Paradise Lost Essays (Examples)

View Full Essay

Paradise Book

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76669062

Paradise Lost Book I

Explain why Satan and his crew are cast out of Heaven.

Milton identifies the reason why Satan and the other angels are cast from Heaven at line 36: "Pride." In Milton's account here, apparently Satan's pride assembled a "host of rebel angels" because he was, with their help, "aspiring / to set himself in glory above his peers" and thus Satan "trusted to have equal'd the most high" if he had been victorious (lines 37-40). For a being (such as Satan) created by a perfect God to "trust" to "equal" that perfect God cannot be ascribed to any motive other than stupidity or hubris, and Milton's Satan does not seem stupid. In fact, Milton's grammar seems to make a gesture in the direction of gratifying the Satanic hubris, as the poem states "Pride / had cast him out of heaven," rather than God. The ambiguity of…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Paradaise Lost Satan's Argument to Eve Possesses

Words: 1084 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62832051

Paradaise Lost, Satan's argument to Eve possesses several fallacies. According to Laura Skye: "Satan's speeches are indeed rhetorical masterpieces that confuse and twist as much as his serpentine actions" (Slye 1). Satan does a wonderful job, up until the end of his speech, making his argument sound logical. However, he uses persuasive speech, flattery, and lies in order to convince her -- all fallacies of an argument.

Initially, Satan's actions with Eve involve little effort to convince her that he is not any evil demon that Adam told her to expect on her voyage. Of course, this is an example of one of Satan's fallacies, because he is lying -- of course he is evil; he's Satan, after all. The second type of fallacy he uses is flattery in order to gain her attention and trust, an essential objective if he was willing to destroy mankind (p. 248-249 lines 540-548):…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Thoughts in Captivity. Internet. Available Online.  http://www.ebonmusings.org/atheism/thoughts.html .

Skye, Laura. Paradise Lost Novel Notes. Internet. Available Online. http://navisite.collegeclub.com/servlet/novelnotes.SummaryServlet?note=paradiselost
View Full Essay

Decisions in Paradise III With Paretto Analysis

Words: 1665 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86046902

Decisions in Paradise III With Paretto Analysis

Decisions in Paradise II

Cesar a ivera

oy Chuang

Decisions in Paradise II

This is Nik's problem

Nik has landed on Kava an island that is faced with numerous challenges including tidal waves/tsunami; typhoons/hurricanes; tornadoes; floods; fires; volcanic eruptions; earthquakes; HIV / AIDS; petroleum spill; high risk for avian flu; and terrorism, and has been asked to helped establish a business there. Aside from the above problems that impact the potential business, other challenges include the location and site being a mess; H procedures being chaotic, disrupted and confused organizational structure; and conflicting and conflicted workforce due to diverse composition, beliefs, attitudes, and ideologies. Employees in the past, the wrong mix and too many, barely stayed and so business management and environment became increasingly chaotic.

Nik's tasks, according to Alex, consist of establishing a greater presence in Kava. Ways of establishing that presence…… [Read More]

References

Decision Making Styles." Leadership Management. Leadership Management

Development Center, Inc., 1997. Web. 6 Jun 2011.

"Introduction Human Resources Applies to Any Size of Organization." Library's Human

Resources Blog. Free Management Library, 2010. Web. 6 Jun 2011.
View Full Essay

Lost in Translation This Story Is a

Words: 1842 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87611846

Lost in Translation

This story is a typical immigrant success tale. It is a rich and an ambiguous story with the first section of the narrative representing, "Paradise," and revolves around Hoffman's childhood and adolescence in Cracow. The most prominent image in Eva Hoffman's mind during her family's immigration to Canada was the crowd gathered at the shore to see the ship off. She was thirteen years old and left Gdynia, Poland together with her father, mother, and younger sister. To her the crowd at the shore waving at them as the ship drifted away, was symbolic, it meant the end of everything she knew. Deep inside her there was sorrow and pain, she never wanted to leave Poland. As they journey on, her memory is filled with the loss she has suffered, Cracow a place she loved just as one would love a person. Her mind wonders around the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldwin, James. "Stranger in the Village." Press, Beacon. Notes of A Native Son. Beacon Press, 1955 .

Hoffman, Eva. "Lost In Translation." Ed." Robert, DiYanni and Pat C. Hoy . Occassions for Writing: Evidence. Boston: Thomson, 2008. 176-77.

Nomaday, Scott. The Way to Rainy Mountain . UNM Press, 1976.
View Full Essay

Paradise and Power Robert Kagan

Words: 1791 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6507685

Nobelprize.org). Pinter went on:

"The crimes of the U.S. have been systematic, constant, vicious, remorseless -- not to mention very effective. You have to hand it to America," Pinter explained, "It has exercised a quite clinical manipulation of power worldwide while masquerading as a force for universal good" (Pinter, 2005). He added, cryptically, "It's a brilliant, even witty, highly successful act of hypnosis."

Conclusion

The timing of his book (2003) prevents Kagan from realizing that his narrative on page 88 is incorrect. "There is little cause to believe that the United States will…begin to conduct itself in the world in a fundamentally different manner" than Bush did. Indeed, President Obama has already charted a more democratic course and has reached out to some of the cultures (namely Islam) that Bush relentlessly and ruthlessly attacked with words and bullets. I would enjoy seeing an updated version of Kagan's book, and see…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Delahunty, Robert J., and Yoo, John. 2009. The Bush doctrine: Can Preventative War

be Justified? Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy, 32 (3), 843-855.

