Open Heart Surgery Essays (Examples)

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Decision to Found an Open

Words: 1167 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10474284



Given the projected demographic trends and the actual statistics from the surrounding hospitals considered above, it is obvious that the "business" for open heart surgery is moving into the Cabarrus Memorial Hospital area. In the interim however, the hospital administrators on the Board will have to consider possible alternative strategies before making a "go/no-go" decision on the possible addition of the open heart program. Unfortunately, a helicopter medevac average price is $7,500-$8,000. This will of course vary based upon the medications and supplies used during trip ("How much does," 2011).

First of all, in the opinion of the author, we have identified an access problem for the present CMH area residents to the existing open heart surgery facilities at the surrounding hospitals. As noted in the case study text, driving to Charlotte is a major problem. The immediate issue will be relieving this before an open heart surgery center is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Heart. (2011). Retrieved from http://www.cmc-northeast.org/body.cfm?id=51.

How much does a ride in a medevac helicopter cost? (2011). Retrieved from http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100329055051AAbYeqW.

Nilsson, J., Algotsson, L., Hoglund, P., Luhrs, C., & Brandt, J. (2006). Comparison of 19 pre-operative risk stratification. European Heart Journal, 27, 867 -- 874.

Swayne, L.E., Duncan, W.H., & Ginter, P.M. (2007). Strategic management of health c are organizations. Malden, MA: Blackwell, MA.
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History of Surgery

Words: 6608 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18946792

History of Surgery had been started from the prehistoric time with its appropriate technique and tools applicable during the age. There was no sophisticated care of hygiene and anatomic knowledge in the early days; the basic research was started using trial and error on every case and it had set a very strong basic which still makes sense and counts into modern practice.

The following summary of history of surgery is compiled from various sources based on the timeline set in dr. Schell's lecture: The History of Surgery.

The Ancient Medicine (Prehistoric Time)

People had strong magic beliefs and connection to multiple gods during the prehistoric time, so that any cases of illness were also believed as the punishments from angry gods for community's or one's moral failure. Some common cases recorded were respiratory and digestive problems, infections, and gynecologic disorders. Life expectancy low, then 28-35 years was a successful…… [Read More]

Bibliography

13.3 Trephination, An Ancient Surgery. http://www.uic.edu/classes/osci/osci590/13_3%20Trephination%20An%20Ancient%20Surgery.htm. March24, 2002.

Anaesthesia History. The Surgery Door Pain Centre by Neurofen. http://www.surgerydoor.co.uk/coe/paincentre/anaesthesia.shtml. March26, 2002.

Anesthesia: A Brief History. Feb 13, 2001. Simon Fraser Health Region. http://www.sfhr.com/anesthesia/abrief.htm. March26, 2002.

Bune, Matt and Gregor, Pam. Ancient Egyptian Surgery ed. Majno, Guido. The Healing Hand: Man and Wound in the Ancient World. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1982. pp. 86-121. http://emuseum.mnsu.edu/prehistory/ancienttech/ancient_egyptian_surgery.html. March26, 2002.
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Cardiovascular Surgery

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45849353

Cardiovascular surgery includes operations on the heart and blood vessels of the body to repair structural defects of the cardiovascular system. If a patient's heart condition poses a significant risk to their health and livelihood, surgery is the preferred treatment option. There are more than a half million heart surgeries performed in the U.S. each year for heart problems. Heart surgery may be performed on both children and adults. Heart surgery can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and increase lifespan (National Heart Lung and Blood Institute).

There are many different types of heart surgery. Surgeries are performed to:

Repair or replace valves controlling the direction of blood flow through the heart's chambers

Bypass or widen blocked or narrowed arteries to the heart

Destroy small amounts of tissue that disturb electrical flow through the heart

Repair damaged or abnormal structures of the heart

Implant medical devices that are used to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Medline Plus. Heart Surgery. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Oct. 2011. Web. January 2012.

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. What is heart surgery? Apr 1, 2011. Web. January 2012. <  http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hs/ >

Schools in the U.S.A.com. Cardiovascular Surgeon. 2003-2012. Web. January 2012.
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Healthcare Finance

Words: 421 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87148871

Heart Hospital: A Combined Effort between Cornell University

and the New York Presbyterian Hospital

According to the American Heart Association, approximately 2,600 Americans die each and every day from cardiovascular diseases and claim an average of one life every 33 seconds. By building on the successes of the New York Presbyterian Hospital and Cornell University NYP will leverage its cardiac resources to educate, research, treat, and prevent the nation's and New York's number one killer.

The primary driving force behind NYP Hospital's design has been its efficiency to support advanced patient care, synergy of comprehensive cardiac services, and farsighted and visionary advances in medical technology. The planned facility will be a state-of -- the art wireless (digital) environment permitting physicians, nurses and other healthcare practitioners to be significantly closer to the medical consumer's bedside and the design of inpatient surgery and medicine step-down units will improve the workflow across all…… [Read More]

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Contemplate My Admission to Your

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93534305

I know whatever major I choose, my first priority is to help others and make a difference in their lives.

I feel I have a lot to offer to your university in my attitude, involvement, and dedication. I am a very sensitive person because of my sister and her condition. She has had many medical problems (including open-heart surgery, heart failure, and several battles with pneumonia). She is an inspiration to me, and my family rejoices in all of her successes. This has made me more open to others, and to understand those who are different, as well as those who fit in. I feel this will make me a better, more compassionate student and peer.

My sister has taught me more than compassion and sensitivity. Despite her health problems and situation, she still holds down a part time job at McDonald's, and is always positive and upbeat. As my…… [Read More]

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Anesthesia Means Temporary Loss of

Words: 3728 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12779152

In year 1799 anesthetic properties of Nitric Oxide were discovered by Humphery Davy (1778-1829) he advised that the by using nitric oxide, pain and shock of the surgical procedure can be negated. Third person who continue with Morton and ells philosophy was Charles T. Jackson. The Fourth man who contributed to anesthetics was Thomas Mortan (Blatner, 2009). In the year 1848 James Simpson used chloroform in obstetric surgery, he used diethyl ether to anesthetize a women with a pelvic deformity for delivery (kodali, 2009) and in year 1853 John Snow did a successful induction of chloroform to her Majesty Queen Victoria at the time of Prince Leopold's Birth and also on Fenny Longfellow who wrote to her poet brother that this use of ether is certainly the greatest blessing of this era (Longfellow, 1956). In the year 1885-illiam Halsted introduced the nerve block. In 1891 Heinrich Quincke demonstrated the process…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Bergman, Norman. History of Anesthesia. chua2.fiu.edu.  http://ahahq.org/Bulletin/AHA_GB_1991-10.pdf  .Retrieved from 14th Jan 2013.

Conquering surgical pain: Four men stake their claims. (2012). Massachusetts General

Blatner, Adam. The discovery and invention of Anesthesia. Blatner.com.  http://www.blatner.com/adam/consctransf/historyofmedicine/4-anesthesia/hxanesthes.html . Retrieved on 14th Jan 2013.

Fadden, John. Cultural, Environmental and Genetical influences on drug therapy. Jbpub.com. http://samples.jbpub.com/9780763786076/86076_CH03_FINAL.pdf . Retrieved on 14th Jan 2013.
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Technical Instructions for Coronary Artery

Words: 1986 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30752594

Indeed, "time heals all wounds," even those resulting from open heart surgery, and the payoff was shown to be clearly worth the risks involved for most of the people who electively seek out the CABG procedure for their coronary heart disease.

eferences

CABG and PCI Each Have Strengths, Weaknesses Ann Intern Med. 2007 [Published online Oct.

16, 2007] cited in Latest research. (2007, November 2). Medical Economics, 84(21), 75.

Ben-Zur, H., appaport, B., Ammar, . & Uretzky, G. (2001). Coping strategies, life style changes and pessimism after open-heart surgery. Health and Social Work, 25(3), 201-

Kos-Munson, B. A, Alexander, L.D., Culbert, P.A., Hinthorn, E.L. & Goetze, C.M. (1988).

Psychosocial predictors of optimal rehabilitation post-coronary artery bypass surgery.

Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing Practice, 2(3), 171-172.

Peterson, J.C., Charleson, M.E., Williams-usso, P. & Krieger, K.H. (2002). New

postoperative depressive symptoms and long-term cardiac outcomes after coronary artery bypass surgery. The American Journal…… [Read More]

References

CABG and PCI Each Have Strengths, Weaknesses Ann Intern Med. 2007 [Published online Oct.

16, 2007] cited in Latest research. (2007, November 2). Medical Economics, 84(21), 75.

Ben-Zur, H., Rappaport, B., Ammar, R. & Uretzky, G. (2001). Coping strategies, life style changes and pessimism after open-heart surgery. Health and Social Work, 25(3), 201-

Kos-Munson, B. A, Alexander, L.D., Culbert, P.A., Hinthorn, E.L. & Goetze, C.M. (1988).
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Cardiopulmonary Bypass

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99639376

Cardiopulmonary bypass entails the techniques through which perfusionists replace some major functions of the lungs and heart with a mechanical system to support a patient during surgical interventions on the pulmonary or cardiovascular system (Ghosh & Cook, 2009). It involves bypass of the lungs and heart in an open-heart surgery where perfusionists redirect blood getting to the heart via a heart-lung machine before it gets into the arterial circulation. Cardiopulmonary bypass takes the role of the lungs and heart during surgery.

Reasons for Application

Cardiothoracic surgeons conduct cardiopulmonary bypass while repairing cardiac defects. he surgeons need a bloodless and motionless heart to work on, and to attain this, the surgeons stop the motion of the lungs and the heart. While the lungs and the heart remain motionless, there must be a way for blood to flow throughout the body to deliver oxygen and nutrients essential in life. Perfusionists together with…… [Read More]

The patient receives heparin to avoid clotting besides protamine sulfate to overturn heparin effects. In the course of the procedure, the surgeons maintain hypothermia, and body temperature remains at 8°C to 32°C (McCann, 2005). The surgeons and perfusionists cool the blood during cardiopulmonary bypass and return it to the body. The cooled blood lowers the basal metabolic rate of the body, lowering its oxygen demand. Cooled blood holds an increased viscosity, while the crystalloid solution utilized to guide the bypass tubing water-down the blood. The cardiopulmonary bypass comprises of two major elements, which include the oxygenator and the pump. The oxygenator removes deoxygenated blood from the body replacing it with oxygenated blood via numerous hoses. The elements cardiopulmonary bypass circulates and interconnect through a chain of tubes formed of PVC or silicon rubber while the pump console consists of numerous rotating motor-compelled pumps that massage tubing peristaltically.

Risk Linked to CPB

During open-heart surgery, surgeons temporarily stop the pounding of the heart and maintain life via CPB. Surgeons stop the functioning of the heart through lowering its temperature or through a preservative injection to allow CPB to pump blood throughout the patient's body. Although
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Jesus' Teachings Prayer & Christian Life He

Words: 35411 Length: 109 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95862373

Jesus' Teachings, Prayer, & Christian Life

"He (Jesus) Took the Bread. Giving Thanks Broke it. And gave it to his Disciples, saying, 'This is my Body, which is given to you.'" At Elevation time, during Catholic Mass, the priest establishes a mandate for Christian Living. Historically, at the Last Supper, Christ used bread and wine as a supreme metaphor for the rest of our lives. Jesus was in turmoil. He was aware of what was about to befall him -- namely, suffering and death. This was the last major lesson he would teach before his arrest following Judas' betrayal. Eschatologically speaking, the above set the stage for the Christian ministry of the apostles, evangelists and priests. Indeed, every Christian is called to give of him or herself for the Glory of God and the Glory of Mankind. The message at the Last Supper was powerful. People have put themselves through…… [Read More]

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Tribute the Late Dr Wilson Koc

Words: 843 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16319489

Tribute: The Late Dr. Wilson Ko

The Late Dr. Wilson Ko: Tribute

Tribute to Dr. Wilson Ko

I feel honored to write this tribute to Dr. Wilson Ko -- a teacher, colleague, doctor, scholar, educational administrator, father, husband, son, and friend to many. From whatever vantage position we knew him, Wilson stood out as someone special.

