Panopticism Essays (Examples)

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Panoptism Michel Foucault Used the Term Panoptism

Words: 1815 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6728666

Panoptism

Michel Foucault used the term Panoptism (all-seeing) to describe the methods of control and surveillance used by industrial society to discipline and control the lower classes, whether in factories, schools, hospitals, mental institutions or other bureaucratic institutions. In these, everyone is under constant observation and surveillance, being analyzed, evaluated and regulated, and the most extreme versions of this system would be found in police states like Nazi Germany or Stalin's Soviet Union. He began his chapter of Panopticism with a description of a 17th Century town under quarantine for the plague. This was not yet the full-fledged machine of control that would emerge in the 19th and 20th Centuries but only a hint of things to come. Of course, the quarantine was only a temporary measure while the system of Panopticon is permanent, and the methods of control and surveillance were still primitive and crude in a preindustrial society.…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. Vintage Books, 1995.
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Foucault and Davis

Words: 527 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6229694

Foucault and Davis

The idea of the panopticon came from English philosopher and thinker Jeremy Bentham, after he helped to design a building in which one supervisor could observe all of the workers within. Eventually, Bentham's panopticon was converted into prison design, as people realized the benefits of a building which contains a point from where all of the prisoners inside could be watched by a single guard. While the architectural theory of the panopticon failed to catch on during Bentham's lifetime, many philosophers have since examined the idea from a variety of angles, discussing ideas like social control and authoritarianism. One of those philosophers was the Frenchman Michel Foucault, who wrote a book called Discipline and Punish in 1975 which contained many references to the panopticon as becoming the model for social structures. According to Foucault's view, the panopticon as imagined by Bentham has become more than just a…… [Read More]

References

Davis, M. (1992). Fortress Los Angeles: the militarization of urban space. Variations on a theme park, 154-180.

Foucault, M. (1984). The foucault reader. Random House LLC.
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Gaze and the Culturally Determined Body Michel

Words: 1679 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76923139

Gaze and the Culturally Determined Body

Michel Foucault first developed his theory of the panopticon as a means of describing the ways in which a society may dominate the thought processes and behavior of the individual by "convincing" that individual to implicitly engage in their own surveillance, in the same way that a literal, brick-and-mortar panopticon relies on the self-regulation of prisoner behavior due to the fear of possible surveillance and punishment. In formulating this theory, Foucault uncovered important details regarding the way in the body is created, regulated, and sometimes even decimated by societal standards, something which Susan Bordo expands upon in her essay "Beauty (re)Discovers the Male Body." Bordo analyzes the way in which bodies (and in this case, male bodies) and the meanings gained from them are culturally determined, to the extent that the human body as it is commonly considered has almost nothing to do with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bordo, Susan. The Male Body: A New Look at Men in Public and Private. New York, NY: Farrar,

Straus, & Giroux, 1999. Print.

Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish. New York, NY: Vintage Books, 1977. Print.
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History of Punishment Critically Assess

Words: 4559 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95135347

Too little, for what matters is that he knows he is being watched and too much, because he has no need in fact of being so (Alford, 2000).

Bentham laid down the principle that power should be visible and unverifiable. Visible in that the inmate would constantly have before him the tall outline of the central tower from which he was watched. Unverifiable in that the inmate must never know whether he is being looked at or not, but he must be sure that there is always the possibility. In order to make the attendance or nonattendance of the guard unverifiable, so that the prisoners, in their cells, cannot even see a shadow, Bentham visualized not only venetian blinds on the windows of the central observation hall, but, on the inside, partitions that intersected the hall at right angles and, zigzag opening instead of doors. For even the slightest noise,…… [Read More]

References

Alford, C.F. 2000, "What would it matter if everything Foucault said about prison were wrong? Discipline and Punish after twenty years," Theory and Society, vol. 29, no. 1,

pp. 125-146.

Barratt, E. 2002, "Foucault, foucauldianism and human resource management," Personnel

Review, vol. 31, no. 1, pp. 189-204.
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Foucault' Michael Foucault Was Born

Words: 1944 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39062997

Take for example, Foucault's 'Omnus at singulatim', in which the thinker shows his reader how the Christian practice of 'pastoral power' paves the way for certain modern practices that in actuality govern almost all the aspects of a living population anywhere in the world. Foucault also stressed on his belief that religion, in a positive way, possessed the capacity to contest against the nascent forms of control instituted during the modern period of man, like for example, Protestant eformation, which tried its best to resist the onslaught of emerging forms, and therefore, became representative of a set of emerging disciplinary discourses and practices. As far as Foucault was concerned, religion presented difficulties for autonomous self fashioning, but at the same time, religion was not a dangerous precursor to modern forms of governments.

