Original Sin Essays (Examples)

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Terrible Political Sin of Telling

Words: 2434 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26716742

Good people do not use their power as belonging to the dominant group in society to make those who are minorities -- because of their race or their gender, their religion or their ethnicity -- feel lesser.

Simple, right? Multiculturalism preaches tolerance, and this is a very good first step. But critical multiculturalism teaches tolerance plus the need to be honest with ourselves and others about who in any relationship or interaction has power. Simple, right? Well, not really. One of the striking things about the responses to Straw was that while many of his critics chastised (or excoriated) him for siding with Western values against the values of his Muslim constituents, some of those who supported him praised him for siding with Western values (such as freedom and self-autonomy) against patriarchy and sexism. When he said that veils were not a good thing for a society that includes Muslim…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, D. (Ed.) (1998). Multicultural states. London: Routledge.

Calhoun, C. (Ed.) (1994). Social theory and the politics of identity. Oxford: Blackwell.

Dallmayr, F. (1966) 'Democracy and Multiculturalism' in S. Benhabib (Ed.) Democracy and difference. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Parekh, B. (2000). Rethinking multiculturalism. Basingstoke: Macmillan.
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Role of the Seven Deadly Sins in Doctor Faustus

Words: 1626 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29019835

Faustus, as Christopher Marlowe's character, is a German scholar who wants to exceed the limits of traditional logic, medicine, law and religion by practicing black magic. Through this, he calls upon Mephistopheles, a demon, who arranges a deal between Faustus and Lucifer for 24 years of power and glory in exchange for his soul. Despite Mephistopheles' warnings about the horrors of hell and his own doubts about what the deal really means, Faustus persists in the decision to enter into the bargain, which he signs in his own blood. ich gifts and displays of pleasure from Mephistopheles and Lucifer, though, distract his doubts and lull his senses and reason, in addition to Mephistopheles' impressive information about the nature of the universe. The parade of the seven deadly sins particularly wins Faustus' mind and will. In the fulfillment of their end of the bargain, Mephistopheles takes Faustus to ome, the court…… [Read More]

References

Dyce, Alexander, editor. The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus by Christopher Marlowe. The Quarto of 1616: Blackmask Online, 2001. http://www.blackmask.com/books15c/drfstadex.htm

Finnan, Dennis L. Seven Deadly Sins. The World, the Word and You! Broadcast, 1998. http://www.wwy.org/wwy3398.html

Goldfarb, Russell and Clarke, The Seven Deadly Sins in Doctor Faustus. http://www.industrialdisturbance.com/marlowe/explorer/seven.html

Marlowe, Christopher. The Tragedy of Doctor Faustus. Etext # 811, February 1997.  http://sailor.gutenbeg.org/etext97/drfsta10.txt
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High Degree of Misinformation I Had Received

Words: 3132 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33587097

high degree of misinformation I had received from traditional teachings about the church and the beginning of Christianity. Moreover, I was struck by the notion that most other people in the Western world receive this same degree of intentional misinformation, so much so that I have even heard people defend the idea that knowledge of the historical church is irrelevant to modern Christianity. Reading through the class material, I was struck by how critical this historical information was to the understanding of the actual church. One critical piece of information is the idea of Jesus as the head of the church, despite him not establishing Christianity as a separate religion. Another critical idea was that prophets could play a continuing role in Christianity, when my traditional understanding had suggested that after Jesus there would be no more Jewish prophets. I also found myself wondering about the very obvious and significant…… [Read More]

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Religion Answering Three Questions One Page Per

Words: 921 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44098530

religion, answering three questions, one page per question.

Martin Luther once said "In order to be truly free, one must be properly enslaved." Evaluate this statement using your knowledge of the Catholic Tradition. 2) hat is the Catholic Tradition view of Original Sin and does this view still have relevance today, why or why not? 3) hy has the Church ruled and maintained the ruling that only men may serve as priests, should this practice continue or change, why? Three sources. MLA.

Religion

Martin Luther, a 15th century monk of the Augustinian order, symbolizes the split within Christianity between Protestants and Roman Catholics. Luther once said "In order to be truly free, one must be properly enslaved." He was referring to his belief that human beings have free will only by the grace of God. Luther believed that without God one would have no free will. According to Luther, a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Martin Luther: 1483-1546." http://www.island-of-freedom.com/LUTHER.HTM.(accessed 02-19-2003).

Schreck, Alan. Basics of the Faith: A Catholic Catechism. Servant Books. 1987; pp. 18-

Women's Ordination." Catholic Internet Library..  http://www.womenpriests.org .

A accessed 02-19-2003).
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Religions of Buddhism and Christianity

Words: 2909 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69498612

Many believe that this judgment takes place within a person's lifetime through sufferings for acts committed, and one does not have to wait for the end of time. The basic belief of Christianity is that there is a Christian God, who is benevolent and giving, but who is also a vengeful God. In fact, a large part of Pilgrim theology was premised on God being vengeful, and that self sacrifices were needed to appease God. Christians also believe that Christ was the son of God, who came to fulfill the Messianic prophecy espoused by sages from the Old Testament. Goodness, kindness, good deeds, generosity, honesty are divinely inspired. Christians keep Christ as a cherished beacon to be emulated every step of the way. Good deeds (which would satisfy uddhists) without true faith is meaningless.

The uddhists have an assigned eight-step path to enlightenment. These are not far removed from any…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernstein, Alan E. The Formation of Hell: Death and Retribution in the Ancient and Early Christian Worlds. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993.

Bowker, John Westerdale. The Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 1997.

Easwaran, Eknath. The Dhammapada. Petaluma, Calif.: Nilgiri Press, 1986.

Meeks, Wayne a. The Origins of Christian Morality: The First Two Centuries. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1993.
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New Testament and Christianity

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17573158

Gospel: Gospel is a message that has contents on Jesus, God, salvation, the Kingdom of God, and everything that is done to reach out this message to the believers. Gospel is also one of the books in the New Testament talking about the life, death, resurrection, and the works of Jesus Christ.

• Original sin: Original sin refers to the tendency and deprivation to the evil that is seen as innate in all humankind and it is passed from Adam to all human beings, resulting from the sin engaged by Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. The sin is naturally adapted to every born human being, born of Adam being the initial sinner.

• Fundamentalism: Fundamentalism is a 20th-century religious movement emphasizing on a strict belief in the literal understanding and interpretation of the religious texts.

• Heresy: Heresy is a theory that is developed to be at…… [Read More]

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Bronfenbrenners Ecological Model

Words: 878 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47431240

Bronfenbrenner Ecological Model

Comment by Sabina:

Bronfenbrenner's Ecological System Theory is about a child's development within the context of relationships in the child's life. Bronfenbrenner's theory is based on different complex layers of the child's environment, with each different layer impacting and affecting the development of the child. In this model of child development the microsystem and mesosystem are both important influential factors in the development of the child. The microsystem and mesosystem impacts the development of the layers in the developing child. Bronfenbrenner's theory also accounts for the individual's biological makeup. The Bronfenbrenner's Ecological System Model basically explains how nurture influences nature to create the individual. This theory is about the complex layers in the child that were created by both biological factors and environmental factors. The breakdown of any of these layers will cause a rippling effect in the development of the child.

The environment in which is…… [Read More]

References

Baker, M (2001) Cultural variations in families. In Families. Labour and Love. Family diversity in a changing world. (pp 26 -- " 49). Crows Nest, NSW: Allen and Unwin.

Centre on the Developing Child (2008). The Timing and Quality of Early Learning Experiences Combine to Shape Brain Architecture. Available at http://developingchild.harvard.edu/library/reports_and_working_papers/working_papers/wp5/

Darling, N. (2007). Ecological Systems Theory: The Person in the Center of the Circles. Research in Human Development. 4 (3-4), 203-217.

Gerhardt, S. (2004). Original Sin. In Why love matters. How affection shapes a baby's brain. (167-191). Hove: Bruner Routledge.
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Non-Denominational Religions the New Facility

Words: 2495 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49473265

" Therefore, the Second Coming and the Rapture are coincidental events, both of which have to do with Christ returning to Earth. The Rapture specifically refers to what happens to human beings. Once Christ returns, the "thousand-year reign" on Earth begins. According to the FFM website, "Jesus Christ will one day return to bring believers home to Heaven and will reign with them over the Earth for 1,000 years." The thousand-year reign has scriptural origin, and is also called the Millennial Reign of Jesus. A "new heaven and earth," ostensibly a holier and happier one, will result from the Second Coming.

