Obsessive Compulsive Disorder Essays (Examples)

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Neurotransmission OCD and the Psychotropic

Words: 2322 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76916718



Discussion

Though a great deal more is known about neurotransmission today than was known at the beginning of the research associated with the initial biological discoveries of neurotransmitters and the neurotransmission process there is still a great deal to be discovered. Neurotransmission disorganization and impairment is clearly identified as a pervasive aspect of many psychological disorders. This is particularly true of the anxiety disorders and OCD. There is no doubt that increased understanding of the various mechanisms of OCD and normal neurotransmission will add to a greater research understanding of the biological causalities and modalities of OCD.

Though the most simplistic and earliest neurotransmission disturbance theories have been largely discounted the research has created ample evidence of disturbances in neurotransmission function (in more complex terms) as the root cause of several psychological disorders including various forms of anxiety disorders the subgroup which OCD falls into.

…this research has revealed the…… [Read More]

References

Goodman, W.K., Rudorfer, M.V., & Maser, J.D. (Eds.). (2000). Obsessive-compulsive disorder contemporary issues in treatment. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Hollander, E. Allen, A. Steiner, M. Wheadon, D.E. Oakes, R. Burnham, D.B. (September 2003) Acute and long-term treatment and prevention of relapse of obsessive-compulsive disorder with paroxetine. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 64(9) 1113-1121.

Howland, R.H. (2005). Chapter 6 Biological bases of psychopathology. In Psychopathology: Foundations for a Contemporary Understanding, Maddux, J.E. & Winstead, B.A. (Eds.) (pp. 109-119). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Liebowitz, M.R. Turner, S.M. Piacentini, J. Beidel, D.C. Clarvit, S.R. Davies, S.O. Graae, F. Jaffer, M. Lin, S. Sallee, F.R. Schmidt, A.B. Simpson, H.B. (December 2002) Fluoxetine in Children and Adolescents With OCD: A Placebo-Controlled Trial Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 41(12) 1431-1438.
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Self-Regulation Issues in Children and Adolescents With ADHD ODD and OCD

Words: 6305 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39399907

Self-egulation Issues in Children and Adolescence with ADHD, ODD, and OCD

Self-regulation in children and adolescence who suffer from ADHD, ODD, and OCD (Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Oppositional Defiant Disorder) is often evident due to several things. A lot of the issues in relation to self-regulation stem from additional anxiety the child/teen may feel from the difficulties experienced from these kinds of mental disorders. OCD is known to cause anxiety and isolationist behaviors leading to decreased emotional self-regulation. ADHD at times can cause hyperfocus, making it difficult for the child/teen to switch tasks therefore limiting their ability to handle their emotions and activities that assist in regulating themselves. ODD, connected to ADHD, is a disorder that has the child react angrily and spitefully to people in otherwise normally responsive situations. The extreme feelings of children or adolescence who manifest ODD make it hard for them to…… [Read More]

References

Barkley, R.A. (2013). Oppositional Defiant Disorder: The Four Factor Model for Assessment and Management - by Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D. Retrieved from  http://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course079.php 

Blum, K., Chen, A.L., & Oscar-Berman, M. (2008). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and reward deficiency syndrome. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 4(5), 893-918. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2626918/ 

Campbell, S.B. (1990). Behavior problems in preschool children: Clinical and developmental issues. New York: Guilford Press.

Cheng, M., & Boggett-Carsjens, J. (2005). Consider Sensory Processing Disorders in the Explosive Child: Case Report and Review. Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 14(2), 44-48.
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Gwas OCD and Genes

Words: 3400 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35243323

Personal Details of Student

Family Name: ooney

Given Name (s) Bridget

Student Number (SID): 312165250

Email (University email only) broo2460@uni.sydney.edu.au

GWAS OCD

Assignment number (if applicable): #1

Becker

Genetics of Brian and Mind Disorders

Academic Honesty -- all forms of plagiarism and unauthorized collusion are regarded as academic dishonesty by the university, resulting in penalties including failure of the unit of study and possible disciplinary action. A module of academic honesty and plagiarism is at http://elearning.library.usyd.edu.au/learn/plagiarism/index.php .

Declaration:

I / We have read and understood the University of Sydney Student Plagiarism: Coursework Policy and Procedure (which can be found at sydney.edu.au/senate/policies/Plagiarism.pdf).

I / We understand that failure to comply with the Student plagiarism: coursework Policy and Procedure can lead to the University commencing proceedings against me / us for potential student misconduct under Chapter 8 of the University of Sydney By-Law 1999 (as amended).

3. This work is substantially my…… [Read More]

References

Ahmari, S. E., Spellman, T., Douglass, N. L., Kheirbek, M. A., Simpson, H. B., Deisseroth, K., ... & Hen, R. (2013). Repeated cortico-striatal stimulation generates persistent OCD-like behavior. Science, 340(6137), 1234-1239.

Arnold, P., Sicard, T., Burroughs, E. et al. (2006). Glutamate Transporter Gene SLC1A1 Associated With Obsessive-compulsive Disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 63(7), p.769.

Baxter, A., Scott, K., Vos, T. and Whiteford, H. (2012). Global prevalence of anxiety disorders: a systematic review and meta-regression. Psychological Medicine, 43(05), pp.897-910.

Barrett, P., Healy-Farrell, L. & March, J. S. (2004). Cognitive behavioral family treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder: a controlled trial. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry . 43, 46-62.
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Genome Wide Association Study Analysis for OCD Complications

Words: 2050 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12779863

Genome-Wide Association Study for OCD Complications

The OCD (Obsessive -- compulsive disorder) is referred as repetitive behaviors and thoughts experienced by individuals. (Visscher, Brown, McCarthy, et al. (2012). Typically, the genes' characteristics of twins and families have revealed that the OCD has the feature of multifactorial familial condition involving both environmental and polygenic factors. (Moran, 2013). Genetic studies have revealed that the interaction of the glutamatergic, serotonergic, and dopaminergic systems and genes affecting them play a crucial role in functioning of the circuit. (Yang, Lee, Goddard, Mand et al. 2011). Meanwhile, the environmental factors that include psychological trauma, adverse perinatal effects and neurological trauma may modify the risk genes, which can consequently manifest the compulsive-obsessive behaviors. (Visscher, Brown, McCarthy et al. 2012). The OCD is a frequent and, relative common debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder affecting 2% of the U.S. population. (Arnold, Sicard, Burroughs, et al. (2006). Typically, the OCD is obsessions…… [Read More]

Reference

Arnold, P., Sicard, T., Burroughs, E. et al. (2006). Glutamate Transporter Gene SLC1A1 Associated With Obsessive-compulsive Disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 63(7), p.769.

Baxter, A., Scott, K., Vos, T. and Whiteford, H. (2012). Global prevalence of anxiety disorders: a systematic review and meta-regression. Psychological Medicine, 43(05), pp.897-910.

Barrett, P., Healy-Farrell, L. & March, J. S. (2004). Cognitivebehavioral family treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder: a controlled trial. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry . 43, 46-62.