The very first time Wilson and I met, he had just completed his cardiothoracic fellowship in Weill Cornell Presbyterian Hospital. His visionary and charismatic leadership qualities were almost immediately apparent to me, and we seemed to share the same passion and vision for the Chinese community. This very first encounter back in 1996 marked the start of our scholarly collaboration and long-standing friendship.

Wilson was passionate about improving the welfare of the Chinese community through the treatment of cardiac diseases. By then, there were only very few Chinese cardiothoracic surgeons; however, Wilson was committed…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Administration the Six Stakeholders Groups for

Words: 1033 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41114334

Healthcare Administration

THE SIX STAKEHOLDES GOUPS FO IVEVIEW EGIONAL MEDICAL

The six stakeholder groups for the iverview egional Medical Center are as follows: clerical staff, medical laboratory technicians, nurses, housekeeping staff, patients, and physicians. The hospital is comprised of 700 people who all play as stakeholders for the hospital.

TAGETS MAKET OF EXISTING POGAMS AND THE GAPS IN MC MAKETING STATEGY

An addition added to the MC is the Heartburn Treatment Center. A nurse manager is utilized in the Heartburn Treatment which is similar to that of the management model used in the ED. PH monitoring, which uses the Bravo capsule, is considered one of the diagnostic procedures. This procedure is used on qualified patients, and the Nurse First program stressed the role of the hospital's commitment to the care of the patient. Usually, the nurse is the first person viewed by the patient in the ED, not individuals that…… [Read More]

REFERENCE

Swayne, L.E., Duncan, J., & Ginter, P.M. (2009). Strategic management of healthcare organizations (6th ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Cohn, K.H. & Harlow, D.C. (2009). Field-tested strategies for physician recruitment and contracting.
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Routine Shaving of the Surgical Site Select

Words: 2524 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31433982

Routine Shaving of the Surgical Site

Select a preoperative procedure (e.g., routine shaving of the surgical site) that you would commonly find on a surgical floor.

Describe the process or procedure you have chosen and why you think it needs change.

The process which I have chosen for surgical floor is routine shaving of the surgical site and I think it needs change because patients going through surgery are required to remove hair from the site of the cut. This is considered to reduce the chance of the surgical site becoming infected (National Collaborating Centre for omen's and Children's Health, 2008). Shaving, clipping the hair and using a cream which dissolves the hair are some of the different methods available to remove hair. And these are important because clinically, care plans offer a way to plan and communicate appropriate patient care.

A2. Based on your initial investigation of the situation,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, A.S. (n.d.). Preventing Health Care - Associated Infections. Retrieved October 30, 2012, from National Center for Biotechnology:  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2683/ 

Graham, I.D., RN, J.L., Harrison, M.B., Straus, S.E., Tetroe, J., RN, W.C., et al. (2006). Lost in knowledge translation: Time for a map? Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 13-24.

Green, L.A., & Seifert, C.M. (2005). Translation of Reserch into Practice: Why we can't "Just Do It." PubMed, 541-545.

National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health. (2008, October). Surgical Site Infection: Prevention and Treatment of Surgical Site Infection. Retrieved October 29, 2012, from Nice.org.uk: http://www.nice.org.uk/nicemedia/pdf/CG74FullGuideline.pdf
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Dangerfield Inc A Delaware C Corporation

Words: 3383 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65288388

Dangerfield and Associate Entities

Upon examining this case, it's clear that the claims made by Hartman are completely legitimate. The claims made by Mitchell are somewhat legitimate. This paper will first examine the basis of the lawsuit waged by Hartman, as the bulk of the valid accusations made are made by this particular plaintiff. The crux of Hartman's lawsuit is based on the claim that Dangerfield was liable for the negligence of its parking attendant along with independent negligence. Hartman then claims that Dangerfield and Sandman were fundamentally liable by association. While these aren't the exact details of why Hartman was suing these connected entities, it does boil down the fundamental reason. The essential element of Hartman's case boils down to primary tort's law. "A person is negligent if he fails to exercise ordinary care to avoid injury to other persons or their property. In other words, he failed to…… [Read More]

References

Best, A. (2007). Basic Tort Law: Cases, Statutes, and Problems. New York: Aspen Publishers.

Carper, D. (2008). Understanding the Law. Mason: Thomson West.

Cornell.edu. (2010). Responsibility in Negligence: Why the Duty of Care is not a Duty "To Try." Retrieved from Cornell.edu:  http://scholarship.law.cornell.edu/facpub/127/ 

Delpo, A. (2009). The Manager's Legal Handbook. Nolo Books.
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Martin Army Medical Center Fort Benning Georgia

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72428112

Martin Army Medical Center, Fort Benning, Georgia and St. Francis Medical, Columbus Georgia

Because resources are by definition scarce, it is important for tertiary healthcare providers to develop healthcare delivery structures that are efficient and effective. Since every healthcare organization is unique, though, these delivery structures can vary widely in scope and purpose. To gain some fresh insights into the healthcare delivery structures that are used by civilian and military health facilities, this paper provides a comparison of Martin Army Medical Center at Fort Benning, Georgia with St. Francis Medical in Columbus, Georgia, followed by a summary of the research and important findings in the conclusion.

eview and Comparison

Martin Army Medical Center, Fort Benning, Georgia

Health care delivery structure. Opened in 1958, this is a U.S. Department of Defense facility operated by the U.S. Army that offers inpatient, outpatient and emergency services. At present, Martin Army Medical Center 250-bed,…… [Read More]

References

About St. Francis Hospital. (2012). St. Francis Hospital. Retrieved from http://www.

sfhga.com/about-st-francis-hospital.

About us. (2012). Martin Army Community Hospital. Retrieved from http://www.martin.

amedd.army.mil/meddepts/about.htm.
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Health Care Industry Consists of

Words: 594 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69947659



UHS, Inc. Financial Analysis overview:

According to the analysts' report, the average net income for the previous five years for UHS, Inc. shows a 20.1% growth rate; this is higher than the industry average of 10.6% and sales of 12.7% which also higher than industry average of 8.67%. UHS, Inc. has dividends that average 4.64% of earnings while the average of Healthcare industry is only 0.64%. The price per share is $58.11 and earnings per share is 4.08%,. UHS, Inc. is expected to grow only 10.40% in the present projection, which is behind the industry standard that is set at about 13.50%. Despite the current economic challenges, UHS, Inc. is expected to outperform the market within the next six-month with less risk than average.

LifePoint Hospitals, Inc. Financial Analysis overview:

The analysts' report revealed that, the average net income growth for the previous five years for LifePoint Hospitals, Inc. was…… [Read More]

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Strategic Leadership Outline a Specific Area Where

Words: 743 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62483156

Strategic Leadership

Outline a specific area where a change would significantly improve productivity in your organization

In the UAE, health care services are provided by government with the rapid expansion of hospitals and treatment options. This is a part of an effort to modernize the health care system and improve quality. However, the prices associated with receiving a variety of services have increased dramatically. Evidence of this can be seen in a study conducted by the UAE government. They found that for a woman to have a simple procedure (such as: delivering a baby) the costs are between: Dh 6,000 to Dh 25,000. (Haine, 2012)

This is problematic, as these kinds of challenges could undermine the dramatic amounts of spending inside the sector to modernize and build more facilities. Once this occurs, is when it could place added strains on the health care system and the quality that is provide.…… [Read More]

References

Haine, A. (2012). Eight Steps for a Cost Effective Birth. The National. Retrieved from:  http://www.thenational.ae/lifestyle/personal-finance/eight-steps-for-a-cost-effective-and-hassle-free-birth-in-the-uae 

Zain, A. (2010). Health Care Costs need to be Controlled. Khaleej Times. Retrieved from: http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle08.asp?xfile=data/theuae/2010/February/theuae_February199.xml&section=theuae
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Healthcare Institutions Different Sources of Funding

Words: 1350 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87050902

Healthcare Institutions

Financial Environments Paper

Healthcare institutions: Nonprofit, for-profit, and government-administered

"Three types of entities -- nonprofit, for-profit, and government" exist within the American healthcare industry (Horowitz 2015). All available evidence indicates that this status affects the business model choice of all of these institutions. "In this econometric analysis of American Hospital Association data for every U.S. urban, acute care hospital (1988 -- 2000), more than thirty services were categorized as relatively profitable, unprofitable, or variable. For-profits are most likely to offer relatively profitable medical services; government hospitals are most likely to offer relatively unprofitable services; nonprofits often fall in the middle" (Horowitz 2015). Thus it is important to understand how these various organizations view profitability, given its material effect upon how they allocate resources and impact patient care.

Not-for-profit healthcare institutions like the Mayo Clinic are dependent upon donors, government funding, foundations, and also from revenue from activities. Unlike…… [Read More]

References

Aurora's role as a not-for-profit organization. (2015). Aurora Healthcare. Retrieved from:

http://www.aurorahealthcare.org/aboutus/notforprofit/index.asp

About community benefit. (2015). Kaiser. Retrieved from:

http://share.kaiserpermanente.org/category/about-community-benefit/
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Health Organization Case Study

Words: 1847 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69534591

Healthcare Organization

Banner Healthcare is an American non-profit healthcare system predominantly used in Phoenix, Arizona. The healthcare organization runs twenty-three hospitals plus various other specialized units. It has about 35,000 workers in its employment and so is one of the state's biggest employers. It offers emergency care, hospital care, rehab services, outpatient surgery, pharmacies, hospice, home care and long-term care. The organization has recently begun running primary care physician clinics such as Banner Arizona Medical Clinic and the Banner Medical Group. The organization was founded when Samaritan Health System and the Lutheran Health Systems merged.

The mission statement of Banner Health is "To make a difference in people's lives through excellent patient care (Banner health, 2014). The institution is known all over the country and is well recognized. The merger that led to the formation of the institution happened over two decades ago in 1991. The resultant company launched onto…… [Read More]

References

Banner Healthcare. (n.d.). Retrieved from Banner Healthcare: https://www.bannerhealth.com/

Bannerhealth. (2014). Our Mission. Retrieved from Bannerhealth: https://www.bannerhealth.com/staying-well

Brach, C., Keller, D., Hernandez, L. M., Baur, C., Parker, R., Dreyer, B., . . . Schillinger, D. (2012, June). Ten Attributes of Health Literate Health Care Organizations. Retrieved from http://www.ahealthyunderstanding.org/Portals/0/Documents1/IOM_Ten_Attributes_HL_Paper.pdf

Gooch, K. (2015, August 13). 5 of the biggest issues nurses face today. Retrieved from Hospital Review: http://www.beckershospitalreview.com/human-capital-and-risk/5-of-the-biggest-issues-nurses-face-today.html
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Healthcare Quality Improvement Program Proposed

Words: 1786 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21517976

Success in several high-profile areas, such as stroke prevention, acute coronary intervention, or nosocomial infection have the benefits of focusing the organization on a task which can bring tangible results, measured in clinically-relevant ways.

Specific Program for our Institution

This memo recommends that we choose five treatment areas, and implement specific quality improvement programs for each one. The focus on each should include procedures which are important to the overall quality of this institution's morbidity and mortality results. Given the hospital's focus on acute care, the following procedures might be candidates for quality improvement programs:

Ischemic stroke treatment

ACS treatment (acute coronary syndrome).

Trauma in the ER related to gunshot wounds.

Maternal ward delivery performance

Nosocomial infection reduction.

In each case, the procedures should proceed as outlined above: (1) an identification of the problem, (2) identification of best practices as demonstrated in peer-reviewed clinical trials, (3) adoption of the best…… [Read More]

Bibliography

CancerCenter. (2007). Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Retrieved November 23, 2007, from CCA: www.cancercenter.com

Civitarese, L.A. (1999). Congestive Heart Failure Clinical Outcomes Study in a Private Community Medical Group. Journal of American Board of Family Practice, 467-472.

Dana Farber. (2005). Dana-Farber attains nation's highest honor for nursing excellence; first cancer center in New England to earn Magnet recognition. Boston: Dana Farber Cancer Institute.

