Filter Results By:

Reset Filters

We have over 8 essays for "Ozymandias"

View Full Essay

Rewards for the Watchmen

Words: 1928 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Creative Writing Paper #: 47329884

Watchman Award

Adrian Veidt (Ozymandias) Receives the Nobel Peace Prize

Five prizes are awarded by the Nobel committees each year, and probably the most memorable is the Nobel Peace Prize. Although the selection is sometimes controversial, the committee has specific directions from the founder himself regarding the quality of person he wished to receive this award. In devising how the specific prizes should be awarded, Nobel wrote specific language regarding each category. For the Nobel Peace Prize he said he wanted it to go "to the person who shall have done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses" (The Nobel Peace Prize). Thus, it is no wonder that the Peace Prize committee has awarded the prize to the man who is most responsible for the eradication of hostilities between the Soviet…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Ripening of Age the Short

Words: 7517 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87256169

This sentence, although it talks about bowels, is really describing the mother's love of the baby.

This story is written like a detective story. It is very difficult to determine which woman is telling the truth and to determine if King Solomon is actually a bad person or a good person. It does not give the names of the women. They are simple referred to as one woman and the other woman. It does say that they were "harlots," but it does not give any background information about who the women are or how they got involved in this argument. They were simply two women in the same place that had babies at the same time.

Also, it is not clear to the reader rather King Solomon is a bad person or a good person. He does propose to slay the baby and divide it into two half to settle…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

White Mountains by John Christopher

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54535528

White Mountains by ohn Christopher

How the Author Makes This Book Interesting

ohn Christopher makes this book interesting in a few ways. The most important way is that Will chooses running away and looking for free people instead of being safe because he does not want the tripods to control his mind. Will is 13 years old and lives in a world that is run by the tripods. Will knows that "capping" is a ceremony that 14-year-old boys are supposed to have and that it means a metal cap is put on a boy's head. From then on, the capped person must wear the cap for the rest of his life because "the metal is joined to the flesh, so that it cannot be removed."[footnoteRef:1] Will begins to think there might be something strange about capping after Will's cousin gets capped and seems different. Then Ozymandias, who is a kind…… [Read More]

John Christopher makes this book interesting in a few ways. The most important way is that Will chooses running away and looking for free people instead of being safe because he does not want the tripods to control his mind. Will is 13 years old and lives in a world that is run by the tripods. Will knows that "capping" is a ceremony that 14-year-old boys are supposed to have and that it means a metal cap is put on a boy's head. From then on, the capped person must wear the cap for the rest of his life because "the metal is joined to the flesh, so that it cannot be removed."[footnoteRef:1] Will begins to think there might be something strange about capping after Will's cousin gets capped and seems different. Then Ozymandias, who is a kind stranger, explains to Will that tripods cap people because the caps "Are the means by which they keep men docile and obedient to them."[footnoteRef:2] After hearing that, Will says, "Anger burned in me, not only for the Vagrants but for all the others - my parents and elders, Jack..."[footnoteRef:3] After that, Will decides to run away to The White Mountains to find the free people who live there. Running away means that Will gives up being taken care of by the tripods and being safe with a place to live and enough to eat. Will runs away anyway because he wants to be free. [1: Christopher, J. (1967). The White Mountains. New York: Simon & Schuster Children's Publishing. [Electronic book version on ePubBud]. Retrieved 01/01/2012 from  http://www.epubbud.com/read.php?g=CQ5RJZGJ&p=1 , p. 21.] [2: Ibid., p. 20.] [3: Ibid., p. 21.]

Another way that John Christopher makes this book interesting is by using the tripods and the vagrants. The book tells enough about the tripods so that we know that they rule the world, they are not people, they might be machines, or they might come from another planet.[footnoteRef:4] The book never tells exactly who the tripods are or where they came from, so we want to read the next volume to see if it tells more about the tripods. John Christopher also makes this book interesting by telling about the vagrants. All the normal people think that capping is fine and that it makes you an adult. The vagrants are people who were never capped or who were capped but did not change. In the book, the normal people treat vagrants like there is something wrong with them, but vagrants are freer than the normal people because their minds are not controlled by capping. [4: Ibid., p. 20.]