Cantor, R., Lange, K. and Sinsheimer, J. (2010). Prioritizing GWAS Results: A Review of Statistical Methods and Recommendations for Their Application. The American Journal of Human Genetics, 86(1):.6-22.
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Difficulty of Giving Therapy to OCD Patients

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45733320

Difficulty of Treating Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety disorders are difficult to treat for a multitude of reasons; first, there is no 100% proven-to-be-effective method of therapy that acts as a one-size-fits-all treatment for patient. Behavioral therapy is used by some therapists; others utilize medical therapy, such as Zoloft, Paxil or other prescriptions. Psychosurgery is also an option for patients who do not respond well to either treatments, but such surgery requires literally burning part of the brain and is noted as only having a 50% success rate (Psych Guides, 2015). The bottom line is that anxiety disorders are a complicated manifestation of an underlying issue within the human psyche for which medical science only has a limited understanding.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most difficult to treat primarily because it requires a strong and durable commitment to transformative behavior therapy such as cognitive behavior therapy. In cases where patients…… [Read More]

References

Psych Guides. (2015). Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.psychguides.com/guides/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-treatment-program-options/

Sasson, Y., Zohar, J., Chopra, M., Hendler, T. (1997). Epidemiology of obsessive, compulsive disorder: A world view. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 12(12): 7-10.

Wexler, E. (2013). Clinical neurologists: behavioral management of inherited neurodegenerative disease. Neurologic Clinics, 31(4): 1121-1144.
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Questions OCD and PTSD

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48316131

ABC/123 Version X

Week Five eview Worksheet

PSY/203 Version

Week Five eview Worksheet

Choose two categories of psychological disorders and outline the main symptoms associated with the disorders.

The old classification system for psychological disorders only had two kinds, neurosis and psychosis with people suffering from neurosis experiencing anxiety and people with psychosis suffering from hallucinations. Now psychological disorders are categorized even further. The two selected are from the category of anxiety disorders. The first is PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder. The second is OCD or obsessive-compulsive disorder. There are other classifications, the somatoform disorders and dissociative disorders. The three main symptoms of PTSD revolve around re-experiencing the traumatic scenario. The afflicted person will experience nightmares, upsetting memories, flashbacks, including feels of distress (Barlow, 2001). The person will also experience intense physical reactions like nausea, sweating, and pounding heart. They will also try to avoid any remind of the trauma.…… [Read More]

References

Antony, M. & Barlow, D. (2002). Handbook of assessment and treatment planning for psychological disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

Barlow, D. (2001). Clinical handbook of psychological disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

Copyright © XXXX by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2015 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.
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The Aviator Howard Hughes OCD and Bipolar

Words: 1673 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38951893

Hughes would be diagnosed with bi-polar disorder, with differential diagnoses consisting of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and agoraphobia. As DSM-V (2013) states, the diagnostic criteria for Bipolar 1 Disorder are as stated, "For a diagnosis of bipolar 1 disorder, it is necessary to meet the following criteria for a manic episode. The manic episode may have been preceded by and may be followed by hypomanic or major depressive episodes" (p. 123). This diagnosis may very well apply to Howard Hughes, as throughout the film The Aviator, he demonstrates an impulsive personality and is not adverse to taking enormous risks, in which his entire fortune and even life are on the line. He alternates between manic-depressive moments, where he shuts himself away for months, and moments where he emerges as a king-of-the-world type of figure (as in the court room scene towards the end of the film, when he defends himself). These…… [Read More]

References

Campbell, G. (2001, May). The anxious client reconsidered: Getting beyond the symptoms to deeper change. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.proxy1.ncu.edu/docview/233312959?accountid=281

Chouinard, V. (2012). Mapping bipolar worlds: Lived geographies of 'madness' in autobiographical accounts. Health & Place, 18(2): 144-151.

Connolly, K., Thase, M. (2011). The clinical management of bipolar disorder: A review of evidence-based guidelines. Primary Care Companion for CNS Disorders, 13(4): 1-4.

Steketee, G. (2003). Clinical update: Obsessive compulsive disorder
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Cap OCD Dear Diary Okay

Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97004549

I don't understand it, it happens all the time -- a half-way decent looking girl gets a vision of a bald shiny statuette, and it's off with the lip gloss and suddenly she's making like Angelina Jolie in some sweaty country on a bad hair day.

More info on the secret room tomorrow, but I'm getting a way important IM right now, so I'll wrap it up.

Massie Block

Letter 1: Main Character to Secondary Character

Fourth Period

Dear Claire:

What's up with the new look (should I call it that)? I understand that you're trying to seriously pursue your acting art, but acting like someone who doesn't know the difference between Juicy Couture and Juicy tracksuits is no way to go! Can't you concentrate your energies on something that's really important, like finding the key to the secret room before Skye has taken up residence there for good? She'll…… [Read More]

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Obsessive Compulsive Personality Disorder

Words: 459 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58394795

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is a personality disorder connected with anxiety which is characterized by repeated thoughts and behavior. epeated thoughts, feelings compose the obsessive part of the disorder while actual drive to do those actions repeatedly falls under the compulsive category. A person suffering from this condition would succumb to the drive and engage repeatedly in those actions just to get rid of the feeling but it only helps him temporarily. Failure to engage in the actions can result in serious anxiety attack.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Like most personality disorders, the causes of OCD are unknown. Several theories have surfaced regarding the causes but none is universally accepted or agreed upon. Some studies have connected the disorder with brain abnormalities but only further research can confirm this. It is known that those who eventually display OCD usually start developing symptoms by the age of 30.…… [Read More]

References

1. Blais MA, Smallwood P, Groves JE, Rivas-Vazquez RA. Personality and personality disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. 1st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2008:chap 39.

2. Feinstein RE, Connelly JV. Personality disorders. In: Rakel RE, ed. Textbook of Family Medicine. 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier;2007:chap 60.
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Theoretical Analysis of Obsessive Compulsive

Words: 3218 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49908541

Clinically meaningful differences between juvenile and adult participants were also found. Compared to adults, juveniles were more likely to be male, recall an earlier age at OCD onset, and have different lifetime comorbidity patterns. Significant outcomes were that children were less likely than either adolescent or adults to report aggressive obsessions and mental rituals.

The glaring - and possibly only -- distractions that I see with this study are that groups are ill matched. There is a large range of ages even amongst each group (children ranged between 6-12 whilst adolescents ranged between 13-18); they were ill-matched in OCD symptoms too; there were far less children than adolescents; and adults more than doubled the size of the juvenile and children group combined. Self-reported OCD symptom could have been produced by an alternate factor (another determinant) that was not taken into account. What could have been taken then as start of…… [Read More]

References

Abramowitz, J. (1997) Effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a quantitative review Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 57, 1-35

Fineberg, N.A. & Gale, T.M. (2005). Evidence-based pharmacotherapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder. Int J. Neuropsychopharmacol; 8, 107-29.

Foa, E.B. & Goldstein, a. (1978) Continuous exposure and complete response prevention in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive neurosis. Behav Ther; 9, 821-9.

Freeman, J.B. et al. (2008). Early Childhood OCD: Preliminary Findings From a Family-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Approach J. Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 47, 593 -- 602
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Compulsive Hoarding Is a Disorder That Is

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23295665

Compulsive hoarding is a disorder that is characterized by an inability discarding items that to most people appear to have little or no value. This inability to throw things away results in an accumulation of clutter that often leads to an inability to use living areas and workspaces for their intended functions. Moreover, the clutter can lead to potential serious health conditions and to safety risks of the hoarder or others.

In order for a person to meet criteria to qualify for a diagnosis of compulsive hoarding the person must experience significant personal distress and/or impairment in their functioning due to their hoarding behaviors. More often it is the impairment in functioning that qualifies someone for a diagnosis as the hoarding behavior serves to reduce anxiety in the person associated with discarding items. Several types of functional impairment seen in hoarders include: health or fire hazards due to clutter or…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental

Disorders, IV- Text Revision. Washington, DC: Author.

