will allow me to develop my skills in all areas of nursing: from leadership to bedside practice. The Mark and Huldah Buntain School of Nursing is unique in that it offers a perfect fusion of Christian values with cross-cultural awareness, and correspondingly, cultural sensitivity.

I have always valued my spiritual health every bit as much as my physical and psychological health. This is why I gravitated towards the Mark and Huldah Buntain School…… [Read More]

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Nursing in Bisphosphonate Therapy for

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3320937

One of the primary role of the nurse, notes the authors, is to help educate the patient about the parameters of his or her disease. Part of the education process is teaching patients about the drugs recommended to them by their doctors or the pharmaceuticals they are already taking to alleviate symptoms. urses can use their knowledge to make patients feel more comfortable about their treatments, more well-informed, and therefore more in control of their course of treatment. Patients who are cognizant of the possible side-effects and benefits of the drugs they take to manage their disease are more likely to comply with guidelines for treatment because they understand the motives behind them. The authors also claim that patient education is an integral part of healing. The article's impact on the nursing profession is broad and extends beyond the limited subject matter they address in "Bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic bone…… [Read More]

Nursing

In "Bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic bone disease: the pivotal role of nurses in patient education," authors Fitch & Maxwell (2008) focus on the importance of nurse awareness of oncology treatments. Nurse awareness of existing and cutting-edge oncology treatments fosters deeper patient trust and understanding. The more comfortable nurses are with their knowledge of bisphosphonates, the better their patients can understand the drugs as a part of their treatment. Fitch & Maxwell (2008) outline the different types of bisphosphonates, various methods of administration, and also detail their role in treating metastatic bone diseases and cancer with the ultimate objective of creating a more well-informed nursing and patient community.

The Fitch & Maxwell (2008) article is not an experiment related to bisphosphonates or bone disease. Rather, the article is a meta-analysis, a summary of existing and prior research on how bisphosphonates can help patients with metastatic bone diseases. The authors explain the use of bisphosphonates and their role in aiding recovery. Most importantly, Fitch & Maxwell (2008) urge nursing professionals to learn about and understand bisphosphonates. One of the primary role of the nurse, notes the authors, is to help educate the patient about the parameters of his or her disease. Part of the education process is teaching patients about the drugs recommended to them by their doctors or the pharmaceuticals they are already taking to alleviate symptoms. Nurses can use their knowledge to make patients feel more comfortable about their treatments, more well-informed, and therefore more in control of their course of treatment. Patients who are cognizant of the possible side-effects and benefits of the drugs they take to manage their disease are more likely to comply with guidelines for treatment because they understand the motives behind them. The authors also claim that patient education is an integral part of healing. The article's impact on the nursing profession is broad and extends beyond the limited subject matter they address in "Bisphosphonate therapy for metastatic bone disease: the pivotal role of nurses in patient education."
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Nurse Practitioners' Autonomy the Current

Words: 2015 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63318773



hat is the current level of autonomy among NPs?

How independent are nurse practitioners? It is well-known that NPs desire and deserve autonomy -- which gives NPs "substantial control over [their] professional practice" (Bahadori, et al., 2009, p. 513). The research conducted by Bahadori and colleagues shows that of 48 primary care NPs (all of whom attended a state clinical conference in Florida and completed a detailed questionnaire with 30 items to evaluate), "…had very high levels of autonomy" (517). Specifically, NPs that had been practicing in "family specialty practice area" reported "greater clinical decision-making authority, and the NPs involved in acute care had "…very high levels of autonomy also" (Bahadori, 517). The conclusion for this article explained that while the NPs enjoyed "high levels of autonomy," and had high levels of skill and accountability, that had "…only moderate levels of empowerment" (rights, privileges, and legal status) (Bahadori, 518).

Collaboration…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bahadori, a., and Fitzpatrick, J.J. (2009). Level of autonomy of primary care nurse

Practitioners. Journal of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, 21(9), 513-519.

Carryer, J., Gardner, G., Dunn, S., and Gardner, a. (2007). The core role of the nurse

Practitioner: practice, professionalism and clinical leadership. Journal of Clinical Nursing,
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Nursing Nurses Specialize in Various

Words: 977 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80304435



According to the South Carolina Nurse Practice Act, the practice of nursing includes "the provision of services for compensation," and the use of "nursing judgment." Nursing judgment is clearly defined as "the logical and systematic cognitive process of identifying pertinent information and evaluating data in the clinical context in order to produce informed decisions." The South Carolina Nurse Practice Act is lengthier than either of the other two definitions provided here. It deals directly with practical and mundane matters related to the profession such as monetary reward for the practice of nursing; the different classes of nurses, "commensurate with the educational preparation," and other official areas of interest: "Nursing practice occurs in the state in which the recipient of nursing services is located." While this definition lacks the inclusion of terms like "compassion," nurses must be firmly grounded in the practical matters of the profession as outlined by the Nurse…… [Read More]

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Nursing for an Associate Degree

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81080660

Technology-based teaching strategies can greatly accelerate the how both teaching and learning occur and therefore often reduce traditional issues and concerns faced by students and instructors. This approach changes the conventional way of thinking about how quality nursing programs are assessed and changes the levels of requirements to better suit student learning with better access to libraries, counseling and tutoring services, computing equipment, tuition, and financial aid to name a few.