Speaking in tongues is a phenomenon that occasionally accompanies the baptism rite. Many Protestant and evangelical groups encourage speaking in tongues as proof of one's salvation during baptism (Robinson 2005). More formally known as "glossolalia," speaking in tongues is considered to be a supernatural manifestation of the glory of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

'History." Faith Fellowship Ministries.org.< http://www.faithfellowshipministries.org/history.html>.

Interview material.

"Our Beliefs." < http://www.ffmwoc.org/FFM3/Beliefs.html>.

Robinson, B.A. (2005). "Comparing the Beliefs of Roman Catholics and Conservative Protestants." Ontario Consultants on Religious Tolerance: Religious Tolerance.org.<  http://www.religioustolerance.org/chr_capr.htm >.
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Islam Select a Religion Is Considered to

Words: 2127 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 594931

Islam

Select a eligion

eligion is considered to be belief and acts of worship, which concentrates on worshiping a deity and gives a detailed and comprehensive outline for the way of living. It teaches the difference between good and evil, right and wrong and morality and immorality. This paper has selected Islam as the religion to be discussed.

Analysis of Christianity

Analysis of Christianity

Analysis of Islam

eligion plays an essential role in providing spiritual, moral and ethical guidelines to individuals in order to apply it into their daily lives (Fisher, 2005). eligion is considered to be belief and acts of worship, which concentrates on worshiping a deity and gives a detailed and comprehensive outline for the way of living. It teaches the difference between good and evil, right and wrong and morality and immorality. There are several religions in the world, which includes Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism and Taoism.…… [Read More]

References:

Fisher, M.P. (2005). Living religions (6th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

McInerney, W. (2003). Instructor's manual with tests: Living religions (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice-Hall.

Religion of Islam.(2009). Minnesota State University. Retrieved from http://www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/cultural/religion/islam/beliefs.html
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Nathaniel Hawthorne the Objective of This Work

Words: 2831 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87693031

Nathaniel Hawthorne

The objective of this work is to examine Nathaniel Hawthorne's works and to conduct a comparison of the life of Hawthorne to his short stories and to examine how his life and his works paralleled one another.

The life of Nathaniel Hawthorne many times was played out in his stories as his life events and experiences bled forth into his works demonstrating the struggles that the writer faced within himself and his own life. unning through the threads of the stories of Hawthorne is the theme of Puritanism and this is clearly perceived as one reads the stories of Hawthorne entitled "The Scarlet Letter," "The Minister's Black Veil and "The Birthmark." In order to understand Hawthorne's view it is necessary that one understand what Puritanism is, believes, and represents.

Puritanism

Puritanism was first presented in the works of William Tyndale (1495-1536) as well as in the work of…… [Read More]

References

Hawthorne, Nathaniel (1999) The Minister's Black Veil: Boston: Ticknor and Fields 1850. Retrieved from http://eldred.ne.mediaone.net/nh/sl23.html

Hawthorne, Nathaniel (1999) The Scarlet Letter: Boston: Ticknor and Fields 1850, Retrieved from: http://eldred.ne.mediaone.net/nh/sl23.html

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. (1999) The Scarlet Letter: A Romance. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1850.Retrieved from: http://eldred.ne.mediaone.net/nh/sl23.html

Rummel, C. (1996) Puritanism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Short Stories. 25 7 1996. American Short Stories. Retrieved from:  http://bronski.net/works/hawthorne.html
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Universally Accepted as One of the World's

Words: 2036 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13997941

Universally accepted as one of the world's foremost epics, John Milton's Paradise Lost traces the history of the world from a Christian perspective. (Milton, 1667) The narrative of the poem largely deals with falling and how desires -- God, Satan, Jesus, Adam and Eve's -- lead to it. The book is about mankind's fall -- Original Sin -- Adam and Eve's disobedience of God. There are other instances of falling in the plot too. First, Satan's fall from God's graces, as related to Adam and Eve by the angel Raphael, represents the past in the Universe's creation. The second instance -- the present (in the narrative) -- is the Adam and Eve's eating of the Forbidden Fruit. The third instance represents the future. Michael, as he readies to escort Adam and Eve out of Paradise, presents to them the various falls of man until Jesus comes to rescue by dying…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bendz, Fredrik. Proof That There Is No God. 1998. Fredrik Bendz. Available. December 27, 2002.  http://www.update.uu.se/~fbendz/nogod/no_god.htm 

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. The Poetical Works of John Milton. Vol. I and II. Boston R.H. Hinkley Company, 1667.

Wigglesworth, Michael. Day of Doom. The Poems of Michael Wigglesworth. Ed. Roland Basco. New York: University Press of America, 1662.

Paintings:
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Augustine Is Considered as the

Words: 2224 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57706212

" When these words of mine were repeated in Pelagius' presence at ome by a certain brother of mine (an Episcopal colleague), he could not bear them and contradicted him so excitedly that they nearly came to a quarrel. Now what, indeed, does God command, first and foremost, except that we believe in him? This faith, therefore, he himself gives; so that it is well said to him, "Give what thou commandest." Moreover, in those same books, concerning my account of my conversion when God turned me to that faith which I was laying waste with a very wretched and wild verbal assault, do you not remember how the narration shows that I was given as a gift to the faithful and daily tears of my mother, who had been promised that I should not perish? I certainly declared there that God by his grace turns men's wills to the…… [Read More]

References

Charles Eadward Pratt., A Reviewed: The Quaker Doctrine of the Inward Light Vindicated.

John Tulloch., the Christian Doctrine of Sin

Augustine, Edward Bouverier Pusey., Confessions of S. Augustine: Revised from a Former Translation by E.B. Pusey: with illustrations.

Edward Bouverie., The Doctrine of the Real Presence: As Contained in the Fathers from the Death of S. John.
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Religion Matthew FOX

Words: 1654 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96760823

Mattew Fox: Te Man, Te Controversy

Mattew Fox: Ten and Now Mattew Fox is a literary groundbreaker in te world of teology, in particular te doctrines of te Catolic Curc. His 1983 first-book, Original Blessing is a solid look at te blessings of life rater tan te concept of original sin. Te notion of Original sin is a central tenet to te Catolic Doctrine, and in 1989 te Vatican silenced Fox for one full year because of is teacings from Original Blessings.

In Original Blessings, Fox divides is book into four sections, befriending creation (te via positiva); befriending darkness, letting go, and letting be (te via negativa); befriending creativity, befriending our divinity (via creativa); and befriending new creation: compassion, celebration, and erotic justice (te via transformativa). He states tat awe and goodness will be te greatest counters to our society's predominantly pessimistic and fearful mood.

Fox believes tat Jesus teaces…… [Read More]

http://www.personaltransformation.com/Fox.html. Nurriestearns, Mary. "Beyond a Job: Doing the Great Work. An Interview With Matthew Fox." Personal Transformation.

Fox, Matthew. "Right Livelihood." Yes Magazine. Spring 2001.

Pacwa, Mitchell S.J. "Catholicism for the New Age: Matthew Fox and Creation-Centered Spirituality." Christian Research Institute. Report DF105. http://www.equip.org/free/DF105.htm
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Lewis Christianity Creation Evil and

Words: 2889 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89467696

McGrath's comments above suggest periods of conceptual adjustment as observers of the Christian faith worked to make explanations for the presence, even the commonality, of sin as it exists in spite of God's innate goodness.

So again, to the idea that Christianity's incredible facets couldn't rationally be reached by outsiders to the faith with some guesswork does not hold up against the process by which we know Christianity came to be. McGrath points out that in this discussion on how best to reconcile sin with God's innate goodness, Christianity was in a place of coming into its own identity. Answering questions such as this quandary on the dualism of good and evil would be very much a part of 'guessing' the structure of Christian faith as it were, but directly within the framework allowed by the basic tenets relating to God, man and the universe.

The text by Lewis demonstrates…… [Read More]

References:

Lewis, C.S., Mere Christianity. Harper San Francisco, 2001.

McGrath, A.E., Theology: The Basics, Wiley-Blackewell; 1st edition, 2004.

Polkinghorne, J., Belief in God in an Age of Science. Yale University Press, 2003.
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Chocolat There Is No Better

Words: 4622 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50575299



Clarence-Smith 6)

In so doing the commodity market and global trade developed a new history for chocolate, one that makes it a very fitting liberator in the small French village depicted in the film.