A fourth way that John Christopher makes this book interesting is by telling about Will's dangerous journey to The White Mountains. Will starts the journey with Henry, then meets Beanpole on the way and Beanpole joins them. So many dangerous things happen to them that we do not know whether they will make it to The White Mountains or whether the tripods will get them and cap them. Even though Will is only 13, he goes from a place that seems like England to a place that seems like France and becomes very sick. A girl named Eloise takes care of Will and he wants to stay with her until he accidentally knocks off her turban and sees that she is capped. When Will knocked off her cap, he saw "the mark, in her eyes,
View Full Essay

Irish Poetry Is Unavoidably Shaped by Its

Words: 2759 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90708507

Irish poetry is unavoidably shaped by its historical, social, and political context. The Troubles have infiltrated poets throughout several generations, permitting unique artistic insight into the conflict. Younger poets writing about The Troubles in Northern Ireland understandably have a different point-of-view than poets from a previous generation. Their personal experiences were different, and the historical events they witnessed or were surrounded by in the media likewise differed from their predecessors. Yet there are also shared themes that provide the inextricable cultural links between all poets of Northern Ireland. Some poets, like Seamus Heaney, rely heavily on literalism and a direct political commentary in addition to poetic tropes like symbols of colonization. Likewise, Derek Mahon does not hold back in terms of diction related to The Troubles. hen examining poets from an earlier generation, who wrote during some of the most violent occasions of The Troubles, allusions and metaphors seem to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Heaney, Seamus.

Kearney, Timothy, Hewitt, John and Montague, John. "Beyond the Planter and the Gael: Interview with John Hewitt and John Montague on Northern Poetry and The Troubles." The Crane Bag. Vol. 4, No. 2 p. 85-92, 1980/1981.

Longley, Michael.

Mahon, Derek.
View Full Essay

Why We Fail

Words: 1690 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11303280

Americans: Environmental Collapse and the End of Civilization" by Jared Diamond.

With a BA from Harvard University and PhD from Cambridge University, as well as a vast amount of works published, professor Diamond uses his extensive knowledge as well as his equally extensive field work and research to put on the table what he found disturbing about the fall by self-destruction of ancient civilizations, among which, he focuses on that of the Mayas.

The author opens his essay with Percy Shelly's poem, Ozymandias, using poetry to appeal to the reader's sensibilities. By creating a sad, hopeless atmosphere, he is setting the tone in anticipation of the rest of the essay. His choice for the poem of an incurable romantic as Shelley, may seem odd for the opening of an essay about the environment. However, it strikes several cords and thus opens the reader's heart instead of just one's mind. This…… [Read More]

Lopez, Barry. "Children in the Woods."

Diamond, Jarred. "The Last Americans: Environmental Collapse and the End of Civilization"

Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. 2009. Discourse on Inequality: On the Origin and Basis of Inequality Among Men. The Floating Press.
View Full Essay

Percy Bysshe Shelley in Representative

Words: 858 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 16915562



Because I was happy upon the heath,

And smiled among the winter's snow,

They clothed me in the clothes of death,

And taught me to sing the notes of woe.

And because I am happy and dance and sing,

They think they have done me no injury,

And are gone to praise God and his priest and king, Who make up a heaven of our misery."

In these two poems, Mark Blake was allegorically relating the importance of God and religion in our lives. In The Little Black Boy, he gives an optimistic perception of God. The poem having the persona of an African child who questions his color and identity learns from his mother that God does not base his love on the color of one's skin. His mother also teaches him that the lives we have here on earth are temporary and but mere preparations of the rewards…… [Read More]

References

Percy Bysshe Shelley. (2006). Retrieved December 13, 2006, from Representative Poetry Online

 http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/display/displayprose.cfm?prosenum=6 

Romanticism. (2006) Retrieved on December 13, 2006, from Encyclopedia Britannica online.  http://www.Encyclopediabritannica.com 

William Blake poems. (2006). Retrieved December 13, 2006, at  http://quotations.about.com/cs/poemlyrics/a/William_Blake.htm
View Full Essay

Robert Frost Poetry

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92068702

oad not Taken, obert Frost uses the setting, mood, and characterization to help illuminate the theme of choice symbolized by the road not taken.

The poem uses various literary devices to describe choice.

The poem is set in the woods, where two roads diverge.

The setting is symbolic.

The roads represent choice.

The poem has a contemplative mood.

Each of the choices is appealing

The traveler knows that choosing one road means choosing not to follow the other road.

The poem has a complex structure with:

Four five-line stanzas;

ABAAB rhyme structure;

Iambic tetrameter; and D. The use of some anapests.

Frost uses an unnamed narrator in the poem

A. Old enough to have made choices

Not an old person because the narrator expects to age

Poetry Analysis: The oad not Taken by obert Frost

In The oad not Taken, obert Frost uses the narrator's voice to describe a man…… [Read More]

References

Frost, R. (1916). The road not taken. Retrieved May 19, 2014 from Poetry Foundation website:

 http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/173536