But where this Associates Degree approach will benefit the profession most is in the healthcare system where it is needed most. New nurses will be better acclimated to the needs of sophisticated logging processes, medical billing and inventory as well as scheduling and other tasks now all handled via digital processing and computer. A modern day nurses are more technologically sophisticated, the overall patient care process also gets better as more available free time is offered back to the…… [Read More]

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Nursing in the Media Not

Words: 2210 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54993298

The author quotes Gary Zukav as emphasizing that if a nurse perceives herself as powerless and her image as negative, the idea can sink to the subconscious level and realize itself. She will be drawn to those who will reinforce the idea. Practitioner Pauline Robitaille's stresses impact each nurse has on others. Her influence on people she comes in contact at the peri-operative setting cannot be overstated. She found the published feedbacks of registered nurses in nursing journals as very positive while others were very negative. Those who gave positive feedbacks described the efforts of preceptors to teach and support them. Thus the intended learning flowed smoothly. However, other nurses reported the negative, punitive and critical behavior of their preceptors. The nurses described the difficulty of working with these preceptors. Hence, the nurses did not benefit from their experience with the preceptors.

Ulmer emphasizes that those in the profession must…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gonzales, L. (2005). A mission for the center for nursing advocacy. 3 pages. Nevada RN Foundation: Nevada Nurses Association

Nursing BC (2002). How to create community media coverage for nursing. 2 pages. Registered Nurses Association of British Columbia: ProQuest Information and Learning Company

Ulmer, B.C. (2000). The image of nursing. 4 pages. AORN Journal: Association of Operating Room Nurses, Inc.

Willging, P (2005). it's time to take the politics out of nursing home quality. 5 pages. Nursing Homes: Medquest Communications, LLC
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Nursing Pus Bodily Fluids and

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90930668

Nursing means working one on one with individuals who may be bogged down will all manner of physical or mental pain and suffering or who may even be on the brink of death. Because nurses work so closely with the most delicate matters of human existence: pain, suffering, and death, ours is a difficult job.

Nursing is but one of many healthcare professions and involves unique and specific work. For instance, nurses work directly with the patient by touch and voice. Nurses listen to people's complaints and address them immediately; we massage, we empty bed pans, we bandage bruises and poke people with needles and stick tubes down their throats. Not everyone wants to deal so intimately with patients but would rather remain in the lab. Nurses usually have more direct contact with patients than doctors do, for instance. Nurses must possess a full understanding of the profession and what…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bolton, Zoe. "Is nursing a profession in crisis?" Daily Mail. 12 May 2004. Online at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/health/healthmain.html?in_article_id=302561&in_page_id=1774.

Virginia Avernal Henderson." Nurses.info.  http://www.nurses.info/nursing_theory_person_henderson_virginia_.htm .
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Nursing One Need Only Read the Newspaper

Words: 1837 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99718284

Nursing

One need only read the newspaper "Classified" ads to realize that employers are trying many clever marketing tactics to attract prospective nurses into their organizations. Many are offering sign-on bonuses, extra benefits and other amenities to attract a limited supply of nurses. As both the general population and the elderly population grow, the number of nurses needed to care for them increases proportionally as well. The number of people choosing to pursue nursing as a career has been on the decline, mainly due to long working hours, low pay, high job stress and other factors. These factors will not resolve themselves if the nursing deficit continues to increase. In addition, graduate nurses find it difficult to enter the workforce due to their lack of experience and a shortage of mentors to teach them. The solution is simple, more nurses are needed, and soon. Novice nurses are fresh graduates who…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Durkin, Barbara.(2002) Reliving Hospital Mistake: Mom recalls overdose case February

24, 2002. Newsday, Inc.

Lang, Susan. (1996) Lack of nursing assistants is an impending crisis, says Cornell gerontologist. Cornell University. Cornell University. http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/May96/nursingassistants.ssl.html. Accessed June, 2002.