This new history is a story of sweetness and power, that is, the power to define what constitutes refined taste (Mintz 1985). All these accounts relate how Spanish nuns or monks were the first to domesticate a bitter, cold drink judged to be "more fit for pigs than for human consumption" (compare Constant 1988, 29; Robert 1990, 20). Chocolate was supposedly tamed by adding heat, sugar, and more refined flavorings such as vanilla, cinnamon, amber, and musk. This triumphant transformation heralded the introduction of chocolate to European nobles at court. "Hot, flavored, sweet; virtually nothing recalled its savage origins and, throughout the seventeenth century, the brown ambrosia would attract new followers" (Schiaffino and Cluizel 1988, 18).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barrette, Gene. "Spiritual Direction in the Roman Catholic Tradition." Journal of Psychology and Theology 30.4 (2002): 290.

Charlie's Chocolate Fact-Ory; SOME TASTY FACTS ON OUR FAVOURITE SNACK 2 ozs Can Kill a Dog Was Once a Medicine 400 Beans Make 1lb It Speeds Heartbeat." The People (London, England) 17 July 2005: 24.

Jacobs, Robert N. Chocolat, Movie, 2000.

Clarence-Smith, William Gervase. Cocoa and Chocolate, 1765-1914. London: Routledge, 2000.
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Anderson Neil The Bondage Breaker Overcoming Negative

Words: 2163 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82198563

Anderson, Neil. The ondage reaker: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings, Habitual

One of the most fascinating aspects of Neil Anderson's work of non-fiction, The ondage reaker, is that despite all of the different aspects of Christianity, spirituality, history, and contemporary culture that he details, the book revolves around a relatively simple precept. This tenet is the founding one of Christianity and the principle that has seen many an adherent through any assortment of beneficial or malefic circumstances. Quite simply it is that Jesus sacrificed himself on the cross, and in doing so gave a redemptive power to the world and to all who were willing to believe in him and his sacrifice. This power is referred to in Anderson's work again and again as a means of overcoming sin, evil, and self-indulgence, and to triumph in the spiritual warfare that the author posits occurs daily between Christians and minions of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, Neil. The Bondage Breaker: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings, Habitual Sins. Sisters, OR: Harvest House Publishers, 2006. ISBN: 0736918140.

Notes

1. Neil Anderson, The Bondage Brekaer: Overcoming Negative Thoughts, Irrational Feelings, Habitual Sins. (Sisters: Harvest House Publishers, 2006), 85.

2. Anderson, Bondage Breaker, 228
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Christianity to Hinduism Dear Hindu

Words: 1765 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24627724

Salvation will come based on one's deeds rather than on his capacity to achieve a high spiritual level, as in the Hindu faith and others.

Christianity does not necessarily provide all the answers. Christian believers will still have doubts about their existence, about their role on Earth and about their lives, as well as about their capacity of attaining salvation. However, Christianity provides the means by which one can integrate successfully into his or her life, enjoy the life here, while committing to a life within the Church and doing the good deeds that can help an individual attain eternal salvation. The idea of salvation puts things into perspective, but with a direct impact on the present, because it is the acts of the individual here that will get the salvation or not.

Christianity can be considered, from all these perspectives, the most complete religion in existence and a way…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Barrow, Martin. The Four Gospels. 1995. On the Internet at http://www.domini.org/tabern/martyn.htm.Last retrieved on February 3, 2009

2. Salvation. 2008. The Catholic Encyclopedia. On the Internet at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13407a.htm.Last retrieved on February 3, 2009

Barrow, Martin. The Four Gospels. 1995. On the Internet at http://www.domini.org/tabern/martyn.htm.Last retrieved on February 3, 2009

Salvation. 2008. The Catholic Encyclopedia. On the Internet at http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/13407a.htm.Last retrieved on February 3, 2009
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Christianity in a Way That

Words: 1629 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58429280

Once his word is accepted as truth, he promises eternal salvation, "I am the resurrection and the life. He who believes in me will live, even though he dies; and whoever lives and believes in me will never die," (John 11:25-26). Despite believing in the Lord and observing his rules by his rules, the Jewish people are still in danger for they do not accept Jesus to truly be God's messenger. If God's word is truth and is honestly recorded in the Bible, how can one ignore Jesus Christ as the Messiah? For he is "the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but through Me," (John 14:6).

Accepting Jesus' message as truth is "being justified before God," (Halverson 2). Christianity, through Jesus is a fulfillment of the old prophecies and brings God to mankind in a personal way where each individual can accept…… [Read More]

References

Giesler, Norman L. "How Can We Know the Bible is the Word of God?" International

Students, Inc. 1995.

Halverson, Dean. "World's Religions Overview." International Students, Inc. 2004.

Robinson, Rick. "Judaism and the Jewish People." International Students, Inc. 2004.
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Machiavelliism Political Thought Reflected in Martin Luther Thomas Muntzer

Words: 1989 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52774414

Machiavelli, Luther, And Muntzer

Must a good politician be morally bad? In the context of the Reformation, this question revolves around how Christians would define what is "morally bad" had become suddenly and seriously complicated by competing definitions of what constitutes "morally good" behavior. The rhetoric very often yielded more heat than light: Luther's and Muntzer's apparently sincere eschatological belief that the Vatican was to be identified with the hore of Babylon in the Book of Revelations made the question of cooperation with wicked temporal powers more than a purely academic one. Yet it is arguably the religious situation of Roman Catholicism in the first place that leads to the ethical differences in the political philosophies of Machiavelli, Luther and Muntzer. Indeed, the religious distinction that Luther upheld against the Vatican -- insisting on salvation sola fide, by faith alone, rather than by deeds -- indicates that in response to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Luther, Martin. "Temporal Authority: To What Extent It Should Be Obeyed" (1523).

Machiavelli, Niccolo. The Prince. Translated by W.K. Marriott. Project Gutenberg; n pag. Web.

Muntzer, Thomas. "The Prague Protest" (1521).

Muntzer, Thomas. "A Highly Provoked Defense" (September, 1524)
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Pop Is Tomorrow's Classical- Paul Mccartney Discuss

Words: 3141 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43780038

Pop is tomorrow's Classical"- Paul McCartney. Discuss this contention within the context of rock/classical music collaborations since the early 1950s.

Classical Rock and Popular Prophecy

To the average music-listener, musical genres are easily divided into homogenous groupings without any danger of overlapping one another. Certainly, there are rare occurrences of "cross-over" hits on the radio that find airplay on both Adult Contemporary and Country stations, or those releases which find an audience among both Easy Listening and Rock fans. Another seemingly strange occurrence that may be observed by the slightly more alert music consumer is that time shifts musical pieces from one genre to another, and yesterday's Alternative Rock is today's Easy Listening, yet even this phenomenon is considered an anomaly of the music industry. A simplicity is desired among musical elitists that preserves some musical forms as valid, labeling others as mere fads. However, the deep impact of musical…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Classical Music." Heart & Soul. World Book. 2004. http://www2.worldbook.com/features/aamusic/html/classical.htm

Duxbury, Janell R. "The Nexus of Classical and Rock." Progression, no. 39, p70-74. Summer, 2001. http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/8660/article.html

Duxbury, Janell R. Rockin' the Classics and Classicizin' the Rock: A Selectively Annotated Discography. Greenwood Press, 1991.

Fissinger, Laura. "Jim Steinman: To 'Hell' & Back." BMI MusicWorld. Spring 1994.  http://jimsteinman.com/bmi.htm
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Machiavelli's 'The Prince' and St

Words: 2308 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95846699

Parableman. 11 Aug etrieved from: http://parablemania.ektopos.com/archives/2008/08/rightreason2.html]

Machiavelli notes how the smart and successful ruler never allows the public to know his true intentions. This brings to the light of day the knowledge that what one sees is not what one always gets and that the most pleasing ruler might in reality be the most evil and corrupt ruler but who is smart enough and strategic enough to pull a sleight of hand and deceive those over whom he rules. Suppose for instance that Lucifer is already residing in a major world city. Then consider what city he might choose. According to Machiavelli, the city would be one that demonstrated "great enterprises" and from the view of Machiavelli's theory the city would exude the magnificence of its ruler. Two cities come to mind in the contemporary age and those being the cities of New York City and the city of Dubai…… [Read More]

References

Figgis, JN (2010) the Political Aspects of St. Augustine's City of God. Ido-European Publishing. Retrieved from: http://books.google.com/books?id=SB0WMroBE18C&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Hurd, Lindsey (nd) St. Augustine's 'The City of God'. Retrieved from:  http://www.fortifyingthefamily.com/cityofgod.htm 

Machiavelli, N. (1908) the Prince. Transl. W.K. Marriott Written c. 1505, published 1515. Rendered into HTML by Jon Roland of the Constitution Society. Retrieved from:  http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince00.htm 

Machiavelli, N. (nd) the Prince. How a Prince Should Conduct Himself as to Gain Renown. Chapter XXI. Retrieved from:  http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince21.htm
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Evil What Is the Nature

Words: 2945 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79449306



Initially St. Augustine favoured the dualistic view that evil was external and separate from the world and mankind that in evident from the Manichean worldview. However, he was later to reject this strict dualism and taker another view of the nature of evil. This was more Platonic and was based on the writings of Plotinus and Porphyry. This refers to the view that evil is a measure and result of our separation from God.