Katzan, I.L. (2003). Quality Improvement and Tissue-Type Plasminogen Activator for Acute Ischemic Stroke. JAHA, 799-800.
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Movie the Doctor

Words: 759 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4014195

Doctor

The film The Doctor illustrates both sides of the doctor-patient relationship. Played by illiam Hurt, Jack McKee is a head surgeon who exudes arrogance until he is diagnosed with throat cancer. Not only does a brush with death change his outlook on life, but also his experience as a patient at his own hospital alters the way he treats his patients. hen Jack is forced to wait in lengthy lines, fill out tedious forms, and deal with impersonal physicians, he realizes how dehumanizing, humiliating, and frustrating it can be on the other end of the doctor-patient spectrum. McKee's behavior transforms considerably from the beginning of the film to the end, but he still manages to retain his witty sense of humor throughout. The Doctor provides a cinematic example of why doctors and other professionals caught up in the modern medical system need to respect their patients more, by including…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Doctor. Dir. Randa Haines. Perf. William Hurt, Christine Lahti, Mandy Patinkin, Elizabeth Perkins. Touchstone, 1991.
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Mission in Strategic Management Process

Words: 1833 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21783960

A mission is valueless if it does not truthfully motivate and guide the force of every worker in the similar course. Everyone has to consider the mission is sensible and achievable and not just unfilled speechifying (11).

usiness leaders must "outshine" by setting the model for all workers. They do not merely converse about missions, but they develop into a perfect example of the contemporary value; they should live by it day by day. A mission is vital to directing the firm in these unstable times and to establishing a competitive lead (5).

The businesses that have dedicated themselves to apply the strategic management process have accomplished considerable sensation by using the formulating missions after a careful assessment of the environment. This triumph can be calculated in terms of real evolution in concentrating on the organization's mission and of exclusive escalation in customer contentment and loyalty (5).

ibliography

1) arley,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Barley, Stephen R., and Gideon Kunda. "Gurus, Hired Guns, and Warm Bodies: Itinerant Experts in a Knowledge Economy." Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2004.

2) Benko, Cathleen, and F. Warren McFarlan. "Connecting the Dots: Aligning Projects with Objectives in Unpredictable Times." Boston: Harvard Business School Press, 2003.

3) Black, J. Stewart and Hal B. Gregersen. "Leading Strategic Change: Breaking Through the Brain Barrier." Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2002.

4) Bossidy, Larry and Ram Charan. "Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done." New York: Crown Business, 2002.
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Nonprofit and for Profit Healthcare Organizations Non-Profit

Words: 1013 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32329707

Nonprofit and for Profit Healthcare Organizations

Non-Profit and for-Profit Healthcare Organizations

healthcare system is in shambles. As a source of intense debate, it is clear that it is failing to provide adequate health care for millions of individuals. Both for-profit and non-profit hospitals have their strengths and weaknesses, yet it is clear that mixing business with health care is a dangerous mix.

First, the locations of the two different types help showcase some of their primary differences. For profit tend to serve a more affluent community that can pay high premiums for the specialty care many offer at high prices. Often, for-profit hospitals run very much like on-profit or government run hospitals, yet it is their location that allows them to focus on a for-profit business strategy. According to the research, "they differentially locate in areas with relatively well-insured patients" (Horwitz, 2005). Meanwhile, nonprofit hospitals are often much more geared…… [Read More]

References

Andre, Claire & Velasquez, Manuel. (1988). A healthy bottom line: Profits or people? Issues in Ethics, 1(4). Santa Clara University. Web. http://www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/iie/v1n4/healthy.html

Horwitz, Jill R. (2005). Making profits and providing care: Comparing nonprofit, for-profit, and government hospitals. Health Affairs, 24(3), 790-801.

Real Natural. (2012). Hospitals' unnecessary medical treatments exposed. Responsible Health News. Web.  http://www.realnatural.org/hospitals-unnecessary-medical-treatments-exposed-are-for-profit-hospital-chains-the-problem/
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Blacks in America

Words: 474 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10625838

United States is a country that thrives on the achievements of various people groups. The achievements of African-Americans in the United States are particularly significant. African-Americans have contributed greatly to the world of literature, medicine, and business. The purpose of this discussion is to examine the role that African-Americans have played in the formulation of American culture.

lacks in America

Although the history of blacks in America has been steeped in bigotry, hatred, and segregation, the culture has managed to face these adversities with courage and triumph. African-American's have fought for equal rights since their arrival in this country. Initially, they were forced to fight for the right to be free men and to end slavery. Eventually, African-Americans also struggled for integration during the civil rights movement. There were several individuals that were instrumental in ensuring that African-Americans were free from slavery and that they gained their civil rights. These…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bennet, L. 1989. The 50 most important figures in Black American history; experts list men and women who made indispensable contributions. Ebony. Volume: 44 Issue
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Privacy Violations and Malpractice at the Okc VA Medical Center

Words: 2020 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89366269

Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Today, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) operates the nation's largest healthcare system through the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), including 152 medical centers (VAMCs), 800 community-based outpatient clinics and numerous state-based domiciliaries and nursing home care units (About VA, 2016). As the second-largest cabinet agency in the federal government, the VA's budget exceeds the State Department, USAID, and the whole of the intelligence community combined) with more than $60 billion budgeted for VHA healthcare (Carter, 2016). One of the VHA's largest medical centers that provides tertiary healthcare services to eligible veteran patients is the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center (OKC VAMC) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Like several other VAMCs, the OKC VAMC has recently been implicated in a system-wide scandal concerning inordinately lengthy patient waiting times and misdiagnoses which may have contributed to the deaths of some veteran patients and jeopardized…… [Read More]

References

About the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. (2016). Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. Retrieved from http://www.oklahoma.va.gov/about/.

About VA. (2016). Department of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved from http://www.va.gov / about_va/vahistory.asp.

Breen, K. J. & Plueckhahn, V. D. (2002). Ethics, law, and medical practice. St. Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Carter, P. (2016). How to fix the VA. Slate. Retrieved from http://www.slate.com/blogs / the_works/2016/03/25/slate_s_infinite_scroll_implementation_explained.html.
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Broke My Father's Heart and

Words: 1753 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49104580

Rather, the reader is only exposed to the short, choppy explanations of a first person narrator. Very little explanation is given as to why the events are happening or who the characters really are underneath their outward expressions and appearances. This tends to add to the general confusion the narrator feels during the intensely scary situation. One moment the narrator was thinking about tailgating with friends, and the next he is on the floor after being hit by a bus. The level of description coincides with the overall tone of confusion. The events following the initial accident also tend to carry this sense of confusion, but the atmosphere is much faster paced. The hospital and the ensuing trouble the narrator faces is in a much more rapid and hectic atmosphere than the dull and dreary atmosphere seen in Butler's work.

Overall, it is clear that the two works may share…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Butler, Katy. "What Broke My Father's Heart." New York Times. 2010. Web. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/20/magazine/20pacemaker-t.html?pagewanted=all

Riederer, Rachel. "Patient." The Missouri Review, 33(1), 2010. Pp 152-166.
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Hospital for Special Surgery

Words: 1221 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80994317

Hospital for Special Surgery

In America there a wide variety of healthcare organizations, that have specialized in addressing the needs of various patients. Part of the reason why this occurring, is many facilities are unable to address the challenges facing those individuals requiring some kind of specialty care. As a result, a number of hospitals have evolved to deal with these issues. One such example of this is with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). Even though the facility was established as a community hospital in 1811, their overall mission has evolved. What has been happening is the hospital has become more focused on: offering specialized care and innovative health solutions. This is an effort by the administration to build upon their outstanding reputation through: improving the overall quality of care that patients are receiving. ("Hospital Overview," 2011)

As a result, the facility has become known for the specialty care and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Health Care Uncovered. (2011). Connect With Partners. Retrieved from: http://www.connectwithpartners.org/2011/04/14/%E2%80%9Chealthcare-uncovered%E2%80%9D-program-highlights-mgh%E2%80%99s-care-management-program/

Hospital Overview. (2011). Massachusetts General. Retrieved from:  http://www.massgeneral.org/about/overview.aspx 

Monagan, D. (2000). MGH and MGPO. Massachusetts General. Retrieved from: http://www2.massgeneral.org/pubaffairs/Issues/081100CPM.htm

Valencia, M. (2011). MGH Faces Suit. Boston. Retrieved from: http://articles.boston.com/2011-03-10/news/29339649_1_hospital-staff-hospital-report-hospital-officials
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How Rheumatic Fever Can Turn Into Rheumatic Heart Disease

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18204135

heumatic heart disease is caused by heumatic Fever or group a streptococci. It consists of "cardiac inflammation" accompanied by scarring which itself is a reaction to the autoimmune system fighting the group A streptococci. The myocardium, endocardium, and epicardium are each affected in turn. In the chronic stage, heumatic heart disease results in valvular fibrosis (Burk, 2013).

The pathophysiology of heumatic heart disease is as follows: The causative agent is group A streptococci. It develops into strep throat, which if untreated can turn into heumatic fever. At this point, the individual suffers inflammation of the layers of the heart as well as the mitral valve. Vegetation also begins to develop. This will lead to valvula regurgitation plus stenosis. The result of all of this is heart failure (Burke, 2010).

heumatic fever typically occurs in individuals between the ages of 5 and 25, so it is neither a newborn's disease nor…… [Read More]

References

Burke, A. (2013). Pathology of Rheumatic Heart Disease. Medscape. Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1962779-overview#a7

Wallace, M. (2014). Rheumatic Fever Medication. Medscape. Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/236582-medication
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Nursing and Religion Practice Religion and Nursing

Words: 2267 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 452423

Nursing and eligion Practice

ELIGION AND NUSING PACTICE

Nursing success depends on the ability to put the patient in a state of rest and comfort as much as it is about administering the prescriptions of the doctor. To secure the rest of the patient, nurses need to understand their needs and show respect to their beliefs and values. This requires courteous and open communication with the patient and adopting a patient-centric orientation. Along with other factors, the religious background of the patient makes a lot of difference to their values and expectations. eligious doctrines and practices may differ across religions and denominations such as Jehovah's Witnesses, Muslims, Seventh Day Adventists and Scientologists and may impose restrictions on certain kinds of interaction between nurse and patient or on certain forms of treatment. Moreover, people with a different religious background are not usually aware of such differences. Therefore, it is necessary for…… [Read More]

References

Banja, J.D. (2010). Overriding the Jehovah's Witness patient's refusal of blood: A reply to Cahana, Weibel, and Hurst. Pain Medicine, 10(5), 878-882. doi: 10.1111/j.1526-4637.2009.00648.x.

Charles, C.E., & Daroszewski, E.B. (2012). Culturally competent nursing care of the Muslim patient, Issues in Mental Health Nursing. 33(1), 61-63. doi: 10.3109/01612840.2011.596613.

Cort, M., & Cort, D. (2008). Willingness to participate in organ donation among Black Seventh-Day Adventist college students. Journal of American College Health, 56(6), p. 691-697. Retrieved from EBSCO Academic Search Primer.

Effa-Heap, G. (2009). Blood transfusion: Implications of treating a Jehovah's Witness patient. British journal of nursing, 18(3), 174-177.
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New Technology the Best Cure

Words: 13809 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56996011

Taken in isolation, some of the new, minimally-invasive procedures are less expensive by far, when analyzed on a procedure-by-procedure basis, than previous significant surgical interventions, as demonstrated below:

Procedure

Cost

Estimated duration of 'cure'

CAG

5-7 years

PCI (percutaneous coronary intervention

3-5 years

ased on the above analysis, it would appear to be clear that a PCI is more cost-effective than CAG procedures. This may not be true when all costs are considered, however. The logic of comparison needs to include additional factors than the 'cure' period and the direct procedural costs.

CAG cost discussion

CAG can vary from a simple mammary artery, single bypass to a 3- to 5-vessel bypass graft operation with the use of saphenous vein grafts from the leg. Many of the single-artery bypass operations have been overtaken by PCI in the past few years, as the need to 'open' single vessels has been taken in…… [Read More]

Bibliography: Note -- these are additional articles which I included, which you may wish to delete.