National League for Nursing (NLN). (2000). Unpublished Data. New York, NY. http://nursing.about.com/gi/dynamic/offsite.htm?site=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.nln.org%2Faboutnln%2Fnews_tricouncil2.htm. Accessed June, 2002.
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Nursing Elizabeth Kerr Porter Elizabeth Kerr Porter

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78113810

Nursing

Elizabeth Kerr Porter

Elizabeth Kerr Porter "was a leader in nursing education and an advocate for nurses' rights," (ANA 2011). Porter advocated for nurses' labor rights in terms of the right to collective bargaining and professional organization. Her work helped improve working conditions for nurses and also lobbied against racial discrimination in the nursing professions. Porter served for many years as the president of the American Nurses Association and also as the Dean of the nursing graduate degree program at Case Western eserve University. Therefore, Elizabeth Kerr Porter promoted the interests of nursing education, enhanced the image of the profession, and also championed the labor rights interests of professional nurses.

Dorothea Dix

Dorothea Dix worked as both an educator and a nurse, but never actually combined her two careers. Dix devoted most of her career to raising awareness about mental illness. Dix advocated for the humane treatment of both…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association (ANA 2011). Elizabeth Kerr Porter. Retrieved online:  http://www.nursingworld.org/ElizabethKerrPorter 

Buckwalter, K.C. & Church, O.M. (2009). Euphemia Jane Taylor: An Uncommon Psychiatric Nurse. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care 17(3):125-131

Bumb, J. (n.d.). Dorothea Dix. Retrieved online: http://www.webster.edu/~woolflm/dorotheadix.html

Lewis, J.J. (n.d.). Clara Barton biography. About.com. Retrieved online: http://womenshistory.about.com/od/bartonclara/a/clara_barton.htm
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Nursing Scholarship Program in Pursuing

Words: 584 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3406238

One of the invaluable experiences I had working with underserved communities was between the years 2007 and 2008, when I was fortunate enough to be involved as a volunteer conducting missionary work in Atotonilco, Mexico. As a community nurse for the mission, I was responsible for taking the glucose level, vital signs and educated the general public about diabetes and heart disease. I have found my work in Mexico very rewarding that I decided to volunteer again in 2009, this time locally in St. Kitts and Nevis, but the volunteer work covered the same responsibilities assigned to me as a volunteer in Mexico. Perhaps what made my second volunteer stint more challenging is that we conducted home visits to patients afflicted with diabetes, and had to be visited because they cannot walk as a result of having their leg amputated because of diabetes. Indeed, the feeling of fulfillment and happiness…… [Read More]

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Nursing Conceptual Model Develop Your

Words: 1343 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77625252

Nurses may feel as if they do not have anyone who understands them: even their non-nursing partners may not seem to truly comprehend what they deal with on a regular basis, day in and day out at the hospital. Nurses may be isolated from one another in the hospital, too busy to 'talk shop' in a positive way with like-minded colleagues, or deal with doctors who are not sympathetic to the unique demands of nursing. Nurses may also find it difficult to have an appropriate work and life balance, as increasingly they are pressured to do more and more at work, to make up for declining numbers of caregivers at the facilities where they work. They may be called upon to perform many additional duties traditionally performed by doctors and physician's assistants that strain at the traditional definitions of nursing.

Nurses may feel as if their unique insights as nurses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burnout: Warning signs. NurseWeek. 97.2.

Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.nurseweek.com/features/97-2/burn2.html

Gelinas, Lillee. (2003, October 1). Addressing nurse burnout - Changing culture is the cure

Staffing the Suite. Endonurse. Retrieved July 9, 2009 at http://www.endonurse.com/articles/3a1staffing.html
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Nursing the Differences Between a

Words: 973 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91153825

("Summary of the LPN Declaratory Ruling, 2003)

The selected tasks and shared responsibilities of the licensed practical nurse define such nurses as responsible for being adequately prepared for the nursing responsibilities they assume because they have obtained the validation of completion of an approved preparatory program and have evidence of the successful completion of a nursing licensing examination. A registered nurse, however, as the title conveys, must be registered as a specific health care professional, within a professional organization, rather than merely possess evidence of having a license, and has passed the necessary coursework to obtain his or her master's in the nursing profession. The LPN's validation documents state that he or she has reached the achievement of mastering all theoretical and nursing skill competencies required of an entry level practical nurse in caring for individuals in any age group. It states that the licensed practical nurse has the sufficient…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carter, Melodie R. (Jun 2004) "ABCs of Staffing Decisions." Journal of Nursing Management. Retrived 2 Sept 2005 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3619/is_200406/ai_n9425719

Nurse Practice Act. (2004) Retrived 2 Sept 2005 at http://www.arsbn.org/pdfs/practice_act/2004/nursepracticeact_2004.pdf

Summary of the LPN Declaratory Ruling." (Feb 2003) Connecticut Nursing Journal. Retrived 2 Sept 2005 at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3902/is_200212/ai_n9305171
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Nursing Leader