For Augustine, the measure of all existence was God. Instead of the Manichean view that evil existed outside humanity "…as an invasion," he posited the view that evil only existed to the extent that we do not acknowledge and live within God's word and law. ( Augustine Influences Christianity). Stated in another way, evil exists only because mankind refuses to acknowledge God. In essence Augustine defines evil as "…a privation in goodness." (A Brief Response to…… [Read More]

Works cited

A Brief Response to the Problem of Evil. April 22, 2009.



Augustine Influences Christianity. April 22, 2009.

 http://www.fsmitha.com/h1/ch25.htm
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Concept of God in Judaism and Christianity

Words: 7257 Length: 26 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52966776

Judaism and Christianity both have fairly common as well as totally contrasting religious concepts. In spite of the apparent differences and divisions it has to be understood that both these religions are like different streams of water merging in the ocean of god.

Christianity and Judaism are both religions of abrahamic origin. There are many similarities and differences between the two religions. Since Christianity originated from Judaism, it lends to the thought that both the religions are very closely related. However, in spite of their common origin, they differ considerably in some of the important issues while at the same time exhibit resemblance in many aspects. Even the monotheistic belief, which both these religions stand for, is quantified by entirely different perception of the attributes of godhead. Similarly, in the understanding of the messianic concept there is a significant contradiction giving us a hint of the vastly different nature of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Tracey R. Rich, "Moshiach: The Messiah," Accessed on May 23rd, 2003

http://www.jewfaq.org/moshiach.htm

2) Catholic Encyclopaedia, "original Sin," accessed on May 23rd, 2003  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/11312a.htm 

3) Jono, " Different sects of Judaism," Accessed on May 23rd, 2003, http://members.aol.com/bagelboyj/reports/sects.html
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How King David Falls Bathsheba and Uriah

Words: 4395 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53879216

King David as Described in 2 Samuel 11

Samuel 11 describes the events surrounding the sin of King David with regard to Uriah, whom he essentially had executed so that David's adultery with Uriah's wife would not be made known to him. This shameful action on the part of David displeased the Lord immensely, which is described in the following chapters. This chapter, however, reveals a side of David's character that prior to this incident had not been explored before. Much of what is known about David's character is celebratory -- from his time as the boy who slays the giant Goliath, to his handling of the Ark of the Covenant. David is described as a man after God's own heart (1 Sam 13:14) and most of his actions support this idea. His "humility and innocence" in his approach to Saul, playing for him on his lyre and soothing the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bartlett, David; Taylor, Barbara. Feasting on the Word. Louisville, KY: Westminster

John Knox Press, 2009.

Bosworth, David. "Evaluating King David: Old Problems and Recent Scholarship," The

Catholic Biblical Quarterly, vol. 68, no. 2 (April 2006), 191-203.
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Religion Augustine Divine Grace and

Words: 6715 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32713443

In Chapter 5, the great churchman informs us that Water is in fact an apt designation for the Divinity, better than any of the other elements.

Water possess the unique properties of being more moveable than earth (though less movable than air) while at the same time being essential to the creation and sustaining of life, as in the way water must be added to the soil in order for plants to grow.

This signification of matter first conveys its end, that is, that for the sake of which it was made; secondly, its formlessness; thirdly, its service and subjection to the Maker. Therefore, it is first called heaven and earth; for its sake matter was made. Secondly, the earth invisible and without form and darkness over the abyss, that is, the formlessness itself without the light, as a result of which the earth is said to be invisible. Thirdly,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101597555

Augustine. Augustine of Hippo, Selected Writings. Translated by Clark, Mary T. New York: Paulist Press, 1984.

Augustine. Confessions, Trans. Albert C. Outler, Ph.D, D.D. (1994, orig. pub. 1955).

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=101602917
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Jesus Jew or Christian the

Words: 5150 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98554255

His followers claimed He had risen as He said He would, bodily appeared to them and then bodily ascended into Heaven, as Elijah prophesied. This experience emboldened them to come out of hiding and they gathered at the upper room of the Cenacle on the Day of the Pentecost. From then on, they openly preached the radical ethic taught by Jesus. The resurrection of Jesus is the origin of Christian worship and prayer and it directly links Jesus to God and Jesus has been called Lord, the Christ, the faithful and true witness. His followers who observed and advocated His teachings of the Good News were called Christians. Christianity was later founded and spread by the Roman soldier, Saul, who persecuted the Christians but was converted into an apostle by a direct encounter with Christ on Saul's way to Damascus. He was later renamed Paul.

Jesus as a Jew demanded…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beeck, FJ van (1997). Who Do You Say I am? - Studying Jesus Christ. Commonweal: Commonweal Foundation. http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1252/is_12_126/ai_58400678

Cantor, N. (1994). The Jew Jesus Christ, the Nazarene. The Sacred Chain: the History of the Jews. http://artfuljesus.Ocatch.com/cantor.html

Carroll, J. (2001). Jesus, a Jew? Constantine's Sword. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company. http://artfuljesus.Ocatchcom/carroll.html

Dankenbring, WF. Jesus Christ Was Not a Christian. Triumph Prophetic Ministries. http://www.triumphro.com/shocking%2C_but_true_nonetheless_jesus_christ_was_not_a_christian
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Biblical Worldview

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55930355

Bible

Paul's epistle to the omans offers a thorough framework for what would become the Christian worldview. In omans, Paul outlines core themes related to the natural world, human identity, human relationships, and culture. The way Paul delivers the message that became the heart of Christian doctrine was to present not a systematic theology, but a reasoned outline of why the teachings of Christ offered something new and potentially meaningful.

One of the themes in omans, and particularly in the first several chapters, is Paul's view of the natural world. In omans, Paul spends a good deal of time on the nature of creation and the human relation to it. As of omans 1:3, at the start of the letter, Paul is already referring to Jesus's "earthly life," thus focusing on the physicality of Christ and linking Jesus to the natural world. Paul understands that much of his audience will…… [Read More]

References

Bible: NIV

Ellis, J. (2012). The Christian worldview and Romans. The Power of Grace. Retrieved online: http://joelellis.blogspot.ca/2012/07/christian-worldview-romans.html

Frank, B. (2013). Christian worldview. Retrieved online: http://brandonsfrank.wordpress.com/2013/10/26/christian-worldview-2/

West, C. (2013). Biblical worldview essay. Retrieved online: http://christianwest12.wordpress.com/2013/08/06/biblical-worldview-essay/
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Psalm 1

Words: 5329 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11791265

Psalm 1 read in different translations.

The New International Version (NIV), The American Standard Version (ASV), The New Living Translation (NLT), The King James Version (KJV), The Contemporary English Version (CEV), The Message (MSG), and The Harper Collins Study Bible, New Revised Standard Version (NRSV).

I read the NIV the most often because I grew up reading the NIV and am comfortable with its language and cadence. I find that, of the Bibles I read, it is the one that feels the most familiar. I actually found reading MSG a little disconcerting; I do not know that it conveyed the feelings that the other translations conveyed. It actually made me think about the number of times the Bible has been interpreted and how connotation and denotation both impact the meaning of different passages.

To me, Psalm 1 is a reminder that sinners have no place in Lord's kingdom. It was…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Addis, W.E. "The Psalms." Peake's Commentary on the Bible. Ed. Arthur Peake. New York:

Thomas Nelson & Sons, 1920. 366-. Print.

ASV. The American Standard Version Bible. Online at Bible Gateway.com.

Blair, Edward. The Illustrated Bible Handbook. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1987.
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Sacramental Life in the New

Words: 1723 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53696115

The Pope and the leadership guide us in our interpretation of scripture and tradition.