Sadock, B.J., and Sadock, V.A., (2007). Kaplan and Sadock's Synopsis of Psychiatry:

Behavioral Sciences/Clinical Psychiatry (10th edition). Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
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Compulsive Hoarding Due to Childhood

Words: 4019 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62247855

" (p. 12) According to Cromer (2005) the literature that addresses the relationship between stressful life events and obsessive compulsive disorders does provide some degree of support implicating traumatic life-stress as being a factor in the onset and maintenance of the obsessive compulsive disorders however the exact relationship between the SLE and OCD "remains an empirical questions" specifically relating to "traumatic negative life events" (2005; p.13) Most of studies in this area investigation the association between SLEs and OCD have held limitations of: (1) small sample sizes; and (2) difficulty of establishing retrospectively the temporal relationship between onset and SLEs; and (3) a limited scope with regard to the effect of SLEs on OCD. (2005; p.13) Cromer relates that "mounting evidence suggests that early life-stress, in particular may preferentially incline individuals to develop adult psychiatric disorders." (2005; p.13) McCauley et al. (1997) states evidence from a large epidemiological investigation that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beamish, Patricia M. And Hill, Nicole R. (2007) Treatment outcomes for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a critical review.(Private Practices) Journal of Counseling and Development 22 Sept 20077. Online available at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-170413211.html

Bechtel, Robert B. And Ts'erts'Man, Arzah (2002) Handbook of Environmental Psychology. John Wiley and Sons Ltd.

Boston University School of Social Work (2007) Online available at http://www.bu.edu/ssw/training/pep/programs/workshops/boston/index.shtml

Cromer, Kiara R. (2005) a Pathoplastic Vulnerability Mode: An Association Between Traumatic Stressful Life Events & OCD. Florida State University 2005. Online available at http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses/available/etd-11/unrestricted/Cromer_Thesis_Nov_2005.pdf
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Realm of Psychological Disorder Through the Use

Words: 2202 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14333578

realm of psychological disorder through the use of a character assessment. The character in question is fictional and the data used to evaluate the psychological profile derives from a movie. Melvin Udall, the main character in the movie "As Good as It Gets" serves as the character used in this assessment. Ultimately, I find and explore specific links to Melvin's condition in the movie to that of one suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

In order to discuss the relationships previously mentioned, I needed to perform several steps in order to logically conclude that Melvin represents someone suffering from OCD symptoms. In order to accomplish this task, I first watched the film and examined many of the traits that Melvin demonstrated. Next, I used a set of ten questions which provided a baseline assessment formula. These questions are each answered separately within the body of this essay. This character assessment…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, L. (2009). A radical treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. The Guardian, 14 Dec 2009. Retrieved from http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/dec/15/obsessive-complusive-disorder- gamma-knife

Brooks, J.L. (1998) As Good As It Gets. Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear. Tristar Pictures.

Bouchard, C. Rheaume, J. Landouceru, R. (1998). Responsibility and perfectionism in OCD. Behavior Research Therapy 37 (1999). 239-248. Retrieved from http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/Homepage/Class/Psy394Q/Research%20Design%20Clas s/Assigned%20Readings/Experimental%20Psychopathology/Bouchard99.pdf

Eddy, M.F., & Walbroehl, G.S. (1998, April 1). Recognition and treatment of obsessive- compulsive disorder. American Family Physician, p. 1623-1632.  http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1623.html
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Eating Disorder and Gender

Words: 5075 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8532186

Eating Disorders and Gender

There are medical conditions which more commonly occur in one gender over another. These conditions can be either mental or physical. Very often, they are both mental and physical conditions. Certain medical situations are extremely severe and can potentially result in serious harm to the body or perhaps even death. There are certain conditions which being with a mental impression, a false belief that has been ingrained within the mind which then manifests itself in the body of the individual. One of the most common and most disturbing types of condition is known as an eating disorder. By this term, it is meant that the patient suffers a mental conditioning which makes them either unwilling or unable to eat in a healthy manner resulting in either over or under eating and malnutrition. Eating disorders such as bulimia and anorexia are the result of psychological issues on…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bates, Daniel. "Globalization of Fat Stigma: Western Ideas of Beauty and Body Size Catching

on in Developing Nations." Daily Mail. 2011. Print.

Battiste, Nikki & Lauren Effron."EDNOS: Deadliest Eating Disorder Is Quietly the Most

Common." ABC News. ABC News Network, 14 Nov. 2012. Web. 19 Nov. 2012. .
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Panic Disorder During Pregnancy and

Words: 1880 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57684873

The authors state, "underlying mechanism through which exposure to childhood abuse is associated with increased risk of panic cannot be determined based on these data alone" (p. 888). They offer several possible explanations. Exposure to abuse as a child may result in an extreme and realistic fear of threat to survival. This may be how panic disorder starts. Later, it may persist, or recur spontaneously, even without abusive conditions. In the face of a real life threat, panic is not pathological, but in childhood panic may make the child more vulnerable to panic later. Exposure to abuse may lead to biochemical changes that increase the risk of a disorder. Because the study was based on interviews with 18 to 21-year-olds, who were asked to recall past experiences, the findings could be contaminated by recall bias in which young people with mental instability might be more likely to report abuse in…… [Read More]

References

Bandelow, B., Sojka, F. et al. (2006). Panic disorder during pregnancy and postpartum period. European Psychiatry, 21, 495-500.

Biederman, J., Petty, C., Faraone, S.V. et al. (2006). Effects of parental anxiety disorders in children at high risk for panic disorder: A controlled study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 94, 191-197.

Goodwin, R.D., Fergusson, D.M. And Horwood, L.J. (2004). Childhood abuse and familial violence and the risk of panic attacks and panic disorder in young adulthood. Psychological Medicine, 35, 881-890.

Warren, S.L., Racu, C., Gregg, V. And Simmens, S.J. (2006). Maternal panic disorder: Infant prematurity and low birth weight. Anxiety Disorders, 20, 342-352.
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Diagnosis in Children

Words: 1668 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6767069

Attention Deficit HyperactivITY Disorder DIAGNOSIS IN CHILDEN

Historical ecords

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is a diverse behavioral set of symptoms described by the hub indication of impulsivity, hyperactivity and inattention. Even as, these symptoms have a tendency to gather together, some individuals are for the most part hyperactive and impetuous, even as others are predominantly inattentive. This disease affects both toddlers and adults of all ages and should be taken seriously. When this disease is being diagnosed in children, doctors often make quick decisions to make a diagnosis and handing out prescriptions. This should not be the case as doctors are supposed to take enough time to well analyze the condition of the children before offering prescriptions.

About Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

There are two main diagnostic decisive factors that are currently in use. These are the International Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders uses the initials (ICD-10) and the…… [Read More]

References

Honos-Webb, L. (2010). The gift of ADHD: How to transform your child's problems into strengths. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Kushner, T.K. (2010). Surviving health care: A manual for patients and their families.

Cambridge England: Cambridge University Press.

Nass, R.D. & Leventhal, F.,. (2011). 100 questions & answers about your child's ADHD: From
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Panic Disorder Counseling Panic Disorder

Words: 4240 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27767876

Apparent health can be generally positive or negative; in spite of how it links with the real health; it may be significant to comprehend its function in certain kinds of psychopathology. Negatively apparent health has been anticipated to symbolize a cognitive risk factor for panic disorder (PD), detached from elevated anxiety feeling. As a result, PD may be more likely to take place on a background of negative perceptions of one's health. A negatively perceived health may also have predictive implications for PD patients, bearing in mind that negatively perceived health has been found to be a considerable predictor of mortality in general and that individuals with panic-like anxiety indications, panic attacks, and PD have elevated mortality rates, mostly due to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular illnesses (Starcevick, Berle, Fenech, Milicevic, Lamplugh and Hannan, 2009).