Words: 896 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83567924

Nursing Sills

Grayce Sills and Nursing Leadership

Brief Biography:

Grayce Sills dedicated her life's work to improving conditions for psychiatric health patients, both through reforms in the area of psychiatric nursing and through education of future generations of nurses. During the era succeeding orld ar II, the psychiatric nursing profession was making its first forays into mainstream treatment orientation. Grayce Sills would emerge into the profession during this time and, in the late 1950s and 1960s, would observe that the conditions to which psychiatric patients were often treated at this juncture were abhorrent, inhumane and inconsistent with the standards otherwise sought in general patient treatment. As a student of Hildegard Peplau, whom she refers to as the mother of psychiatric nursing, Sills would come to appreciate the need for greater demonstration of caring and compassion in this subsection of the nursing profession. (Barker, p. 79) Earning a Bachelor's Degree from…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Barker, P.J. (1999). The Philosophy and Practice of Psychiatric Nursing. Elsevier Health Sciences.

Fitzpatrick, J.J.; Shultz, C.M. & Aiken, T.D. (2010). Giving Through Teaching: How Nurse Educators Are Changing the World. Springer Publishing Company.

Houser, B. & Player, K. (2007). Pivotal Moments in Nursing: Leaders Who Changed the Path of a Profession. Sigma Theta Tau International; 1st edition.

Murray, A. (1995). OHIO STATE HONORS NURSING PROFESSOR AT WINTER COMMENCEMENT. Ohiostate.edu.
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Nursing Industry Nursing Is One of the

Words: 618 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47367001

Nursing Industry

Nursing is one of the most important professions in the world today. It involves not only physical healing, but also healing on a deeper level, where the care giving extends to the patient's environment and relationships to speed the healing process. The nursing environment then often also concerns politics and political involvement. As caregivers who operate in an inclusive environment and relationships, it is often necessary for nurses to be aware of political processes and policies. In this way, nurses can ensure an optimal environment for their patients and the healing process in general.

Des Jardin (2001) defines politics as "a means to an end." Nurses who are concerned with policy formation outcomes must involve themselves in politics. There are a number of ways in which this can be accomplished. Mainly, the author notes that nurses can affect the development of institutional policies by becoming involved in politics…… [Read More]

References

Des Jardin, K.E. (2001, Oct.). Political involvement in nursing education and empowerment. AORN Journal. Retrieved from: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FSL/is_4_74/ai_80159541/
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Nursing Is One of Those Professions That

Words: 786 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85517325

Nursing is one of those professions that provides the opportunity not only to further oneself on a professional level, but also on a personal level. It provides the individual with the opportunity to connect with others by providing a platform of health care, while also providing a helping hand that promotes not only short-term healing, but also long-term well-being. This makes nursing one of the most caring professions, as it provides the nurse with the opportunity to use his or her skills, and also to lend a hand above the duties of simple physical health care. In this way, nursing extends to caring for the whole person rather than the physical being alone. This is one of the major factors that has attracted me to the profession throughout my life.

According to Limon (2001), there are four central concepts that are central to the metaparadigm of nursing, including the person…… [Read More]

References

Kocisko, D. (2010, Jan 23). Counselor, patient advocate, researcher, teacher -- and nurse: A Nurse's Journal. Retrieved from:  http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2010/01/counselor_patient_advocate_res.html 

Limon, C. (2007). The Components of the Metaparadigm for Nursing. Nutrition and Health Hub. Retrieved from: http://smalldogs2.com/NutritionHealthHub/The_Components_of_the_Metaparadigm_for_Nursing.html
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Nurse Assessment the Overall Health Care Profession

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18563301

Nurse Assessment

The overall health care profession is undergoing fundamental change due in part to new laws and regulations. These laws and regulations, although well intended may result in unintended consequences for the nursing profession overall. Turnover, in particular is a critical aspect of the health care profession. Turnover creates added costs to the firm, while also sacrificing both care and service. In the future, the role of a nurse will be fundamentally altered. For one, regulation such as the Affordable Care Act will result in an entire population of insured patients needing care. As such, the role of a nurse will ultimately be predicated on a more individualized basis with specialization in certain aspects. Reducing turnover therefore will now become paramount to overall viability of the healthcare firm. The population at risk, due in part to regulation, is now society as a whole. Nurses due in part to this…… [Read More]

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Nursing Kidney Nursing Perceptions and

Words: 2121 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89660948

(2008). The study measures public opinion concerning two scenarios: one in which the kidney donor is given a fixed financial compensation; and one in which the donor is provided with health insurance coverage for life. According to the findings of the study, "although almost half of the respondents (46%) were reluctant towards introducing a system with fixed compensation to increase the number of living kidney donors, still 25% of the general public reacted positively." (Kranenburg, 1039) This study would conduct a similar comparative discussion, but would expand the number of available options discussed and would use a different sample population, as discussed in the subsequent section.