As stated previously, Roman Catholicism is truly a lifetime experience. From cradle to grave, Holy Baptism to the Anointing of the Sick, we are surrounded by these life giving and soul building acts and rarely appreciate them fully. This investigation has not only, truly deepened the author's knowledge of the sacraments by choosing Holy Eucharist, Baptism and Penance. They are an organic whole that represent the totality of our lives and with the spread of the Church's doctrines will hopefully encompass humanity as a whole.

orks Cited

Benedict 16th, (2009, June 14). Angelus. Retrieved from http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/angelus/2009/documents/hf_ben-xvi_ang_20090614_en.html

Catechism of the catholic church. Retrieved from http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/__P3E.htm

Consequences of original sin for all humanity . (1986, October 1). Retrieved from http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/audiences/alpha/data/aud19861001en.html

Knox, James, & right, John. (1977, March 31). A letter from the vatican: first penance, first communion.. Retrieved…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Benedict 16th, (2009, June 14). Angelus. Retrieved from http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/angelus/2009/documents/hf_ben-xvi_ang_20090614_en.html

Catechism of the catholic church. Retrieved from http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/__P3E.htm

Consequences of original sin for all humanity . (1986, October 1). Retrieved from http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/audiences/alpha/data/aud19861001en.html

Knox, James, & Wright, John. (1977, March 31). A letter from the vatican: first penance, first communion.. Retrieved from  http://www.vatican.va/roman_curia/congregations/cclergy/documents/rc_con_cclergy_doc_19770331_penance-communion_en.html
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Evil Is Divided Into Two

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2137458



4. How does Luther and Calvin's view of moral evil differ from that of Catholicism?

The classical Christian approach to the dilemma of moral evil has been that people are abusing the freedom of choice given to them by their creator. With free will and the ability to choose between good and evil actions, people who exercise the wrong choices can create moral evil, which impacts others. The Catholic Church essentially takes this approach to evil. To understand their approach, one must understand the concept of original sin. When Adam and Eve were in the garden, they were created in the image of God, but with a presumably much more limited intellect than modern humans. They were forbidden to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge, because it would give them moral reasoning, thus making them closer to God. However, they chose to eat of this fruit, which distanced…… [Read More]

References

Hill, B., Knitter, P., & Madges, W. (1997). Faith, religion & theology: A contemporary introduction revised & expanded. Mystic, CT: Twenty-Third Publications.
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History of Satan Since the

Words: 4478 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21876124

These Gods subjugated humans in a way that never happened in other primitive river-valley cultures yet seemed to follow a political will as the concept evolved. This finally culminates in the marriage between the God of Above, Nergal, lord of Summer, Growth and Heat; and the Goodness of the Below, Ereshkigal, queen of the underworld, inter, the Cold, and of Death. e now have opposites, attracted, and yet polarized in deed, action, and even interpretation (Messadie, 1996, 90-7).

This conception then seems to flow mythologically out of the Middle East into other cultures; we have the trickster, the shadow, the evil one, and even the unknown. However, considering the geographical location of the Abrahamic religions, it is logical that there would be a cross-over from the archetype that would manifest itself within these religious traditions.

Satan in Judaism -- in traditional Judaic thought, there is no conception of the Devil…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jews Believe in the Satan, and Not in the Devil. (2003, March). Retrieved November 2010, from What Jews Believe:  http://whatjewsbelieve.org/explanation7.html 

Anderson, W. (2010). Dante the Maker. Brooklyn, NY: S4N Books.

Bowker, J. (1997). The Oxford Dictionary of World Religions. New York: Oxford University Press.

Catchpool, D. (2002). The Koran vs. Genesis. Creation, 24(2), 46-51.
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Sacraments a Dialogue With God the Anglican

Words: 1018 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61251395

Sacraments a Dialogue With God

The Anglican faith is divided between those who are more Protestant in their beliefs and practices, and those who are more Catholic. Anglican Catholicism, sometimes referred to as the "High Church," is very similar to oman Catholicism, but does not recognize the Pope as the head of the Church. When it comes to the sacraments, the High Church, like the oman Catholic one, recognizes seven sacraments, while other Anglican churches recognize as little as two. Whether one recognizes seven sacraments, or only two, those sacraments are seen by Anglicans as "channels of grace, by which members of the Church are united to Christ, the centre of unity." (Staley, 1908, p. 64) These channels of grace have often been called a "dialogue with God."

The term "sacrament" comes from the Latin word sacer, meaning devotion to a particular deity, and "mentum," meaning intent, mind, or thought.…… [Read More]

References

Aquinas Thomas, "Summa Theologica III q61. The necessity of the sacraments." Retrieved from http://www.franciscan-archive.org/scotus/opera/Monte-ST3-

61.pdf

"The Holy Bible: King James Version. Bartleby.com" Bartleby.com: Great Books Online -- Quotes, Poems, Novels, Classics, and Hundreds More. Retrieved from  http://www.bartleby.com/108/ 

Lewis, C.S., (2009) "C.S. Lewis on Women Priests: Priestesses in the Church?" Retrieved from http://jandyongenesis.blogspot.com/2009/01/cs-lewis-on-women-priests.html
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Conflict There Is a Difference

Words: 1088 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70949952

The Palestinians have never the Jewish version of history and desire to have all the land returned to them. This conflict is intractable and there is little hope of a resolution in the immediate future.

In applying Reinhold Niebuhr's Christian realism to the conflict summarized above it should be noted that Niebuhr was a Zionist who strongly supported the right of Israel to occupy the land and defend itself. His Christian realism combines there elements of realism, political realism, moral realism and theological realism (Moseley 23). Thus, the conflict must be understood firstly as a problem on sin in the lives of the inhabitants of the area. The groups involved will firstly need to understand their action as a product of a sinful experience (Inboden). They should be prepared to act in moral and right way toward their fellow men. The Jews should be prepared to live peacefully with the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hodges, Sam. "Niebuhr's 'Christian realism'." The Dallas Morning News Feb. 10, 2006. Web

Inboden, Will "Putting the 'Christian' back in 'Realism': A response to Steve Walt" Foreign

Policy December 21, 2009. Web

Moseley, Carys "Reinhold Niebuhr's Approach to the State of Israel: The Ethical Promise and Theological Limits of Christian Realism" Studies in Christian-Jewish Relations
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Government of the Tongue Richard

Words: 6042 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88904117

Allestree indicates that flattery is a form of mental slavery and says that love and friendship are far too valuable to prostitute them. In addition, he believes that flattery is harmful because, by failing to point out a man's flaws, or by transmuting those flaws into assets, one condemns the man to continue in those faults. Furthermore, he points out that flatterers are often treacherous, because their affection ends when the one that they have flattered falls out of favor. In fact, when the formerly adored friend falls out of favor, the flatterers are often the first to point out their faults to those who are coming into favor.

In section nine, Allestree speaks about boasting. Boasting is not limited to people speaking bombastically about themselves, but also includes people who cannot hear talk on any subject without trying to turn that subject towards them. Therefore, it becomes clear that…… [Read More]

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Religion Saint Anselm the Duke of Canturbury

Words: 640 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14305436

Religion

Saint Anselm, the Duke of Canturbury, was "one of the most important Christian thinkers of the eleventh century," (Sadler). This is because Anselm used a reasoned philosophical argument to address theological questions. In Cur Deus Homo, or hy God Became Man, the author addresses the Incarnation of Christ and the theme of Atonement for sin from this philosophical perspective. Anselm distinguishes between "different ways in which an action or state can be just or unjust, specifically just and unjust at the same time," (Sadler).

hy God Became Man is divided into two sections. The first part addresses sin and redemption in a general fashion. Anselm outlines the concept of sin as fulfilling the satisfaction of God, which is related the concept of being indebted to God. This is outlined best in Chapter 11 of Book 1. The author states, "To sin is nothing else than not to render to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anselm. Cur Deus Homo (Why God Became Man). Retrieved online: http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/anselm-curdeus.asp

The Holy Bible, NIV.