Chen, J. a. (2008). Treatment of Restenotic Drug-Eluting Stents: Ultrasound Analysis... Recurrent Coronary Stent Thromboses and Myocardial Infarctions. J of Invasive Cardiology, n.p.

Economist. (2007). 2008 World Almanac. London: Economist.

Edwards. (2008). PVT valve. Retrieved February 13, 2008, from Edwards: www.edwards.com

Glassman, a. (2007). Depression and cardiovascular comorbidity. Dialogues Clinical Neuroscience, 9-17.
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Company Analysis of Fortis Healthcare Care

Words: 3026 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23118375

Apart from that, Chennai has become the eye specialist city and Kerala has become the ayurvedic center for healing. These facilities are being made use of by the non-Indian nations (Connell, 2011).

Huge market at hand

The population is surging, the patterns of diseases are altering, salary levels are rising, clinical needs aren't attended, health issues aren't being attended, demand for quality care is needed at moderate prices and medical tourism is all set to rise. So is the need for modern equipment. In any case, demand for modern equipment is needed in India on a basis of 12%-15% yearly. Many foreign companies commence their initial 500 surgeries in India after getting approval from FDA. Medical services are still shallow by the way. China has 106 doctors while India has 60 doctors per 1000. Australia has 247 doctors per 1000 people. The rural areas suffer a lot from this lack…… [Read More]

References

Connell, J. (2011). Medical Tourism. CABI - Business & Economics.

Dhawan, J (2007). The Changing Face of Indian Economy. Atlantic Publishers & Dist.

Gulati, S., & Taneja, U. (2012). Specialty Hospitals Leveraging Information Systems For Greater Success. Internet Journal of World Health & Societal Politics, 7(2).

Herzlinger, R.E. (2008). Fortis Healthcare. Harvard Business School.
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Patients With Relevant Information Required

Words: 6307 Length: 23 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62180402

Merrill, in the UK. Following his experience with heart surgery using innovating surgical techniques, the physician noted the problems he experienced in understanding all of his alternatives compared to a simpler earlier procedure, and finally trusted to the advice of his cardiologist to surgically intervene. In response to the experience, Dr. Merrill emphasized that, "As a physician talking to colleagues, I had the best information possible under the circumstances. But it wasn't the same as my hernia repair. The experience brought home to me the realization that the progress of medicine has made informed consent impossible -- even for me" (Merrill 1999: 190).

ationale of Study

Taken together, the foregoing issues indicate that there is an ongoing need for an assessment of knowledge levels of informed consent among perioperative nurses and operating department practitioners. Perioperative nurses and operating department practitioners, though, are frequently subjected to an enormous amount of stress…… [Read More]

References

Calloway, S.J. (2009) 'The Effect of Culture on Beliefs Related to Autonomy and Informed

Consent.' Journal of Cultural Diversity 16(2): 68-69.

Cobb, W.G. (2005) 'Defending the Informed Consent Case.' Defense Counsel Journal 72(4):

330-331.
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Nursing Culture Overcoming Barriers to Change Introduction

Words: 5230 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4699596

Nursing Culture: Overcoming Barriers to Change

Introduction and Theoretical Framework

This program of study continues personal research and professional practice in the field of nursing within the area of public and private health systems. In an era characterized by increasing calls for more efficient approaches to healthcare delivery and accountability on the part of healthcare providers, there is a growing need for identifying opportunities to overcome organizational barriers to change that facilitate the implementation and sustainment of evidence-based practices over time. In order to accomplish this challenging enterprise, the nature of existing organizational barriers must be better understood, an issue that directly relates to the problem to be considered by the study proposed herein and which is discussed further below.

Statement of the Problem

According to Mannion, Davies and Marshall et al. (2005), the results of much of the research to date have identified a relationship between nursing culture and…… [Read More]

References

Banyard, V.L., & Miller, K.E. (1998). The powerful potential of qualitative research for community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology, 26(4), 485.

Burton, S., & Steane, P. (2004). Surviving your thesis. New York: Routledge.

Dennis, C., & Harris, L. (2002). Marketing the e-business. London: Routledge.

Department of Health. (2000). The NHS plan: A plan for investment, a plan for reform. London:
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Vietnam International Hospital Case Study

Words: 3218 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68962512



In summary there is a complete lack of methodology to get beyond what appears to be a major opportunity in the Hanoi market for healthcare when in fact there was a very good reason that part of the market was open; no one had taken the time to define services in the high-end of medical services, and the pricing dynamics of the market would later prove to be difficult to sustain such a high-end hospital on. If the founders had done research before the actual launch of the VIH they would have known this.

If you had been acting as a pre-project marketing consultant to Mr. Lee what might you have done by way of data collection to ascertain the nature of the market? (Remember, this is a developing-world country, and oftentimes consumers have little conceptualization of the product you envision.) would have taken a very systematic approach to building…… [Read More]

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Nursing Definitions Autonomy in the Nursing Profession

Words: 3242 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47314806

Nursing Definitions

Autonomy

Autonomy in the nursing profession states the importance of the client's role in making decisions that reflect advocacy for the client (Wade, 1999, p.310). Ultimately, this includes taking care of the patient physically as well as mentally and emotionally, developing a relationship with the patient that is beneficial to his care and actively advocating for the patient's rights and care. This type of autonomy, it is important to note, is not the same as individual or work autonomy, yet it must be considered that empowerment in nursing autonomy will inevitably lead to better professional and personal autonomy and should also lead to increased job satisfaction (Wade, 1999, p.310).

Typical definitions of autonomy would include the idea of complete independence for the person making the decisions. However, in the case of the nursing profession, the client's needs and desires must be heavily weighed and, in fact, become central…… [Read More]

References Cited

Wade, G.H. (1999). Professional nurse autonomy: Concept analysis and application to nursing education. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 30(2), 310-8.

Gaylord, N. & Grace, P. (1995). Nursing advocacy: An ethic of practice. Nursing Ethics, 2(1),

11-18.

White, L. (2004). Foundations of nursing: Second edition. Clifton Park, NY: Delmar Learning.
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Ears Are Blasted Daily by the Drumbeat

Words: 2037 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9156008

ears are blasted daily by the drumbeat of environmental forewarnings. The seas are rising. The glaciers are melting. Don't drive -- take the bus. Recycle. Turn off the lights. Adjust that thermostat. Save the polar bears! Reduce your carbon footprint!

Nothing against carbon, or ecologists, or polar bears, but while society focuses on reducing carbon footprints, why aren't more folks out there creating footprints for God? ho is marching through the pain and the rain and the snow to rekindle faith that God will intercede in broken lives, and will help repair the world's environmental problems if we just put one foot in front of the other in a march towards Christian truth?

hy have we been waiting for inspiration as to what we should do in this troubled world? Are not seeing that global warming and rising sea levels are sending us warning that we need to trust God's…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Faris, Stephan. (2008). Craig Sorley. Time. Retrieved October 25, 2011, from http://www.time.com.

Sorley, Craig. (2011). Christ, Creation Stewardship, and Missions: How Discipleship into a Biblical Worldview on Environmental Stewardship Can Transform People and Their Land.

International Bulletin of Missionary Research, 35(3), 137-143.

Srokosz, M.A. (2008). God's Story and the Earth's story: Grounding our concern for the Environment in the biblical meta-narrative. Science & Christian Belief, 20(2), 163-175.
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Information Systems in Healthcare Organizations

Words: 3540 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87187361

In addition, Fortis Healthcare has grown to become a worldwide leader in the delivery of a wide variety of sophisticated medical care in areas such as heart surgery. Although this is a positive aspect, particularly because it has led to the increase of medical tourism, this trend will result to adverse effects in the future (Fortis Hospital, 2001). This is because the company is gradually losing the desire to cater for the local people, and it is focusing on foreign care seekers.

Therefore, the local people may opt to seek healthcare services from other emerging healthcare providers, which can make the organization lose local dominance in its home country. In addition, the company always sees an opportunity in failed healthcare firms, and that is why it seeks to acquire them. However, it fails to calculate the costs involved in the improvements of the organizations. The company has some cases in…… [Read More]

References

Fortis Hospital. (2001). Fortis healthcare. Retrieved from  http://www.finedocs.com/Resources/case_studies/cs_health_001.pdf 

Fortis Healthcare. (2011). Fortis Healthcare Ltd. India: Vision for global expansion. Retrieved from http://www.fortishealthcare.com/pdf/Fortis-Analyst-Presentation-Final.pdf

Rao, M., & Mant, D. (2012). Strengthening primary healthcare in India: White paper on opportunities for partnership. BMJ. Retrieved from  http://www.bmj.com/content/344/bmj.e3151 

Rao, M. et al., (2011). Human resources for health in India. Lancet, 377, 587-98
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Boston Children's Hospital Has Become an Important

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71912774

Boston Children's Hospital has become an important location for assisting children to deal with a host of issues ranging from cancer treatment options to transplants. According to U.S. News and World Report (2013), Boston Children's Hospital is ranked as the number one facility for helping children to address a host of health issues including cardiology and neurology. he hospital is having a positive impact on the lives of children by offering them state-of-the-art treatment options in a caring environment. However, the institution faces a variety of challenges. his case study examines those challenges and how Boston Children's Hospital can meet those challenges.

Background of Boston Children's Hospital

Boston Children's Hospital first opened its doors in 1869, as a 20-bed facility in the South End. By 1891, Boston Children's had already proven itself to be a leader in health care delivery by creating the first laboratory for producing bacteria-free milk in…… [Read More]

To learn from Boston Children's Hospital, it is necessary to focus on the way the institution is evolving to meet health management and real life challenges. It is hypothesized that leadership and effective change management have become the core competencies of Boston Children's Hospital's management team. An examination of Boston Children's Hospital's approach to challenge and change will demonstrate how the institution can and will succeed over the long-term. This analysis will in turn help Boston Children's Hospital become a role model for other health care organizations.

Sandi Fenwick, President and COO

Fenwick has worked with Boston Children's Hospital for more than a decade. Fenwick is dedicated to promoting a health care system that is focused on the patient and not on profits. In her public statement, Fenwick states, "some healthcare discussions seem to imply that cost is the only measure of a hospital's worth. At Boston Children's value means more than just dollar and cents," (Boston Children's Hospital, 2013). Children are not to be treated as "small adults," according to Fenwick, who also acknowledges the practical and medical differences between treating children and treating adults. Boston Children's Hospital leadership is also committed to running an efficient organization, by forming strategic alliances with organizations like Blue Cross Blue Shield
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Cyprus Problem Ancient History Establishment of the

Words: 15734 Length: 55 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74494950

Cyprus Problem

Ancient History

Establishment of the epublic of Cyprus

Intercommunal Conflict

Establishment of the UNFICYP

Turkey Bombs Cyprus

Turkey ejects UN s Mediator on Solution of Cyprus Problem

New ound of Intercommunal Talks

Military Junta Takes Over in Greece

Kofinou Crisis

einforced Talks with Constitutional Experts

Formation of the EOKA B. And Civil Strife

Junta Coup d'Etat and Turkish Invasion

The Aftermath

estoration of Communal Order

Great Britain

Greece

Turkey

Greek Cypriots

Turkish Cypriots

Sovereignty

EU and the Cypress Problem

Struggle for Justice and Compromise

Where Should the Solution Line be Drawn?

POLICY IMPLICATIONS

CONCLUSIONS

EFEENCES

SUMMAY

Cyprus is an island in the Mediterranean which has been at the heart of a dispute since 1963. In 1960, the island was given freedom from British control, but since then there has been very little time that has not been plagued by some form of unrest. Since there are two distinct…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Attalides, M.A. (1979). Cyprus, nationalism and international politics. New York: St. Martin's Press.

Australian Hellenic Council. (2009). Cyprus. Retrieved from http://www.helleniccouncil.org.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&i'd=99&Itemid=81

Ayres, R. (1996). European integration: The case of Cyprus. Cyprus Review, 8(1), 39- 62.

