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patient centered care in healthcare nursing

Words: 4617 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 92870872

Introduction

Patient-centered care is the goal of many healthcare organizations, but the ability of an organization to deliver patient-centered care is influenced by a number of factors both internal and external. Business practices, regulatory requirements, and reimbursement all can impact patient-centered care in any healthcare organization. Promoting patient-centered care requires an organizational culture committed to this paradigm, which also needs to be embedded in the mission and values of the organization.

Executives and administrators create the organizational culture that promotes patient-centered care. All leaders in the organization are responsible for using patient-centered practices and communications styles in their interactions with patients and their families. Furthermore, administrators oversee the policies and procedures that directly impact the culture of care. Analyzing areas of weakness within the organizational structure and culture via established assessments like the Patient-and Family-Centered Care Organizational Self-Assessment Tool, it is possible to create multidisciplinary teams that promote the organization’s…… [Read More]

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Patient Guide to the Worldwide Web Scenario

Words: 898 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5890068

Patient Guide to the Worldwide Web

Scenario

Mr. Atkins, 64, arrives at the hospital with his wife complaining that he has not had a bowel movement in over a week, and that he has significant pain in his abdomen. Mr. Atkins has an MI which shows a significant blockage in his colon. Surgery is suggested and when this is completed Mr. Atkins is told that he has colon cancer and a mass was removed from his colon along with eight inches of the diseased organ. It is then relayed that the cancer has also metastasized to his liver. The Atkins are farmers who have very little to do with computers other than checking weather reports. They both want to learn about the diagnosis and what can be done, but with their limited knowledge of the internet ask a nurse for help.

The patient is very motivated to learn how to…… [Read More]

References

Johns Hopkins. (n.d.). Colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver. Retrieved from  http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/liver_tumor_center/conditions/cancerous_liver_t  umors/colorectal_liver_metastases.html

Joy, K. (n. d.). Liver metastasis from colon cancer treatments. Retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/about_6618908_liver-metastasis-colon-cancer- treatments.html

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM). (2006). Evaluating web-based health resources. Retrieved from http://nccam.nih.gov/health/webresources
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Patient Guide to the Internet

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 63679863

There is also relevant information for specific sectors of society such as women and seniors. The MedlinePlus Magazine includes several links to asthma information. The bottom of the page includes links that contain information such as disclaimers, copyright, and privacy information. It also contains links that provide information on the contributors of information to the Website. The privacy statement clearly provides visitors and subscribers with the assurance that their information will not be shared. All the information on the site is therefore provided on the basis of full disclosure, both of the information itself and on information providers.

This Website is therefore very reliable, and also includes information on a myriad of other health topics, which will be helpful for Amy if she wants more information on her other conditions as well.

Suspicious Website: http://www.asthmaanswersonline.com/cures-asthma/

This Website indicates that asthma can in fact be cured. Prominently displayed at the top…… [Read More]

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Patient Perceptions of Maternal HIV Testing Ob-Gyn

Words: 771 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 74299762

Patient Perceptions of Maternal HIV Testing

Ob-Gyn Maternal HIV Testing Study

Coleman et. al., (2009) Patient Perceptions of Obstetrician-gynecologists' Practices Related to HIV Testing. Maternal Child Health Journal 13: 355-363.

The study objectives were to identify the percentage of women who had been tested for HIV, explore the perceptions of women patients about HIV testing and ascertain their knowledge about their own HIV risk status, to determine the primary reasons patients refuse to be tested for HIV, and to learn what patients recall about how their obstetrician-gynecologists' introduced the topic of HIV testing.

The authors hypothesized that pregnant women, women seeking preconception care, and women with risk factors for HIV infection would recall their obstetrician-gynecologists recommending HIV testing" (Coleman, et al., 2009)

Overall research goal & recommendation. The purpose of the study was to identify if patient-physician communication about HIV risks and testing to pregnant women is consistent with current…… [Read More]

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Education of Abbasid

Words: 4250 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57391060

Education of Abbasid

Today, the majority of high school students hope to finish college one day. This is a realistic dream for many, as there is an established education system that gives students a choice of career paths and training. The modern world if full of universities and training centers. However, the world was not always like this. Many centuries ago, education was limited to the privileged and even the privileged did not have many opportunities in learning. Today's existing modern educational system has been influenced by traditions of the past, particularly by the great advances that occurred during the Abbasid Dynasty in the Muslim world.