Sadler, Greg. " St. Anselm of Canturbury." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Oct 2006. Retrieved online:  http://www.iep.utm.edu/anselm/
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Anglican and Reformation Theology Comparison

Words: 4237 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49729536

To combat subjectivity, he called for interpretation to be subject to church authority, which was the voice of reason. Reardon (1981) echoes this interpretation: "Hooker sets out to refute the puritan contention that in religion holy scripture affords the sole and absolute authority and rule" (p. 280). Hooker shows that the narrow principle of sola scriptura "disregards the larger context of the divine law in creation within which even the scriptural revelation must be placed if we are to understand its proper scope and purpose" (Reardon, 1981, p. 280). Not far from the Reformers, they upheld the idea that the directly inspired written word contains supernatural revelation. There is perhaps less emphasis on preaching and proclamation in the Anglicans than in the Reformers.

hat is the status of the creeds and traditions? In Anglicanism, the Nicene, the Athanasius, and the Apostle's creeds are stressed as true because they are taken…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aland, K. (Ed.). (2004). Martin Luther's 95 theses. Saint Louis: Concordia Publishing House.

Avis, P. (2007). The identity of Anglicanism: essentials of Anglican ecclesiology. London and New York: T & T. Clark.

Bayer, Oswald. (2008). Martin Luther's theology: a contemporary interpretation (Trans T.H. Trapp). Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.

Beckwith, R.T. (1988). "Anglicanism." In New dictionary of theology (S. B. Ferguson & D.F. Wright, Eds.), pp. 21-23. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.
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Baptism Debate Theology

Words: 3101 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65398044

Theology: The aptism Debate

Peter's encouragement sermon on the Day of Pentecost -- "repent and let each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins, and you shall receive the Holy Spirit" (Acts 2:38) has been the source of raging debate, marred by conflicting views on i) whether Peter was referring to spirit or water baptism; and ii) whether through the phrase 'be baptized…the forgiveness of sins', Peter was identifying baptism as a requirement for salvation[footnoteRef:1]. In other words, should Peter's exhortation be interpreted at face value, or should it be understood some other way? This text purposes to interact with the opposing views on these issues, examine their theological and syntactic viability, and then conclude with an interpretation that aligns with both the immediate and the larger contexts of the verse in question. [1: 1 ruce Compton, "Water aptism and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beach, Mark. "Original Sin, Infant Salvation, and the Baptism of Infants," Mid-America Journal of Theology 12 (2001): 47-79.

Calvin, John. "Doctrine: John Calvin's Argument for Infant Baptism," The Theologian (n.d.), Accessed September 15, 2014,  http://www.theologian.org.uk/doctrine/calvin-baptism.html 

Campbell, Alexander. Christian Baptism: With its Antecedents and Consequents (1853), Google Ebook.

Compton, Bruce. "Water Baptism and the Forgiveness of Sins in Acts 2:38," Detroit Baptist Seminary Journal 4 (Fall 1999): 3-32.
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Islam and Christianity Have a Lot in

Words: 960 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36299024

Islam and Christianity have a lot in common because they originate from a single source. Abraham is believed to be the source from which Islam, Christianity and Judaism took roots and this is one of the reasons why these religions are also known as Abrahamic religions. Due to their common origins, the scriptures of birth Islam and Christianity have a lot in common and at the same time, they also differ in a few aspects.

Christianity and Islam have been divided into many smaller sects and sub-sects that believe and follow differing thoughts and ideas. For example, Christianity is divided into Roman Catholics, Protestants, Lutherans, Seventh Day Adventists, Orthodox and other groups and each of these groups have a different way of practicing the religion and the underlying beliefs. Similarly, Islam is also divided into Shi'ite, Sunni and to a smaller extent Sufi that have their differences as well. Moreover,…… [Read More]

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Martin Luther's Life Martin Luther Took His

Words: 4355 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68339119

Martin Luther's Life:

Martin Luther took his birth on November 10, 1483 in a peasant family in Eisleben in the Holy oman Empire, presently known as Eastern Germany. After the birth of Luther his family migrated from Eisleben to Mansfeld. His father was a comparatively effective miner and smelter and the Mansfeld was then a larger mining town. The Parents of Martin were Hans and Magarete Luther and he was their second child. Martin started his schooling in Mansfeld most probably around seven. The School emphasized Latin and a bit of logic and rhetoric. When Martin was 14 he was brought to Magdeburg for taking up his further studies. He resided there only of a year and then admitted into a Latin School in Eisenach till 1501. During 1501 he entered the University of Erfurt that was regarded as one of the oldest and best universities in Germany where he…… [Read More]

References

An Account of the Life and Persecutions of Martin Luther: 1483-1546. Retrieved from http://www.myfortress.org/MartinLuther.html Accessed on 25 April, 2005

Buckingham, Lizzy. Martin Luther Protestant Reformer. May 27, 1997. Retrieved from http://www.cpcug.org/user/billb/luther.html Accessed on 25 April, 2005

Frost, Ronald. N. Aristotle's Ethics: The Real Reason for Luther's Reformation? Trinity Journal. Fall, 1997. Retrieved from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3803/is_199710/ai_n8776993/pg_1 Accessed on 25 April, 2005

Martin Luther and the Reformation. Retrieved from http://www.redeemerdenver.org/reformation.html Accessed on 25 April, 2005
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Christian Knows the Earliest Verses in the

Words: 2342 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75618331

Christian knows the earliest verses in the ible. The ook of Genesis proclaims powerfully, that man was created in the image of God. We are also told that Man was created so that he could hold "dominion" over all of other God's creation. Yet, soon after, there was the Fall. And God cast Man out of the Garden of Eden to suffer on earth burdened by the pains of the Original Sin. Through Christ's advent and resurrection, we are informed that Christ was also the image of God and also in the image of Man; and, that we have a way out from our sinful ways. The doctrine of the Image of God emerges as a powerful mandate for good Christian Living. The rewards are eternal salvation and the restoration to how we were originally created. As the book of Revelations relates, the consequences of not doing so would consign…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baker, W.H. (1991). In the image of God: a biblical view of humanity. Chicago: Moody Press.

Edwards, R.B. (1972). Reason and religion; an introduction to the philosophy of religion. New York,: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.

Kazantzakis, N. (1960). The last temptation of Christ. New York,: Simon and Schuster.

Masson, R. (1982). The Pedagogy of God's image: essays on symbol and the religious imagination. Chico, CA: Scholars Press.
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Evil and the Holy Cross

Words: 1896 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57917161

Personal Theodicy Apologetics
The problem of evil is something everyone has to face sooner or later. As Schlesinger points out, philosophers want to understand “why there is any suffering in the world at all.”[footnoteRef:2] The problem with a philosophical approach to suffering is that it does not reveal the whole story or the whole picture of why suffering (evil) exists. Religion, on the other hand, does provide that whole story—and depending on the religion, the story will be a little different. Christianity teaches that evil is a result of sin—that it is not something that came of its own into the world or that God created but rather something that His creatures chose of their own free will. The choice to pursue evil (defined as an absence of the good) altered God’s world—or at least man’s perception of it. Prior to man’s fall, he lived in happiness in the Garden…… [Read More]

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Nathaniel Hawthorne's Novel the Scarlet

Words: 976 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32601203

The child is closely associated with the original sin and the symbol of it. The scarlet letter was, in fact, one of the first items that caught her eye. "One day, as her mother stooped over the cradle, the infant's eyes had been caught by the glimmering of the gold embroidery about the letter; and, putting up her little hand, she grasped at it, smiling, not doubtfully, but with a decided gleam that gave her face the look of a much older child" (95). Such duality of sin and its symbols foreshadows Hester's eventual empowerment as a result of her punishment and ostracism by the Puritan community. Her life with Pearl is indeed lonely and filled with the challenges of single parenthood, but Hester transcends her misery by employing her own mix of pride, humility, and dignity.

As seven years pass and Pearl becomes a little girl instead of a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter. Cleveland: Economy Book League, 1933.
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Faustus and Everyman an Analysis

Words: 3798 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8354078

Faustus, who sees his time also coming to a close, becomes a kind of Hamlet-figure and doubts that he can be forgiven. Faustus' problem is more than a life of misdeeds -- it is a problem of lack of faith. The faith of Everyman may have been lukewarm, but it was not corrupt. The faith in the time of Everyman has been polluted by Lutheran and Calvinist doctrines.

Considering the form of the narrative, this is not surprising: Faustus is obsessed with fame and renown. Everyman has no name proper -- and neither does his author. That the author of the medieval morality play should be anonymous is nothing out of the ordinary, and indeed seems all the more fitting when one considers that the second most printed book after the ible was The Imitation of Christ, a work whose author never put his name on the original (and which…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Craig, H. Morality Plays and Elizabethan Drama. Shakespeare Quarterly 1(2), 1950, 64-

72. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/pss/2866678

Everyman. NY: Fox, Duffield and Company, 1903.