Dunn, David Hastings. 2006. A Doctrine Worthy of the Name?: George W. Bush and The Limits

of Pre-Emption, Pre-Eminence, and Unilateralism. Diplomacy and Statecraft, Vol. 17,
View Full Essay

Lost Mountain' and Look at What the

Words: 3690 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13162945

Lost Mountain' and look at what the writer say about coal mining and its overall effects to the overall environment and the entire human race. It will first analyze the problem at hand both from the political side and other actors involved in the coal mining on mountain tops. In addition to that the study will go ahead to see the varying criticism and proponents views on the issue and particularly on what the author of the book takes on the issue. According to Reece, the author of the book, the problem of coal miming on mountaintops has a political twist which makes it difficult to solve or work on its solution.

Lost mountain is a book by Reece Erik that has been eloquently been written and quite moving with the main agenda concentrating on the issue of cold mining at the mountain tops. Reece is mainly against the practice…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Reece E. (2006) Lost Mountain: A year in the Vanishing Wilderness: Radical Strip Mining and the Devastation of Appalachia, Riverhead Books Publishers

Lasswell H. (2007) American Political Scientist
View Full Essay

Working Decisions Paradise Business Scenario Build Assignment

Words: 1153 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95249219

working Decisions Paradise Business Scenario build assignment Weeks Three Four began development a response scenario. For Decisions Paradise, Part III complete items: ead Decisions Paradise Business Scenario.

Decisions in Paradise Business

The scope of the company at this stage is that of increasing its presence on Kava. The means to attaining this objective are complex and challenging and they as such require a comprehensive plan for implementation. Specifically, the expansion onto the new market is represented by sustained efforts to increase the customer base through the simultaneous reach of new customers, as well as the generation of more sales among the current customer base, through the more intense promotion of the company's offer. The implementation of such an effort would be represented by the gradual completion of the following stages:

Analysis of the already existent customer base in an effort to better understand customer behavior and consumption patterns.

2. Identification…… [Read More]

References:

Knorr, A., Arndt, A., 2003, Why did Wal-Mart fail in Germany? Institute for World Economics and International Management,  http://www.iwim.uni-bremen.de/publikationen/pdf/w024.pdf  last accessed on July 25, 2011

Ansoff's product / market matrix, Tutor2U,  http://tutor2u.net/business/strategy/ansoff_matrix.htm  last accessed on July 25, 2011
View Full Essay

Eve as Society in Milton's

Words: 912 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80158926

At the Tree of Knowledge, in a last impassioned speech designed (successfully to convince Eve to taste the fruit, Satan (in the guise of the serpent) extols the virtues of the fruit in high apostrophe: "O Sacred, Wise, and Wisdom-giving Plant, / Mother of Science" (Paradise Lost 9 679-80). This is a clear indication of what the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge represented, both to Eve in Milton's tale and to the seventeenth century readers of Milton's telling. That is, Milton quite purposefully equated knowledge with science, and not just the moral knowledge of good and evil that is explicitly referenced in the Bible, and later on in Milton's own version of the tale. Paradise Lost is not meant to simply be a modern retelling of the story of Adam and Eve, the casting out of Satan and the other fallen angels, and other portions of the Christian mythology.…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Milton and Shakespeare

Words: 2432 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81577742

Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" with Milton's "Paradise Lost"

Comparison of the two works:

Shakespeare's Twelfth Night and Milton's Paradise Lost are two examples of great works that seemingly have little in common. The differences in subject, approach, language and style contrast greatly but these works also share many common themes. Although Twelfth Night is a romantic comedic work and Paradise Lost is an epic poem that deals with a much heavier subject matter, both present the reader with stories of the consequences when there is a disruption in world order and balance while incorporating elements of disguise and character consequences.

Shakespeare's work is consistent with the witty, bright comedies popular during its time. According to Warren and Wells, these comedies typically included a mixture of dialogue, singing, stage fights, and suspense and the nature of the lighthearted language used was commonplace during the early 1600's (1994). Additionally, critic en Johnson said…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Bloom, H. (ed.) (1987). John Milton's Paradise Lost. New York: Chelsea House Publsihers.

Corns, T. (1998). John Milton: The Prose Works. New York: Twayne Publishers.

Elledge, S. (1993). John Milton's Paradise Lost: An Authoritative Text Backgrounds and Sources of Criticism. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Notkoff, T. (2001). Readings on Twelfth Night. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press
View Full Essay

Universally Accepted as One of the World's

Words: 2036 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13997941

Universally accepted as one of the world's foremost epics, John Milton's Paradise Lost traces the history of the world from a Christian perspective. (Milton, 1667) The narrative of the poem largely deals with falling and how desires -- God, Satan, Jesus, Adam and Eve's -- lead to it. The book is about mankind's fall -- Original Sin -- Adam and Eve's disobedience of God. There are other instances of falling in the plot too. First, Satan's fall from God's graces, as related to Adam and Eve by the angel Raphael, represents the past in the Universe's creation. The second instance -- the present (in the narrative) -- is the Adam and Eve's eating of the Forbidden Fruit. The third instance represents the future. Michael, as he readies to escort Adam and Eve out of Paradise, presents to them the various falls of man until Jesus comes to rescue by dying…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bendz, Fredrik. Proof That There Is No God. 1998. Fredrik Bendz. Available. December 27, 2002.  http://www.update.uu.se/~fbendz/nogod/no_god.htm 

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. The Poetical Works of John Milton. Vol. I and II. Boston R.H. Hinkley Company, 1667.