Subjects and Sampling Technique:

The subjects will be drawn from amongst nursing professionals working in randomly selected renal specialty facilities and wards. Initial contact will be made by phone with a Director of Nursing at selected facilities requesting participation. Those that agree will receive…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Conesa, C.; Rios, a.; Ramirez, P.; Sanchez, J.; Sanchez, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Martinez, L.; Ramos, F. & Parrilla, P. (2009). Attitude of Primary Care Nurses Toward Living Kidney Donation. Transplantation Proceedings, 37(9), 3626-3630.

Kranenburg, L.; Schram, a.; Zuidema, W.; Weimar, W.; Hilhorst, M.; Hessing, J. & Busschbach, J. (2008). Public Survey of Financial Incentives for Kidney Donation. Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 23(3), 1039-1042.

Neyhart, C. & Colaneri, J. (2004). Living Anonymous kidney donation: A solution to the organ donor shortage? Nephrology Nursing Journal. Online at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0ICF/is_3_31/ai_n17207253/

Watson, J. (2007). Theory of Human Caring: Theory Evolution. University of Colorado at Denver. Online at http://www.nursing.ucdenver.edu/faculty/jw_evolution.htm
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Nursing Statistics Sampling and Results

Words: 878 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26815540



In interacting, factors may also modify each other:

nurse who might return to work for a higher salary might decide to do so only later when her children are older. The incentive of salary is therefore modified by the factor of young children.

The table is significantly complicated by the inclusion of more than two factors:

Any combination of the factors could result in the majority of nurses returning to work. Individually, each nurse has his or her own motivations for doing so.

The iterative proportional fitting procedure can be used to calculate expected frequencies.

Note: pecifically, the indication of this study is that nurses would return to work were certain factors in the work situation to change. pecifically, the highest frequencies are assigned to work load and hours. These are also the two most common factors in causing burnout and stress in the profession. Concomitantly, if inactive nurses were…… [Read More]

Sources

StatSoft, Inc. (2008). Log-Linear Analysis of Frequency Tables. http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/stloglin.html

Williams, Kimberly a., Stotts, R., Jacob, Susan R., Stebauer, Cheryl C.; Roussel, Linda, & Carter, Donna (2006, April). Inactive Nurses: A source for alleviating the nursing shortage? In Journal of Nursing Administration, Vol. 36(4).
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Nursing Ethical Compassion in Nursing What Personal

Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68126975

Nursing

Ethical Compassion in Nursing

hat personal, cultural, and spiritual values contribute to your worldview and philosophy of nursing? How do these values shape or influence your nursing practice?

The role played by the nurse professional is highly consequential to the health outcomes experiences by patients. This means that the nursing profession must be highly regulated by clearly defined and positively reinforced ethical provisions. These provisions are given by the ANA Nursing Code of Ethics and, in my personal experiences, are imperative as a way of dictating how we, as professionals, are expected to engage patients, required to relate to colleagues and trained to respect human dignity. This connection between ethicality and treatment quality contributes both to my personal worldview and to the broader field of nursing. ith specific reference to my experiences in the NICU and maternity wards, this connection takes on particular importance. Here, quality outcomes mean sound,…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Allen, D.E., & Vitale-Nolen, R.A. (2005). Patient care delivery model improves nurse job satisfaction. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing, 36(6), 277-282.

ANA. (2004). The Nurses Code of Ethics. The Center for Ethics and Human Rights.
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Nursing With the Intention of

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10486000

This is one of the many reasons I look forward to being able to work within my own community. Nurses are at the forefront of community outreach and community betterment. As I get to know the local physicians, administrators, and program leaders, I can become a more effective member of the health care community.

In the future I intend to serve my community in a position of leadership, as a coordinator for healthcare services. I want to apply family systems theory to my nursing practice, because I see a growing demand for more collaborative methods of intervention that support rather than deny the role of family systems. With a great sensitivity to diversity in terms of religion and culture, I will be of great service to the local patient population.

While with the Post Masters Nurse Practitioner Program, I will improve my communications and networking skills because I believe in…… [Read More]

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Nurse Jobs Increase the Proportion of Nurses

Words: 568 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8878158

Nurse Jobs

Increase the proportion of nurses with baccalaureate degrees to 80% by 2020

By increasing the proportion of nurses with advanced degrees, health care firms can hire skilled workers at a lower cost. In has been proven that workers are, in many instances, the highest cost insured by businesses. By increasing the level of baccalaureate degrees for nurses to 80%, competition is enhanced significantly. This competition ultimately will lower labor costs for businesses. Through this competition, potential employees will work for less money as the supply of labor outweighs the demand for labor. Therefore, it is my belief that to compete in this market, potential candidates must possess skills that differentiate themselves relative to peers in the industry. Aspects such as interpersonal skills, which are highly desirable within the health care profession, would become highly sought after. In addition, transferrable skills such as leadership and communication skills would be…… [Read More]

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Nursing Is There a Limit to One's

Words: 741 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72521533

Nursing

Is there a limit to one's professional obligation to the patient? Is that the same as advocacy?