Gardiner, H. Introduction. The Imitation of Christ (Thomas Kempis). NY:
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Cloistered Virtue and Democratic Freedom Role of Education for American Christianity

Words: 3540 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47583214

philosophy of education through a historical and then through an explicitly Christian lens, with a focus on the political role of education, and the Christian philosophy of John Milton. Milton's 1644 works Areopagitica and Of Education are invoked to justify the true Christian purpose of education as being exposure to the sort of free expression and free exchange of ideas that are guaranteed in America under the First Amendment.

What would a true Christian philosophy of education look like? The answer might actually be surprising to the majority of Americans who identify themselves as Christian and seek a Christian education. In 2014, frequently Christian education can seem retrograde, a form of ressentiment and indoctrination that derides Darwinism and has a greater interest in upholding a political consensus than in embodying the ideals set forth by Christ Himself. I propose to examine a Christian philosophy of education through a somewhat unique…… [Read More]

References

Fish, S. (1971) Surprised by sin: The reader in Paradise Lost. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gaustad, E.S. (2005). Roger Williams. New York: Oxford University Press.

Gutek, G.L. (2011). Historical and philosophical foundations of education: A Biographical introduction (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Jefferson, T. (1778) A bill for the more general diffusion of knowledge. Retrieved from  http://candst.tripod.com/jefflaw1.htm
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How to Explain the Existence of Evil

Words: 1418 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65550068

Apologetics: Evil, Suffering and Hell
1. What are some of the facts of history and experience that give rise to the problem this course calls the problem of evil?
The facts of history and experience that give rise to the problem of evil are primarily war, pain, death—i.e., suffering. This is what Lewis describes as the problem of pain: Why would a good God create a world wherein people suffer and are doomed to die? Why does it seem, moreover, that innocent people suffer? These are the questions that Lewis asks, noting in particularly that “all civilisations pass away and, even while they remain, inflict peculiar sufferings of their own probably sufficient to outweigh what alleviations they may have brought to the normal pains of man.”[footnoteRef:2] [2: C. S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain (Samizdat University Press, 2016), 2.]
2. To what extent would you defend the following claim: the…… [Read More]

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Hawthorne Literary Symbolism and Hawthorne's

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18679823

The only material similarity between Prynne's scarlet "badge" and Faith's pink ribbons is that both are made of cloth and adorn some type of clothing, i.e., Faith's ribbons are part of her cap while Prynne's "badge" is sewn into her dress as needlework.

The reader is first introduced to Prynne's "badge" in Chapter Two of the Scarlet Letter when she emerges from jail -- "On the breast of her gown, in fine red cloth, surrounded with an elaborate embroidery and fantastic flourishes of gold thread, appeared the letter a." Upon being led to her "place of punishment" for committing adultery with Arthur Dimmesdale, all eyes are immediately drawn to the scarlet "A" which "had the effect of a spell, taking (Hester) out of the ordinary relations with humanity and enclosing her in a sphere by herself" (ell, 163-164). Obviously, this scarlet emblem upon Hester's dress seems to emit a life…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bell, Millicent, Ed. Nathaniel Hawthorne: Collected Novels and Short Stories. New York: The Library of America, 1983.

Richardson, Robert D., Jr. "Ralph Waldo Emerson." Dictionary of Literary Biography. Vol. 59: "American Literary Critics and Scholars, 1800-1850." Ed. John W. Rathburn. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Research, Inc., 1987, 108-129.
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Elizabethan Love Poetry Is Laden

Words: 939 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23235078

He "almost" despises himself but still seems not to think that his actions were absolutely wrong. Furthermore, the narrator of the Shakespeare Sonnet finds solace and comfort in thinking of his lover. By thinking of the one he loves, a human being, the narrator feels absolved of any wrongdoing. The narrator of the Shakespeare Sonnet is more concerned with the consequences of his actions, such as being an outcast, than with whether the action was right or wrong. For Herbert, morality is quite the opposite. Herbert suggests that the human condition is itself a state of sin.

Therefore, a central difference between secular and religious morality as expressed in Elizabethan poetry is between absolute and situational ethics. For Herbert, morality is based on a set of absolute values that God and only God can create. God is the "Just Judge" and God's judgments transcend any human laws (l 12). Moreover,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Herbert, Mary Sidney, Countess of Pembroke. "Psalm 51." Retrieved July 15, 2009 from  http://www.luminarium.org/renlit/psalm51.htm 

Shakespeare, William. "Sonnet 29." Retrieved July 15, 2009 from  http://www.shakespeare-online.com/sonnets/29.html
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Jesus' Teachings Prayer & Christian Life He

Words: 35411 Length: 109 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95862373

Jesus' Teachings, Prayer, & Christian Life

"He (Jesus) Took the Bread. Giving Thanks Broke it. And gave it to his Disciples, saying, 'This is my Body, which is given to you.'" At Elevation time, during Catholic Mass, the priest establishes a mandate for Christian Living. Historically, at the Last Supper, Christ used bread and wine as a supreme metaphor for the rest of our lives. Jesus was in turmoil. He was aware of what was about to befall him -- namely, suffering and death. This was the last major lesson he would teach before his arrest following Judas' betrayal. Eschatologically speaking, the above set the stage for the Christian ministry of the apostles, evangelists and priests. Indeed, every Christian is called to give of him or herself for the Glory of God and the Glory of Mankind. The message at the Last Supper was powerful. People have put themselves through…… [Read More]

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Montanism Theology Like Many Early Heresies

Words: 3085 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91419614

Montanism / Theology

Like many early heresies, Montanism has not left behind much in the way of written testimony: only one Montanist writer, Tertullian, has works that survive, and it is primarily in his work that the statements of the Montanist movement (Montanus, Prisca and Maximilia) survive in quotation. Gonzales notes that, among many differing interpretations of Montanism, one view sees them as something like "an early Pentecostal group." [footnoteRef:0] It is clear from accounts of Montanism that it included the emphasis on the Holy Spirit, including manifestations of glossolalia, that are seen in contemporary Pentecostals. ut overall, Montanus seems to have combined several contradictory impulses into his schismatic movement. The first hinged upon greater involvement of women in ministry: the heresy of Montanus is seldom mentioned without reference to "those demented women Prisca and Maximilia," as Saint Jerome calls them in his letter to Marcella refuting the Montanist heresy.[footnoteRef:1]…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gonzales, Justo L. And Gonzales, Catherine Gunsalus. Heretics for Armchair Theologians. Louisville: Westminster John Knox Press, 2008.

Saint Jerome, Letter XLI. Accessed online at: http://www.ccel.org/ccel/schaff/npnf206.v.XLI.html

Saint Justin Martyr, First Apology XXVI. Accessed online at: http://www.crossroadsinitiative.com/library_article/269/first_apology_of_st._justin_martyr.html

Swift, Jonathan. A Tale of a Tub. Accessed online at:  http://www.online-literature.com/swift/tale-of-a-tub/8/
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How Confucianism Impacted China

Words: 4732 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28788747

Confucianism in Pre-Modern China

Confucianism comes from the Chinese philosopher Confucius, after whom the philosophy takes its name. Confucius lived from the middle of the 6th century BC to the first part of the 5th century BC and was a teacher of the values of those who lived in the days of Chinese antiquity. For Confucius, the greatest years of the Zhou dynasty had come in the three centuries prior to his birth. The dynasty itself lasted for centuries following Confucius' life, though in a much different form from what came before. Confucius viewed the lessons of the early Zhou dynasty as containing valuable nuggets of wisdom. Confucius' teachings carried on well after his day as did many other schools of thought in China, where philosophy and wisdom were highly prized and sought after by many Chinese leaders from Confucius' own time till the end of the 3rd century BC.…… [Read More]

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Anthony the Great Why St

Words: 2502 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19228397

St. Anthony is recognized as the head of the monastic family. His date of birth was in 251 and somewhere in Egypt. His parents died when he was only sixteen years old. He remained to be the guardian of his younger sibling, Dious. Six months after the demise of his parents, he went to the church to hear the word of our lord. 'If you would be perfect, go sell all you have, given to the poor and come follow me.' (Matthew 19:21)

He regarded to this advice as a personal message sent to him God himself. From the fortune his family left behind, he sold 300 acres land that was fertile and the proceeds he gave the poor remaining with a little for taking care of his sister. He left the sister to be taken care of by the community of virgins. This allowed him to be free and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anthony and Derwas J. Chitty. The Letters of Saint Anthony the Great.Fairacres, Oxford: SLG Press, 2010. Print.