Psychological

Studies have suggested that panic attacks (PA) are widespread and connected with an augmented occurrence of…… [Read More]

References

Carrera, M.; Herran, a.; Ramirez, M.L.; Ayestaran, a.; Sierra-Biddle, D.; Hoyuela, F.;

Rodriguez-Cabo, B.; Vazquez-Barquero, J.L..(2006). Personality traits in early phases of panic disorder: implications on the presence of agoraphobia, clinical severity and short-

term outcome. Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 114(6), p.417-425.

Craske, Michelle G., Kircanski, Katharina, Phil., C., Epstein, Alyssa, Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich,
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder ADHD

Words: 6369 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74077030

Often is forgetful in daily activities

10. Often has difficulty maintaining alertness, orienting to requests, or executing directions

11. Often fidgets with hands or feet or squirms in seat

12. Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected

13. Often runs about or climbs excessively in situations in which it is inappropriate

14. Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly

15. Often is "on the go" or often acts as if "driven by a motor"

16. Often talks excessively

17. Often blurts out answers before questions have been completed

18. Often has difficulty awaiting turn

19. Often interrupts or intrudes on others (e.g., butts into conversations/games)

20. Often has difficulty sitting still, being quiet,... inhibiting impulses in...classroom or at home

21. Often loses temper

22. Often argues with adults

23. Often actively defies or refuses adult requests or rules

24.…… [Read More]

References

The Columbia World of Quotations. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996. Retrieved April 16, 2008, at http://www.bartleby.com/66/3/33503.html

Cloward, Janessa. "ADHD drugs pose heart risks, federal panel says," University Wire, February 15, 2006. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P1118518952.html

DeMarle, Daniel J.;Denk, Larry;Ernsthausen, Catherine S.. "Working with the family of a child with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.(Family Matters)," Pediatric Nursing, July 1, 2003. Retrieved April 16, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1107215868.html

Edwards, Jason H.. "Evidenced-based treatment for child ADHD: "real-world" practice implications." Journal of Mental Health Counseling, April 1, 2002. Retrieved April 17, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-87015306.html
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Combat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Words: 1389 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31962980

Computer games were also effective in the treatment of people who underwent automobile accidents. Apparently, something as simple as computer games can serve as a therapy method for people suffering from PTSD. hile some might believe that such therapy techniques are not effective, patients were reported to display intense physical responses to them. Still, because therapists were quick to react to such demonstrations, matters were rapidly resolved and patients were exhibiting fewer symptoms as a result. By adapting the Health Belief Model to the needs of PTSD sufferers therapists succeeded in treating them. The patients did not show reluctance in being subjected to such methods of treatment, as they trusted that it would assist their psychological condition (Burke, Degeneffe & Olney).

Both the Social Cognitive Theory and the Health Belief Model are effective in treating people suffering from PTST. They differ through the fact that the former is applied indirectly…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Bhagar, H.A. & Schmetzer A.D. (2007). Pharmacotherapy of Combat-Related Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association 10.4.

2. Burke, H.S. & Degeneffe, C.E. & Olney, M.F. (2009). A New Disability for Rehabilitation Counselors: Iraq War Veterans with Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. The Journal of Rehabilitation 75.3.

3. Stein, D.J. & Hollander E. (2002). Anxiety Disorders Comorbid with Depression: Social Anxiety Disorder, Post-Traumatiac Stress Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. London: Martin Dunitz.
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Psychological Disorder

Words: 576 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92100674

Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Film

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as defined by the American Psychiatric Association (AMA), involves excessive worry and anxiety for a six-month period or longer (AMA 429). GAD is not typically associated with the more intense expressions of anxiety, such as panic attacks or panic disorder (Shelton S2), yet the degree of worry and anxiety experienced is easily recognized as disproportionate for the reality of the situation (AMA 473-475). A diagnosis depends in part on eliminating contributions from an underlying medical condition or the effects of a substance such as drugs or excessive caffeine, and the focus of the anxiety is not limited to a single concern, such as experiencing a panic attack or becoming deathly ill. The anxiety experienced therefore involves wide swaths of the patient's life.

Patients often report experiencing muscle tension, trembling, twitching, feeling shaky, muscle aches, soreness, sudden fatigue, irritability, and difficulty concentrating…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. New York: American Psychiatric Association, 2000. Print.

Analyze this. Dir. Harold Ramis. Perf. Robert De Niro, Billy Crystal, and Lisa Kudrow. Warner Brothers, 1999. Film.

Shelton, Charles I. Diagnosis and Management of Anxiety Disorders. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 104.3 (2004): S2-S5. Web.
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Panic Disorder a Branch of

Words: 1396 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18297443

The results were found to be similar with regards to the scales of CMAS (a 37 item measure), STAIC (for the 20 item state scale measure only), CDI (a 27 item measure) and FSSC- (an 80 item measure). The trait scale of STAIC showed a few variations but was not strong enough when the Bonferroni correction was applied. The CASI scale presented a higher occurrence in the second group compared to the first, regardless of Bonferroni corrections. This amounted to at least 16 of the 18 items. The remaining two items, recorded higher in the second group can be considered to be of an external nature. The origins of these differences were obtained using t-test analysis methods (Kearney, Albano, Eisen, Allan & Barlow, 1997)

Conclusions of the research

The conclusions drawn from the study participants with panic disorder revealed nausea, shivering, difficulties in breathing and increased heart rate as the…… [Read More]

References

Kearney, C, A, Albano, A, M, Eisen, A, R, Allan, W, D & Barlow, D, H. (1997) The Phenomenology of Panic Disorders in youngsters: Empirical Study of a Clinical sample, Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 2(1), 49-62
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Internet Addictive Disorder or Iad Is Defined

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57422039

Internet Addictive Disorder or IAD is defined in this paper as a "maladaptive behavior surrounding the use of the Internet," and it was established earlier that this kind of disorder is not yet formally recognized, most especially among the scientific community. IAD is significant and poses a crucial problem for every individual who gets acquainted with Internet use, and even though IAD may be difficult to define and determine accurately, the problems it poses to an individual and the society around him/her can be considered serious and critical.

This paper also discussed some behavioral patterns in which one can observed an individual or even one's self if they are afflicted with this kind of disorder. Primarily, IAD is considered to be type of an obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). Another theory says that IAD is only a "phasic" behavior, which can be rationally explained because of the overwhelming effect of Information Technology,…… [Read More]

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An effective'strategy in dealing with people with mental disorders

Words: 655 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22365821

Grand Canyon University (GCU) presents an inclusive doctorate course adaptable to every doctorate program. DNA represents a metaphor that denotes distinctive artifacts personalized by GCU’s doctorate course for simplifying pupils’ academic journey. The course is grounded in curricular and content development, research guidance, competences and acquaintance, and a detailed dissertation procedure (Gcumedia.com, 2017). The aim is: creation of an effectual, engaging, and stimulating academic experience for doctorate level pupils.

The campus provides corporate leadership and educational courses concentrating on cultivating accountability and knowledge with regard to the development and inspiration of superior- performance entities. The institution also offers other doctoral courses like philosophy in nursing practice, general phycology, and business administration. This course is grounded in the DNA system utilized for instilling economic, leadership and business capabilities among directors and educators. It is based on in- depth scientific, practical and abstract research. Learners imbibe skills that facilitate the application of…… [Read More]

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Autism Disorder The Writer Explores What it

Words: 4038 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91627778

autism disorder. The writer explores what it is and how it manifests itself. The writer also discusses the teaching methods that have been used to allow the autistic student to take part in a public education. There were ten sources used to complete this paper.