Advocacy can be construed as a professional obligation to the patient, especially when advocacy is framed as an ethical obligation. There are therefore few limits to a nurse's ethical responsibilities to the patients, even though some situations may seem morally ambiguous. Many nursing researchers promote the concept of patient advocacy as "an ethic of practice," one that is an immutable part of the professional responsibilities of the nurse. (Gaylord & Grace, 1995, p. 11).

Are the characteristics of caring relevant to 2010?

The characteristics of caring are more relevant in 2011 than they were in 2010 or have ever been before, in part because of increasing patient diversity. Knowledge of the different concepts of health, healing, illness, and the role of the doctor helps make nurses more accountable to patient needs. Viewing…… [Read More]

References

Beyea, S.C. (2005). Patient advocacy: nurses keeping patients safe. AORN Journal. On FindArticles. Retrieved online: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FSL/is_5_81/ai_n13793213/

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics 2(1): 11-18.

Hanks, R.G. (2008). The lived experience of nursing advocacy. Nursing Ethics 15(4): 468-477

Vaartio, H., Leino-Kilpi, H., Salantera, S. And Suominen, T. (2006), Nursing advocacy: how is it defined by patients and nurses, what does it involve and how is it experienced?. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 20: 282 -- 292. doi: 10.1111/j.1471-6712.2006.00406.x
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Nursing Knowledge Patterns of Knowing in Nursing

Words: 839 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58863827

Nursing Knowledge

Patterns of Knowing in Nursing

There is a great abundance of information available to us in the universe. Every second, we are bombarded with thousands if not millions of tiny facts arriving through the unbidden working of our sensory organs, each of which is quietly and usually subconsciously processed by the brain; active study engages other parts of our grey matter, and quickly creates a store of facts and associations; and ultimately all information is judged against the framework that is continuously being constructed from previous information. In addition to these different processes for analyzing, categorizing, and associating information, there are also different types of knowledge, several if not all of them working on subconscious and unconscious levels, that help to inform the way in which the world is perceived and responded to. These are both different subject areas and different ways of viewing the world and receiving…… [Read More]

References

Chinn, P. & Kramer, M. (2008). Integrated knowledge development in nursing. St. Louis: Mosby.

Lafferty, P. (1997). "Balancing the curriculum: promoting aesthetic knowledge in nursing.." Nurse education today 17(4), pp. 281-6.

Milligan, F. (1999). "Beyond the rhetoric of problem-based learning: emancipatory limits and links with andragogy." Nurse education today 19(7), pp. 548-55.
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Nursing Risks When Dealing With

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37292338



Characteristics of Nursing Employment Settings Without Collective Bargaining

Collective bargaining, which is what is done by unions, is generally thought by most people to be beneficial, but there are some health care settings where the nurses choose not to be part of collective bargaining agreements or unions. These employment settings are generally characterized by nurses who have an affinity for their job, and who would do that job as a volunteer if they did not get paid. In other words, these nurses believe that they are doing what is right for their patients, and that is what matters to them. Sure, many of them have bills to pay and mouths to feed at home, and they understand the value of their paycheck. However, they want to be paid on the merits of what they are doing, not because a big group of people got together and said that they were…… [Read More]

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Nursing Associations the Benefits of

Words: 4670 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31671067

In the emergency room, this distinction can have a determinant impact on the ability of the staff to preserve life and diminish pain and suffering.

The introduction of a bioethical perspective into this dialogue invokes a question as to the primacy of an interest in pursuing to the utmost the well-being of the patient. This speaks to one of the core values associating the principles of the ANA with the treatment outcomes desired in patiences. An examination of the ANA's Code of Ethics reveals that a theoretical basis exists to contend a direct correlation between the nurse's self-interest and that which is best for any given patient. There exists an essential obligation for such healthcare practitioners to "examine the conflicts arising between their own personal and professional values, the values and interests of others who are responsible for patient care and health care decisions, as well as those of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

American Nurse's Association (ANA). (2004). The Nurses Code of Ethics. The Center for Ethics and Human Rights. Online at .

The American Organization of Nurse Executives (AONE). (2009). AONE Resource Center. www.aone.org.

