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Organization Models Within the Correctional System There
Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34402874
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Organization Models

Within the correctional system there are three different organization models which apply and are used in administrative and management purposes. These models include the authoritarian model, bureaucratic model and participative model. The paper will give a description of each of these three models as they apply to the correctional environments. It will also discuss the intended goals of the correctional administrations that utilize these models and the specific time period the models were developed as well as finding out if these models were effective during the period which they were developed. The information the paper will give the foundation of the correctional systems as well as the models that are found within in and if these models are still in effect now. The operations of a correctional facility are under these models in order to provide the in mates with a particular type of security and care. With…

References

Baunach, PJ.(1981). Participatory Management - Restructuring the Prison Environment. Retrieved February 18, 2014 from  https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=76572 

Lancefield, K, Lennings, C, J. & Thomson, D. (1997).Management style and its effect on prison officers' stress. Retrieved February 18,2014 from  http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2FBF02765325 

Carlson P.M,, Garret S, J. & Christopher.(2010). Prison and Jail Administration: Practice and Theory.pg 272.Retrieved February 18,2014 from  http://books.google.co.ke/books?id=hW0rAQAAQBAJ&pg=PA272&lpg=PA272&dq=Participative+model+in+correctional+environments&source=bl&ots=BhslBxRktE&sig=-B5MbbBXyE1YRWJnSYf3T2IPuPk&hl=en&sa=X&ei=fkwDU_zuKc-p0AWd64GADw&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Participative%20model%20in%20correctional%20environments&f=false 

The sanctuary model.(2010).Authoritarianism. Retrieved February 18,2014 from  http://www.sanctuaryweb.com/authoritarianism.php

Organization Model for Accounting Company a Group
Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 40771544
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Organization Model for Accounting Company

A group of accountants who want to start their own accounting company need to make several considerations including having a clear vision of the firm's purpose and comprehensive understanding of the requirements of an entrepreneur in this field. In addition to these factors, the group of accountants also needs to examine and identify the most suitable organizational form of business for the accounting company. The need for identifying the most appropriate organizational form of business is fueled by the fact that finance and accounting companies usually provide a range of services to clients, which generates the need for effective organizational form of business to ensure coordination of the various services. Therefore, the groups of accountants seeking to start their own accounting business must decide and identify the suitable form of business organization.

Generally, there are various kinds of organizational forms of business with varying strengths…

References

Hamel, G. (n.d.). Strengths and Weaknesses of a Partnership. Retrieved March 21, 2015, from http://www.ehow.com/info_7736835_strengths-weaknesses-partnership.html

Phillips, C. (n.d.). The Three Types of Business Entities in Accounting. Retrieved March 21,

2015, from  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/three-types-business-entities-accounting-10242.html

Team Organization Models for Team Behavior Within
Words: 1425 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22748598
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Team Organization

Models for team behavior within the organization

Teams have become an increasingly ubiquitous part of complex, modern organizations. One survey of 962 H leaders found that fifty-four percent of respondents spent up to 30% of their day in team settings (Blanchard 2012). No longer are individual employees solely appraised in terms of their individual usefulness: their ability to function as part of a team is essential. "Organizations are more networked, more flexible, and more dynamic than ever before. Outsourcing, globalization, and competitive pressures are forcing organizations to rely more on work teams comprised of not only of employees, as well as outside experts or counterparts from allied organizations" (Blanchard 2012). Teams may composed of a combination of external or internal employees and they are invariably diverse and multifaceted.

Although every team is different, certain genetic rubrics have been developed to assess how teams function, the most famous of…

References

Blanchard, K. (2013). Critical role of teams. Retrieved:

 http://www.kenblanchard.com/img/pub/pdf_critical_role_teams.pdf 

Chapman, Alan. (2009). Bruce Tuckman: Storming, norming, and performing. Retrieved:

 http://www.businessballs.com/tuckmanformingstormingnormingperforming.htm

Organization Analysis Analysing Organisation Using Relevant Theoretical
Words: 3563 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90414650
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Organization Analysis

Analysing Organisation: Using relevant theoretical perspectives frameworks, critically analyse organisation choice.

Analyzing organization is the process of assessing the organizations systems, functionality and capacity so as to increase the organizations performance, efficiency and overall output. This is done by using various theories and models whose aim is to understand the structure of the organization, technology and behavioral relationships Bate, Khan, & Pye, 2000.

This should be a periodic and detailed activity that assists the organizations management to identify any inefficiency or problems that may have risen and have not been dealt with the management will then come up with strategies to deal with them.

The Company

Compulyzed Telecommunications is a telecommunications company dealing with telephone, cabling, and internet provision services for both home and corporate clients. Compulyzed Telecommunications had an increase of 1.7% operating profit in the fiscal year 2011 as compared to the previous year this was…

References

Barney, J.B. (1995). Looking inside for Competitive Advantage. The Academy of Management Executive (1993-2005), 9(4), 49-61.

Bate, P., Khan, R., & Pye, A. (2000). Towards a Culturally Sensitive Approach to Organization Structuring: Where Organization Design Meets Organization Development. Organization Science, 11(2), 197-211.

Becker, I., & Flaxer, E. (2008). Analysing the Hierarchical Organization of Text by Using Biologically-Inspired Statistical Methods. [Article]. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics, 15(4), 318-339. doi: 10.1080/09296170802326657

Bloodgood, J.M., & Bauerschmidt, A. (2002). Competitive Analysis: Do Managers Accurately Compare Their Firms To Competitors? Journal of Managerial Issues, 14(4), 418-434.

Organizational Diagnosis of Palm
Words: 2397 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 40614387
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Organizational Diagnosis of Palm

Palm Computing had reinvented the hand held computer market overnight with the line of PalmPilot and similar devices geared to the mobile gadget industry. According to Clancy (1999), "Palm Computing ultimately sold faster than the videocassette recorder, the color TV, the cell phone, even the personal computer that was its great-grandfather. Introduced in April 1996, within 18 months Palm Computing had shipped more than 1 million units of the handheld and some estimate there were 2 million Palm devices shipped in 1998 alone." (Clancy, 1999)

Such incredible demand for Palm Computing's products were a function of the brilliant and innovative management and design team that launched and built the company. The two prominent executives of the company, responsible for developing product and marketing, and product releases, were Jeff Hawkins and Donna Dubinsky.

According to Clancy (1999), "In Hawkins, Silicon Valley has one of its most independent,…

References

Enderle R. (2010) "HP and Palm: The Explosion that Will Rock the Computer Industry"

Leadersphere (2008) "HR Intelligence Report -- Organizational Diagnostic Models -- A Review & Synthesis"

Niccolai J., Gohring N. (2010) "A Brief History of Palm"  http://www.pcworld.com/article/195199/a_brief_history_of_palm.html 

http://www.leadersphere.com/img/OrgmodelsR2009.pdf

Organizational Politics Organizational Behavior Loosely
Words: 575 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24756222
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Caring organizations are most commonly represented in the service sector, but many traditional manufacturers are caring organizations as well. In a caring organization, "trust flourishes" among employees (492). Totally caring organizations are considerably rare, but tend to be highly successful and effective companies with high levels of job satisfaction and customer loyalty.

The statement: "the rational model of the organization implies that the corporation is based on consent, while the political model implies that the corporation is based on force, and the caring model implies that the corporation is based on interpersonal relationships" adequately summarizes the differences between these three organizational models. However, no organization embodies only one of these models. All three of these organizational approaches may be present in a single organization, or an organization exhibits two of these styles more strongly than another.

Universities are commonly caring organizations at heart because most professors tend to be dedicated…

Organizational Behavior an Employer of Any Number
Words: 3695 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59002388
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Organizational Behavior

An employer of any number of employees must consider it a basic duty to provide a stress free workplace for all his employees. It is a well-known fact that stress at a workplace induces animosity among the employees and creates problems that would not have been present under ordinary circumstances. Stress at the workplace also reduces the productivity of the workers therein and creates tension for the management, which finds itself under a lot of pressure. In a medical sense stress at the workplace actually affects the powers of the brain in such areas as concentration, learning and being able to memorize details that are an important function of the brain. In a legal sense, stress is a factor that leads to a whole lot of litigation when the employees sue the company for bad stress management in the workplace. This in turn results in bad publicity and…

References

Bennett, Rebecca J; Robinson, Sandra L. "Organizational Deviance" Retrieved at http://www.businessfaculty.utoledo.edu/rbennett/devchapter-final.doc. Accessed on 23 September, 2004

Big Dogs Leadership Page: Organizational Behavior" (March 19, 1998) Retrieved at  http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/leadob.html . Accessed on 23 September, 2004

Crosby, James R. "Strategic Planning Cycle" Mana 4330, Team Management. Retrieved at http://management.uta.edu/Crosby/4330/Strategic%20Planning%20Cycle.doc. Accessed on 23 September, 2004

Dexter, Hansen. (2004) Performance Appraisal Tips Help Page. Retrieved at http://iso9k1.home.att.net/pa/performance_appraisal.html. Accessed on 23 September, 2004

Organizational Vision Analysis Doctor of
Words: 2864 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 49064297
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" (2003)

IV. VISION and PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

Greene, Forster, and Winters (2003) report that charter schools typically serve disadvantaged populations. "The targeting of charter schools to disadvantaged populations I so common that many people have come to believe, incorrectly, that all charter schools serve disadvantaged students." (2003) One reason for this is that the "procedures by which new charter schools are created often encourage such targeting." (Greene, Forster, and Winters, 2003) Greene, Forster, and Winters reports case studies conducted by the U.S. Department of Education, one of which included 91 schools and states conclusions that "charter schools are held accountable for their performance...resource limitations are the biggest obstacles facing charter schools." (2003) in another study involving 150 schools and 60 authorizing agencies the U.S. Department of Education states findings that: "...charters learn quickly the best way to satisfy their various constituents is to focus on quality instruction." (Greene, Forster, and…

Bibliography

Elmore, Richard F. (2000) Building a New Structure for School Leadership. Albert Shanker Institute Winter 2000.