One of the achievements of Muslim culture during the Abbasid Dynasty was the widespread spread of literacy. Elementary education was almost universal, especially in the cities. Emphasis on the value of reading and writing stems from the very first revelations of the Qur'an, which…… [Read More]

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Patient Centered Medical Homes

Words: 964 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73130692

Patient Centered Medical Homes

In the 1960s, the medical home concept referred to as patient centered medical home was developed.In order to reform the healthcare in the U.S.; the patient centered medical homes are evolving as a centerpiece of efforts (Bates, 2010). Basically, PCMH can be defines as a primary care model that offers coordinated and comprehensive care to the patients in order to improve health outcomes. PCMH is also recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA). Patient centered medical homes can be portrayed as a team of people working together in form of a community. The purpose is to improve the health as well as healing of the people in that community. In comparison with the primary care, PCMH is more responsive towards the needs of local patients.

PCMH offers a number of benefits including complementary nutrition as well as wellness counseling along with providing prevention education…… [Read More]

References

Aysola, J., E.J. Orav, and J.Z. Ayanian. 2011. "Neighborhood Characteristics Associated With Access To Patient-Centered Medical Homes For Children." Health Affairs no. 30 (11):2080-2089.

Bates, D.W., and A. Bitton. 2010. "The Future Of Health Information Technology In The Patient-Centered Medical Home." Health Affairs no. 29 (4):614-621.

Nutting, Paul A., William L. Miller, Benjamin F. Crabtree, Carlos Roberto Jaen, Elizabeth E. Stewart, and Kurt C. Stange. 2009. "Initial Lessons From the First National Demonstration Project on Practice Transformation to a Patient-Centered Medical Home." Ann Fam Med no. 7 (3):254-260.
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Patient Mr D Is a 74-Year-Old Male

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27288674

Patient, Mr. D., is a 74-year-old male Caucasian, married and retired. Mr. D. complains of dizziness and weakness. Type-2 diabetes was diagnosed in 1994, hypertension in 2002, and arthritis in 2007. Mr. D. is currently taking 20mg Lipitor/daily; 81 mg Aspirin/daily; 333mg Calcium/daily; 5mg zinc/daily, and 500mg Vitamin C/3X day. He denies any drug or herbal use, and uses 650 mg of Tylenol for pain as needed. He has no known food allergies, does not use tobacco or illicit drugs, but has a family history of diabetes and heart disease with both mother and father. His general health acuity is strong (bowels, urinary, etc.), but has occasional slurred speech, weakness in right lower limb, syncope, vertigo, and vision fluctuations. Mr. D. reports that his wife complains he asks the same question repeatedly within a short time period.

Areas for Focused Assessment- The combination of syncope, vertigo, vision, and memory issues…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Hypoglycemia. (2012). Web MD. Retrieved from:  http://symptoms.webmd.com/#./conditionView 

Ezzo, J., et.al. (2001). Is Massage useful in the Management of Diabetes? Diabetes Spectrum -- The American Diabetes Association. 14 (4): Retrieved from:  http://spectrum.diabetesjournals.org/content/14/4/218.full 

Madden, S., Loeb, S. (2009). An integrative literature review of lifestyle interventions for the prevention of diabetes mellitus. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 17(2), 2243-56.

Polin, B. (2011). Why Water Aerobics is Good Exercise. Diabetic Lifestyle. Retrieved from:  http://www.diabeticlifestyle.com/exercise/why-water-aerobics-good-exercise
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Patient to Nurse Ratio Nursing

Words: 752 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 80166796

Many advocates of the move feel that lower patient to nurse ratio would lead to additional savings because it would reduce nurse turnover rate, lawsuits, complications and length of stay. Nursing unions in the state of California have asked for a PTN ratio of 3 to 1. The health association however agreed on 5 to 1 which sound more reasonable than the originally proposed 10 to 1. (othberg, 2005)

Patient to nurse ratio when it is too high can definitely adversely affect care. And with baby boomers aging and needing healthcare, we know that number of people looking for healthcare will continue to rise in the coming years. However staff shortage continues to pose a serious problem. And unfortunately, the problem doesn't always lie with cost control. While it is true that most of the problems with staff shortage can be attributed to hospitals cutting down their costs and hence…… [Read More]