Each year millions of American couples add to their family with the birth of a baby. The pregnancy is spent getting ready for the newcomer. Names are chosen, baby items are purchased and stored and other people's children are discussed as examples of what might be produced by this child. The family becomes ready as they read up on the milestones that they can expect the baby to make at various times of the first few years of development.

By the time the baby is born the parents have studied the progress that can be expected and are ready to start their life as a…… [Read More]

References

Address: Richard L. Simpson, University of Kansas Medical Center, Department of Special Education, 3901 Rainbow Blvd., Kansas City, KS 66160-7335.

Simpson, Richard L.-Myles, Brenda Smith, Effectiveness of facilitated communication with children and youth with autism.. Vol. 28, Journal of Special Education, 01-01-1995, pp 424.

Murray, John B., Psychophysiological aspects of autistic disorders: overview.. Vol. 130, The Journal of Psychology, 03-01-1996, pp 145(14).

Simpson, Richard L.-Myles, Brenda Smith, Effectiveness of facilitated communication with children and youth with autism.. Vol. 28, Journal of Special Education, 01-01-1995, pp 424.
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Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and

Words: 3764 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56744836

The right medication stimulates these under-operating chemicals to make added neurotransmitters, thereby enhancing the child's potential to concentrate, have a check on the impulses, and lessen hyperactivity. Medication required to attain this usually needs a number of doses in the course of the day, since a single dose of medication remains effective for a short interval up to 4 hours. but, slow or timed-release types of medication for instance, Concerta would let a child having ADHD to go on to take the advantage of medication in an extended stretch of period. (Identifying and Treating Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A esource for School and Home)

Psycho-stimulant medications like MPH are considered to trigger auto-regulatory or control procedures, thus improving the basic restraint shortfall in children having ADHD. Documented experiments on stimulants have exhibited experimental favor for this hypothesis. For instance, the influences of MPH on reaction restraint employing the fundamental stop-signal…… [Read More]

References

Arcus, Doreen. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Gale Encyclopedia of Psychology. 2002. pp: 14-23

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. December 2001. Retrieved at http://www.reutershealth.com/wellconnected/doc30.html. Accessed on 8 December, 2004

Barabasz, Arreed; Barabasz, Marianne. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity, Disorder: Neurological Basis and Treatment Alternatives. Journal of Neurotherapy. Volume: 1; No: 1; p: 1. Retrieved at (http://www.snr-jnt.org/JournalNT/JNT (1-1)1.html. Accessed on 8 December, 2004

Bedard, Anne-Claude; Ickowicz, Abel; Logan, Gordon D; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Schachar, Russell; Tannock, Rosemary. Selective Inhibition in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Off and on Stimulant Medication. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology. June, 2003. Volume: 12; No: 1; pp: 90-93
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Female Substance Use Disorder Gender

Words: 2505 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21550261

..in their view, rather than promoting wholeness and recovery, the experience recreated the secrecy of abuse and fed the stigma associated with each of the three issues."

In the hopes of a more well-organized approach to providing these key services to women, the WELL project instituted a mechanism for promoting strategy and collaboration changes at the state, regional, and local levels. The WELL project also recommended an open dialogue between agencies as to better systems to put in place, and suggested giving individuals within each area of service "freedom to make change at any given moment" when a better approach can be taken by a trained professional healthcare provider.

Predominantly Female Caseloads: Identifying Organizational Correlates in Private Substance Abuse Treatment Centers, a piece in the Journal of Behavioral Health Services & esearch (Tinney, et al., 2004), speaks to the issue of the need for healthcare providers to be meeting "distinctive…… [Read More]

References

Conrad, Patricia J., Pihl, Robert O., Stewart, Sherry H., & Dongier, Maurice. (2000). Validation

Of a System of Classifying Female Substance Abusers on the Basis of Personality and Motivational Risk Factors for Substance Abuse. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 14(3),

Markoff, Laurie S., Finkelstein, Norma, Kammerer, Nina, Kreiner, Peter, & Prost, Carol a.

2005). Relational Systems Change: Implementing a Model of Change in Integrating
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Avoidant Personality Disorder

Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25899608

adults become susceptible to avoidant personality disorder.

Avoidant Personality Disorder

Avoidant Personality Disorder results in social constraint, feeling of insecurity and susceptibility towards criticism. Even if one want to socialize with others he is most often scared to. Being embarrassed in front of others horrifies individuals suffering from Avoidant Personality Disorders. As a result they usually withdraw themselves from social gatherings to avoid any sort of discomfort. John G. Gunderson in his article Childhood Antecedents of Avoidant Personality Disorder: A etrospective Study outlines the risk factors and primordial exhibition of Avoidant Personality Disorders by investigating present perspective reports of social functioning and antagonistic childhood encountering.

Primitive social operative and pathological childhood experiences were investigated through a childhood experience questionnaire. It was shocking to find out that around 146 adults out of 376 patients suffered from Avoidant Personality Disorder.

Adults with AVPD reported poorer child and adolescent athletic performance, less involvement…… [Read More]

References

Gunderson J. Childhood Antecedents of Avoidant Personality Disorder: A Retrospective

Study. 1 Sept. 2003.
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Bi-Polar Disorder in Medical Terms

Words: 627 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90377436



Since bipolar disorder has been shown to be a major cause of suicide, a number of U.S. studies have concluded that a person affected by this condition often shows signs and symptoms that may accompany suicidal feelings, such as talking or discussing suicide, having the feeling that "nothing will ever change or get better," that "nothing one does makes any difference" and feelings that the person is "a burden to family and friends." Also, the suicidal person may begin to abuse alcohol or illegal drugs like marijuana, cocaine and even heroin and proceed to put his/her affairs in order like "organizing finances or giving away possessions to prepare for one's death." Not surprisingly, such as person may also put him/herself in "harm's way or in situations where there is a danger of being killed" (2007, "Bipolar Disorder," Internet).

Clearly, a person with bipolar disorder will exhibit outward signs and indications…… [Read More]

References

2007). "Bipolar Disorder." National Institute of Mental Health. Internet. Retrieved at http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/bipolar-disorder/complete-publication.shtml.

Glanze, Walter D., Ed. (2002). Mosby's Medical, Nursing and Allied Health Dictionary.

St. Louis: C.V. Mosby Company.
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Diagnostics on Hoarding the Diagnostics

Words: 2647 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91521679

, 2011). Since hoarders are less likely to be married, it is possible that help for a hoarder who has fallen or otherwise become injured may be severely delayed. Sometimes, it can be too late. Fire is another danger faced by a hoarder. Such a large number of items can make a house more flammable, and also make it highly difficult to escape if a fire does get started (Saxena, et al., 2011). That is something that should be taken into consideration.