Baier-Allen, S. (1999). Looking into the future of Cyprus: EU relations. Baden-Baden: Nomos.
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Authors Communicate There Are a Number of

Words: 950 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45112597

Authors Communicate

There are a number of points of interest regarding "Massage therapy in post-operative rehabilitation of children and adolescents with cerebral palsy - a pilot study." On the whole this is an extremely well-organized article, which is one of its primary strengths. The different sections and phases of the research are well documented. There are a variety of tables that elucidate several components related to the literature review, the results, and the particulars of the subjects considered in the research. However, there is more than one area of the study in which the researchers could have benefited from the use of more substantial effort and a more thorough methodology, which is certainly reflected in the results and the conclusion.

The central weakness of this study is the fact that all of the results were based on research performed on just six subjects. To the credit of the researchers they…… [Read More]

References

O'Conner, P. (2003). Woe is I: The grammarphobe's guide to better English in plain English. New York: Riverhead Books
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Sanford J Townsend-Rocchicciolli J horigan A & Hall

Words: 932 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48563261

Sanford, J., Townsend-Rocchicciolli, J.,Horigan, A., & Hall, P. (2011). A process of decision making by caregivers of family members with heart failure. Research & Theory for Nursing Practice, 25(1), 55-70.

Describe the population for this study.

participants were recruited from cardiology offices, inpatient hospital units, or adult day care facilities. The participant had to be related to the patient with heart failure (HF), provide one activity of daily living, and/or assist the care recipient with two activities of daily living and do this voluntarily.

How was the sample selected? What are the strengths and weaknesses of this sampling strategy?

This was a convenience sample. The participants were recruited from cardiology offices, inpatient hospital units, or adult day care facilities and had to meet certain conditions. The strengths are that the researchers know and get precisely what they are looking for (in terms of qualifications of participants). The weaknesses are that…… [Read More]

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Coronary Bypass Nurse Training for

Words: 1776 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7176434



Learning Objectives:

In support of the Terminal Objective, several key learning objectives will drive the content and curriculum for nurses undergoing the present training course. Primary among them, the training course is designed to create a standardized set of behaviors amongst nurses that conform with existing and evolving best practices in the perioperative care of CABG patients. This means that course content and design will be geared toward achieving procedural and professional consistency amongst attending nurses where preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative care are concerned.

An additional learning objective is to ensure that outgoing students are informed in the ethical and personal dimensions of the profession. Coronary surgical procedures are inherently serious in nature as are the heart and circulatory conditions that typically require such procedures. Therefore, it is of critical importance that nurses are trained in the proper bedside manner to approach patients, families and extended support systems with potentially…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Aroesty, J.M. (2010). Patient information: Recovery after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Up To Date, 19(2).

Cleveland Clinic (CC). (2011). Diseases and Conditions. my.ClevelandClinic.org.

Kulick, D. & Shiel, W.C. (2011). Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery. MedicineNet.com.

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI). (2010). What is Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. National Institute of Health.
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Achilles Tendon Rupture Every Time

Words: 949 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94683266

To verify this diagnosis, a doctor may then order either an X-ray of the area, or more likely, an MRI, which is better at imaging tears in soft tissues. hen surgery is required, these symptoms persist for several weeks after surgery.

Surgery is a common treatment for a rupture to the Achilles tendon; and most often consists of making an incision to the back of the lower leg and stitching together the torn section of the tendon. ("Surgery for an Achilles Tendon Rupture") if the rupture is complete, then the repair may be reinforced by connecting the torn tendon to other nearby muscles. hile the surgery is often performed through an open surgery procedure, if a patient has heart, circulatory, or poor healing risk factors, a percutaneous surgery will be performed. This surgical procedure differs in that it requires a number of small incisions instead of a single large one.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Everything About Achilles Tendons." AchillesTendon.com. Web. 26 Mar. 2012.

http://www.achillestendon.com/

rupture
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Care Needs Concerns and Treatment

Words: 4512 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58816657



Furthermore, one of the pillars of collaborative care that will need to be firmly established is the fostering of clear dialogue and a means for strong communication within the care management planning. For instance, there needs to be a clear decision and communication of all tests ordered and when the test results will be available. One of the most important aspects of this collaborative care will be the nursing interventions which can have significant impact on the patient's health and stabilization (Allen, 2010). In fact, strategic nursing care can even minimize readmission rates of Margaret and other patients with comparable conditions (Chen et al., 2012).

Prioritize the Nursing Care Needs of Margaret

The prioritization of nursing interventions is essential, and the way in which a nurse determines this priority is going to be something unique and distinct. "Trials reviewed demonstrated a beneficial impact of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in…… [Read More]

References

Adler, H.M. (n.d.). Toward a biopsychosocial understanding of the patient -- physician relationship: An emerging dialogue. (2007). J Gen Intern Med,22(2), 280 -- 285.

Afilala, J. (n.d.). Frailty in patients with cardiovascular disease: Why, when, and how to measure. (2011). Curr Cardiovasc Risk Rep, 5(5), 467 -- 472.

Allen, J.K. (2010). Randomized trials of nursing interventions for secondary prevention in patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure: Systematic review.

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing,25(3), 207-220.
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Scleroderma a Chronic Systemic Disease

Words: 608 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21116072

For example, in these procedures it is often difficult to open the patient's mouth wide enough for laryngoscopy and intubation, thus creating the possibility that cardiopulmonary changes may be present and the "probability o lesions in oesophagus, bowel, kindneys, skin and joints." This information would not be known if not for this study and its reported findings.

The study's conclusion is that the use of thoracic epidural anesthesia to sevoflurane based inhalation "may be a suitable technique for thoracic surgery in achalasia due to sclerodermic patients." The reason for this conclusion is that the study found that this procedure "can provide a smooth anesthesia course and a rapid recovery, with hemodynamic stability, and also having pain-free postoperatively." More so, the study found that providing anesthesia without neuromuscular blockade and non-intravenous opioids has "provided a shorter recovery time."

Clearly this specific case study has important and practical implications to the practice…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Erol, Demet Dogan, M.D. (2006): "Thoracic Epidural Blockade in an Elderly with Achalasia Due to Scleroderma for Thoractomy, Esophageal Myotomy and Cystotomy-Capitonnage. The Internet Journal of Anesthesiology. Vol. 11, Number 1.
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Obese Patients Have More Psychosomatic

Words: 3158 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82551024



References

Boulton, Martha (2005) Exploring alexithymia, depression, and binge eating in self-reported eating disorders in women. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care

Dahm, Lori (2005) Obesity update: are we getting any thinner?(Special Report)

Private Label Buyer

Merrick, Joav (2005) Psychosomatic reasons for chronic pains.(Editorial)

Southern Medical Journal

____(2006) Obese people may be more sensitive to pain.(NEWS Breaks)(Brief article) Nutrition oday

PORER, LAWRENCE C. WAMPLER, RICHARD S (2000) Adjustment to Rapid Weight Loss. Families, Systems & Health

Rubin, Jay J. (2005) Psychosomatic pain: new insights and management strategies.(CME opic: Psychosomatic Pain) Southern Medical Journal

ucker, Miriam E. (2005) Depression tied to poor adherence to cardiac Rx: results of two studies show that use of aspirin and [beta]-blockers was lower in depressed patients.(Psychosomatic Medicine) Clinical Psychiatry News

MEHODOLOGY

his study will seek to determine whether or not obese post operative patients have a higher incidence of psychosomatic disorders and illnesses than non-obese post op…… [Read More]

The need for this study is evident. The cost factor of psychosomatic illnesses may be reduced if it can be determined whether or not the obese patient population has a higher incidence of psychosomatic illness in post op. If it does then future steps can be taken to better prepare the obese patient population for surgery to reduce the incidence of post op psychometric illness.

REFERENCE

Tucker, Miriam E. (2005) Depression tied to poor adherence to cardiac Rx: results of two studies show that use of aspirin and [beta]-blockers was lower in depressed patients.(Psychosomatic Medicine) Clinical Psychiatry News
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Technological Th Century Surgical Technological

Words: 1071 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54487773

As Pressman states, "Given what has later become known about the delicacies of brain function and the complexities of psychiatric illness, it strains credulity that such a crude procedure as the original lobotomies might truly have yielded therapeutic benefits for a great many patients." (Pressman1998, 195) This also refers to the fact that some medical theories are favored at certain times and not others. This suggests the relativity rather than the certainty of the scientific -- rational worldview.

The above brings us to the views put forward by Freeman and others concerning the technological fix. This in turn relates to other questions; such as why a method like lobotomy should have been seen to be effective in the past but not today. This leads to the view that political and social factors influence medicine and especially the success once attributed to a technology like lobotomy. For example, Pressman refers to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Freeman, Walter and Watts, W. 1942. Psychosurgery, Intelligence, Emotion and Social

Behavior Following Prefrontal Lobotomy for Mental Disorders. Springfield:Baltimore.

Freeman, Walter and Watts, W. 1937. "Subcortical Prefrontal Lobotomy in the Treatment

of Certain Psychoses." Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry 38: 225-229
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Illness Modern Nursing Is Extremely

Words: 723 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34974867

It is also a population that often has limited resources and one that seeks to find others to help comfort and educate them. Modern technology has certainly improved both the diagnosis and treatment of the illness, but there are so many options that the patient is often left bewildered and frightened (Guadalupe).

A proactive and professional nursing approach to this illness takes Mishel's theory and uses it in four ways:

To combat ambiguity -- Patients are unaware of the progress and severity of their illness and often fill in with worst-case scenarios. Open and honest communication about that status of the illness will alleviate many concerns, or at least allow for uncoerced decision making.

To combat complexity -- Illness is complex and often based on statistical tables, not individual expressions. Using Michel, the nurse can simplify to the necessary degree both the illness and options.

To provide information -- More…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Alligood, M. (2010). Nursing Theory: Utilization and Application. Denver, CO: Mosby.

Guadalupe, K. (2010, Feb.) Understanding a meningioma diagnosis using Mishel's theory of uncertainty in illness. British Journal of Neuroscience Nursing. 6 (2): 77-82.

Mishel, M. And Clayton, M. (2003). Theories of Uncertainty in Illness. In Smith, M. ed. Middle

Range Theory for Nursing. New York: Springer. Chapter 2.
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Market Driven Management

Words: 25695 Length: 75 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32150042

Pharmaceutical industries have to operate in an environment that is highly competitive and subject to a wide variety of internal and external constraints. In recent times, there has been an increasing trend to reduce the cost of operation while competing with other companies that manufacture products that treat similar afflictions and ailments. The complexities in drug research and development and regulations have created an industry that is subject to intense pressure to perform. The amount of capital investment investments required to get a drug from conception, through clinical trials and into the market is enormous. The already high-strung pharmaceutical industry is increasingly investing greater amounts of resources in search of the next "blockbuster" drug that can help them gain market position and profits. Laws, regulations and patents are important to the industry while spending billions of dollars in ensuring the copyright of their products.

It is the intention of this…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ansoff, H.I. (1957). Strategies for diversification. Harvard Business Review, 35(5), 113-124.

Ansoff, H.I. (1965). Corporate Strategy. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Ashour, M.F., Obeidat, O., Barakat, H., & Tamimi, A. (2004). UAE Begins Examination of Patent Applications. Tamino.com. Retrieved January 18, 2004, from the World Wide Web: http://www.tamimi.com/lawupdate/2001-01/intprop.htm

Bain, J.S. (1954). Economies of scale, concentration, and the condition of entry in twenty manufacturing industries. American Economic Review, 44, 15-36.
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Evidence-Based Research Problem in Nursing

Words: 1019 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29177472

Still, the concept of guided imagery tends to stray far from traditional methods of pain management. Pharmaceuticals have long been a major method of treatment for pain, but have resulted in major backlashes in regards to patients becoming addicted, especially in long-term and chronic cases of pain. If guided imagery could be a successful method, it may reduce pain or increase pain tolerance, without the threat of chemical dependence.