Charter School Basics (1998) the Charter School Roadmap, September 1998. Online available at  http://www.ed.gov/pubs/Roadmap/ch1.html 

Greene, Jay P.; Forster, Greg; and Winters, Marcus a. (2003) Apples to Apples: An Evaluation of Charter Schools Serving General Student Populations. Equation Working Paper. Manhattan Institute for Policy Research. July 2003. No. 1. Online available at  http://www.manhattan-institute.org/html/ewp_01.htm#01 

Finn, Chester E.; and Vanourek, Gregg (2005) Lessons from the U.S. Experience with Charter Schools. Prepared for the PEPG Conference: Mobilizing the Private Sector for Public Education. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, October 5-6, 2005. Online available at  http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/pepg/PDF/events/MPSPE/PEPG-05-10finn.pdf

Organizational Issues and Criminology Introduction- When We
Words: 1540 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35120345
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Organizational Issues and Criminology

Introduction- When we think of the criminal justice system in the United States, we are referring to a broad collection of federal, state, and local agencies that are focused on crime prevention and upholding the law. In general, these agencies uphold the law at various levels, investigate crime, process the accused, compile evidence, work with the district attorney, and develop profiles and crime prevention techniques. The process of the criminal justice organization is designed to work in conjunction with the three branches of the U.S. government, and to uphold the Constitution. Organizationally, because there are so many agencies, personalities, interpretations and goals, there tends to be either a crime control model or a due process model. Many scholars see that this is one of the downfalls of the organization, because the tension and competition between the two viewpoints tends to cause negative issues within the system…

REFERENCES

National Strategy for Homeland Security. (2002, November). Retrieved from ncs.gov: http://www.ncs.gov/library/policy_docs/nat_strat_hls.pdf

Aman, T. (2008). Decentralization: Pros and Cons. Fdle.state.fl.us. Retrieved from: http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/Content/getdoc/9da64f08-58b2-4d8c-96ac-e3b2a9ef8265/Aman-Tommy-paper-pdf.aspx

Autry, R.H., (1996). What is Organization Design? Innovus.com. Retrieved from:  http://www.inovus.com/organiza.htm 

Clark, D. (2008). Leadership and Organizational Behavior. Nwlink.com. Retrieved from:  http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/leadob.html

Organizational Change and Development in
Words: 911 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48505289
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The organizational change theory which best fits the organizational development and change of military organization is the "Teleological Change Theory." The top management and the leadership of the military realized the need for constant changes and realized the necessity of change in the organizational structures. The individual managers, the Generals in this case, have been instrumental in bringing about this change. Internal decision making and structures are more affected by the organizational change. In a teleological change, leader is right at the centre of the change, process, people and management. Leader is the one who aligns the goals, rewards, processes, expectations, roles and duties. Strategy formulation and implementation is based on the experiences from the ongoing processes. (Marshak, 2005)

It is important to take into account various factors while evaluating the organizational change in military. The size of the military and complexity of operations make it extremely hard to implement…

References:

Murrell K.L. (1999). New Century Organization Development. Organizational Development Journal. Volume 17: No.4.

Marshak, R.J. (2005). Reinventing organizational development: New approaches to change in organizations. San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer.

Force Development Process and Organizational Model

The article on "General Odierno AUSA Winter Symposium" presents pertinent issues that affect the actual force development process. The force development process takes place in five phases. These five phases include development capabilities, design organization, organization model development, determining organization authorizations and organization authorization documentation. Among the last three stages of the force development process, the article greatly addresses issues that affect determining organizational authorization (General Odierno 2012). The issues of the Army force discussed in the reading greatly affects the various aspects of determining organizational authorizations compared to the other phases of force development process.

Determining organizational authorization is the resourcing phase of the development process. The force development and operations require resources to operate effectively. The various areas of the organizational model within the force compete for a substantial share of resources from the planning stage through to the programming and budgeting…

Reference

F103RA-1 (2014). The Army Force Development Process. US Army Command And General Staff College

General Odierno. "Feb. 24, 2012 - Gen. Odierno AUSA Winter Symposium," US Department of the Army, News Archives, February 28, 2012. Transcript of speech given by General Odierno. (Accessed 6 June 2014.)  http://www.army.mil/article/74650/Feb__24__2012___Gen__Odierno_AUSA_Winter_Symposium/

models of organizational behavior and culture
Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88893059
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organization described in the Kuppler (n.d.) case study is General Motors (GM). General Motors is one of the largest automobile manufacturers in the world. Its other strengths include its operations in more than a hundred different countries. In spite of its more than a century of relative success, GM has experienced growing pains in recent years due to what Kuppler (n.d.) calls a "culture crisis." The organizational culture of General Motors is hierarchical, bureaucratic, and resistant to change.

Organizational Modeling

The Kuppler (n.d.) case study reveals GM as having an organizational culture that is primarily custodial in nature, with some autocratic attributes. Both the autocratic and custodial elements discourage individual responsibility and prevent the sense of "urgency" that might have prevented the disastrous ignition switch debacle, which killed 13 people. One of the hallmarks of a custodial organizational model is that employees are acculturated to be dependent and loyal to…

References

"Best 5 Organizational Model," (2016). EduCBA. Retrieved online:  https://www.educba.com/organizational-behavior-model/ 

Kuppler, T. (n.d.). The GM Culture Crisis: what leaders must learn from this culture case study. Retrieved online:  http://switchandshift.com/the-gm-culture-crisis

Organizations Why Are People Resistant to Change
Words: 861 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15047165
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Organizations

Why are people resistant to change? What psychological factors can inhibit change, particularly technological change? Technology is supposed to (and often does) make human being's lives easier, yet switching to a new operating system, even an obviously more efficient one, frequently brings profound resistance on the part of employees. One possible answer is that change resistance is hard-wired into the psyche of many human beings and regardless of how necessary and logical the change may be, there will be inevitable unconscious resistance. This resistance can manifest itself in anger at management for instituting the changes, unproductive complaining and claiming to 'not understand' the change.

Change resistance can also occur for more practical reasons, namely that people may feel that their positions within the organization will be threatened if the change is instituted. They may fear that their jobs will be outsourced or subsumed by new technology, or that expanding…

Analyzing Organizational Structure Analysis
Words: 1322 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 73107649
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Organizational Structure Analysis

Why Flattening Hierarchies and Empowering Teams Is a Strategy

Flattening, also called delayering, simply refers to the removal of layers in the organizational hierarchy of a company, and the expansion of the manager's span of power. The supposed benefits of flattening run basically from pushing decisions down to improving client and market responsiveness to enhancing drive as well as responsibility. This is a strategy because the basis of flattening seems positive: to stay competitive in the face of more competition, for example, companies should pursue a streamlined, effective organization, which could respond to clients more rapidly (Wulf, 2012).

An empowered worker has the power and responsibility of making decisions, instead of the need to get instructions or consent from the manager. In an empowered team, every teammate has a say in group discussions. The team might make alterations to their product or project at will. An organization…

References

Boundless. (2015, July 21). Divisional Structure. Retrieved from Boundless Management. Boundless: https://www.boundless.com/management/textbooks/boundless-management-textbook/organizational-structure-2/common-organizational-structures-25/divisional-structure-147-3977/

Corcoran, C. K. (2000). The Intersection of Technology and Organizational Culture. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from  http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Fall_2000/corcoran.htm 

Harris, S. (2015, December 9). Global expansion -- the essential enabling technologies. Retrieved February 21, 2016, from Orange Business:  http://www.orange-business.com/en/blogs/connecting-technology/emerging-markets/global-expansion-the-essential-enabling-technologies 

Marzec, E. (2016). What Is Team Empowerment? Retrieved February 21, 2016, from Small Business:  http://smallbusiness.chron.com/team-empowerment-12716.html

Organization Behavior and Theory
Words: 1709 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 78230613
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Organizational culture theory and the role and impact of both formal and informal groups on the functioning of modern day organizations.