Dimaria, R.A. & Ostrow, L. (2004). West Virginia University School of Nursing Makes the Move to Web-Based Learning. Technological Horizons in Education Journal, 31.

Emergency Nurses Association (ENA). (2008). Vision/Mission Statements and Code of Ethics. www.ena.org.
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Nursing I Want to Be

Words: 568 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81906416

Nurses are rarely alone and assistance is usually right outside but if someone falls, has a seizure, or requires me to move them immediately, I should be able to handle it. Nurses also do a lot of walking on shift so I should be able to walk around all day without any trouble.

While these are the top skills I will need to focus on to be a nurse, I will also need to be able to manage those around people around me, complete paperwork efficiently, and possibly work with finances. The best skill a nurse can have, however, is patience. For me, being a nurse in the future means not only doing my routine duties, but being a good listener when patients need to talk. I must have a sharp eye for details that may help patients avoid complications and needs to be intelligent who can multi-task and prioritize…… [Read More]

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Nurse Summaries Effects of Nursing

Words: 724 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90500427

The survey population included hospital administrators and physicians as well as registered and practicing nurses, and as such it provides a comprehensive view of this issue. The research was also able to not certain key differences in perception amongst these groups as to thee likely effects of an ongoing nursing shortage, including some major differences in perception between nurses and hospital administrators, and it is suggested that this will serve as a barrier to implementing necessary changes; working to bring expectations of all stakeholders more in line would be ideal, and this research can accomplish this and ground perceptions in empirical evidence.

Buerhaus, P. (2011). Nurses Assess the Impact of the Shortage of RNs on Hospitals,

Nurses, and Quality of Patient Care. Sigma Theta Tau Biennial Convention

[conference paper].

In this research, also a survey study that aimed to obtain qualitative results regarding nurse stress and reactions to the nursing…… [Read More]

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Nursing Nurse Has Traditionally Been

Words: 1592 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65390326

Perhaps a nurse must also be given a say in the way in which the entire healthcare system is being run today, especially since it is a nurse who is the closest to the patient, and who is completely responsible for the daily care of the patient, and it is a nurse who would put the patient on the road to recovery. A nurse would then be allowed and be given a chance to make use of her education, her leadership training, her skills in mass communication and her management skills in order to further the interest of the patient. The International Council of Nurses in Geneva, Switzerland has summarized the various duties of nurses today, as they increasingly take part in important decision making processes, as follows: 'strategic planning, budgeting, efficient resource planning and utilization, and the planning, management and evaluation of programs and services'. (Akinci, 2007) it can…… [Read More]

References

Akinci, Ugur. (2007, Jun) "More nurses in decision making roles, prospects and challenges" Retrieved 16 November, 2007 at http://www.nurse-recruiter.com/articles/misc/more_nurses_in_decision_making_roles.html

Allen, Davina. (2001) "The changing shape of nursing practice"

Routledge.

Beaulieu, Elise M. (2002) "A guide for nursing home social workers." Springer
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Nursing How Can Nurses Use

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44106968



Why should nurses recognize nursing expertise varies with education, experience and context of practice?

Nurses should recognize nursing expertise differs from person to person because of varying experience levels, forms of education, and context of practice. This is substantial knowledge for nurses to remember for several reasons. For one, it will help nurses better understand their colleagues (Husted, 2008). For example, a nurse who attended a better school than their colleague, will be more understanding if their colleague under performs or is hesitant in comparison because he or she had a higher quality education (Husted, 2008). Conflicts between colleagues are less likely to arrive when there is an understanding that performance among each other may differ due to varying circumstances. (Benner, 2009).

In addition, nurses should retain that their coworkers expertise will most likely not be the same due to the varying routes everyone takes to the medical field and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Apker J., Propp K.M., Ford W.S.Z., Wallac N., Serbenski M., & Hofmeister N. (2006).

Collaboration, Credibility, Compassion, and Coordination: Professional Nurse

Communication Skill Sets in Health Care Team Interactions. Journal of Professional Nursing 22 (3), 180-189.

Benner P.E., Tanner C.A., Chelsa C.A. (2009). Expertise in Nursing Practice: Caring,
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Nursing Changes in Nursing Discuss

Words: 1076 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64168306



In what ways did the wave of the nursing shortage in the 1980's and in 2000 support or constrain theoretical thinking? Why? Are there ways to influence the cycle of shortage and theoretical thinking? Identify one nursing theorist that would support your discussion/views. Provide rationale for selection of theorist.