There are a number of benefits which are seen in the ongoing discourse today. As such, the expected improvements include things like drops in blood high blood pressure, lower heart rates, and reduction of chronic pain symptoms, lessoning of headache pain, and increasing overall pain tolerance (Cornelius, 2010). In situations were patients going into a major surgery were coached with guided imagery, it was "shown to decrease stress and anxiety before and after surgery," thus helping reduce additional pain issues during…… [Read More]

References

Bresler, David E. (2012). Raising pain tolerance using guided imagery. Practical Pain Management. Web.  http://www.practicalpainmanagement.com/treatments/psychological/raising-pain-tolerance-using-guided-imagery 

Cornelius, Debra. (2010). Guided imagery improves treatment options for various conditions. Health. Web. http://voices.yahoo.com/guided-imagery-improves-treatment-options-various-6299902.html

Davies, Karen Sue. (2011). formulating the evidence-based practice question: A review of the frameworks. Evidence-Based Library and Informative Practice, 6(2), 75-81.
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Hospital Case Study if the First Requirement

Words: 2934 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56781691

Hospital Case Study

If the first requirement of any successful case study is a detailed and analytical examination of the situation, the emotional component of so called "high stakes" issues can make this requirement difficult, indeed. The simple fact, however, is in order to find good solutions and policies regarding the problem presented in the case study, one must apply the three main questions of "situation," "remedy/s," and "method/s." Although this may seem difficult in some situations, the emotional component must not be considered.

A good example of this fact occurs in the examination of an unfortunate case involving the botched heart/lung transplant of a 16-year-old girl, much like the recent incident at Duke Hospital. In this case, a young girl died as a result of receiving miss-matched organs. Unfortunately, in this case, all of the supposed safeguards of the system, imposed to assure that proper blood typing of both…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chibbaro, Lou. (2004) Victory Claimed in HIV Suits. Washington Blade. Web site. Retrieved on August 8, 2004, at http://www.washblade.com/print.cfm?content_id=2771

Colorado State University Writing Center. "Case Studies." Retrieved from Web site on August 2, 2004 http://writing.colostate.edu/references/research/casestudy/com2a1.cfm

CTDN. California Donors Network. (2004) Facts about organ and tissue donation. Web site. Retrieved on August 8, 2004, at http://www.ctdn.org/resources/faqs.php?id=3&NoHeader=1

Duke University. (2004). UNOS and DUH Safeguards for Organ Transplant Safety. Duke Medical News. Retrieved on August 7, 2004, at http://dukemednews.org/filebank/2003/06/28/UNOS%20and%20DUH%20Safeguards%20for%20Organ%20Transplant%20Safety.doc
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George Washington University's Sonography Bachelor's

Words: 511 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78388281



Nevertheless, my passion for medicine remained which led to applying to the Technology Institute of Pharmacy at the university. Unfortunately, due to conditions beyond my control, I requested a transfer to the Nursing Institute at the university, yet because of my brother's failing health, I was forced to remain at home to care for him. Things changed in 2001, when I came to the U.S., knowing that I had a much better chance there to fulfill my dreams of becoming a medical specialist. Soon after, I registered at Northern Virginia Community College to major in science and after working full-time to pay for my studies, I am now in my last semester at NVCC, aiming for an Associate in Science which hopefully will open the door to pharmacy school. Overall, by obtaining a pharmacy degree, I could not only help people in the U.S. But also my own people in…… [Read More]

My initial interest in pursuing a degree in the medical field came about when my brother developed a very serious disease. This event prompted me to wonder about his medical future regarding treatment in the form of surgery or chemotherapy, and due to the fact that we were living in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where I was born and raised, the prospects of my brother finding adequate treatment and care for his disease were rather poor. As a result, I decided to create the foundations for a career in medical science. Part of this required that I take the Ethiopian School Living Examination. In 1994, after competing against 167,000 other high school graduates, I received a passing score which made me eligible to attend Addis Ababa University; however, since Ethiopia follows the command economy, I ended up in social sciences rather than in my chosen field of medicine.

Nevertheless, my passion for medicine remained which led to applying to the Technology Institute of Pharmacy at the university. Unfortunately, due to conditions beyond my control, I requested a transfer to the Nursing Institute at the university, yet because of my brother's failing health, I was forced to remain at home to care for him. Things changed in 2001, when I came to the U.S., knowing that I had a much better chance there to fulfill my dreams of becoming a medical specialist. Soon after, I registered at Northern Virginia Community College to major in science and after working full-time to pay for my studies, I am now in my last semester at NVCC, aiming for an Associate in Science which hopefully will open the door to pharmacy school. Overall, by obtaining a pharmacy degree, I could not only help people in the U.S. But also my own people in Ethiopia. While a student at NVCC, I served the Ethiopian Community Development Council by providing outreach services for refugees seeking health assistance.

In conclusion, my personal desire is to expand and enhance my knowledge in the pharmacy field and thus be able to provide my services to communities in the U.S. And abroad, particularly in Ethiopia. Therefore, I am looking forward with much relish to participating in GWU's Sonography Bachelor's Program.
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Injuries in the Hospital

Words: 757 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66538926

Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration

One of the platforms upon which the law enforcement agencies and the healthcare providers interact on frequent occasions is the treatment and handling of the patients who might have been injured outside the hospital and brought in for treatment, or even sustained the injuries from within the hospital altogether in the process of general medical care, surgery or drug administration. There are OSHA regulations that guide the reporting, recording and handling of such events within the hospital settings.

The following are the injuries that hospitals are required to formally report to the local law enforcement authorities or the police department for the city within which the treatment took place (UNC School of Governance, 2011). If there are patients brought into the hospital with wounds and injuries resulting from apparent gunshots or any other type of discharge from a firearm, then these must be reported…… [Read More]

References

UNC School of Governance, (2011). Reporting Patient Injuries to Law Enforcement: It's Not Just Gunshot Wounds.  http://canons.sog.unc.edu/?p=5792 

U.S. Department of Labor, (2014). OSHA Forms for Recording Work Related Injuries and Illnesses.  https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/new-osha300form1-1-04.pdf
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Nurses Recount About Experiences With

Words: 4322 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1715264



Nurses expressed empathy when I complained of pain or discomfort and promptly advocated for me when the need arose.

While hospitalized in an acute care setting, I feel that because I am a nurse, I did not receive the same degree of scrutiny a non-clinician patients or physician may have been given.

While hospitalized in an acute care setting, I feel that because I am a nurse, I received more consideration than a non-clinician patient may have been given.

While hospitalized in an acute care setting, I feel that because I am a nurse, I received less consideration than a physician may have been given.

I feel that the type, quality, and consistency of care I received while acutely hospitalized did not differ from treatment any other person would have been given.

My experience as a patient contributed to shaping my perception as nurse of the health care environment.

I…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, Leeann RN. (2007). "When a Nurse Becomes a Patient." American Nurses Credentialing Center. Retrieved October 23, 2008, at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/564685

Bowers, Len RMN PhD., McFarlane, Linda BSc, Kiyimba, Frank RMN, Clark, Nicola MA MSc, Alexander, Jane. "Factors underlying and maintaining nurses' attitudes to patients with severe personality disorder." Department of Mental Health Nursing, City University' August 2000, p. 6. Retrieved October 23, 2008, at http://www.city.ac.uk/sonm/dps/research/research_reports/bowers_l/sdp.pdf

Growing question in hospitals: Como esta?," Post and Courier (Charleston, SC). July 24, 2006. Retrieved October 23, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1=148588515.html

Hample, Henry. "When Doctors and Nurses Become Patients. Inside MS, June 22, 2000. Retrieved October 23, 2008, at http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G163690617.html
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Ethics Project

Words: 4363 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61479708

Life and Death: The Life Support Dilemma by Kenneth E. Schemmer M.D

Kenneth Schemmer in his thorough, thought provoking book brings to life the controversial subject of the life support issue. For years, many all over the country have pondered, "What if a person were in some kind of an accident and the physicians told them that they were not going to make it?" And all that he or she could do is just lie there in extreme pain waiting for their life to the end. Or even worse case scenario what if they happened to end up completely brain dead? These debated questions are taken on by Dr. Schemmer in making his point that life support decisions may not necessarily be the decision of the family, the doctor or the patient but by a higher being that gives life and takes life. Schemmer uses these controversial questions in his…… [Read More]

References:

Court backs right to die | terminally ill have right to refuse medical life support. (1984, Dec 28). The San Diego Union, pp. A.1-1.

Ackerman, T. (2005, Mar 27). Life support battle shifts / A decade ago, patients families had to press for 'right to die. Houston Chronicle, pp. 1-B.1.

Allen, P. (2000, Oct 07). Right to die upheld despite new euro law, doctors can end life support rules judge. Daily Mail, pp. 33-33.

Dolan, M. (2001, Aug 10). Justices deal setback to right-to-die movement; health: State court bans removal of life support from conscious patients whose wishes are not clear. Los Angeles Times, pp. A.1-A.1.
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Mitchell Ted Tim Church & Martin Zucker

Words: 1128 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26800478

Mitchell, Ted, Tim Church & Martin Zucker. (2008). Move yourself: The Cooper Clinic medical director's guide to all the healing benefits of exercise (Even a little!). New York: Wiley.

Much has been written about the importance of reforming the American diet. However, there is an equally important aspect of fitness and the maintenance of a healthy weight: exercise. Move yourself: The Cooper Clinic medical director's guide to all the healing benefits of exercise (Even a little!) is a positive, upbeat book that proclaims the value of even small amounts of exercise, as a way of encouraging overweight Americans to change their negative lifestyle behavioral patterns. Given the multiplicity of prescriptions to Americans about the right way to 'move more' as well as to 'eat less' as the way of addressing their weight problems, it is worth considering the question as to if it is enough to do even small amounts…… [Read More]

References

Cloud, John. (2009). Why exercise won't make you thin. Time Magazine.

Retrieved December 7, 2011 at http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1914974-3,00.html

Mitchell, Ted, Tim Church & Martin Zucker. (2008). Move yourself: The Cooper Clinic medical director's guide to all the healing benefits of exercise (Even a little!). New York: Wiley.

Taubes, Gary. (2007). The scientists and the Stairmaster. New York Magazine.
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Nursing Assessment Taking the History of a

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45591901

Nursing Assessment

Taking the history of a patient is a crucial aspect of patient assessment and treatment. A good history can mean the difference between a successful patient outcome and unsatisfactory outcomes. However, taking a complete and useful history is a skill that is developed by means of training and practice; it is not some talent that is innate (Bickley & Szilagyi, 2007; McKenna et al., 2011). According to Craig (2007) nurses are increasingly being asked to take patient histories. Given these growing responsibilities nurses need training and guidelines to taking an adequate patient history. The following is a summary and critique of Craig, L. H, (2007), A "Guide to Taking a Patient's History" in Nursing Standard, volume 22, issue 13, pages 42-48.

Craig (2007) takes a comprehensive approach to explaining the interview and history taking process. This approach is applicable for most any patient population; however, Craig does not…… [Read More]

References

Alarcon, R.D. (2009). Culture, cultural factors and psychiatric diagnosis: Review and projections. World Psychiatry, 8, 131 -- 139.

Bickley, L.S. & Szilagyi, P.G. (2007). Bates' Guide to Physical Examination and History

Taking. 9th ed. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Craig, L.H. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22 (13), 42-48.
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Invention and Summarize the Significance of the

Words: 1156 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42977589

Invention and Summarize the Significance of the Underlying Technology Innovation

The device titled the Thornton Adjustable Positioner or TAP is an oral/dental device worn in the patient's mouth during sleep to move the lower jaw slightly forward to create an open airway for proper breathing while sleeping. The device or some like them have been previously tried on minor sleep disturbances such as snoring, yet, their efficacy has been unknown for more serious problems such as mild to severe sleep apnea. Sleep apnea, a disorder that creates oxygen deprivation during sleep and can moderately to severely affect the health of the individual first by depriving the individual of restful sleep and in more severe cases by creating oxygen deprivation that can lead to other chronic diseases or even acute death from asphyxia.