Organizational culture is the way organizations conducts its business transactions. It also refers to the different perspectives that a company sees things. An organization builds its own organizational culture through structure, history and the traditions of the company (Shafritz 2005). Theories of organizational culture suggest that culture gives an organization a sense of identity and defines what the company stands for. It also tells us what the company is. Culture also gives details to the principles of the company. Organizational culture in broader terms is the collective behavior of humans and the meaning of the actions that people do.

It involves the vision, norms, systems, beliefs and the organization values. Organizational culture contains values accepted by the employees of an organization. There are four main categories of organizational culture.…

Men and women perform different tasks in the society. There are tasks that women cannot do whereas the men are competent. Other tasks are hard for men to perform while the same tasks are easy for the women. The changing world enables women to work in the fields that many people regarded as belonging to the men. Women are now working in construction companies as a form of employment. The tasks affect positively in a bureaucratic performance since women incorporate their skills with that of men to work towards the achievement of an organization's goal. Strong and good working relationships between the employees in a bureau are beneficial (Gormley 2008). The strong relationships ensure that there is competence and effectiveness in performance of the employees.

Political support is crucial for any bureaucracy to thrive. Political stability and support are the main determinant factor that will enable a bureaucracy to thrive in its activities. Political support enables the bureaucracy to work without any hurdles. This ensures that the bureaucracy works with ease. Political support enables the bureaucracy to receive help and assistance from politicians (Gormley 2008). Political interference is the main factor that leads to the collapse of bureaucracy. Negative working relations between a bureau and politicians are a negative factor that will make the bureau not to function accordingly.

Good leadership helps bureaus to work effectively. Good leadership ensures that there are no corruption cases in many bureaus (Gormley 2008). Bad leadership results in the misappropriation of funds and corruption in the bureaus. Good leadership is a motivator to the junior staffs who look up to the leaders and follow the examples set up by the leaders. This enables the employees in the bureau to perform excellently in all sectors. Good governance and leadership by the officials enable the organization to get funding from the government that helps it in carrying outs its tasks.

Organizational Philosophy at Work Technology & Ethics
Words: 1632 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5619850
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OGANIZATIONAL PHILOSOPHY AT WOK: TECHNOLOGY & ETHICS

Organizational Behavior

Digital and information technology allows for new opportunities for education, including at the professional level. More and more, human resources use technology to assist in the modification and development of company culture. 21st century organizational leadership can be characterized by the realization that a clearly defined and strongly present organizational culture is key to success. Some of the most successful organizations are ones wherein their culture is adaptable and flexible. These same companies understand the importance and value of smooth transition and effective implementation of organizational change as well as promotion of organizational culture. Human esources is a department that is integral in the development and sustainment of the organizational culture. Human esources is additionally a depart that can facilitate organizational change(s). Human esources professionals should take the time to educate themselves and learn the ways in which technology can supplement…

References:

Dewett, T., & Jones, G.R. (2001) The role of information technology in the organization: a review, model, and assessment. Journal of Management, 27, 313 -- 346.

Heracleous, L., & Barrett, M. (2001) Organizational Change as Discourse: Communicative Actions and Deep Structures in the Context of Information Technology Implementation. The Academy of Management Journal, 44(4), 755 -- 778.

Jin, K.G. (2007) Information Technology Professionals' Perceived Organizational Values and Managerial Ethics: An Empirical Study. Journal of Business Ethics, 71(2), 149 -- 159.

Organization Behavior Performance Management and People Performance
Words: 3584 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1510997
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Organization Behavior

"Performance Management" and "People Performance"

Performance Management and People

"Performance Management" and "People Performance"

Management SUMMAY

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and critically evaluate the Performance Management model by Michael Armstrong and People Performance model by John Purcell. The paper starts with an ample introduction and significance of the employee performance management practices and proceeds by discussing the various concepts and strategies which are incorporated by business organizations all over the world. The major focus of the paper is to discuss the implications of these models for the success and prosperity of an organization. The main body of the paper discusses these models from a critical perspective and explains their major components in detail.

The most important strategies which are recommended by Performance Management model include performance appraisal and reviews, training and skills development, Management by Objectives (MBO), the techniques to manage the low performers,…

REFERENCES

Armstrong. M, 2012, Armstrong's Handbook of Human Resource Management Practice, 12th edition. U.S.: Kogan Page

Becker, B. & Gerhart, B. 1996, "The impact of human resource management on organisational performance: Progress and prospects," Academy of Management Journal, 39 (4): 779-801.

Becker, B. & Huselid, M. 2006, "Strategic Human Resources Management: Where do we go from here?," Journal of Management, 32 (6): 898-925.

Boselie, P., Dietz, G., & Boon, C. 2005, "Commonalities and contradictions in HRM and performance research," Human Resource Management Journal, 15 (3): 67-94.

Organizational Diagnosis Burke & Litwin
Words: 1469 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55505325
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The seven variables that have been termed as "levers" by the authors all start with the letter 'S'.

Following are the things included in the seven variables:

-Strategy

-Systems

-Staff

-Skills

-Structure

-Shared values and -Style.

Structure is explained as the skeleton of the organizational chart or an organization. Strategy has been identified by the authors as the path or plan of action that is taken in order to achieve some goals and target over a period of time. Systems are defined as the routine process and procedures that are carried out within the firms. Staff is further divided into the personal categories within the firms (e.g., engineers). The skills refer to the capabilities possessed by the staff that is working within an organization. Style is defined as the way in which the managers behave or act in order to achieve the organizational goals. Shared value variable basically comprises of…

References

Burke & Litwin. (1992). A Causal Model of Organization Performance and Change', Journal of Management, Vol 18, No 3, pp 523 -- 545.

Katz, D. & Kahn, R.L. (1978). The Social psychology of organizations. (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Wiley.

McLindon, D, McDaniel, K., Smiley, J., Anderson. T. And Moorman, R., (2012). Whole Foods Market Case Study. Retrieved from:  http://www.slideserve.com/arleen/whole-foods-market-case-study  on May 15, 2013.

Pascale, R.T. & Athos, a.G. (1981). The art of Japanese management: Applications for American executives. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.

Organizational Change in the Public Sector This
Words: 6104 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 9103024
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Organizational Change in the Public Sector

This research proposal explores the feasibility of management in the public Sector as an organizational paradigm and new model in organizational development. The literature review reviews numerous journal articles that explore on the key concepts of change management strategies from a public sector project management perspective. The authors suggest that employee's participation, effective feedback across the board, and empowerment of subordinate staffs is a major step in transforming public organizations. This proposal further hypothesis that establishment of long-term and productivity advantages are crucial throughout the organization.

SCOPE AND PURPOSE

Research Questions

Hypotheses:

LITERATURE REVIEW

Factor 1: Need for change

Factor 2: implement a Plan for change

Factor 3: create political internal environment for Change

Factor 4: Support and Commitment from managers

Factor 5: enhancing External Support

Factor 6: Provide Resources for change

Factor 7: establish Change

Factor 8: ascertain comprehensive Change

Determinants of implementing…

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Abramson, Mark A., and Paul R .Lawrence .2001. The Challenge of Transforming

Administration and its influence on organizational change. Management Decision,

50(10), 1843-1860, Review 62: 555-67.

Armenakis, Achilles A ., and Arthur G .Bedeian .1999 .Organizational Change: A Review of Associates.

Organizational Theory 2 What Core Competences Give
Words: 2740 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28567012
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Organizational Theory #2

What core competences give an organization competitive advantage? What are examples of an organization's functional-level strategies?

Core competencies are those capabilities that are critical to a business achieving a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Typically, core competencies can be identified by certain common characteristics -- offering a benefit to the customer, difficult to imitate, uniquely identify the organization and easily leveraged to create many products or operate in many markets (Kern, 2010). The organization that is best able to use its resources to create value is in an ideal position to outperform the competition, thus creating advantage (Jones, 2010). Core competencies tend to change in response to changes in the environment. They are flexible, evolve over time and enable the company to enter apparently different markets with a clear and distinctive brand proposition. Examples of core competencies include manufacturing, research and development, new technology or organizational design…

References

Jones, G. (2010). Organizational theory, design, and change (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Terry, L.D., & Hoefer, R.A. (1995). Making politics and power respectable. Public Administration Review, 55(3), 298.

Organization Management the Walt Disney the Walt
Words: 2052 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67334434
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Organization Management

The Walt Disney

The Walt Disney Company

The Walt Disney Company

An organization is any social entity that has a well-designed structure to coordinate its functions, and the organization has to have a specific goal. Most organizations hardly work internally alone, but rather involve the external environments. Some organizations are profit oriented, like the business organizations, while others are non-profit making (Daft et al. 2010). In this context, a contemporary focus is overlooked towards the Walt Disney Company, a profound firm dealing with mass media and affiliated industrial operations.