Wigglesworth, Michael. Day of Doom. The Poems of Michael Wigglesworth. Ed. Roland Basco. New York: University Press of America, 1662.

Paintings:
View Full Essay

Account Studying the Characters of Adam and

Words: 1748 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39306605

Account

Studying the characters of Adam and Samson reveals that they have many things in common but it seems totally out of place to compare them with Jesus. Adam and Samson typify men who are on a godward journey while Jesus is the way and also the end of the road.

John Milton the poetic legend of the seventeenth century is well-known for his deep belief in providence and divine judgement. His puritanical sentiments are echoed in most of his poems. His sheer belief in divine ordinance is reflected in his works like "On his Blindness," "Paradise lost" and the tragic poem "Samson Agonistes." In all these poems we see a peculiar pattern wherein Milton projects his own beliefs through the characters. In these poems there is a gradual transition wherein the troubled conscience finally finds tranquility and deliverance by divine grace. Particularly Milton's Paradise lost and "Samson Agonistes" have…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Fall to Spring's Sprouting The

Words: 3355 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39314195



The Aeneid

Taking a character from The Iliad and setting him on his own journey, the Roman Virgil's epic The Aeneid necessarily contains certain parallels with the earlier Greek text. The overall story of this lengthy poem in and of itself reflects many of the same basic understandings of mankind's place in the universe, its relationship to the gods, and the relationships that exist within society and between men that are already described above, demonstrating that no real fundamental change has occurred in this schema. Aeneas, the titular hero of the tale who flees his native Troy after it is sacked by the Greeks, is as important as the individual heroes of the war itself, but more than a tale of individual heroism The Aeneid is the story of the founding of a people and the long trajectory of history and humanity. It is a tale for and in many…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Power Is Depicted in William Shakespeare's King

Words: 772 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47357493

power is depicted in William Shakespeare's "King Lear," Book I of John Milton's "Paradise Lost" and Francis Bacon's "Of Plantations" and "The Idols" from his "Novum Organum."

Shakespeare's depiction of power in King Lear shows how cunning, ruthless people come to gain political power at the expense of those that show qualities that one would desire in a leader: nobility, honesty and integrity. Shakespeare's key focus is the transition of power from one king or leader to his progeny. In King Lear, the title role decides to abdicate the throne and divide his kingdom equally between his three daughters: Goneril, Regan and Cordelia. Whereas the first two flatter him, Cordelia is honest and is ultimately punished for it: she loses her inheritance. In another part of the story, two brothers fight for control of a dukedom.

Here Shakespeare illustrates a contradiction between well-meaning, honest people and manipulative, power-hungry people. One…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Yin and Yang in Literary Relationships Yin

Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38018024

Yin and Yang in Literary Relationships

Yin and Yang in eastern philosophy constitute two parts of a whole. The one cannot exist without the other. They also represent perfect balance; if one dominates, the balance is disturbed and there is conflict. This idea can be applied to several literary relationships, including Adam and Eve from Milton's Paradise Lost and Gilgamesh and Enkidu from the epic Gilgamesh.

Adam and Eve

The Biblical Adam and Eve begin their lives in perfect wholeness and bliss. God makes them equal, they share everything and they lack nothing. Their love binds them in complete unity and balance. They are also bound together by their obedience and love for God.

The imbalance comes with the arrival of the snake. The snake tempts Eve away from what she knows is right. When she tempts Adam, there is an imbalance between the two of them and Adam attempts…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Samuel Johnson Marks Himself as a Man

Words: 1944 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6087925

Samuel Johnson marks himself as a man of keen sensitivity when he acknowledges in his review of Shakespeare's King Lear that he was "so shocked by Cordelia's death, that I know not whether I ever endured to read again the last scenes of the play till I undertook to revise them as an editor" (1765). This may seem like a fair assessment from the man who gave the English language of the first and greatest and wittiest dictionaries of all time; but upon a second examination, it may perhaps reveal something about Johnson and his age that is so foreign to the ideas which Shakespeare presented in King Lear that he could do nothing but recoil in horror. Johnson was, after all, an Anglican -- of the Church that persecuted Campion (Jesuit priest) and Lyne (the woman martyred for harboring Catholic priests during the Protestant takeover and memorialized in Shakespeare's…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Literature Poetry

Words: 1192 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72206274

ERASED BEFORE YOU TURN IT IN!!!