Nursing shortages have been a problem in this country for a long time. It has been found that because of these shortages there needed to be a better way to incorporate theoretical thinking into nursing education so that nurses are better prepared to be the best that they can be. The accomplishment of critical thinking abilities has been recognized as an essential product of undergraduate nursing teaching. It has been found that nursing scholars learn best by way of experiential education. Kolb's experiential learning theory is the basis for a practice incorporation technique intended to offer critical thinking skills in undergraduate…… [Read More]

References

Experiential Learning (Kolb). (2008). Retrieved September 30, 2010, from Web site:

 http://www.learning-theories.com/experiential-learning-kolb.html 

Kim, Hesook Suzie. (2010). The Nature of Theoretical Thinking in Nursing. Retrieved September 29, 2010, from Web site:

http://www.springerpub.com/samples/9780826105875_chapter.pdf
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Nursing Practice Changes

Words: 727 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39815924

Nursing: Today and Throughout History

The occupation of nursing has been around for almost all of history in some form or another. In the ancient Roman Empire are found records of the nursing practice, where nurses provided care to in-patients at local Roman hospitals. In Constantinople—the Rome of the East—nurses were “known as hypourgoi” (Kourkouta, 1998). These nurses (both male and female) were tasked with jobs much like today’s nurses: they provided a wide variety of services to patients. Kourkouta (1998) states that the main tasks of the hypourgoi (male nurses) and hypourgisses (female nurses) were to give “psychological support of patients, everyday care of patients’ bodily needs and elementary comfort, cleaning of patients and providing them with proper food, the administration of medicines according to a doctor’s instructions, supervising wards when the physicians were not present, the performance of enemas, cuppings and bloodletting, the main therapeutic means used at…… [Read More]

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Nursing and Religion Practice Religion and Nursing

Words: 2267 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 452423

Nursing and eligion Practice

ELIGION AND NUSING PACTICE

Nursing success depends on the ability to put the patient in a state of rest and comfort as much as it is about administering the prescriptions of the doctor. To secure the rest of the patient, nurses need to understand their needs and show respect to their beliefs and values. This requires courteous and open communication with the patient and adopting a patient-centric orientation. Along with other factors, the religious background of the patient makes a lot of difference to their values and expectations. eligious doctrines and practices may differ across religions and denominations such as Jehovah's Witnesses, Muslims, Seventh Day Adventists and Scientologists and may impose restrictions on certain kinds of interaction between nurse and patient or on certain forms of treatment. Moreover, people with a different religious background are not usually aware of such differences. Therefore, it is necessary for…… [Read More]

References

Banja, J.D. (2010). Overriding the Jehovah's Witness patient's refusal of blood: A reply to Cahana, Weibel, and Hurst. Pain Medicine, 10(5), 878-882. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00648.x.

Charles, C.E., & Daroszewski, E.B. (2012). Culturally competent nursing care of the Muslim patient, Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 33(1), 61-63. doi: 10.3109/01612840.2011.596613.

Cort, M., & Cort, D. (2008). Willingness to participate in organ donation among Black Seventh-Day Adventist college students. Journal of American College Health, 56(6), p. 691-697. Retrieved from EBSCO Academic Search Primer.

Effa-Heap, G. (2009). Blood transfusion: Implications of treating a Jehovah's Witness patient. British journal of nursing, 18(3), 174-177.
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Nurse Self-Care Nurses as Primary

Words: 936 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6712258

739, p=0.009, e?=0.727). This study clearly highlighted that sleep shortage and work fatigue poses a threat to patient safety and that nurse self-care is warranted.[Dorrian et.al, (2006)]

Nurse Support Services

An earlier Australian study by Moore KA (2001) which observed 201 nurses working in three different hospitals had concluded that organizational restructuring policies and the consequent work overload was a high stressor for nurses and this was made worse by the poor communication style (top -- down approach instead of consultative style) that only contributed more to nurse burnout. [Moore KA, (2001)]. Given the high levels of occupational stress and burnout among nurses, it is important that nurse self-care interventions are prioritized. A recent literature review on the subject of work stress and coping methods among Australian nurses revealed that 'work load ', 'role conflict' and 'expression of aggression' were the three main stressors. The literature study also revealed 'seeking…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Linda H. Aiken, 'Image of Nursing Global Trends', retrieved Sep 4th 2010, from,  http://www.fpnl.co.za/downloads/Presentations/Presentations/Prof%20Linda%20Aiken%20-%20Image%20of%20Nursing%20-%20Global%20Trends.pdf 

2) Jillian Dorrian, Nicole Lamond & Cameron Van del Heuvel et.al (Oct 2006), 'A Pilot study of the Safety Implications of Australian Nurses' Sleep and Working Hours', Chronobiology International, Vol 23, Issue 6, pg 1149-1163

3) Lim J, BOGOSSIAN F. & AHERN K. (2010), ' Stress and coping in Australian nurses: a systematic review. International Nursing Review 57, 22-31

4) Moore KA, (2001), 'Hospital restructuring: impact on nurses mediated by social