Brief Company Profile

Walt Disney Company was founded in 1923, and has always kept the reputation in providing quality and extremely creative products, which consumers have loved ever since. The organization specializes in providing quality entertainment, services of media communication, broadcasting, television programs and live performances. The company, which is located in California (United States), exemplifies exponential characteristics that…

References

Barry, L. (2009) Think Like an Iconoclast: The Principles Of Walt Disney's Success: Rotman Magazine, Pg 108-110.

Daft, R.L., Murphy, J. & Willmott, H. (2010) organization Theory and Design: New York, Cengage Learning EMEA.

Forester, M. (2002) Table-Talk Perspective: Chain Store Age, 10870601, Vol.78, Issue 11.

Gershon, R.A. (1996) The Transnational Media Corporation: Global Messages and Free market Competition: New York, Routledge.

Organizational Environment Starbucks In-Depth Analysis of Organizational
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Organizational Environment Starbucks

In-depth Analysis of Organizational Environment - Starbucks

Starbucks Organizational Culture and Environment

Global Perspectives of Starbucks

Social esponsibility embraced by Starbucks

Starbucks Planning Process

Decision Making Process of Starbucks

Starbucks Corporate Strategy

Organizational Structure of Starbucks

Starbucks uses a mechanistic structure as a contemporary design

Starbucks Organizational Culture and Environment

Starbucks Corporation is considered as one of the leading coffee house chains that offer best quality coffee to its customers. This retail corporation is based in the United States, initiated in the early years of the decade of 1970. Due to its popularity, the company rapidly expanded to various locations around the globe. The vision, goals and strategies designed clearly indicated the fact that the owners did not believe in having growth that can abate the corporate culture, therefore, the corporate culture was considered to be one of the integral aspects for the company. The mission statement…

References

Anthony, W.P., Gales, L.M., & Hodge, B.J. (2003). Organization Theory: A Strategic Approach. 6th Edition. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.

BCG. (2012). Howard Schultz on Global Reach and Local Relevance at Starbucks - An Interview with the CEO. bcg.perspectives. Retrieved from:  https://www.bcgperspectives.com/content/videos/leadership_management_two_speed_economy_howard_schultz_global_reach_and_local_relevance/ 

Behar, H. (2007). It's Not About the Coffee: Leadership Principles from a Life at Starbucks. USA: Portfolio.

SeaZone. (2012). Successful Application of Organizational Behavior: Starbucks - Achieving Success the Starbucks Way. Yahoo Voices. Retrieved from:  http://voices.yahoo.com/successful-application-organizational-behavior-2435551.html?cat=3

Organization Behavior Strategic Management of Human Resources
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Organization Behavior

Strategic Management of Human esources

Human resource is considered as the most precious asset for business organizations. The financial performance and growth in the industry heavily depends upon the way an organization's employees perform at the workplace (Edwards 2003). A dedicated and committed workforce contributes towards a high level of operational excellence and market competitiveness. Therefore, it should be among the top priorities for an organization to manage its human resource in an effective and efficient way (ose 2004).

Strategic Human esource Management deals with formulating policies and procedures for getting the best work from employees, implementing different techniques to motivate them, and assessing the future human resource requirements at the workplace (Saxena 2009). This paper explains the strategic human resource management policies of one of the World's Top software companies -- Adobe Systems Incorporated. These policies are required to meet the current human resource requirements of the…

REFERENCES

Ashamalla, M., H., 1998, International Human Resource Management Practices: the Challenge of Expatriation. CR, Vol. 8, Issue 2, pp. 54-63

Adobe, 2012, Adobe Fast Facts 2011, Available from

Adobe, 2012, Commitment to Employees, Available from

Adobe, 2012, Professional Development, Available from [Accessed January 24th, 2012]

Organizational Behavior Case Study
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Organizational Behavior Case Study

OGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOU

esidential care facility's staff plays an important role in the daily lives of residents; unfortunately these facilities are usually faced with organizational obstacles and lack of information that prevents them from taking proper care of residents (Smith, 1998). This organizational behavioral case study is about a residential care facility which is part of a parent company that runs six different residential care facilities. The management of the company observed, this residential care facility facing serious problems. Turnover rate was high, performance was poor and economic losses were high.

In order to diagnose and solve the problem; parent company conducted a culture survey in all of its residential care facilities in which each member was bound to participate. The results were satisfactory for all residential care facilities except this care facility which showed totally negative results.

Looking at this serious situation; management hired a new…

References

Atchison, J. (1998). Perceived job satisfaction factors of nursing assistants employed in Midwest Nursing

Homes. Geriatric Nursing.

Cunningham, J.B. & Eberle, T. (1990). A Guide to Job Enrichment and Redesign. Personnel, Feb 1990,

p.57 in Newstrom, J. & Davis, K. (1993). Organization Behavior: Human Behavior at Work.

Organization Behavior Competitive Advantage Through Human Resource
Words: 4150 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52563184
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Organization Behavior

Competitive Advantage through Human esource Management Practices

Human esource Management Practices

Competitive Advantage through Human esource Management Practices

HUMAN ESOUCE Management

Human esource Management involves all those activities which are related to the management of workforce or employees of an organization. It is also one of the core functions which managers perform at the workplace. Human esource Management entails activities like recruitment and selection, training and development, performance assessment, compensation, leadership, and motivation at large (Chadwick & Dabu 2009). Basically, Human esource Management focuses on recruitment, management, guidance, and motivation of employees in an organization. In the past, HM was just restricted to two core functions: employee management and motivation. Now, it has emerged as one of the biggest strategic issues in the business world (Kandula 2007).

With the passage of time, the scope and functions of Human esource Management have also increased. Now, it also involves employee…

REFERENCES

Armstrong, M. 2007, A handbook of Human Resource Management Practice, 10th Edition. London: Kogan Page

Baudler, C.R. 2011, Employee Engagement: Through Effective Performance Management by Edward M. Mone and Manuel London, Personnel Psychology, 64 (3): 813-816.

Birdi, K., Clegg, C., Patterson, M., Robinson, A., Stride, C.B., Wall, T.D., & Wood, S.J. 2008, The Impact of Human Resource and Operational Management Practices on Company Productivity: A Longitudinal Study, Personnel Psychology, 61 (1): 467-501.

Browning, V., Edgar, F., Gray, B., & Garrett, T. 2009, Realizing Competitive Advantage through HRM in New Zealand Service Industries, The Service Industries Journal, 29 (6): 741-760.

Organizational Theory 1 Create a Code of
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Organizational Theory #1

Create a code of ethics for an organization of your choice. For each point in the code of ethics, describe an ethical dilemma that would be resolved using the code of ethics.

All employees will conduct business honestly and ethically. We will constantly improve the quality of our services, products and operations and create a reputation for honesty, fairness, respect, responsibility, integrity, trust and sound business judgment. (Provides a clearly stated, over-arching business philosophy for honesty and fair dealings that every employee can follow).

No illegal or unethical conduct on the part of company employees or affiliates is in the company's best interest. All are expected to adhere to high standards of personal integrity -- not allowing their personal interests to conflict with the interests of the company, its clients or affiliates. We will not compromise our principles for short-term advantage. (Encourages all employees to seek the…

References

Beauchamp, L., & O'Connor, A. (2012). America's most admired companies: A descriptive analysis of CEO corporate social responsibility statements. Public Relations Review, 38(3), 494-497. doi:10.1016/j.pubrev.2012.03.006

Jones, G. (2010). Organizational theory, design, and change (6th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Organizational Change Change Implementation Within an Organization
Words: 1641 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 93730516
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Organizational Change

"Change implementation within an organization can…be conceptualized as an exercise in social influence, defined as the alteration or an attitude or behavior by one actor in response to another actor's actions… [and] one important dimension along which they vary is the extent to which they break with existing institutions in a field of activity…" (Battilana, et al., 2012).

hen companies need to make major changes -- do to the emerging trends in the marketplace, new products being produced, or simply because the old ways are not profitable anymore -- how do they go about it and how do they deal with employees' resistance to change? This is one of the most common problems that organizations face, and there are reasonable answers as to why they face those problems. This paper points out the need for change and the resistance to change. There are also solutions to resistance to…

Works Cited

Battilana, J. And Casciaro, T. (2012). Change Agents, Networks, and Institutions: A

Contingency Theory of Organizational Change. Academy of Management Journal, 55(2),

381-398.

Denning, Steve. (2011). How Do You Change An Organizational Culture? Forbes. Retrieved June 30, 2013, from  http://www.forbes.com .