Volpone by Ben Jonson

Act I, Scene 1, Lines 30-39: This is at the start of the play when we learn about what kind of man Volpone is. This particular passage, being spoken by him, is referring to his money -- he is speaking of how he enjoys the chase of the money more than the actually having it. The play is centered on how Volpone is faking a fatal illness that has caused some greedy people to become "butt-kissers" in order to become his sole heir. Again, it is more fun for Volpone to play tricks on people. In this particular passage he is referring to how he gets his money -- he doesn't actually work for it, nor does he share it, nor does he keep it in a public bank. Mosca is his servant, whom has joined him in his trickery.…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Monstrosity in Frankenstein Mary Shelly's Frankenstein Or

Words: 1252 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22864437

Monstrosity in Frankenstein

Mary Shelly's Frankenstein; Or, the Modern Prometheus, which is considered by many to be one of the first science-fiction novels that was ever written, is full of anti-Enlightenment sentiments, many of which are still present in society today. Shelley's novel, published first in 1818 and then edited and republished in 1831, takes a look at the conflicts between science and religion. Through this examination, Shelley provides insight into the dangers of playing God and taking the forces of nature into one's own hands. Seeing as Mary Shelley was the daughter of two well-known Enlightenment intellectual figures, it can be posited that Shelley understood the arguments and beliefs of the movement and could provide a well thought out argument against the movement. Shelley's anti-Enlightenment stance takes a look at the dangers that may arise through unsupervised educational pursuits, which include the unharnessed exploration of science and denunciation or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kant, Immanuel. Was ist Aufklarung? Modern History Sourcebook. Fordham University.

Web. 3 May 2012.

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Project Gutenberg. Web. 3 May
View Full Essay

What Happens in the Middle of Frankenstein

Words: 778 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9664825

monster recalls his "birth," and tells Victor about how he learned to survive out in the world. His recollections are touched with innocence but also with something of that which is fallen in human nature. As he meets people, he finds that they all run away from him because of his ugliness. He finds a shack and spies on its occupants.

The occupants of this shack are not very happy: they are a young man and woman and an elderly man. They are poor like the monster, who is contributing to their problems by taking their food. The monster has a conscience, feels sorry for making their condition worse, and tries to improve it by bringing them firewood. From them he learns how to speak by mimicking the sounds they make. He also admires their grace and form while being shocked at the sight of his own misshapen nature.

When…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Love and Creation in Frankenstein

Words: 1374 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22820645

Creation ithout Love: The Problem of Frankenstein

In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Dr. Frankenstein assumes the role of God by attempting to create new life. He is not, however, prepared for the consequences, and the outward hideousness of his creation compels him to reject the monster. Inwardly, Frankenstein's monster possesses a soul and longs for love and learning. The fact that he must seek both surreptitiously (and is yet still rejected) compels him to lash out -- both at society and at his creator. Along the way, the monster identifies with Milton's Satan -- another creature who lashed out at his creator after feeling spurned. This paper will show how Frankenstein's monster feels rejected by "god" (both the actual God of creation and also Frankenstein in the role of creator-god for the Creature) and how this leads to tragic consequences -- namely, both Frankenstein's and the monster's eventual isolation and death…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. Poetry Foundation. Web.

 https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poems/detail/45718 

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. UK: Oxford University Press, 2008. Print.
View Full Essay

Poisoning Our Planet if it

Words: 8834 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68794962

From the point-of-view of the variation and flexibility of the species such cultivated woody crops rank as no more than cornfields. While the tree farms are conveniently be stretched on the private lands, national forests those are considered priceless reservoirs of most of the biological diversity of the nation cannot expand so easily. The commercial logging is considered as the greatest danger for survival of the national forest system. The timber sales are growingly concealed beneath the post fire recovery and fire prevention missions, forest health initiatives and restoration programs. (Endangered Forests: Endangered Freedoms)

Wetlands disappearing

Declining wetlands and reservoir construction are having spectacular influences on a global scale. (the Importance of Wetlands and the Impacts of eservoir Development) the data of USF & WS reveals that the United States added 2.3 million acres in ponds and inland mudflats during the period of mid 1950s and mid1970s. The country added…… [Read More]

References

Acid Rain -- a Contemporary World Problem. Retrieved at http://www.geocities.com/narilily/acidrain.html. Accessed on 3 February, 2005

Acid Rain: Do you need to start wearing a rain hat? Retrieved at  http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/acidrain.html . Accessed on 3 February, 2005

Barney, Gerald O. The Whole World in Our Hands. SF Chronicle. 31 December, 2000. Retrieved at http://www.mindfully.org/Sustainability/in-Our-Hands.htm. Accessed on 3 February, 2005

Bryant, Peter J. Biodiversity and Conservation: A Hypertext Book. Retrieved at http://darwin.bio.uci.edu/~sustain/bio65/lec05/b65lec05.htm. Accessed on 3 February, 2005
View Full Essay

Cloistered Virtue and Democratic Freedom Role of Education for American Christianity

Words: 3540 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47583214

philosophy of education through a historical and then through an explicitly Christian lens, with a focus on the political role of education, and the Christian philosophy of John Milton. Milton's 1644 works Areopagitica and Of Education are invoked to justify the true Christian purpose of education as being exposure to the sort of free expression and free exchange of ideas that are guaranteed in America under the First Amendment.

What would a true Christian philosophy of education look like? The answer might actually be surprising to the majority of Americans who identify themselves as Christian and seek a Christian education. In 2014, frequently Christian education can seem retrograde, a form of ressentiment and indoctrination that derides Darwinism and has a greater interest in upholding a political consensus than in embodying the ideals set forth by Christ Himself. I propose to examine a Christian philosophy of education through a somewhat unique…… [Read More]

References

Fish, S. (1971) Surprised by sin: The reader in Paradise Lost. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Gaustad, E.S. (2005). Roger Williams. New York: Oxford University Press.