Up to this point the most commonly prescribed device for sleep apnea is a device that forces oxygen…… [Read More]

Resources

University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (2009, February 4). Small Device Helps Sleep Apnea Sufferers In A Big Way. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090203140147.htm
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Arguments for Limiting Free Speech

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21176640

limiting free speech ID: 53711

The arguments most often used for limiting freedom of speech include national security, protecting the public from disrupting influences at home, and protecting the public against such things as pornography.

Of the three most often given reasons for limiting freedom of speech, national security may well be the most used. President after president, regardless of party has used national security as a reason to not answer questions that might be embarrassing personally or would show their administration as behaving in ways that would upset the populace. Although there are many examples of government apply the "national security" label to various situations, perhaps some of the stories that are associated with the Iran-Contra issue best display what government uses limitations on free speech for. In horrific tangle of lies double and triple dealing that resulted in the deaths of many Nicaraguans, the egan administration sought to…… [Read More]

References

Curtis, M.K. (1995). Critics of "Free Speech" and the Uses of the Past. Constitutional Commentary, 12(1), 29-65. Retrieved August 5, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.

Dan, W. (1989). On Freedom of Speech of the Opposition. World Affairs, 152(3), 143-145.

Reflections and Farewell. (2002). Social Work, 47(1), 5+. Retrieved August 5, 2005, from Questia database, http://www.questia.com.
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Wired Hospital in Today's Time

Words: 2249 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93861590

This is exactly where the problem usually starts.

There are a number of reports published which revealed that even the physicians are not so keen into attending more seminars and trainings to learn the new systems (Ball, 1992). Physicians are expectedly always busy. They sometimes work from hospital to hospital. They are always on call hence they really find it hard to squeeze in their thigh schedule the time for further training and semi-are regarding the system. At some point in time, physicians will also worry about their income that will be affected if they will get a time off just to attend the training.

In the same manner, most of the administrators, who will manage the new systems for the hospitals, also show signs of hesitance regarding the training. It must be noted that the being considered as a 'wired hospital' the institution must have uniform data standards (Aspden…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aspden, P., J.M. Corrigan, J. Wolcott, and S.M. Erickson. 2003. Patient Safety: Achieving a New Standard for Care. Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Ball, M. 1992. "Computer-Based Patient Records: The Push Gains Momentum." Health Informatics 9 (1): 36-38.

Bates, D.W., J.M. Teich, J. Lee, D. Seger, G.J. Kuperman, N. Ma'Luf, D. Boyle, and L. Leape. 1999. "The Impact of Computerized Physician Order Entry on Medication Error Prevention." Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association 6 (4): 313-21.

Benefits of it to Medical Profession http://www.cica.org.uk/bre-cica_survey/ranking_of_it_benefits.htm. September 25, 2006
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Risk and Hazard Factors of

Words: 3788 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60811016

Even though users of light therapy are often advised not to look directly at the light source, the mechanisms of the eye focus incoming light onto the macula, the small region of the retina where vision takes place, and where age-related macular degeneration occurs. Since blue light wavelength make up only a small percentage of the light in white light, any form of light therapy using a high proportion of blue light therefore risks subverting a variety of defensive mechanisms that protect the retina against blue light hazard. These defensive mechanisms include the anatomical positioning and structure of eye and its surrounding features, as well as human posture, which makes it awkward for humans to gaze upwards for long periods of time. Sunnex iotechnologies, 2008)

The work of David H. Sliney entitled: "Ocular Hazards of Light" presented at the International Lighting in Controlled Environments Workshop states the following risks and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Figueiro, M.G., J.D. Bullough, R.H. Parsons, and M.S. Rea. Preliminary Evidence for Spectral Opponency in the Suppression of Melatonin by Light in Humans. Neuroreport, Vol. 15, 2004, pp. 313-316 in: Figueiro, Mariana, Bullough, John D. And Rea, Mark S. (2007) Light isn't just for vision anymore: implications for transportation safety. United States Department of Transportation Lighting Research Center Region 2 University Transportation Research Center Polytechnic Institute 31 Dec 2 -- "7

Figueiro, M., et al. Demonstration of additivity failure in human circadian phototransduction. Neuro Endocrinology Letters, Vol. 26, 2005, pp. 493-498.

Ingling, C.R., E. Martinez, and a.L. Lewis. Tonic-Phasic-Channel Dichotomy and Crozier's Law. Journal of the Optical Society of America, Vol. 73, 1983, pp. 183-189 in Figueiro, Mariana, Bullough, John D. And Rea, Mark S. (2007) Light isn't just for vision anymore: implications for transportation safety. United States Department of Transportation Lighting Research Center Region 2 University Transportation Research Center Polytechnic Institute 31 Dec 2 -- "7 Report

Lack, Leon, Bramwell, Toby, Wright, Helen, and Kemp, Krystyn (2007) Morning blue light can advance the melatonin rhythm in mild delayed sleep phase syndrome
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Theatre Art

Words: 1343 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93824753

Shape of Things:

Theatrical Convention from Class: Suspension of Disbelief -- the audience is made to believe that a man or any person for that matter could become so obsessed with a single person that they are willing to completely change themselves, including having plastic surgery and destroying their interpersonal relationships for a person whose only appeal to them is a sexual one.

Potential Convention: Given the subject matter of the play and the heightened emotions the ending portrays at least on the part of one character that I would try to have the actors deliver their dialogue and their attitudes as realistically as possible.

In the Blood:

Theatrical Convention from Class: Pathos -- the audience is meant to feel sympathy for the main character of this play and to understand her sense of desperation and her inability to find a way to preserve herself and her sense of dignity…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Albee, E. (2000). The Goat or Who is Sylvia? Overlook TP.

Edson, M. (1995). Wit. Faber & Faber.

LaBute, N. (2001). The Shape of Things.

Parks, S. (1999). In the Blood.
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Hospitals Are Catering to Customers

Words: 2466 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68914328

Heart hospitals are foregoing the traditional systems with a model known as patient-focused care. In this model patients stay in one room throughout the entire procedure, rather than the traditional method of waiting for beds to open as they transfer from one unit to another. This one-room approach also works to reduce the time spent in the hospital. The Heart Hospital, which has 12 beds, usually sends patients home in three days, in comparison to five to seven days in a conventional hospital.

In addition, medical staff is generally paid higher salaries at specialty hospitals. Nurses can earn between $5 and $7 more per hour than their counterparts in traditional hospitals (tringer, 2001).

A study by health care research firm HCIA.com in Maryland demonstrates that the amenities of specialty hospitals are winning over more and more patients (tringer, 2001). The study revealed that two public hospitals performed between 25% and…… [Read More]

Stringer, Heather. (January 22, 2001). Change of Heart. Nurseweek Magazine.

Terlep, S. (September 19, 2003). Hospital waiting room or living room? The Detroit News.

Wood, Kaitlin. (October 20, 2005). Hospital aims ads to attract patients. Stanford Daily.
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Direct to Consumer Advertising History of Drug

Words: 16271 Length: 59 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71118969

Direct to Consumer Advertising

HISTRY F DRUG ADVERTISING

THE DTC ADVERTISING PHENMENN

CREATING DEMAND

DECEPTIVE ADVERTISING - A WLF IN SHEEP'S CLTHING

CAUSE F DEATH

PRFIT

UTILIZATIN, PRICING, AND DEMGRAPHICS

LEGISLATIN, PLITICS AND PATENTS

LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES REGARDING DTC

RECALLED and/or DEADLY DRUGS

In order to provide the most efficient method of evaluation, the study will utilize existing stores of qualitative and quantitative data from reliable sources, such as U.S. Government statistical references, University studies, and the studies and publications of non-profit and consumer oriented organizations. Every attempt will be made to avoid sources of information sponsored by or directly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry.

Existing data regarding the history, levels, content and growth of direct-to-consumer advertising will be examined. In addition, the industry's composition prior to and after the proliferation of direct-to-consumer advertising will be examined, with regard to market share, type of substances sold, benefits of substances sold, and…… [Read More]

On January 9, 2002, Dr. Darlene Jody, Vice President of Medical Marketing for Bristol-Myers Squibb, issued a manufacturer's "Important Drug Warning Including Black Box Information." The Important Drug Warning advises healthcare practitioners that "cases of life-threatening hepatic failure have been reported in patients treated with SERZONE." The manufacturer's Warning indicates that numerous persons have or will suffer liver failure, death or transplantation. The manufacturer's Warning also indicates that the current estimate of the rate of liver failure associated with Serzone use is "about 3-4 times the estimated background rate of liver failure." A new Warning is being added to the Serzone prescribing information, advising that "patients should be advised to be alert for signs and symptoms of liver dysfunction (jaundice, anorexia, gastrointestinal complaints, malaise, etc.) and to report them to their doctor immediately if they occur." According to Warnings, Serzone should be promptly discontinued if signs or symptoms suggest liver failure.

Vioxx belongs to a class of drugs known as COX-2 inhibitors. When the drugs were introduced a few years ago, COX-2 inhibitors were thought to be safer and more effective than other drugs such as Aspirin and Ibuprofen. However, several studies have questioned the cardiovascular safety of Vioxx. Studies indicate that people taking Vioxx have four times the risk of a heart attack.

In May 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Talk Paper about new label warnings for the popular arthritis and pain drug know as Vioxx (rofecoxib). The new label warnings are based on the results of the Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research (VIGOR). According to the FDA, recent studies demonstrate that Vioxx is associated with a higher rate of serious cardiovascular thromboembolic adverse events (such as heart attacks, angina pectoris, and peripheral vascular events). Based on the recent study, the FDA agreed with the Arthritis Advisory Committee recommendations February 8, 2001 that the label for Vioxx include gastrointestinal and cardiovascular warning information. Serious side effects attributed to Vioxx are heart attacks, seizures, strokes, or liver/kidney problems. http://www.recalleddrugs.com
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Adults Sign a Do Not

Words: 2037 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69861765

An adult do not need to make all decisions in advance, but educating oneself is a vital first step. (Death with Dignity: Planning Ahead for End-of-Life Care) few guidelines for signing a DN order are given here. A Do Not esuscitate Order - DN is a physician's order to not to employ cardiopulmonary resuscitation - CP in case of cardiac or pulmonary arrest. Competent adult patients may relinquish CP for medical or non-medical reasons. The patient may make such requests verbally irrespective of whether or not he/she is fatally ill. An appeal to relinquish CP may also be part of an Advance Directive. When it has been determined that the patient is short of decision-making capacity, the suitable substitute decision-maker should be recognized to make treatment decisions, including decisions to relinquish CP, if no such person has been appointed by an Advance Directive. If the patient is out of action,…… [Read More]

References

Care of the Sick and Dying. Roman Catholic Bishops of Maryland. Retrieved at http://www.mdcathcon.org/Care.htm. Accessed on 17th March 2005

Collins, Tony. Dealers of Death. Retrieved at http://www.envoymagazine.com/planetenvoy/Update-TCollins-TerriS-Jan04-Full.htm. Accessed on 17th March 2005

Dealers of Death. 30 November, 2004. Retrieved at http://www.catholicexchange.com/vm/index.asp?vm_id=2&art_id=26177Accessed on 17th March 2005

Do not Resuscitate- DNR Orders. 1 January, 2001. Retrieved at http://www.healthsystem.virginia.edu/internet/housestaff/policy-manual/dnr.cfmAccessed on 17th March 2005
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Tissue Donation

Words: 2438 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43055673

Tissue Donation

Donated body organs like hearts and kidneys contribute to the saving of hundreds of lives each year. The fact is that bequeathed tissues like skin, bone and heart valves could remarkably enhance the value of life for the persons receiving them. A patient who is dead following a cardiac arrest i.e. whose heartbeat has stopped permanently cannot be an organ donor but can be a tissue donor. Though in case of tissue donation the urgency of restoring a life by donation of liver or heart is absent, yet it is no way less critical to bring back vision by the help of a donated cornea, avert the severing of a leg using a bone donated by somebody or brighten the odds of survival of a patient having sustained burn injuries by skin donation.