Organizational Change and the Consequences
Words: 2029 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46322064
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This means training that is focused on increasing the knowledge economy of the transforming firm rather than in simply standardizing processes. According to the text by Chapman (2009), this may even call for a change in the linguistic approach to this process. Chapman advises that "training implies putting skills into people, when actually we should be developing people from the inside out, beyond skills, ie., facilitating learning. So focus on facilitating learning, not imposing training." (Chapman, p. 1) It is conceivable that an appeal to this approach might have spared much of the uncertainty that permeated Cutting Edge Paper during and after the changeover in ownership.

Another recommendation is for the opening of dialogue during the process of transformation so that leadership can become more attuned to the needs of personnel. It is conceivable that during this transformation and Cutting Edge Paper, some ambiguity might have been reduced if leadership…

Works Cited:

Chapman, A. (2009). Organizational Change, Training and Learning. BusinessBalls.com.

Corley, K.G. & Gioia, D.A. (2004). Identity Ambiguity and Change in the Wake of a Corporate Spin-off. Administrative Science Quarterly, 49(2).

Eisenberg, E.M. (1984). Ambiguity as Strategy in Organizational Communication. Communication Monographs, 51, 227-242.

Eustis, J. & McMillan, G. (1997). Technology Initiatives and Organizational Changge: Higher Education in a Networked World. CAUSE '97.

Organizational Motivation Leadership Effective and Positive Leadership
Words: 2060 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 299268
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Organizational Motivation Leadership

Effective and positive leadership is a basic foundation for any administrative institution to yield good results and therefore cause a great impact.

In this study we base our focus on a critical organization which is the infant daycare.

Infant daycare organization

Infant daycare centers are organizations that focus on the welfare of the child by providing care while the parent goes to work or gets engaged in other activities that may not allow the mother of father to be around the child during the day. The state requires that such organizations meet certain standards of safety, health and that the staff should have proper training. These institutions are normally equipped with fun toys and learning materials with the qualified caregivers trying as much as they can to make the life of infants as comfortable as possible. With the many challenges that infants face including having to master…

References

Bob Whipple, (2012). Leaders Creating Meaning. Retrieved April 4, 2012 from  http://leadergrow.com/articles/105-leaders-create-meaning 

CEO Flow, (2008). CEO Flow, (2008). The Four Rewards of Intrinsic Motivation. Retrieved April 4, 2012  http://www.ceoflow.com/2008/08/the-four-rewards-of-intrinsic-motivation/ 

David McCelland, (2012). Human Relations Contributors. Retrieved April 4, 2012

http://www.accel-team.com/human_relations/hrels_06_mcclelland.html

Organization Project Intermountain Was Started as a
Words: 1667 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Corporate Paper #: 20976644
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Organization Project

Intermountain was started as a small healthcare nonprofit organization, situated in Salt Lake City. With its well-crafted mission, a clearly stated vision, patient's oriented philosophy and a strategy to manage the organization effectively; it was soon able to manage over 32,000 employees. Helping the acute healthcare needs of Southeastern Idaho and Utah's residents, Intermountain's well-managed system of about 23 hospitals, clinics, physicians and health strategies; deliver clinically exceptional medical care and at an affordable rate.

FORMAL MISSION:

Intermountain health care has a properly drafted and well-communicated mission. Intermountain understands that a mission lays the basis of an organization and is a pre-requisite for its ultimate success. It explains the reason of an organization and identifies the type of business that it intends to engage in. Understanding these basic requirements, Intermountain has setup a mission which promises:

"Excellence in the provision of healthcare services to communities in the Intermountain…

Bibliography

Business, E. o. (2012). MISSION AND VISION STATEMENTS. Retrieved from  http://www.referenceforbusiness.com/management/Mar-No/Mission-and-Vision-Statements.html#b 

Datamonitor. (2006). Health care industry. Retrieved from http://h20247.www2.hp.com/PublicSector/downloads/HP%20blade%20sols%20in%20hc%20-%20final%201%20case.pdf

Healthcare, I. (2012). Strategic Partnerships. Retrieved from  http://intermountainhealthcare.org/about/overview/Pages/partnerships.aspx 

Healthcare, I. (2012). Vision and Mission. Retrieved from  http://intermountainhealthcare.org/about/overview/pages/mission.aspx

Organizational Diagnosis Surrounding the Acquisition
Words: 1468 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Capstone Project Paper #: 85465086
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The advantage on the other hand is of the retrieval of relevant and solid findings based on which the adequate strategies can be implemented.

4. The congruence model

According to the Mind Tools website, the "congruence model is based on the principle that an organization's performance is derived from four elements: tasks, people, structure, and culture. The higher the congruence, or compatibility, amongst these elements, the greater the performance" (Mind Tools, 2010). The advantage of the model is that of simplifying the issues promoted by the previous models and revealing an analysis structure constructed onto four elements alone. This implies lower task complexities and leads to more efficiently retrieved results. However, it could also lead to sometimes irrelevant findings as it does not take into consideration elements outside the organization, such as the socio-economic climate. In other words, this model is highly applicable when conducting an internal audit, but its…

References:

Burton, R.M., Obel, B., 2004, Strategic organizational diagnosis and design: the dynamics of fit, 3rd edition, Springer, ISBN 1402076843

Patel, N., 2010, HP and Palm: what happens next, Engadget,  http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/29/hp-and-palm-what-happens-next  / last accessed on July 29, 2010

A causal model of organizational performance and change (Burke & Litwin model), Reflect and Learn,  http://www.reflectlearn.org/discover/a-causal-model-of-organizational-performance-change-burkes-litwin-model  last accessed on July 29, 2010

Organizational diagnosis, The College of St. Scholastica,  http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CBIQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Ffaculty.css.edu%2Fdswenson%2Fweb%2FPowerpoints%2FOrganizationalDiagnosis.ppt&ei=uYdRTKSkMYqUOMy-4cME&usg=AFQjCNGTL9ElrN8D8QlJeGZvTwHnunMKeA  last accessed on July 29, 2010

Org Diagnosis Organizational Diagnostic Models Falletta 2005
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Org Diagnosis

Organizational Diagnostic Models

Falletta (2005) outlines several different organizational diagnostic models. The first such model is the Force Field model, developed by Kurt Lewin in 1951. In this model, an organization remains in as state of equilibrium until it is shifted out of that state by a driving force that overcomes the restraining forces. The current state then becomes a problem (Falletta, 2005). This model can be used to explain what situation an organization is in, and even how that situation came about. The downside is that it provides little in terms of information about how the company can move to its new equilibrium point. But Lewin's model explains how companies enter into an equilibrium state. The company's current equilibrium has still allowed for steady gains in revenue and profit based on growth, but stability in profit margin (MSN Moneycentral, 2014).

Leavitt's model is a somewhat different representation…

References

Falletta, S.V. (2005) Organizational Diagnostic Models: A Review and Synthesis. Retrieved January 15, 2014, from  http://www.iei.liu.se/fek/frist/723g16/files/1.120328/Orgmodels.pdf 

McMillan, T. (2014). Can Whole Foods change the way poor people eat? Slate.com. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from  http://www.slate.com/articles/life/food/2014/11/whole_foods_detroit_can_a_grocery_store_really_fight_elitism_racism_and.html 

MSN Moneycentral. (2014). Whole Foods Market. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from  http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/stockdetails/fi-126.1.WFM.NAS?symbol=WFM&form=PRFIEQ 

National Defense University, Systems Thinking and Learning Organizations, Retrieved November 7, 2012 from http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/ndu/strat-ldr-dm/pt1ch4.html

Organizational Change Managing Change Organization Provide a
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Organizational Change

Managing Change Organization. Provide a significant change place a major organization, compare contrast established change management models/frameworks implementation phase common lessons learned.

Managing change in the organization: est uy

One of the most recent successful changes to be implemented at a major organization is that of the technology company est uy's shift to a results-only workplace (ROWE). In the ROWE model, workers are judged solely on their output, not on how many hours they log at the company headquarters. This is a complete shift from the previous organizational culture and the way of valuing employees at est uy before ROWE was implemented. efore, workers were encouraged to pride themselves about how early they came in to the office and how late they stayed. Today, measurable output alone is how workers are valued. "Employee productivity has increased an average of 35% in departments covered by the program," and the…

Bibliography

Brandon, John. 2007. Rethinking the time clock. CNN. Available:

 http://money.cnn.com/magazines/business2/business2_archive/2007/03/01/8401022/index.htm  [27 Jun 2012]

Major change frameworks and models. (n.d.). DePaul University. Accessed:

http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/nsutcliffe/450-00Current/450Frameworks-Models.htm [27 Jun 2012]

Organizational Behavior and Team Building
Words: 1986 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 73870674
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In other words, the emphasis is on effective leadership and increased revenue for the company as a whole, which ultimately benefit individual managers as well.