Gutek, G.L. (2011). Historical and philosophical foundations of education: A Biographical introduction (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.

Jefferson, T. (1778) A bill for the more general diffusion of knowledge. Retrieved from  http://candst.tripod.com/jefflaw1.htm
View Full Essay

How Bronte and Shelley Develop the Theme of Abandonment in Their Novels

Words: 2509 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63849391

Abandonment in Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre: a Comparison

Abandonment is a substantial theme in literature written by women. It appears in the poems of Emily Dickinson, in the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, and in the novels of the Bronte sisters -- uthering Heights and Jane Eyre. It is not a theme that is only addressed by women in literature, to be sure, but it is one that seems to be utilized most evocatively by them. This paper will provide a comparative analysis of two literary sources -- Shelley's Frankenstein and Bronte's Jane Eyre -- to show how abandonment can cause depression, deep emotions and despair, but how it can also open up new doors for an individual; it will show how unprofitable it can be and yet how beneficial to one's life it can also prove in the long run.

Jane Eyre is a romantic-gothic novel by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bronte, Charlotte. Jane Eyre. London: J. M. Dent, 1905. Print.

Linker, Damon. "Terrence Malick's profoundly Christian vision." The Week, 2016.

Web. 2 Apr 2016.

Macdonald, D. L.; Scherf, Kathleen, eds. Frankenstein: The 1818 version. NY:
View Full Essay

Man vs God in Frankenstein

Words: 1636 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90238754

Introduction

Victor and his creature are opposing forces that struggle because of their conflicts throughout Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein. Conflict is the dominant theme of the novel—one that Mary Shelley herself experienced in her own life, being married to the romantic poet Percy Byshe Shelley, who struggled with his own romantic ideas just as Victor Frankenstein struggles with his vain desire to be a Creator in Frankenstein. While Victor Frankenstein does become a Creator, he accomplishes his task ironically because he is a creator of the monster (which becomes of a monster because of Victor’s own incapacity to love him). True, the monster comes into life looking hideous—but that is because he had an uncaring creator; the monster is actually very thoughtful and desires to love and be loved. He attempts to make friends but finds that he is rebuked for his ugliness and driven away into isolation. He then…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Jesus' Teachings Prayer & Christian Life He

Words: 35411 Length: 109 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95862373

Jesus' Teachings, Prayer, & Christian Life

"He (Jesus) Took the Bread. Giving Thanks Broke it. And gave it to his Disciples, saying, 'This is my Body, which is given to you.'" At Elevation time, during Catholic Mass, the priest establishes a mandate for Christian Living. Historically, at the Last Supper, Christ used bread and wine as a supreme metaphor for the rest of our lives. Jesus was in turmoil. He was aware of what was about to befall him -- namely, suffering and death. This was the last major lesson he would teach before his arrest following Judas' betrayal. Eschatologically speaking, the above set the stage for the Christian ministry of the apostles, evangelists and priests. Indeed, every Christian is called to give of him or herself for the Glory of God and the Glory of Mankind. The message at the Last Supper was powerful. People have put themselves through…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Devil's Advocate Seeks to Demonstrate

Words: 744 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83876626

Lomax can be interpreted to mean the highest of the low and possibly hints at his place within Satan's hierarchy as he is Satan's son. Mary Ann's name, on the other hand, seems to allude to Mary the mother of Jesus or Mary Magdalene; by naming the character Mary, the author insinuates that she is innocent in the entire affair. Most importantly is John Milton. This is clearly a reference to the author of Paradise Lost. The epic poem seeks to "justify the ways of God to men" by analyzing how Adam and Eve were tempted and why they were expelled from the Garden of Eden (Milton 1.26). Moreover, the epic poem also makes an argument for free will, a concept that Milton, the character, exploits.

One of the central themes within the story is that everything is a test. This sets up the argument that there are several conflicts…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The Devil's Advocate. Dir. Taylor Hackford. United States: Warner Brothers, 1997. Film.

The King James Bible. Web. 27 April 2012.

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. Web. 27 April 2012.
View Full Essay

Sophocles & Milton Sophocles Wrote His Great

Words: 2170 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18088183

Sophocles & Milton

Sophocles wrote his great works two and a half millennia ago, and yet today they are still fresh and powerful. This is because Sophocles deals with deep and important human situations and emotions. Even though we can no longer imagine what it would be like to live in the world which Sophocles inhabits, we can completely understand his characters because they are fully human and human nature does not change much over time. Though he writes about kings and queens and the wealthy of Greece, his characters have the sense of being representatives of every man and woman, in every era. His characters struggle with pride and with sin and with accepting the will of the gods -- when they do things they should not do, in the end they are punished, and accept this punishment. This gives them a greater morality than sinners who are portrayed…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. Project Gutenberg. ftp://ftp.knowledge.com/pub/mirrors/gutenberg/etext91/plboss10.txt

Sophocles. Oedipus the King. Trans. F. Storr. Internet Classics.  http://classics.mit.edu/Sophocles/oedipus.pl.txt
View Full Essay

Is a Prophet Always Inspired

Words: 2424 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8741897

role of a prophet in society has often been questioned and misunderstood. Prophets are often seen as peculiar people who receive divine inspiration. The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether a prophet is always inspired. We will begin our discussion by defining prophetic inspiration and the function of a prophet. Our discussion will then focus on how to distinguish between prophecy that is inspired and prophecy that is uninspired.