Impairment and Insight

The levels of impairment and insight vary with hoarders. Some of them see that they have a serious problem for which they need to get help, and some of them do not see what is wrong with the way they are living (Steketee, et al., 2010). They are generally very reluctant to part with any of their things, and they can become resentful of family…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, S.W. Domasio, H., & Domasio, A.R. (2005). A neural basis for collecting behaviour in humans. Brain, 128, 201-212

Frost, R. & Gross, R. (1993). The hoarding of possessions. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 31, 367-382

Saxena, S., Ayers, C.R., Maidment, K.M., Vapnik, T., Wetherell, J.:. Brstritsky, A. (2011). Quality of life and functional impairment in compulsive hoarding. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 45, 475-480

Steketee, G., Frost, R.O., Tolin, D.F., Rasmussen, J. & Brown, T.A. (2010). Waitlist-controoled trial of cognitive behavior therapy for hoarding disorder. Depression and Anxiety, 275, 476-484
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Bob Case Analysis of Anxiety

Words: 1074 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39062110

Mr. iley's agoraphobia is a matter of particular concern as this defensive response to his anxiety disorder has prevented the subject from engaging a normal, health, active, productive life. According to A.D.A.M. (2010), "panic disorder with agoraphobia is an anxiety disorder in which there are repeated attacks of intense fear and anxiety, and a fear of being in places where escape might be difficult, or where help might not be available. Agoraphobia usually involves fear of crowds, bridges, or of being outside alone." (A.D.A.M., p. 1) The fear of the outside world has inclined the subject in this case to increasingly shut himself off from others and from opportunities to experience life. The result, A.D.A.M. (2010) reports, is a deepening sense of isolation and a further descent into the irrational response mechanisms that have come to control Mr. iley's life.

Demographic Implications:

One major demographic concern for Mr. iley might…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia. (2010). Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia. PubMed Health.

DSM IV. (2010). DSM IV Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Criteria. Biological Unhapiness.com.

Malinckrodt, B.; Porter, M.J. & Kivlighan, D.M. (2005). Client Attachment to Therepist: Depth of In-Session Exploration, and Object Relations in Brief Psychotherapy. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 42(1), 85-100.
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Expectations of Psychology Prior to

Words: 1053 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66425707

All of the information I was gaining about a topic I had not previously understood was intriguing to me, and made me excited and ready to learn more. General Psychology I and Abnormal Psychology were my two favorite classes at Bergen, and I wanted to pursue additional psychology classes.

I transferred to Fairleigh Dickinson and enrolled in General Psychology II with the expectation that I would learn even more about psychology. I did not have an expectation as far as what topics would be covered in the course, but I did expect the material to be harder and more complex; I was right. I did not expect to study the biology and physiology of the brain, and I struggled with understanding and memorizing the material. Memorizing and understanding the parts of the brain and their function, such as the thalamus, cerebellum, brain stem, etc. did not appeal to me and…… [Read More]

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Passing for Normal by American

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30394984

She felt as if no one understood her conditions or why she was the way she was and because it took her longer to accept herself for who she was, she could not have a full understanding of having Tourette's and OCD meant to her or anyone else. It was until she fully accepted her condition that she would be able to come to grips with it and learn how to live with it.

Wilensky associated drinking with a loss of control, but also realized that drinking would help lessen the tics, or at least make it seem like it. The OCD part of Wilensky connected her personal rules as a means for controlling the things her body did that she felt were negative. By drinking with friends, even if it felt good, she was breaking her own rules. She didn't feel like she could be normal like the other…… [Read More]

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Psychological Basis of Mental Illness Is Certainly

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60673893

psychological basis of mental illness is certainly only half of the story. Though mental illness is genetic, the actual symptoms and condition being presented is based on a careful marriage between biological and environmental factors. In particular, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is a mental illness in which "people have unwanted and repeated thoughts, feelings, ideas, sensations or obsession, or behaviors that make them feel driven to do something (compulsions)" (National Institute of Mental Health, 2011). This mental illness, like many others is multi-faceted, in that there is a physiological process associated with it, a set of symptoms that manifest, certain diagnostic criterion and then a set of treatment options.

Foremost, the physiological process of mental illness is mainly concerned with the brain and certain regions of it. The physiological process is a process that evaluates the neural mechanisms of perception and behavior. esearch examining the brain has found that "a selective…… [Read More]

Riccardi, Christina J, Timpano, Kiara R, & Schmidt, Norman B (2010). A Case Study Perspective on the Importance of motivation in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Clinical Case Studies, Volume 9, (Issue 4), pages 273-284.

Rosenberg, David R. & Keshavan, Matcheri S. (1998). Toward a Neurodevelopment Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Biological Psychiatry: Official Journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 43 (Issue 9), Pages 623-640.

Swinson, Richard P (2001). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory, Research, and Treatment. New York: The Guilford Press.
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Behavioral and Psychopathology Analysis

Words: 1045 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33411140

Abnormal Psychology

Lamanda has an etiology that has causal factors gathered right from her childhood. She is behaving in a manner likely to indicate an abnormal psychological problem. No wonder the social worker, she meets at the restaurant she currently works as a waiter, advises her to seek for professional assistance. Lamanda seems confused, disorganized, withdrawn and is living in denial of herself and origin. There is an observable trend in her recent lifestyle, where she has chosen to lead a sedentary lifestyle and her health and physical stature seems to be deteriorating. She dislikes her job and is disinterested in looking for another. She has withdrawn from the other employees at the restaurant and her social circles. She has acquired a new trend of lousiness and laziness. She has lost interest in her physical appearance and personal grooming. She seems to have lost interest in the important things in…… [Read More]

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Bess Case Study Applying the Right Treatment

Words: 695 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31825908

Clinical Case Study: Bess

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) would be an appropriate intervention to assist Bess in overcoming her OCD by targeting the psychological foundation of the disorder. Bess's neurosis is related to a strong, overbearing impact from her mother in her childhood, now verging on agoraphobia, which is having a negative effect on her social and psychological life. Her symptoms do not appear to have a strong biological basis, thus CBT should be an effective intervention.

The rationale for selecting CBT is that it provides a goal-oriented strategy for overcoming negative behaviors and replacing them with positive ones. Because Bess is a goal-driven person, who has been highly motivated in the past to accomplish tasks, this strategy should be helpful in re-orienting her with a more positive focus. Her confused sexual experience followed by the forced abortion on her mother's orders have substantially deprived Bess of any ability to…… [Read More]

References

Asamsama, O., Dickstein, B., Chard, K. (2015). Do scores on the Beck Depression

Inventory-II Predict Outcome in Cognitive Processing Therapy? Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 7(5): 437-441.

Jones, J., Lyddon, W. (2000). Cognitive Therapy and Empirically Validated Treatments.

Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly, 14(3): 337-345.
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Case Study of a Gifted High School Student

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64958518

EP for Gifted Student

Giftedness is an intellectual ability that is significantly higher than average, not a skill, but an innate talent and aptitude that may be general or specific. Just as there are special needs for children who appear on the left side of the bell curve, so should there be for children on the far right. However, these students are often neglected in terms of special programing due to beliefs that they can just do "extra work" within a mainstreamed environment. From the 1920s to the 1970s, the trend in Western countries was to set up special schools to educate those who fell outside the norms of the bell curve, but by the 1980s most educators favored merging special and regular education in a comprehensive program that included students from all backgrounds -- in other words, mainstreaming them into a regular classroom environment. This idea, though, must also…… [Read More]

Intervention Plan- For CB there are essentially four major issues: her lack of attention span, the need for extended time on some assignments combined hyper-perfectionism, lack of social skills, and home activity intervention/anxiety. In each of these there is a discrepency between what is needed and/or expected in CB's school curriculum and her performance. We find that there may a disconnect in motivational issues, as well, CB is clearly bright, and when engaged, is able to perform at a higher than grade level. The key, in wrapping up all the issues, seems to be finding intervention strategies that will allow her to focus, to remove some of the anxiety and perfectionistic issues, and to improve social skills (Suping, 2003; Taylor, 1998):

Intervention #1 -- Issue: Attention Span -- Work with teacher to find modifications within the stated curriculum that are interesting to CB. Allow her to focus more on those aspects, and potentially preload the evening before if possible. This will focus CBs attention on aspects of the lesson that are more comfortable. Possible solutions to aid in this would be to allow an older student or an intern from a local teacher's college to visit a few times a week to work with CB and, with individualized attention, continually reinforce attention to tasks at hand.