Transplanted tissues offer advantages like it helps in alleviating trauma, assisting individuals to see again,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chabot-Long, Lynn. A Gift of Life: A Page from the Life of a Living Organ Donor,

Je-Lynn Publications, 1996

LaTour, Stephen A; Manrai, Ajay K. Interactive Impact of Informational and Normative influence on Donations. Journal of Marketing Research. Volume: 26; No: 3;

August, 1989, pp: 327-335.
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Strategic Management Health Care Feder

Words: 473 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92909867



he short-term financial implications for Beth Israel are initially, of course, that more patients will have Medicare coverage for the use stenting during carotid-cleaning surgery. here are other positive implications, too for the hospital over the long-term. In terms of staffing, as skill is less of a premium in stenting than previously thought, more physicians, and younger, training physicians can perform the procedure. his will free up the schedules of more skilled surgeons for other, more technically demanding operations. he procedure will also be able to be performed more frequently, as more physicians can accomplish it, thus enabling Beth Israel to expand the use of the surgery. As it is safer and less invasive, the surgery long run it may require less insurance for the hospital. One day, perhaps residents can perform this procedure, as well as the most skilled physicians, and the use of stenting during carotid-cleaning surgery could…… [Read More]

The National section of the October 21, 2005 edition of The New York Times has good news for the 200,000 Americans who undergo carotid-clearing surgery each year and the financing of such procedures for the Beth Israel Medical Center. Now, the once-complicated cleaning procedure that could only be performed by the most skilled physicians has become made easier, less invasive, and safer with the ability for physicians to use stents during the operations. Stents are metal cylinders used to prop open blood vessels to keep the vessels from closing again during surgery, after blockages have initially been cleared. Research indicates that the neck stenting, an emerging alternative to more invasive surgery to reduce stroke risks for patients with clogged carotid arteries, is technically less challenging in most cases than had been assumed.

Regulators originally approved marketing the stents only to a high-risk population who could not undergo normal surgery without great risk. Currently, Medicare is covering fewer than ten percent of these individuals undergoing the procedures with the use of stents. However, the new research is likely to spur an increase in aid to the population most at risk for clogged arteries, for both patients who must undergo stenting and now, patients who are not high surgical risks, but do not wish to endure the more invasive procedure without the use of stents.

The short-term financial implications for Beth Israel are initially, of course, that more patients will have Medicare coverage for the use stenting during carotid-cleaning surgery. There are other positive implications, too for the hospital over the long-term. In terms of staffing, as skill is less of a premium in stenting than previously thought, more physicians, and younger, training physicians can perform the procedure. This will free up the schedules of more skilled surgeons for other, more technically demanding operations. The procedure will also be able to be performed more frequently, as more physicians can accomplish it, thus enabling Beth Israel to expand the use of the surgery. As it is safer and less invasive, the surgery long run it may require less insurance for the hospital. One day, perhaps residents can perform this procedure, as well as the most skilled physicians, and the use of stenting during carotid-cleaning surgery could be incorporated into the training regime of new doctors. Regardless, new interest in the surgery and the hospital's more frequent ability to perform the surgery will open up funding from organizations that deal with nutrition, heart health, and other organizations that advocate the use of surgery as well as other means to reduce stroke risks for patients with clogged carotid arteries - the arteries in the neck that carry blood to the brain.
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Thousands of Diseases Afflicting Humans

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97399852

" This drug has already won approval for use in Europe and the United tates. tudies conducted show that the drug "targets the tumor to control in four areas: in the site where hypersecretion starts, in GH secretion, IGF-1 and in the symptoms associated with the disease (Unknown, 2004)." While the drug has been approved, there are still contraindications to taking it such as a patient who has an irregular or slow heart rate, or blood sugar levels which are either too high or too low.

Occurrence

Although gigantism begins prior to puberty, the "majority of giants eventually demonstrate features of acromegaly, of which the mean age for the onset is within the 3rd decade of life. Even a congenital onset of GH excess has been suggested by linear growth acceleration occurring within the first few months of life in young children with documented gigantism (http://jcem.endojournals.org/cgi/content/full/84/12/4379)." Although there is no…… [Read More]

Simmons, Kirt E. (01 October, 1999). "Growth Hormone and Craniofacial Changes: Preliminary Data From Studies in Turner's Syndrome." Pediatrics.

Skatssoon, Judy. (21 May, 2002). "NSW: New discovery could lead to cure for dwaftism, gigantism." AAP General News (Australia).

Unknown. (01 June, 2004). "Novartis Sandostatin LAR approved in Japan for Acromegaly. Worldwide Biotech.
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Science Business Plan Entry Science

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12129535

Most recently he held the position of Vice President of Marketing and Product Management at Whopper Systems, a developer of PACS medical imaging and information management software. John defined the product portfolio and roadmap, managed strategic partnerships and was instrumental in the company's growth and eventual acquisition by Eastman Kodak Health Imaging. John holds a B.Sc in General Science (Physics) from Tel-Aviv University and is currently in his second year of studies at the McMaster Graduate School of Business.

Chief Medical Officer - Michelle Pfeiffer, M.D.

Michelle is a 5th year resident in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at the McMaster University Medical Center. Michelle co-founded and is Vice President of Societal Resources, a company with diverse health care interests ranging from import/export of medical instruments to diabetes education in the United States and serving as a liaison between Medical Bandages and the Bosnian Ministry of Health. Michelle also helped design…… [Read More]

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Web Health Care Located in Wichita Kansas

Words: 1937 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35504884

Web Health Care

Located in Wichita, Kansas, Via Christi Health is the agency that serves the eponymous region through the site via-christi.org. Via Christi provides care through hospitals, outpatient centers, senior communities, and in-home care for individuals in Kansas. The services the agency provides a VCMA directory, which encompasses a search for physicians through Via Christi Medical Associates and the Via Christi Clinic, along with the Via Christi Hospitals. Via Christi Medical Associates is a group of fifty family practitioners, while Via Christi Clinics offer family care and immediate care. The thirteen clinics have been in place since 1948, 160 hired physicians, and encompassed 40 specialties. Via Christi agency offers a directory and location of special centers, which includes burn center, cancer care, cardiac care, and cystic fibrosis. As well, there's epileptology, neurosciences, obstetrics and gynecology, and occupational health services. Moreover, individuals are able to look up care for pediatric…… [Read More]

References

Via Christi Hospitals: VCFM Residency. (n.d.). VCFM Residency. Retrieved December 3, 2011, from http://www.vcfm.net/details/via-christi/

HMR Clinic Program Weight Loss Surgery Weight Loss Class Corporate Wellness HMR at Home Meal Replacements ~ Via Christi Weight Management Wichita Kansas. (n.d.). HMR Clinic Program Weight Loss Surgery Weight Loss Class Corporate Wellness HMR at Home Meal Replacements ~ Via Christi Weight Management Wichita Kansas. Retrieved December 3, 2011, from http://www.viachristiweightmanagement.com/

Via Christi Clinic - Multi-practice medical care in Wichita, KS . (n.d.). Via Christi Clinic - Multi-practice medical care in Wichita, KS . Retrieved December 3, 2011, from http://www.viachristiclinic.com/

Via Christi to open cancer center | Wichita Eagle. (n.d.). Local and breaking news for Wichita and Kansas | The Wichita Eagle and kansas.com. Retrieved December 3, 2011, from http://www.kansas.com/2011/06/24/1906153/via-christi-to-open-cancer-center.html
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Quiet Mourning One Has a

Words: 3698 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78741839



I am not sure what I expected about my check-up. I suppose I thought that the new relationship I had the OBGYN because of my pregnancy would continue on as a special relationship. I was wrong. My visit was, once again, the sterile, medical kind, and not the kind that I had with him while I was pregnant. My OBGYN performed the post surgical exam, and then spoke with me briefly.

"You're healthy," he said, "and I would recommend beginning again, as soon as you're ready, to get pregnant again. If that's what you." Then he was gone, and the nurse came in with a prescription.

"This, she said, is a prescription for a mild pain killer for cramping. Really, it's just a prescription strength aspirin." Then she looked at me and added, "I know what you're going through."

I thought she was the connection I needed. Someone who had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kohner, Nancy, and Alix Henley. When a Baby Dies: The Experience of Late Miscarriage, Stillbirth, and Neonatal Death. New York: Routledge, 2001. Questia. 11 May 2009 .

Seftel, Laura. Grief Unseen: Healing Pregnancy Loss through the Arts. London: Jessica Kingsley, 2006. Questia. 11 May 2009 .
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Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Google Glasses

Words: 3250 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7116900

Google Glasses

The digital world of communications that we are now living is not only the making of its creators; it is not without the active connivance of, if initially tentative, acceptance of we, the users. The creators of this digitally contrived world are very good at reading the human race in that, which eventually comes around to accepting and adapting to things that are thrown hard at it (Miller, 2013). This adaptability and flexibility has been taken advantage of very subtly. The first few tentative steps that humans take slowly gain in strength and eventually the distrust gives way to acceptance, and eventually confidence. What naturally follows is a warm hearted embrace and soon addiction results. A full-fledged dependence is only a matter of time, thence. This a stage most well suited for the advertisers and marketers where they move in to make the most of the situation and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abramovitch, S. (2013). "Google Glass Heading to Film School Class," The Hollywood Reporter, Retrieved online on 17th October 2013 from,  http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/google-glass-heading-film-school-595151  .

ComScore, (2013)"ComScore Reports August 2013 U.S. Smartphone Subscriber Market Share," comScore, Retrieved online n 17th october 2014 from, http://www.comscore.com/Insights/Press_Releases/2013/10/comScore_Reports_August_2013_S_ Smartphone_Subscriber_Market_Share

Cruz, J. (2013). "BiTE interactive Finds Only One in 10 American Smartphone Owners Would Wear Google Glass Regularly," PRWeb, Retrieved online on 17th October 2014 from,  http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/5/prweb10736534.htm  .

Danova, T. (2013). "BI Intelligence: Here's Our Forecast for Google Glass," BusinessInsider, Retrieved online on 17th October 2014 from,  http://www.businessinsider.com/forecast-for-google-glass-slide-deck-2013-5?op=1  .
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Patient Experience Nurse Nursing Personal Statement

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65746738

I also added, honestly, that the family members who had changed their ways actually felt better on a daily basis, as well as had a better prognosis in terms of their health. This was the true essence, I stated, of "loving life" in my opinion. I tried to make him see what he was going to have to do after his operation as a gain, rather than a loss. He would be regaining control over his health, and would feel younger and better.

I tried to help this patient feel empowered, by going into detail what would happen to him during the operation in layperson's terms. I could see that feeling in control was very important to him, and I tried to facilitate that sense of control. After the operation, I saw the patient again, when he was going to see his grandson who had had some minor surgery on…… [Read More]

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Renaissance the Trend in Medicine

Words: 2914 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48408487



It is of extreme importance in medicine to know accurately the anatomical changes that take place in a certain disease for diagnosis and treatment. The man who created this science was Morgagni who taught us to think anatomically in our approach of a disease. Morgagni studied at Bologna under Valsalva and Albertini, who are notable persons themselves in the history of medicine. Morgagni did this in the form of letters to an unknown friend who inquired about Morgagni's thoughts and observations in the diseases he had seen. These included affections of the pericardium, diseases of the valves, ulceration, rupture, dilation and hypertrophy of the aorta which were detailedly described clinically and anatomically. Of all his entires, the section on aneurysm of the aorta is one of the best he had written. A good example of his letter was about angina pectoris.

The aorta was considerably dilated at its curvature; and,…… [Read More]

References

1. Evolution of Medicine.Online. Available from Internet, http:://www.worldwideschool.org/library/books/tech/medicine/theEvolutionofmodernmedicin/legalese.html, Accessed May 12, 2007.

History of Anatomy. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.wikipedia.com Accessed May 12, 3007

Mayeaux, E.J. Jr. 1989. A History of Western Medicine and Surgery. Online. Available from Internet,   http://www.lsumc.edu.com  , Accessed May 12, 2007

Medieval Medicine. Online. Available from Internet, http://www.wikipedia.com Accessed May 12, 3007