Like cross-functional teams, self-managed teams also need specific models to ensure success, not least because of the collective leadership these teams display. The potential for conflict and misunderstanding could result in ineffective group work. To mitigate this, Silverman and Propst (n.d.) proposes a specific model according to which such teams can function optimally. There are various roles inherent in the model that is suggested. These roles include: 1) upholding organizational and personal values and principles; 2) accomplishing the work assigned to the team; 3) organizing the work environment; 4) managing work processes; 5) participating in organization-wide systems; 6) participating in organization-wide strategies; and 7) managing team processes.

The model therefore indicates that some leadership and management are essential in helping the team to achieve its…

References

Armstrong, R.V. (2005). Requirements of a Self-Managed Team Leader. Leader Values. Retrieved from: http://www.leader-values.com/Content/detail.asp?ContentDetailID=1004

Merritt, E.A. And Reynolds, D.E. (n.d.) The Effect of Self-Managing Teams on Manager Commitment and Organizational Tenure in Private Clubs. Retrieved from:

Myshko, D. (2006, Sep.) Cross-Functional Teams: Models of Success. PharmaVoice. Retrieved from:  http://www.skila.com/Downloads/Cross%20Functional%20Teams.pdf 

Pragmatic Marketing (2011). Enabling Cross-Functional Teams: A Leadership Role for Product Managers. Retrieved from:  http://www.pragmaticmarketing.com/publications/topics/09/enabling-cross-functional-teams-a-leadership-role-for-product-managers

Organizational Behavior the Group Behavior Model Is
Words: 3415 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87637976
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Organizational Behavior

The Group Behavior Model is a framework for conceptualizing how various aspects of the external and internal environments of a work group influence the group's performance of its task(s) and the group members' level of satisfaction with the experience of group work. External conditions include an organization's authority structure, rules and regulations, corporate culture, resources, setting, and market competition. Internal factors include the individual skills, talents, and experiences each member brings to the work group; the nature of the group's structure; and the dynamics of the group's work processes. The model helps one understand how the interplay of these four components -- external conditions, group member resources, group structure, and group processes -- determine how the group performs its task and how much satisfaction the members of the group derive from the experience of doing performing the task and the outcome of their efforts (Henderson, n. d.).

This…

Nakata, C., & Im, S. (2010). Spurring Cross-Functional Integration for Higher New Product

Performance: A Group Effectiveness Perspective. Journal of Product Innovation

Management, 27(4), 554-571.

Organizational Case Study -- Nutri Systems Company
Words: 1144 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66187126
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Organizational Case Study -- Nutri Systems

Company Background - Nutrisystem is an American company that provides weightloss products and services. Originally, the company's sales and marketing model focused on Brick and Mortar stores, in-person counseling and exercise sessions, and the sale of prepackaged supplements and food products retail. In 1999, however, largely due to the number of diets on the market and exhaustive competiton, Nutrisystem began selling online with support through 800#s and email. The company expanded to QVC in 2001 and Costco since 2009 (www.nutrisystem.com).

The foundation of the organization is portion-control and a diet that has a low glycemic index. Separate plans are offered for men and women that support a 1-2#/week loss. All plans have love sugar, cholesterol and sodium and cost from $280-400/week. Users must also purchase additional fresh items locally, but 2009 clinical trials showed that persons with Type-2 diabetes consistently lost more weight and…

WORKS CITED

Organizational and Diagnostic Models. (2008). Retrieved December 2011, from Leadersphere.com: http://www.leadersphere.com/img/OrgmodelsR2009.pdf

NutriSystem Investment Guide. (2011, December 17). Retrieved from Wikiinvest:  http://www.wikinvest.com/stock/NutriSystem_ (NTRI)

Liu, Y., & Yang, R. (2008). Competing Loyalty Programs: Impact of Market Saturation. Journal of Marketing, 73(2), 93-100.

Lowman, R. (2005). Importance of Diagnosis in Organization Assessment. Manager Journal, 8(1), 17-28.

Organization Decision-Making
Words: 2990 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10032150
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Organization Decision Making

Within an organization, there have to be many changes taking place at all times, without which the organization may stagnate and start to decline. These changes would have to be organization-wide, rather than small changes like changing the program, adding a new person, and so on. Some examples of organization-wide change are a change in the mission of the company, or a restructuring of operations, or maybe an addition of a new technology, or a merger, etc. In general organizational change is provoked by a need for accomplishing some preconceived goal, or it is caused by some outside force like for example, a need for cutting costs within the organization, or a need to increase declining productivity. Although it is a fact that organization wide change is difficult to accomplish, primarily for the reason that many people are afraid of change of any kind, even though it…

References

Are You a Good Decision Maker? Retrieved From

http://www.onlinewbc.gov/Docs/manage/decisions.html Accessed on 14 July, 2005

Best Corporate Change Resources. Retrieved From

http://cor-ex.com/sites/bestchng/Sites/Change-Consultants.htm

Organizational Developement Plan to Improve
Words: 3507 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 68417744
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In terms of the organizational development style to be used throughout the change process, this should best be the pathfinder style. Despite the complexity of this approach, fact remains that it combines the benefits of other styles, while reducing their limitations. The pathfinder style virtually focuses on both high levels of organizational effectiveness, as well as high levels of member satisfaction (Harvey and Brown, 2001). This means that the approach will focus on improving senior-junior communications, for the satisfaction of the employees, as well as the increase in the performances of the overall entity.

Given that the process of change cannot be structured onto a strict plan, but that the plan has to be tailored to the unique features of the Mobile Mine Assembly Group, the levels of formalization at this stage are reduced. Nevertheless, throughout the actual implementation, or the time in which the change strategy comes into direct…

REFERENCES

Ewing, P., 2009, U.S. Navy Readiness Flaws Exposed, Defense News,  http://www.defensenews.com/story.php?i=4058309  last accessed on December 2, 2009

Harvey, D.F., Brown, D.R., 2009, An Experiential Approach to Organization Development, 6th Edition, Prentice Hall

Kieschnick, F., 2008, Mine Warfare "Shifts Colors" to Southern California, Pentagon Brief,  http://pentagonbrief.wordpress.com/2008/12  / last accessed on December 3, 2009

McNamara, P., 2008, Organizational Performance Management,  http://managementhelp.org/org_perf/org_perf.htm  last accessed on December 3, 2009

Organization Development and Change
Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 45623923
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Organizational Development and Change at FunTime Snacks

Summarize the major problem(s) at FunTime. Choose the most appropriate diagnostic model for this particular case (organization, group, individual job as illustrated in the text) and apply it to this situation.

FunTime is going through a very disruptive time in their business model as larger, more well-financed competitors are challenging them at a local and regional level, undercutting the FunTime differentiated approach of using local, high quality suppliers and selling. The diagnostic model that best fits the FunTime case study is the organization. Bill Richardson, CEO and founder had been able to keep the entire organization focused on customer satisfaction and the pursuit of high quality snacks when the company had not been challenged by stronger, more focused competitors at the regional levels. Yet as the case study continues it's clear the distribution and pricing strength of competitors is beginning to force each…

Org Culture Leadership Leadership Learning
Words: 4817 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 5080702
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" (Simon, 188) the fundamental perspective here is that leadership and the ability to apply actions based on culturally driven decisions are central to helping members of the organization learn in a concrete manner how best to accord with the reigning culture.

In order for this to occur though, there must be a certain initial scrutiny and selectiveness where leadership and personnel are concerned, endorsing an organization-wide emphasis on the quality of personnel. This implicitly brings us to consideration of the application phase in terms of learning organizational culture, which is inevitably associated to all actionable aspects of an organization's structure and operations. The correlation between recruitment, personnel makeup and leadership personalities is perhaps threaded by the common string of day-to-day responsibility within an organizational culture. And quite certainly, we see the stamp of organizational culture on so many of the most important applicable indicators. Schein, to this end, points…

References

Arnold, J., Cooper, C. & Robertson, I.T. (1995). Work psychology: Understanding human behavior in the workplace, Pitman Publishing, London.

Beer, M. & Walton, E. (1990). Developing the competitive organization: interventions and strategies. American Psychologists, 45(22), 154-161.

Bennis, W., & Nanus, B. (1985). Leaders: The strategies for taking charge. Harper and Row, New York.

Bowditch, J.L. & Buono, a.F. (1994). A primer on organizational behavior. John Wiley and Sons Inc. New York.

Organizational Bahavior Conflict and Decision
Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82794735
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However, according to this model, what can be termed as the best way is defined by how the decision made marries with the content and context of the matter at hand. The contingency model establishes that a decision that is made for a particular context may not be applicable in another, even though the contexts may be similar. It also establishes that a unified role is played by the managers who have the decision making capacity. When faced with a particular issue, the managers must find the best way to deal with the situation and they have to create an effective decision process which minimizes conflict. Whatever the situation, the management has the obligation to analyze it and evaluate the assumption that need to be drawn to align the organization with the changed environment. The conclusion must be evaluated on the basis of the effectiveness, efficiency and the solution it…

Organizational Change Anywhere Is Never Easy in
Words: 2563 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54430412
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Organizational Change

Change anywhere is never easy, in fact most people in an organization usually have a difficult adjustment when it comes to that. However, it is a process that cannot be avoided, it must happen. An organization may have no other choice but to change. hen this occurs, it is important to make sure that the employees are all on the same page and that this change is good and scary at the same time. There are so many various reasons for an organization to change, for instance a sudden change of the financial climate or the arising threat of competition. Through getting a good understanding of the procedure and theory of organizational change, an organization such as the Fairfax Media Group can manage change in the best conceivable way.