Prophetic Inspiration

The prime examples of prophetic inspiration can be found in the bible. According to a book entitled Inspiration and Revelation in the Old Testament, it is very difficult to explain the function of the Hebrew prophet. The book asserts that this difficulty exist because the function of the prophet is beyond that of human experience and is characterized by philosophical and religious assumptions. (Robinson) The author also asserts that 'The Hebrew prophets have so greatly influenced religion…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Camille, Michael. "Prophets, Canons and Promising Monsters." The Art Bulletin 78.2 (1996): 198+. Questia. 5 Aug. 2004 .

Cohon, Beryl D. The Prophets: Their Personalities and Teachings. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1939.

Engammare, Max. "Calvin: A Prophet Without a Prophecy." Church History 67.4 (1998): 643-661.

Erler, Mary C. "Palm Sunday Prophets and Processions and Eucharistic Controversy." Renaissance Quarterly 48.1 (1995): 58+. Questia. 5 Aug. 2004 .
View Full Essay

Female Elements in Their Eyes

Words: 4960 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39982417

This renunciation, depending on one's perspective, represents either a willful act of sacrifice or a selfish act of disobedience. Sandra Pouchet Paquet, however, frames this problematic deed in neutral terms in her analysis of the text, which focuses on its ambivalence toward the role of ancestral knowledge in identity formation. Paquet (2009) asserts that Janie "repudiates the values of her surrogate parents in her conscious quest for selfhood" (p.501). She also suggests that ancestral knowledge operates merely as a means to "psychic wholeness" in the novels and argues that the text is successful in exploring "the divorce from ancestral roots that accompanies conventional notions of success" (p. 500) Indeed, this tension between ancestral knowledge and individualistic goals is why Janie has to grapple with interpreting the nature of the knowledge imparted in her moments of coming to consciousness. Specifically, she wants to interpret the mystery conferred to her through the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jones, Sharon L. A Critical Companion to Zora Neale Hurston: A Literary Reference to her Life and Work (New York: Facts on File, 2009)

Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God. 1937. New York: Perennial Classics, 1998. Print.

Morrison, Toni. "Intimate Things in Place': A Conversation with Toni Morrison." The Massachusetts Review. By Robert Stepto. 18.3 (1977): 473-89. JSTOR. Web. 9 December 2009.

Ramsey, William M. "The Compelling Ambivalence of Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God." The Southern Literary Journal. 27.1 (1994): 36-50. JSTOR. Web. 26 October 2010.
View Full Essay

Eye Opening Experience the Rime

Words: 1842 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50528583

Apart from taking an authoritative role in the Symposium, many people consider her to be behind the doubts of her existence. She passes her wisdom to Socrates who in turn passes it to his many friends. She distinguishes the difference that existed between good and beautiful in the context of love. She emphasizes the significance of the object of love even in beauty and birth.

Duchess of Malfi by John Webster

The story presents a penetration of the surface of the anarchy of life that does not guarantee a divine moral pattern. Instead, the outcome is a cycle of terror. The Duchess are yet to conquer the horror to realize spiritual victory. My first encounters with the book Duchess of Malfi was through the course CL/EN2051: English Literature Before 1800. The Duchess of Malfi takes place during the 16th Century at the Duchess' palace in Italy. Ferdinand and the Cardinal…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Monstrous Natures in Frankenstein and

Words: 1330 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59805936

Though the Monster tries to refrain from interfering; "hat chiefly struck me was the gentle manners of these people, and I longed to join them, but dared not…[remembering] too well the treatment I had suffered the night before from the barbarous villagers" (142). The Monster learns how society behaves through the observation of the family, and through the reading of books. Much like Frankenstein, the Monster is greatly influenced by what he reads including Plutarch's Lives, Sorrow of erter, and Paradise Lost. The Monster's innocence and ignorance, at this point, does not allow him to fully understand or relate to any of the characters in the books (166). The Monster eventually relates to Adam in Paradise Lost, not considering himself a monster, because even "Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage him" (169). As Adam was created in God's own image, the Monster is a "filthy type…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus. Project Gutenberg. Web. Retrieved

from  http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/84 .

Stoker, Bram. The Annotated Dracula. Ed. Leonard Wolf and Satty. Ballantine Books, New

York: 1975. Print.
View Full Essay

Harold Bloom on Shelley's Frankenstein

Words: 819 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64379940

Bloom claims that Victor was a "moral idiot" (Bloom) when he shirked his responsibilities. Victor's actions reveal that he is a completely selfish individual, incapable of being aware of anyone else's existence. The monster undergoes a radical transformation in the novel, from a being with no sense to a being completely aware of himself. He is more aware of himself than Victor could ever be and this allows the reader to identify with him on a more personal level. It is his sense of self that makes him human and Victor's selfishness that makes him seem inhuman. The irony is what brings Bloom back to the Romantic mythology of self.