Conclusion:

To conclude, it must be said that Michael Foucault's theories are as relevant today as they were…… [Read More]

References

Smart, Barry. Michael Foucault, Critical Assessments. Routledge, 1995.

McCall, Corey "Autonomy, religion and revolt in Foucaul." Journal of Philosophy & Scripture 2, no. 1 (Fall 2004): 7-13.

Gutting, Gary. The Cambridge Companion to Foucault, Cambridge University Press, 2005.

Carrette, Jeremy R. Foucault and Religion: Spiritual Corporality and Political Spirituality, Routledge, 2000.
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Power and Facebook Michel Foucault

Words: 961 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8582122

Power and Facebook (Michel Foucault)

Throughout the course of his literary career, French philosopher Michael Foucault provided and considered several definitions for the term power, most of which were posited in view of the broader social implications of the word. Of particular note to this assignment is his conception of disciplinary power, which was engendered as a scion of traditional sovereign power, that in which its "form is the law of transgression and punishment…confronted by a power that is law…is he who obeys (History of Sexuality Volume 1, part 4, chapter 1, p.85)." Whereas sovereign power is generally employed as a negative effect of power in which individuals are restrained by litigation to keep from traversing society's laws and norms, disciplinary power is a more beneficial application of power which attempts to make people useful through a subtler means of curtailing their rights (Discipline and Punish, part 1, chapter 1,…… [Read More]

References

Foucault, M. (1978). The History of Sexuality Volume I: An Introduction. New York: Pantheon Books.

Foucault, M. (1975). Discipline and Punishment: The Birth of the Prison. New york: Vintage Books.

Bentham, J.. (1995) Panopticon. In Miran Bozovic (ed.), The Panopticon Writings, London: Verso.

Smart, Barry (1994). Michel Foucault. New York: Routledge.
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Feeling Overwhelmed The Required Reading Felt Daunting

Words: 2199 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86436275

feeling overwhelmed. The required reading felt daunting and it seemed like the expectations put upon students were rather high. I remember having the impression that a lot of my learning would entail simply memorizing and regurgitating facts and ideas. I had concerns about the amount of writing expected of us. As I explained in my "Guided Self-Placement" essay, I started this course without having had a great deal of reading and writing experience.

I feel that this course has enabled me to write and think more critically and formally. Previously, I was not aware of the necessary tone that academic essays had to take and that it's appropriate to omit colloquial phrases and words such as "like." In fact, I would still say that I sometimes have a tendency to write in too much of a conversational tone, and have to be particularly watchful of that in my writing.

I…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bordo, Susan. The male body: a new look at men in public and in private. "Beauty

(Re)Discovers the Male Body." New York: Farrar, Straus and Girror, 1999.

Foucault, Michel. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. New York: Pantheon, 1977.

Tompkins, Jane. "Indians": Textualism, Morality, and the Problem of History." Styles of cultural activism: from theory and pedagogy to women, Indians. Ed. Philip Goldstein. Boston: Associated University Presses, 1994
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Unraveling The Heroine of Charlotte

Words: 1063 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2456035

"I cry at nothing, and cry most of the time… I lie here on this great immovable bed -- it is nailed down, I believe -- and follow that pattern about by the hour. It is as good as gymnastics, I assure you. I start, we'll say, at the bottom, down in the corner over there where it has not been touched, and I determine for the thousandth time that I will follow that pointless pattern to some sort of a conclusion." She does not think of her child, and only occasionally of her husband. The wallpaper and the imaginary woman command her focus. Forced into a pointless existence, and denied the mobility and the intellectual excitement that make life meaningful, the woman's mind turns to other intellectual and imaginary pursuits, Gilman suggests.

Eventually, rather than describing herself as looking at the pattern of the wallpaper, Gilman's heroine disassociates and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bak, John S. "Escaping the jaundiced eye: Foucauldian Panopticism in Charlotte Perkins

Gilman's 'The Yellow Wallpaper.'" Studies in Short Fiction. Winter 1994.

Accessed from Find Articles October 6, 2010 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2455/is_n1_v31/ai_15356232/?tag=content;col1

Gilman, Charlotte Perkins. "The Yellow Wallpaper." Full e-text available from the University
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Chips A Professional Path to

Words: 1887 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57704897



Excerpts and links to written works:

Finally, brief excerpts from a representative sampling of the author's written works is provided below, with the complete work being available through the links provided.