Athanasius, .The Life of St. Anthony the Great: 17 Jan 356 Written a.d. 357. Willits, CA: Eastern Orthodox Books, 2008a. Print.

Athanasius, .The Life of St. Antony the Great. Willets, CA: Eastern Orthodox Church, 2009b. Print.

McDannell, Colleen. Religions of the United States in Practice: 1. Princeton: Princeton Univ. Press, 2006. Print.
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Why I Am Not a Christian

Words: 866 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95033891

man is born with a sinful nature? Why or Why not? If you do believe this, what is the solution to man's sinful nature? If you do not believe it, what do you believe and why?

What constitutes a 'sin,' versus a character flaw or a violation of human law, is defined as the absence of good, and what is absent of good is absent of God. When a human being sins, he or she turns away from his or her true nature. To sin is to resist God, which is why the first sin is said to be eating from the Tree of Knowledge. It is not that eating fruit is 'bad.' What was sinful about Adam and Eve's action was that it resisted what they knew was God's will. However, if we are to accept that God's punishment was just, we must also believe that the first humans…… [Read More]

References

Russell, Bertram. Why I am not a Christian. 6 May 1927. [26 Mar 2012]

 http://www.users.drew.edu/~jlenz/whynot.html
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Culture and Religion

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22211111

Culture & Religion

Roman Catholic: The Roman Catholic religion believes in the Holy Trinity of a creator God the Father; Jesus Christ, His Son; and the Holy Spirit. Other beliefs that characterize the religion are the original sin; the forgiveness of sin; the second coming of the Lord; and life after death (CIM, 49). Given its belief in sin, the religion offers the hope of salvation through its sacraments and baptism. Infant baptism is encouraged to erase the original sin and as a start to a spiritual life through the Church. In addition, the Roman Catholic Church holds that the mass is a continuation of the sacrifice made by Christ and thus teaches the doctrine of transubstantiation or that the bread and wine at communion actually become the body and blood of Christ (Biblical Discernment Ministries, 1997). Generally, the religion has no dietary restrictions. However, it advocates abstaining from meat…… [Read More]

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Biblical Baptism Infants and Adults

Words: 2486 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87556478

baptism was "dipping." The word was widely used in the New Testament in Jesus' teachings and also in the letters of Paul. Jesus uses the term 'baptism' to refer to the death/suffering that awaited him (Mark 10:38)[footnoteRef:2]. He draws parallels between the suffering that awaited him and some form of immersion -- which he was to be drowned in. He says that the immersion was necessary and until he emerged from it, his work is incomplete (Luke 12.50). It therefore means that, right from the start, baptism symbolized Christians sharing in the suffering of Jesus Christ by immersing themselves into a mold similar to that of the suffering of Christ. Paul talks of baptism 'into' Jesus' death (Romans 6.3). Christians experience this as they celebrate Good Friday and also during the Holy Communion as they break the bread.[footnoteRef:3] [2: Williams, Rowan. eing Christian: aptism, ible, Eucharist, Prayer. 2014: 1] [3:…… [Read More]

Bibliography

"Baptism Is a Public Statement about Your Relationship with Jesus." NorthRidge Church. Accessed May 26, 2015.

Best, Thomas F. Baptism Today: Understanding, Practice, Ecumenical Implications. Collegeville, Minn.: Liturgical Press, 2008.

Britton, Dennis Austin. Becoming Christian. Oxford: Fordham University Press, 2014.

Ervin, Howard M. Conversion-initiation and the Baptism in the Holy Spirit: A Critique of James D.G. Dunn, Baptism in the Holy Spirit. Peabody, Mass.: Hendrickson, 1984. Print.
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Why Wright Does Not Always Understand God

Words: 3052 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43727356

God I Don't Understand: Reflections on Tough Questions of Faith

Preface and Introduction

The Preface explains why Wright chose to write this book. He felt that it could be a more personal and humble approach to God than that achieved in his other books, which were about "knowing God." In this book, Wright wants to address some of the more confusing aspects of God. He justifies this approach by showing how God Himself points out that His ways are not our ways in Scripture. This is a valid point, and what Wright is doing is drawing attention to the fact that we are not God's equals and therefore should not try to humanize Him but rather should try to understand that He knows and sees all and therefore has a good reason for why He commands and does things that might seem disturbing or odd to us.

However, in Wright's…… [Read More]

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Christianity and the Middle Ages

Words: 682 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34371308



All classes of people during the Middle Ages were averse to bathing, as it was seen as a way to care for the body. The body was not respected in any sense, and was neglected as much as possible. Indeed, many saw the fleas and lice that resulted from a prolonged lack of sanitation and hygiene as simply part of the body and hence of sin.

The combination of early Christianity with the folk medicines and beliefs of the invading Germanic forces also resulted in a new conception of how healing was to be achieved during the Middle Ages. The root of disease was considered to be supernatural; the afflicted had sinned or was possessed by something evil. In earlier Germanic folk wisdom, it was also believed that illness resulted from noxious darts from elves, deleterious snakes, and venomous dragons.

During the time, there was a variety of options the…… [Read More]

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John Woo's Face Off John Woo's 1997 Face Off

Words: 2028 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62813144

John Woo's Face/Off

John Woo's 1997 Face/Off was only the Hong Kong filmmaker's third American feature, preceded by Hard Target (1993) starring Jean-Claude van Damme and Broken Arrow (1996) starring Christian Slater and John Travolta. Travolta would star again in Woo's third Hollywood effort alongside Nicholas Cage. The film's solid success with critics and at the box-office would move Tom Cruise to hire Woo to helm the second installment of the Mission: Impossible franchise. But that film would prove to be the apex of Woo's success in America: his next two films would draw scant positive reviews and box office receipts. By that time, Woo had traded his inimical style for more overtly transcendent themes of sacrifice and spirituality: Windtalkers heavily embraced both Christian and Native American spirituality and Paycheck (based on a Philip K. Dick story) was more psychologically driven than action-oriented (like his more popular films before that).…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ebert, R. (1997). Face/Off. Retrieved from http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19970627/REVIEWS/706270301/1023

Li, Siu Leung. 2001, 'Kung Fu: Negotiating Nationalism and Modernity' Cultural

Studies, vol. 15, no. ae, pp. 515-542.

Mast, G. (2006). A Short History of the Movies. NY: Pearson Longman.
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Is God a Good God

Words: 1776 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61597743

Personal Theodicy
Theodicy is the vindication or justification of divine goodness in spite of the evidence of a world where evil exists. When one has faith in the divine goodness of God, the question of why God allows evil things to happen is one that is not troublesome; it is one when one has no faith or has doubts that the question becomes pertinent. Thus, it is helpful to explain how and why a good God would allow evil to exist and evil things to befall innocent people so that others might come to believe or might come to believe more strongly. The main reason for the existence of evil is that God gave to men (and to the angels) freedom of will. Men and angels were given the choice, in other words, of whether they would serve Him or their own desires. The fallen angels (led by Lucifer now…… [Read More]

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Luther Calvin Pascal the Three

Words: 2421 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24841517

All human beings are, however, impure and imperfect, which does not make it very difficult to rise above the rest in terms of self-perceived perfection. In comparison to God, however, this changes. The human being who is never dissatisfied with him- or herself, however, never becomes aware that there is a contrast to be made with God.

This is what Calvin appears to mean by piety. People with true knowledge of themselves as imperfect and unholy in comparison with God are those who are most pious. They are aware that there are imperfections to be addressed and aspire to do so by contemplating the nature of Gold. Instead, impious and hypocritical human beings are never aware that there is much wrong with them. They create a type of cycle by only contemplating other human beings to compare with themselves. By doing this, they become aware only of their excellence and…… [Read More]

Sources

Calvin, J. Institutes of the Christian Religion. The Mountain Retreat. Retrieved from:  http://www.mountainretreatorg.net/classics/calvin/institutes7-1.html 

Edwards, J.A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections. The Covenant of Grace. Retrieved from:  http://www.covenantofgrace.com/religious_affections.htm 

Edwards, J. Sinners in the hands of an Angry God. Retrieved from:  http://www.biblebb.com/files/edwards/je-sinners.htm 

Edwards, J. God Glorified in Man's Dependence. What Saith the Scripture? Retrieved from:  http://www.whatsaiththescripture.com/Fellowship/Edwards.God.Glorified.html