Bloom successfully proves his points in this essay. He could have used more quotations from the text itself but the essay is strong enough without them. Bloom's examination of the novel in the broader spectrum of the Romantic Movement is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. "An Excerpt From a Study of Frankenstein: or, The New Prometheus." Partisan

Review. XXXII. 4. 1965.

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. The English Poems of John Milton. London: Oxford University

Press. 1926.
View Full Essay

American Literature Native American and Poetry

Words: 1643 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10850956

Symbolism in "The Origin of Stories"

In "The Origin of All Stories" we can see an example of the importance that the Seneca -- a Native American tribe -- placed in their oral tradition, stories, as well as symbolism. Symbolism, especially, figures prominently in "The Origin of All Stories." It is the figurative device through which this story impresses upon readers the importance of storytelling to the Seneca people. Literally, storytelling formed the basis of the sense of history that the Seneca possessed. ithout it, vital cultural information could not have been passed down from generation to generation. The purpose of this essay is to examine some of the usage of symbolism in "The Origin of All Stories" and detail how those examples of symbolism demonstrate the centrality of the oral tradition to the Seneca people.

To begin, I should make it clear what it means that the Seneca had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lauter, Paul (Ed.). The Heath Anthology of American Literature Volume A: Colonial Period to 1800. 5th ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2005.
View Full Essay

Doubling in Frankenstein Mary Shelley's

Words: 1723 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14594401



It is through Shelley's doubling between Frankenstein and the Monster, and herself and Frankenstein and the Monster, that Freud's uncanny and psychological concepts of the id, ego, and superego can be analyzed. Shelley demonstrates how an individual's outward appearance is not necessarily representative of their character and at the same time is able to come to terms with the psychological traumas that plagued her -- from losing her own mother at childbirth to losing her own children shortly thereafter. Furthermore, Shelley is able to demonstrate how an imbalance between an individual's id, ego, and superego can influence behavior and is also able to demonstrate how each of these is formed, either through instinctual behaviors, observations, and education. Ultimately, Shelley's understanding of the uncanny, and psychological constructs, paved the way for psychologists like Freud to investigate the constructs of fear and unease.

orks Cited

Freud, Sigmund. The Ego and the Id.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Freud, Sigmund. The Ego and the Id. 1923. Web. 2 May 2013.

-. "The Uncanny." 1919. Web. 2 May 2013.

Johnson, Barbara. "My Monster/My Self." Diacritics. Vol. 12. The Johns Hopkins University

Press, 1982, pp. 2-10. JSTOR. 2 May 2013.
View Full Essay

Pope Alexander

Words: 2280 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75700905

Man as a Manifesto of Rationalism

The English Restoration of 1660 delineates a dramatic transition in British literature from writing that is elegant, expressive, and often sentimental to prose and poetry that embraces simple, lucid, classical forms (Evans 203). Additionally, the years after the Restoration saw writers continuing to investigate new regions of the scientific, the philosophical, the political, and the moral. Antecedents of this trend include seventeenth century writers such as Francis Bacon, who pondered always the "nature of truth" (Evans 199), Thomas Hobbes, a political philosopher who asserted that sovereign power is ultimately borrowed from the citizen (McKay, Bennett, and Buckler 552), and John Locke, who contended that all human notions are "derived from experience" (McKay, Bennett, and Buckler 606). Bacon, Hobbes, and Locke foreshadowed and typified the sorts of philosophical texts that would become common during the Enlightenment, works that often expressed the Rationalism of the age.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alexander Pope." The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Sixth Edition, Volume 1. Ed.

M.H. Abrams. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1993. 2212-2216.

Evans, Ifor. A Short History of English Literature. Baltimore: Penguin Books Inc., 1962.

McKay, John P., Bennett D. Hill, and John Buckler. A History of Western Civilization.
View Full Essay

Hawaiian History in From a Native Daughter

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65602444

Hawaiian History

In From a Native Daughter, Haunani-Kay Trask's purpose could not be clearer in that she has written a highly political and ideological work from a left-wing nationalist perspective that denounces the colonization of Hawai'i by the United States. Even more, every word she wrote is absolutely true, even though many whites either do not know this history or do not want to know it. In fact, they might even wish that Trask had written more about the 'positive' or 'beneficial' side of Hawaiian interaction with the U.S. except of course she finds that there has been none. Her entire history is an expression of moral outrage and indignation and what whites have done to the Native people of these islands, to the air, land and water, and to the history and culture of the Hawaiian people. Most tragically, she describes Hawai'i today as a "dying land," crushed by…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Trask, Haunani-Kay. From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawai'i, Revised Edition. University of Hawai'i Press, 1993, 1999.
View Full Essay

Immanuel Wallerstein Was Born in 1930 He

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92013524

Immanuel Wallerstein was born in 1930. he received his BA from Columbia in 1951, his MA in 1954 and his PhD is 1959. He has also received honorary doctoral degrees from place like the university of Paris, The National University in Mexico, and the University of Brussels, just to name a few. He has been published extensively and since 1976, has been a Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Binghamton University (SUNY), and the Director of the Fernand Braudel Center for the Study of Economics, Historical Systems, and Civilizations. His dissertation title was "Road to independence, Ghana and the Ivory Coast." His early interests lied in the strugglers in Africa for independence, however, a look at his published work shows that his focus gradually widened to include social justice worldwide. Utopistics is a short book, only about 90 pages. However, in that short period, he lays out what has happened, what is…… [Read More]

View Full Essay

Summary of Chapters in Oceans End

Words: 653 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94776198

Colin Woodward's book Ocean's End: Travels Through Endangered Seas describes the seas around Belize including those of Caye Caulker. Many of these are tourist areas, but with a low development footprint. As Woodward points out, most people walk and there are no cars anywhere on Caye Caulker. Although the author underestimates the intelligence and geographic awareness of Americans by stating that most of them have "never heard of this little nation," Woodward does do Belize justice in showing that increased rates of tourism to the island are wreaking havoc on the reefs, even though the type of tourism Belize attracts is "ecotourism."