In Jennifer M. George's and Gareth R. Jones book, Contemporary Management, organizational change is well-defined as "the crusade of…

Works Cited

Fisher, D.R. (2000). Global and domestic actors within the global climate change regime: Toward a theory of the global environmental system. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 17(3), 221-234.

Ford, R. (2004). Organizational learning, change and power: Toward a practice-theory framework. The Learning Organization,, 13(5).

Macri, D.M., Tagliaventi, M.R., & Bertolotti, F. (2002). A grounded theory for resistance to change in a small organization. Journal of Organizational Change Management, 15(3), 292-310.

Nelson, L. (2005). A case study in organisational change: Implications for theory. The Learning Organization, 12(3), 18-30.

Organizational Transformation and Intervention at the U S
Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32510265
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Organizational Transformation and Intervention at the U.S. Army

Army, like many organizations whose cultures are design to resist and reject change to ensure consistency of structure and clarity of mission, is in need of a transformation and intervention. The vision, mission and objectives of the U.S. Army require a more agile, flexible and modular organizational structure that promotes transformational leadership over transactional management. The cultural constraints however are exceptionally rigid in this organization and transformational leadership the exception rather than the rule. The key constructs of the Burke-Litwin Model however illustrate that transactional leadership is more complex to manage and maintain over the significantly more streamlined transformational leadership structures the researchers have defined (Burke, Litwin, 1992). The intent of this analysis is to show how an intervention plan for the U.S. Army would make the organization more capable of achieving its vision, mission and objectives. The rationale for the intervention…

References

Bititci, U.S., Mendibil, K., Nudurupati, S., Garengo, P., & Turner, T. (2006). Dynamics of performance measurement and organisational culture. International Journal of Operations & Production Management, 26(12), 1325-1350.

Burke, W.W., & Litwin, G.H. (1992). A causal model of organizational performance and change. Journal of Management, 18(3), 523-523.

Johnson, D.M. (2004). Adaptation of organizational change models to the implementation of quality standard requirements. The International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, 21(2), 154-174.

Organizational Assessment What Follows in This Report
Words: 1858 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29703675
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Organizational Assessment

What follows in this report is an organizational assessment of an organization known as Society for Treatment of Autism. This assessment is broken into three major segments. The first segment is an organizational overview. The second segment is a comparison of the agency's words and mission to the empowerment model. Finally, there is an executive summary of the positive and negative implications for client and staff members of the organization.

Organizational Overview

The organization in question, as noted in the introduction, is the Society for Treatment of Autism. They are a member of the Autism Treatment Services of Canada and they are a dispenser of comprehensive treatments on a charitable basis and they get referrals via any number of methods and they take them all regardless of the source provided there is a need involved. All applicants are screened to ensure that they are appropriate for one or…

References

Hardina, D. (2005). Ten Characteristics of Empowerment - Oriented Social Service

Organizations, Administration in Social Work, 29:3, 23-42

STA. (2013, February 28). Society for Treatment of Autism - Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Society for Treatment of Autism - Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Retrieved February 28, 2013, from  http://www.sta-ab.com/

Organization Citizenship as it Relates
Words: 1735 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 87353120
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Therefore, there is a room for future research (Swaminathan & Jawahar, 2013). The results of this study indicated a possibility of other factors that influence job satisfaction. From this fact, it is important to recommend further research for the purpose of revealing the factors and improving job performance through the use of the results (Mohamed & Anisa, 2012). esearchers should perform the investigation by using many and few participants and compare the results in order to devise the best samples. This is because this research relied on a sample of 65 participants. if, a bigger number than the one stated on this research is used, there is a possibility of a considerable difference being evident (Mohamed & Anisa, 2012).

eferences

Swaminathan, S., & Jawahar, P. (2013). job satisfaction as a predictor of organizational citizenship behavior: an empirical study. Global Journal of Business esearch (GJB),

7(1), 71-80.

Mohamed, M., & Anisa,…

References

Swaminathan, S., & Jawahar, P. (2013). job satisfaction as a predictor of organizational citizenship behavior: an empirical study. Global Journal of Business Research (GJBR),

7(1), 71-80.

Mohamed, M., & Anisa, H.H. (2012). Relationship Between Organizational Commitment and Organizational Citizenship Behavior. IUP Journal of Organizational Behavior, 11(3), 7-

22.

Organizational Power Building Using Power Organization Start
Words: 1017 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74592459
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Organizational Power

Building Using Power Organization Start reading Harvard Business eview (HB) article: Pfeffer J. (2010). Power Play. Harvard Business eview, July-August, Vol 88 Issue 7/8, p. 85-92. Based HB article Jeffry Pfeffer (2010), write a paper answer questions: Why gaining power organization important? Does author gaining power workplace a good bad thing? Please support answer evidence article.

Power in the organization: The Pfeffer model

Power has long been viewed as a synonym for something negative in the workplace. Today, the rhetoric of 'teamwork' tends to be favored more than the rhetoric of power. But according to Jeffery Pfeffer, power is a necessary component of doing business. The question is: is the manager using power for the right reasons? Managers may use power with many different motivations, including the need for affiliation (to be liked); for personal satisfaction, or the desire to influence others in a positive way to achieve…

Reference

Pfeffer J. (2010). Power play. Harvard Business Review, 88 (7/8): 85-92.

Org Design My Most Recent Organization Has
Words: 843 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 80422944
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Org Design

My most recent organization has a structure that is mechanistic in nature. This is, however, conducive with the organization's business and its goals. The organization's competitive advantage lies with efficiency and economies of scale. The ability to perform routine tasks is critical to the success of this organization. The mechanistic structure allows management to determine the optimal means of performance of these tasks, and then transfer that information to each employee. This structure relies heavily on management's abilities in work design, so that all jobs are done, and there are people in place to perform each task, even under unusual circumstances should they arise. The company's goals are of course market share and profit, but these are achieved through performing the routine tasks better than the competitors perform them.

The mechanistic structure relies on the abilities of management, and the training of the workforce to ensure that they…

Organizational Diagnosis and Recommendations
Words: 2744 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 14551194
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Organizational Diagnosis and ecommendations

Imagine studying an organization in more depth in order to determine what needs changed. This is not an easy task because it could take days or months to achieve success. Businesses also have to stay up with current technology, and this means staying present with various leadership theories in order to make the business better. Systems thinking is used as a means in which to fully understand what needs monitored. Through using transactional leadership theory, one is able to grasp what one can do as a means of making recommendation for improvement.

One needs to perform a preliminary review to ensure that he or she obtains information related to organizational leadership, culture, effectiveness and productivity. "Synergy Technical Solutions Corp. (Syntechs) is a leading national technical service solutions provider with over 1,500 highly skilled professionals" (Syntechs, 2011). Many of these individuals work on "desktop and notebook computers…

References

Aronson, D. (2011). Targetted innovation: Using systems thinking to increase the benefits of innovation efforts. Retrieved May 20, 2011, from Thinking: http://www.thinking.net/Systems_Thinking/st_innovation_990401.pdf.

Changing-Minds. (2011). Transactional leadership. Retrieved May 20, 2011, from Changing-Minds:  http://changingminds.org/disciplines/leadership/styles/transactional_leadership.htm .

Management Study Guide. (2011). Transactional leadership. Retrieved May 20, 2011, from Management Study Guide:  http://www.managementstudyguide.com/transactional-leadership.htm .

Mattke, J. (2011, May 20). Syntechs Employee. (E. Mattke, Interviewer)

Organization What Is an Organizational Theory In
Words: 722 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37286118
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Organization

What is an Organizational Theory?

In the organizational sciences (e.g., organizational behavior, organizational psychology), one of the more misunderstood terms is organizational theory. To some, organizational theory is a field of study; to others, it is the process of using metaphorical language to describe organizational processes (e.g., McKenna & Wright, 1992; Morgan, 1986), or it represents an attempt to determine the best way to organize work organizations. The term is used to indicate all of these things, but an organizational theory is really just a way of organizing purposeful human action. Given the diversity of purposeful human endeavors, there are numerous ways to organize them, and, hence, a great many organizational theories.

Major Organizational Theories

Having provided a brief overview of the field of organizational theory, we now move on to a consideration of the major organizational theories themselves. Organizational theories simply represent ideas or models of the form…

References

McKenna, D.D., & Wright, P.M. (1992). Alternative metaphors for organizational design. In M.D. Dunnette & L.M. Hough (Eds.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology (2nd ed., Vol. 3, pp. 901 -- 960). Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Morgan, G. (1986). Images of organization. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage.