1. Peoples' Control: "The Brooklyn Daily Eagle July 29, 1900, article 'Points-of-View' discuses elements that can be better understood from the perspective of "Panopticism." People living contemporary to the article were apparently devoted to restructuring society and shaping it as they considered being best for themselves and for the community as a whole. . . ."

In the essay, "Peoples' Control," I write in part that, "I have tried my best to [curb] this anxiety, to feel more comfortable in my position of surveillance." This project was written using resource materials found on a site that is powered by turnitin.com called writecheck.turnitin.com. After completing this project, I ran it through this web site in the hopes of avoiding any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"America's Best To Become California's Finest." (2011). California Highway Patrol. [Online].

Available: http://www.chp.ca.gov/recruiting/military.html.

"Become a California Highway Patrol Officer." (2011). California Highway Patrol. [Online].

Available: http://www.chp.ca.gov/recruiting/officer.html.
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Women's and Gender Studies

Words: 3367 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70447437

omen and Gender Studies

Of all the technologies and cultural phenomena human beings have created, language, and particularly writing, is arguably the most powerful, because it is the means by which all human experience is expressed and ordered. As such, controlling who is allowed to write, and in a modern context, be published, is one of the most effective means of controlling society. This fact was painfully clear to women writers throughout history because women were frequently prohibited from receiving the same education as men, and as the struggle for gender equality began to read a critical mass near the end of the nineteenth century, control over women's access to education and writing became a central theme in a number of authors' works, whether they considered themselves feminists or not. In particular, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's 1892 story The Yellow allpaper features this theme prominently, and Virginia oolf's extended essay A…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bak, John S. "Escaping the Jaundiced Eye: Foucauldian Panopticism in Charlotte Perkins

Gilmans "the Yellow Wallpaper." Studies in Short Fiction 31.1 (1994): 39-.

Carstens, Lisa. "Unbecoming Women: Sex Reversal in the Scientific Discourse on Female

Deviance in Britain, 1880-1920." Journal of the History of Sexuality 20.1 (2011):
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Cultural Phenomenon of Stranger Things

Words: 1244 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75368361

Stranger Things is a television show on Netflix that recounts the story of a missing boy, a frantic mother, and three friends looking for an answer. The show is a pastiche of popular 80's movies and television shows that featured monsters like E.T. and telekinetic children like Charlie in Firestarter. While the show does not hit on anything original, it does manage to hit a nerve among fans and has swept the nation with its sweet whispers of nostalgia. The show perhaps invites people to reach for their own ideologies in life vicariously through the main characters. Althusser discusses ideologies in his piece, "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses" and Bell Hooks examines desire and resistance in "Eating the Other: Desire and Resistance" that can point towards a better understanding of such a fast-growing cultural phenomenon.

Althusser defines ideologies from a traditional standpoint as 'world outlooks. However, Althusser admits they do…… [Read More]

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Post Feminism and Hip Hop

Words: 1285 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85128289

Carnal teachings: raunch aesthetics as queer feminist pedagogies in Yo! Majesty's hip hop practice" by Jilian Hernandez, the essay explores the concept of 'raunch aesthetics' in the video for the song, "Don't Let Go." Hernandez also explore the notions of community cultural capital, color blind/new racism, and postfeminism through the performance of the women in the video. Hernandez's interpretation of queer and feminist teachings via these four concepts and through the music video provides a unique look, into analysis of text and visuals to gather and form ideas and theory.

The first concept to analyze is 'raunch aesthetics'. A term see in feminist theory, 'raunch aesthetics' describes the women in hip hop and the various ways they express sexuality via staging, choreography, and performance of lyrics. Women in hip hop that participate in 'raunch aesthetics' are thought to attempt to own their sexual identities as well as their bodies by…… [Read More]

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Failing the Bechdel Test

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76947755

There are numerous reasons why so many movies fail the Bechdel test. Most of these reasons directly correspond to the exact nature of this assessment, and what it reveals about society. Still others of these reasons pertain to the function of films within society. For the most part, they are used to reinforce societal values and mores. To a lesser extent, this medium is also widely deployed as a means of introducing new societal norms which will one day become part of the social establishment. Finally, still other reasons directly correlate to the notion of gender and gender constructs in Westernization today. A thorough examination of these different reasons reveals so many movies fail the Bechdel test because they reflect the values of a male-dominated society.

In examining the specific way in which this this thesis applies to some of the theorists analyzed within this class, it is first necessary…… [Read More]