Intervention #2 -- Issue: Extended Time needed/Hyper Perfectionism -- Part of CB's OCD and Anxiety diagnosis have resultant behaviors in needing extended time to complete assignments. Most of the people that work with her, however, believe that CB is quite capable of completing the tasks, but is hyper-self-critical and then unable to finish the work in the timeframe needed. Intervention will be gradual, at first allowing extra time or an untimed period (when applicable), gradually reducing the extra time until CB is back on the schedule with other students at grade level. The goal is to move toward integration within the details of the classroom; begin by offering some extra time and then gradually diminishing it based on
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Tyler Cheever

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85868570

Limiting as Well as the Creative Capacity of Mental Illness in Literature

Anne Tyler's the Accidental Tourist and John Cheever's "The Swimmer"

Mental illness in many works of fictional and non-fictional literature is often portrayed as a kind of wellspring of creativity for the sufferer of the illness. However, even in many works of literature, mental illness is also shown as potentially crippling to the sufferer and those whom are close to the sufferer. This eviscerating honesty is seen in Anne Tyler's The Accidental Tourist as well as depiction of the central character of John Cheever's "The Swimmer." Both illustrate this principle that mental illness is an illness, not a 'gift' as it is sentimentally portrayed. Rather than experiencing glorious and creative highs of mania, or experiencing a form suffering that gives the soul an additional insight into the human condition, both Tyler's and Cheever's protagonists' life experiences are ultimately…… [Read More]

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Paxil Tying Drug Readings Using Readings Support

Words: 916 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19923123

Paxil tying drug readings: (Using readings support analysis)… the articles: "The

Analyze Paxil

In order to properly analyze the drug known as Paxil, one must give prudent consideration to a number of factors. The first of these, of course, is the fact that by the very definition of this narcotic, it is a mind altering substance that is able to readily induce changes in one's brain or psychological state that often time have effects upon the physical body as well. Additionally, it should be noted that the very nature of this particular narcotic is quite different from other narcotics, in particular those which are used for recreational purposes -- namely mind altering substances such as alcohol and marijuana. It is quite possible for users to view occasions to engage in either of these substances as opportunities for fun and pleasure, particularly marijuana. However, although there may be medicinal purposes of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Becker, Howard S. "Becoming a Marihuana User." The American Journal of Sociology. 59, no.3 (1953): 235-242.

DeGrandpre, Richard. The Cult of Pharmacology: How America Became the World's Most Troubled Drug Culture. Durham: Duke University Press, 2006.

Hacking, Ian. "Making Up People." The London Review of Books. 28, no. 16 (2006)
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Bdd in Men Various Problems

Words: 2572 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64723294

"

In addition, to media images that bombard men there are also biological factors that influence the development of BDD in men.

According to an article entitled "Bigger Isn't Always Better - muscle dysmorphia in men" the most severe cases of muscle dysmorphia involve a biological predisposition for the disease (Bartlett 2001). The author explains that from a biological standpoint the man suffering with the disease has a form of obsessive-compulsive disorder (Bartlett 2001). For instance someone who washes his hands 10 times per day is normal, however washing your hands one hundred times per day to the point that it hampers with the rest of your life is a symptom of a greater problem (Bartlett 2001). According to the article this example is used to illustrate "there isn't anything pathological about going to the gym regularly or dieting," but there is a problem when "a huge number of boys…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bartlett J. (2001) Bigger Isn't Always Better - muscle dysmorphia in men

American Fitness. Retrieved July 8, 2005 from; http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0675/is_1_19/ai_69651755

First Controlled Study of Muscle Dysmorphia Published, 2005. Retrieved July 8, 2005 from; http://www.driesen.com/muscle_dysmorphia.htm

Grieve F.G., Lorenzen L.A., Thomas a. (2004) Exposure to Muscular Male Models Decreases Men's Body Satisfaction.Sex Roles: A Journal of Research. Volume: 51: 743+.
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Fictional Case of Ms Jean

Words: 3573 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38755970



A diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder is usually determined through the observation and evaluation of the person's own self-reported experiences. No form of testing, including laboratory tests can determine if a person has this kind of disorder. It is only through analysis of the person's behavior and communication can a psychiatrist identify the disorder.

Major Depressive Disorder tends to exhist in people who have had depression for quite some time or have had recurring depression. Although it is difficult to identify it can be determined and identified. Treatment usually involves cognitive-behavioral therapy.

Mood- Incongruent psychotic features is a term used to describe the characteristics of psychosis. The psychosis usually consists of delusions and hallucinations. They tend to be consistent with an elevated mood such as experienced in Bi-Polar disorder or in depression such as Major Depressive Disorder.

Something such as Schizophrenia is a Mood-Incongruent Disorder. Mood- Incongruent psychotic features tend…… [Read More]

References

Fink M, Taylor MA: Catatonia: A Clinician's Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment. Cambridge, UK, Cambridge University Press, 2003

Fink M, Abrams R, Bailine S, et al.: Ambulatory electroconvulsive therapy. Task Force Report of the Association for Convulsive Therapy. Convulsive Ther 12:42-55, 1996

Husain M, Rush AJ, Fink M, et al.: Speed of response and remission in major depressive disorder with acute ECT: a Consortium for Research in ECT (CORE) report. J Clin Psychiatry (in press)

Kantor SJ, Glassman AH: Delusional depressions: natural history and response to treatment. Br J. Psychiatry 131:351-360, 1977
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Tourette Syndrome the Human Condition

Words: 2284 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72324891

Globus pallidusinterna (GPI) of the patient was treated through DBS. The internal pulse generators (IPG) helped stimulate the inner cognition area of patient's brain. Since the study employed Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for assessing the results after intervention, lateral assessment indicated that 84%improvement in YGTSS was observed by the researchers. Thus, DBS as an effective intervention treatment is corroborated by two results of two independent research studies.

Many people report that since Tourette syndrome is a spectrum condition (that is it ranges from mild to severe and that too depends on the age of the sufferer) therefore associated characteristics and symptoms tend to become less severe as the sufferer ages. hat a Tourette syndrome patient requires most is no extensive cure in the form of administered medication, but instead an encouraging environment and dedicated support system which makes it possible for him or her to lead a completely…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brambilla, a. (n.d.). Comorbid Disorders in Tourette Syndrome. Tourette Centre - IRCCS Galeazzi Milano. Retrieved March 2013

Buckser, a. (2006). The Empty Gesture: Tourette Syndrome and the Semantic Dimension of Illness. Purdue University. University of Pittsburgh- of the Commonwealth System of Higher Education. Retrieved March 2013, from  http://www.jstor.org/stable/20456601 

Coffey, B., Berlin, C., & Naarden, a. (n.d.). Medications and Tourette's Disorder: Combined Pharmacotherapy and Drug Interactions. Retrieved March 2013, from http://www.tsa-usa.org/aMedical/images/medications_and_tourettes_berlin.pdf

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. (n.d.). 4th Edition, 103. American Psychiatric Association.
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DSM IV TR

Words: 1469 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40167120

DSM IV-T

Grade course

Alcohol intake, getting high, cocaine addiction and withdrawal symptoms are some of the terms widely heard by everyone in their day-to-day lives. Although they may sound interesting, habitual or a source of entertainment, they can transform into serious illnesses. Due to this fact, substance-related disorders are listed in the DSM IV-T which includes the disorders associated with drug intake, related to the side effects of a medicine and also to the exposure of toxins.