Yet not all is idyllic on this stretch of paradise. As Woodward first points out, Caulker used to have a glut of spiny lobsters, so common that the locals were able to simply coax them ashore using palm fronds (p. 132). Tourism has increased the demand for fresh…… [Read More]

References

NOAA (2015). Coral anatomy and structure. Retrieved online:  http://coralreef.noaa.gov/aboutcorals/coral101/anatomy/ 

Palumbi, et al. (2014). Mechanisms of reef coral resistance to future climate change. Science 344(6186): 895-898

Woodward, C. (2000). Ocean's End. Basic Books.
View Full Essay

Racial Ideology of Latinas

Words: 11967 Length: 44 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57637272



The novel opens seven years after Gabo's mother, Ximena, was murdered by coyotes -- or paid traffickers -- during an attempt to cross the border. Her mutilated body was found, her organs gone -- sold most likely. Because of the fear surrounding this border town and the lure of the other side, all of the characters become consumed with finding afa. These people are neglected and abused. Like other fiction works on this topic (such as Cisneros's The House on Mango Street), The Guardians (2008) is rich in symbolism and flavored with Mexican aphorisms. The novel also shows the reader how complex and perilous border life is when you're living in between the United States and Mexico.

The book is important when attempting to understand the challenge of the border town life and it is, at the same time, a testament to faith, family bonds, cultural pride, and the human…… [Read More]

Reference:

Giroux, Henry A. (2001). Theory and resistance in education (Critical studies in education and culture series). Praeger; Rev Exp edition.

San Juan (2002) states that the racism of sex in the U.S. is another element of the unequal political and economic relations that exist between the races in the American democracy. Women of color may even be conceived as constituting "a different kind of racial formation" (2002), although the violence inflicted against them as well as with familial servitude and social inferiority, testifies more sharply to the sedimented structures of class and national oppression embedded in both state and civil society (2002).

San Juan (2002) goes on to explore the articulations between sexuality and nationalism. "What demands scrutiny is more precisely how the categories of patriarchy and ethnonationalism contour the parameters of discourse about citizen identities" (2002). How the idea of nation is sexualized and how sex is nationalized, according to San Juan (2002), are topics that may give clues as to how racial conflicts are circumscribed within the force field of national self-identification.

Sexuality, San Juan (2002) suggests, unlike racial judgment is not a pure self-evident category. He states that it manifests its semantic and ethical potency in the field of racial and gendered politics. In the layering and sedimentation of beliefs about sexual liberty and national belonging in the United States, one will see ambiguities and disjunctions analogous to those between sexuality and freedom as well as the persistence of racist ideology.
View Full Essay

Whole and Its Parts an Analysis of Characters in Tortilla Flat

Words: 2285 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97432954

Tortilla Flat

CHAACTES IN TOTILLA FLAT

Tortilla Flat" by John Steinbeck was first published in 1935. It is set in the Monterey coast of California. This book features the adventures of a group of men of Mexican-American descent called the paisanos. As California writer and critic Gerald Haslam has noted, "Steinbeck must be recognized for seeing the diversity of the state's population, for writing about the paisanos of Monterey, for example, at a time when the majority of Californians did not acknowledge the importance or even the existence of mixed-blood Mexicans." (Shillinglaw, Susan. "Steinbeck and Ethnicity, 1995)

Thought they are troublesome people they are good at heart and like to help less fortunate people than them. The members of the gang are Danny, Pablo, Jesus Maria, Pilon and Big Joe Portagee.

They are soon joined by another paisano, the Pirate. All these men like to do is to enjoy a…… [Read More]

References (Shillinglaw, Susan. Steinbeck and Ethnicity, 1995) www.questia.com/PM.qst?action=openPageViewer&docId=23148594(DeMott, Robert. Steinbeck's Typewriter: Essays on His Art. Troy, NY: Whitston, 1996). After the Grapes of Wrath: Essays on John Steinbeck in Honor of Tetsumaro Hayashi. Eds. Coers, Donald V., Paul D. Ruffin, and Robert J. Demott. Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1995 (DeMott, Robert. Steinbeck's Typewriter: Essays on His Art. Troy, NY: Whitston, 1996). (John Steinbeck, Tortilla Flat, 1935).

Shillinglaw, Susan, Steinbeck and Ethnicity After the Grapes of Wrath: Essays on John Steinbeck in Honor of Tetsumaro Hayashi, OH: Ohio University Press, 40-55, 1995.) (Walter Neary, Students Drawn to Human Themes of Hope, Equality The Californian, 1992)