Taylor, F.W. (1911). Principles of scientific management. New York: Harper.

Weber, M. (1947). The theory of social and economic organization (A. M. Henderson & T. Parsons, Trans.) New York: Free Press.

Organizational Behavior Case This Case Is Interesting
Words: 465 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 94374409
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Organizational Behavior Case

This case is interesting because it portrays the cultural variances that an employee might find in different cultures from a first person perspective. First, an American employee shares his perspective about his experience working on a project in Germany. He finds that the employees are extraordinarily methodological during the planning phase of the project; then rather autonomous throughout the duration of the project. In his experience American firms generally set a goals and performance targets earlier in the project and do not require that the entire team comes to a consensus about the underlying ideologies that are driving the project while also expecting that the team leader takes a more authoritarian type approach.

From the German perspective, they feel as if they can devote all of the team's resources and energies in the planning phase then they can save a bunch of time down the road because…

Works Cited

Luthans, F., Youssef, C., & Rawski, S. (2011). A Tale of Two Paradigms: The Impact of Psychological Capital and Reinforcing Feedback on Problem Solving and Innovation. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 333-350.

Organizational Failure That Caused the
Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 12083613
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Emphasis was placed on resource allocation, remuneration of the top managers -- through sometimes luxurious premiums and bonuses -- or financial sufficiency -- often created through loans.

2. The leadership style

At the level of the leadership style, a distinction has to be made between management and leadership in the meaning that leadership refers to people, whereas management refers to technical details -- such as resource allocation, financial consideration and so on. As a general specification, the Enron leadership style was that of the follower. The employees were not encouraged nor empowered. Transparency was virtually inexistent. Whenever conflicts or intriguing findings would arise, they would be hushed up.

3. The organizational structure

The organizational structure at Enron was complex and it lacked an adequate control and audit system. It failed to adequately delegate responsibilities and it also failed to implement and demand accountability. The company did not keep an account…

References:

Clark, D., 2010, Leadership and organizational behavior, Bog Dog, Little Dog,  http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/leader/leadob.html  last accessed on August 9, 2010

Hunter, S., 2007, What brought about Enron's collapse? Associated Content,  http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/167610/what_brought_about_enrons_collapse.html  last accessed on August 9, 2010

Miner, J.B., 2002, Organizational behavior: foundations, theories and analyses, Oxford University Press

Organizational Theory Strengths and Weaknesses
Words: 1496 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 66479874
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The theory sees human organizational behaviors and conceptions culturally bound, rather than natural, unlike advocates of systems theory. Systems theory has been more influenced by sociology and linguistics than the natural sciences.

Analyzing symbolic interpretations may be more useful in organizations serving diverse populations: if a public health organization wants to alleviate the prevalence of diabetes in an area, it is not enough to more effectively disseminate information through the existing channels of communication (as systems theory might suggest) or even change the environment to create healthy options for consumption. Rather the people being served may require counseling to change what they consider good foods, a healthy diet, and a positive body image, if their culture tends to reinforce unhealthy practices. An ideological overhaul is necessary to change some behaviors, like the decreased social acceptability of smoking, for example. Organizations are social as well as formal, and cultural in nature…

Works Cited

Hatch, Mary Jo. (1997). Organization theory: Modern, symbolic and postmodern perspectives.

Oxford University Press, 2nd edition.

Organizational Behavior Organizational Behaviour the
Words: 1545 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26989835
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4. Conclusions

ABC Aviation has managed to capture the attention of international organizations and NATO members due to the high quality of their helicopters. However, to be able to complete the signed contract, the organization must first resolve their internal disputes and must implement a strong organizational culture which embraces and promotes cultural diversity.

eference List

Aghazadeh, S. (2004). Managing workforce diversity as an essential resource for improving organizational performance. International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, 53, 521-531.

Ayoko, O.B. (2007). Communication openness, conflict events and reactions to conflict in culturally diverse workgroups. Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, 14, 105-124.

Chuang, Y.T., Church, ., & Zikic, J. (2004). Organizational culture, group diversity and intra-group conflict. Team Performance Management, 10, 26-34. etrieved February 28, 2008, from Emerald database.

Elmuti, D. (2001). Preliminary analysis of the relationship between cultural diversity and technology in corporate America. Equal Opportunities International, 20, 1-16.…

Reference List

Aghazadeh, S. (2004). Managing workforce diversity as an essential resource for improving organizational performance. International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, 53, 521-531.

Ayoko, O.B. (2007). Communication openness, conflict events and reactions to conflict in culturally diverse workgroups. Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, 14, 105-124.

Chuang, Y.T., Church, R., & Zikic, J. (2004). Organizational culture, group diversity and intra-group conflict. Team Performance Management, 10, 26-34. Retrieved February 28, 2008, from Emerald database.

Elmuti, D. (2001). Preliminary analysis of the relationship between cultural diversity and technology in corporate America. Equal Opportunities International, 20, 1-16. Retrieved February 28, 2008, from Emerald database.

Organizational Theory 'There Is a
Words: 1832 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94462348
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At the same time, this already discovered knowledge can be shared with the existing employees on a common forum and then implemented by each in part under the form of imitation. As we can see, with positive impacts, innovation and imitation can be successfully implemented internally, within the organization, and can help in maximizing the organization's activity.

As we can see, organizational behavior helps, to some degree, shape the organization's encouragement of innovation or imitation and the way by which, internally, one or the other is fostered. The entrepreneur's personality is also often important in defining the relationship between the two and to determine where the line between them is likely to be traced. At the same time, both imitation and innovation are ways by which knowledge can be diffused within the organization or, often in the present, between different organizations.

ibliography

1. Ethiraj, Sendil, Levinthal, Daniel, Roy, Rishir. The…

Bibliography

1. Ethiraj, Sendil, Levinthal, Daniel, Roy, Rishir. The Dual Role of Modularity: Innovation and Imitation. Management Science. March 2007.

2. Organization theory. On the Internet at http://www.hrmguide.co.uk/history/organization_theory.htm.Last retrieved on December 13, 2007

3. Yong, Grace, Ho, Weng, Kong. INNOVATION, IMITATION and ENTREPRENEURSHIP. Singapore Economic Review. June 2006.

4. Schmitz, Jr., J.A. Imitation, Entrepreneurship, and Long-run Growth. Journal of Political Economy, 1989, pp. 721-739.

Organizational Alternatives and Social Change
Words: 1612 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 43118732
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A second change that has occurred and will continue to transform is that, regardless of the motivation, many employers have begun to experiment with flextime, telecommuting, and voluntary reduced-load work arrangements to give employees more discretion and personal flexibility in how they integrate work demands with other life roles such as family, community, and leisure. This increase in flexible work arrangements has further blurred the boundaries between work and home for many employees. Effectively switching and managing multiple work and non-work roles has never been more complex. Findings from individual, family, and organizational perspectives are mixed in terms of the success and social acceptance of alternative work arrangements (Kossek & Lambert, 2005, p. 6)

Though the criminal justice system is known for what they do and have been around for centuries, it is important to note that every organization has a plan, a vision, and successful mixed with failures. This…

References

Kossek, E.E. & Lambert, S.J. (Eds.). (2005). Work and Life Integration: Organizational, Cultural, and Individual Perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Miner, J.B. (2002). Organizational Behavior: Foundations, Theories, and Analyses. New York: Oxford University Press.

Sims, R.R. (1994). Ethics and Organizational Decision Making: A Call for Renewal. Westport, CT: Quorum Books.

Sims, R.R. (2002). Managing Organizational Behavior. Westport, CT: Quorum Books.

Organizational Behavior Since Long the Necessity for
Words: 1894 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 50311150
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Organizational Behavior

Since long the necessity for quality health care for veterans is considered to be a critical issue with widespread implications in respect of health care system of the nation. Irrespective of the incessant pressure on converting the Veteran Administration into a business model it has been alleged vehemently on the ground that the approach is not conducive to the satisfaction of most veterans, the legislators and even the providers of the health care. The problem of extending acceptable quality health care for the veterans of the nation is to be resolved by constituting public consensus on the issue. Irrespective of its increasing challenges it is believed that the provision of quality health care for the veterans of the nation is considered to be an appropriate objective for this country to maintain. Acknowledging the sacrifices of the veterans, the death of millions of Americans in service, 1.5 million returning…

References

Alqarni, Abdul Rahman. "The Managerial Decision Styles" A dissertation submitted to the School of Information Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. School of Information Studies: The Florida State University. http://etd.lib.fsu.edu/theses/available/etd-11242003-215328/unrestricted/Alqarni.Dissertation.pdf Accessed on 25 February, 2005

'Leadership Challenges in Non-Governmental Organisations" (2004) Organisational

Behavior Project.

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