The symptoms of substance related disorders commonly occur due to high dosage of medication. However, it may lower down as soon as the dosage reduces or is put to an end. The examples of some of these medicines include anesthetics, anticonvulsants, muscle relaxants, anti-depressants, and more (Durand, M. 2009).

As mentioned earlier, apart from medications, there are a number of other chemical substances which might also be the factor in causing the…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Fourth Edition. Text Revision. Washington DC

Brooks, B. (2006). "DSM-IV-TR for Clinicians: Accurate Diagnosis and Treatment

Planning." Pesi Training.

Durand, M. (2009). Abnormal Psychology. Wadsworth, Cengage Learning.
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Self-Harm Treatment Self-Harm Classification and

Words: 1467 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27672759

' A cognitive behavioral therapist might ask, what will harming yourself do to improve your grades on the test? Cognitive therapies in general have been shown to be more effective than traditional supportive talk therapies when treating anxiety conditions because they offer concrete steps for self-improvement on a continuing basis (Reeves 2003, p1.). Patients are also asked to identify things they would like to do in which current behavior patterns prevent them from engaging, such as wearing short-sleeved shirts.

Cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy shows a higher success rate in anxiety disorders and OCD than traditional psychotherapy, likely because of its behavioral component. The fact that many DSH patients are diagnosed with BPD may complicate treatment, but BPT responds well in some instances to these therapies, too. BPT patients manifest disordered patterns of relationships, thinking, behavior, and coping mechanisms that contribute to unstable life patterns as well as contribute to the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bland, Ann R., Georgina Tudor & Deborah McNeil Whitehouse (2007, October). Nursing care of inpatients with Borderline Personality Disorder.

Perspectives in Psychiatric Care.

Retrieved from FindArticles.com on February 16, 2009 http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3804/is_200710/ai_n21099913?tag=content;col1

Mangnall, Jacqueline & Eleanor Yurkovich. (2008). A literature review of deliberate self-harm.
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Tourette Syndrome and the Case

Words: 925 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90488771

And the movements which typify chronic movement disorder are probably subserved by the same structures within the basal ganglia as those which underpin compulsive behaviors and complex tics" (p. 470).

In addition to the other disorders associated with Tourettes, there are (not surprisingly) many emotional and social problems that affect its sufferers. Many sufferers of Tourettes are afraid to go out in public for fear of embarrassment, and many have very low self-esteem. There are also noted problems of aggression in Tourettes sufferers, not only because the tics themselves can manifest themselves aggressively, but also because the victims are angry that they were 'cursed' with this debilitating and often humiliating disorder. Making matters even worse is the fact that feelings of anger and stress can actually increase the symptoms of Tourettes (Prestia, 2003).

While there is no known cure for Tourettes, there are ways of reducing the emotional and social…… [Read More]

References

Brady, E. (2006, January 5) How Jessica's learning to live with Tourette's, the Birmingham Post (England), 4

Carr, a. (1999) the handbook of child and adolescent clinical psychology: A contextual approach, Routledge

Hendren, G. (2002), Tourette Syndrome: A new look at an old condition, the Journal of Rehabilitation, 68, 22-30

Prestia, K. (2003), Tourette's Syndrome: Characteristics and interventions, Intervention in School & Clinic, 39, 66-70
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Samantha Jones Like Will Rogers

Words: 1513 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82101148



There is disagreement as to whether CSB is an addiction, a psychosexual developmental disorder, an impulse control disorder, a mood disorder, or an obsessive-compulsive disorder, however most scientists dispute the idea that someone can become addicted to sex in the same way they become addicted to alcohol, thus abstinence as a treatment is viewed as an oversimplification of the problem (Compulsive).

Samantha Jones might be the first to admit that she has CSB, or not. But as long as it does not harm anyone, then "ho cares what you are just enjoy it."

orks Cited

Compulsive Sexual Behavior. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.uc.edu/psc/sh/SH_Compul_Sexual_Behav.htm

Quotes: Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://en.thinkexist.com/quotes/by/character/samantha_jones/

Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.hbo.com/city/cast/character/samantha_jones.shtml

Stein, Daniel J. "Sexual Addiction: An Integrated Approach." Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/51/1/123

Vukadinovic, Zoran. "Sexual addiction, sexual compulsivity, sexual impulsivity, or what? Toward a theoretical model." The…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Compulsive Sexual Behavior. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.uc.edu/psc/sh/SH_Compul_Sexual_Behav.htm

Quotes: Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at  http://en.thinkexist.com/quotes/by/character/samantha_jones/ 

Samantha Jones. Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://www.hbo.com/city/cast/character/samantha_jones.shtml

Stein, Daniel J. "Sexual Addiction: An Integrated Approach." Retrieved November 07, 2005 at http://ps.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/51/1/123
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IQ Discrimination the Concept of General Ability

Words: 3541 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22745648

IQ Discrimination

The concept of general ability or intelligence has in the past been the most important single way of accounting for individual differences. IQ (Intelligence quotient) is usually assessed by measuring performances on a test of a number of different skills, using tasks that emphasize reasoning and problem solving in a number of different areas. Early assessments of IQ were done in France by Alfred Binet in 1905, as part of an attempt to identify children who needed specialist help to make educational progress. Interest in IQ testing continued in the U.S. By researchers such as Louis Terman.

IQ was thought to be fixed in these early years and so was often used in education in an attempt to predict children's future academic progress with different levels of measured intelligence being taken to imply the need for different forms of educational experiences. More able children are supposed to need…… [Read More]

References.

Bates, Steve. (2002). Personality counts: psychological tests can help peg the job applicants best suited for certain jobs. HR Magazine. Feb. 2002

Flynn, Gillian. (2002). A legal examination of testing. Workforce. June 2002

Newitz, Annalee. (2000). The personality paradox. Industry Stand. October, 2000.
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Causes and Remedies of Anorexia Nervosa

Words: 1609 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82048648

Anorexia Nervosa

Naturally, almost all human beings are concerned about adding excess weight. However, in some individuals the fear becomes obsessive, resulting in a condition called Anorexia Nervosa. Anorexia is an eating disorder that could lead to serious weight-loss. The extreme fear concentrates on bodyweight and the food eaten. Anorexia is serious and possibly debilitating life threatening mental sickness (Lloyd et al. 2014). People with Anorexia have not made a 'lifestyle choice'; they are very sick and need help. The reasons for the onset of Anorexia differ from individual to individual; known causes include previous traumatic experiences, environmental, biological aspects. For some individuals, reducing their weight and food can be a way of managing life areas that feel out of their management and their whole body image can come to determine their entire feeling of self-worth. It can be an expression of feelings related to complications like pain, stress, or…… [Read More]

References

Couturier J, Kimber M, & Szatmari P. (2013). Efficacy of Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents with Eating Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Int J. Eat Disord. Vol. 46(1):3-11

Le Grange, D, Accurso, E., Lock, J., Agras, S. And Bryson, S. (2013). Early Weight Gain Predicts Outcome in Two Treatments for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa. (Int J. Eat Disord 2014; 47:124 -- 129)

Lloyd S, Yiend J, Schmidt U, & Tchanturia K (2014). Perfectionism in Anorexia Nervosa: Novel Performance-Based Evidence. PLoS ONE 9(10): 1-8e111697.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0111697