References

Michael Rothberg, 2005. Improving Nurse-to-Patient Staffing Ratios as a Cost-Effective Safety Intervention Med Care 2007;45: 571-578)

Patricia W. Stone, PhD,* Cathy Mooney-Kane,

Nurse Working Conditions and Patient Safety Outcomes.
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Education Motivational Education My 7th Grade Student

Words: 1106 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3895524

Education

Motivational Education

My 7th grade student, Alice Harding, had problems since the beginning of the year. Not only was she painfully shy and never participated in group work; she also appeared not to be interested in either studying the lessons or doing her homework. Whereas her work in the beginning of the years was promising, it had reached a point where I felt intervention is necessary. Her grades had dropped with nearly 20% since the beginning of the year. I have chosen Alice for this project, because I feel she is a perfectly intelligent girl, who with the right methods can be motivated to perform much better.

I had previously tried several methods to attempt to enhance Alice's feelings of security in the classroom. One of the methods was dividing the class into smaller groups of four, and giving them simple tasks to do. Alice however still failed to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brophy, J. (1998). Motivating Students to Learn. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Brophy, J.E. & C.M. Evertson. (1976). Learning from Teaching: A Developmental Perspective. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, Inc.

Good, T.L. & J. Brophy. (1978). Looking In Classrooms. New York: Harper & Row.

1995). Contemporary Educational Psychology. New York: Longman Publishers, USA.
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Education My Role as a

Words: 705 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 12846172

It threw off the momentum of the class, and I felt I had not stressed timing enough. Several also straggled in after the lunch break, and the people that were on time seemed to resent it. I think if I did the training again, I would simply begin the training on time, and not worry about those who were late, if they missed anything, they would have to cover it on their own.

A also felt that the manual might not have been necessary, that students followed along on their computers and with the Power Point, and the manual may have been overkill. However, at least one student said they were glad they had the instructions in writing so they could refer back to it after they got back to their locations, so perhaps it wasn't such a bad idea, after all. This was the first training I developed, and…… [Read More]

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Education Project Proposal Nursing

Words: 1712 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 41691571

Education Project Proposal (Nursing)

This study is intended to educate the patients (within the age group of 8-12) about the post operative treatment approaches and to prepare them to face the situation. As the main audience is the pediatric patients who have gone trough a kidney transplant, we will focus on the recovery issues with respect to this audience. This study will help these patients to learn about the general issues related to recovery of their wounds, the nutrition they are supposed to adopt during the recovery stage and the physical activity that is expected to be maintained by them. This educational activity is important for the patients because a thorough understanding of the recovery process is very important for the patient.

With an understanding of the process the patient will be able to cooperate with the nursing staff and will more actively participate in the process. From this program,…… [Read More]

References

Barbara A. Nilsen: Week by Week: Plans for Observing and Recording Young Children: Delmar Learning, January 1997

Evelyn A. Petersen: Practical Guide to Early Childhood Planning, Methods and Materials, A: The What, Why and How of Lesson Plans: Allyn & Bacon, November 1995

Linda M. Bambara & Tim Knoster: Designing Positive Behavior Support Plans: Amer Assn Mental Retardation: January 1998

Barbara Stevens Barnum: Teaching Nursing in the Era of Managed Care: Springer Publication Company, March 1999
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Patient Nurse Compliance With Scd

Words: 1618 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91082263

" (Morris & Woodcock, 2004)

V. Murakami et al. (2003)

In the work entitled: "Deep Venous Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Trauma: Improved Compliance With a Novel Miniaturized Pneumatic Compression Device" the authors state that: "Intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) devices prevent lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (LEDVT) when used properly, but compliance remains an issue." (Murakami et al., 2003) the study conducted by Murakami et al. (2003) is stated to be a."..prospective trial in which trauma patients (mean age, 46 years; revised trauma score, 11.7) were randomized to DVT prophylaxis with a standard calf-length sequential IPC device (SCD group) or a miniaturized sequential device (continuous enhanced-circulation therapy [CECT] group). Compliance rates for all subjects were averaged in each location: emergency department, operating room, intensive care unit, and nursing ward." (Murakami et al., 2004) the study results state that: "Total compliance rate in the CECT group was significantly higher than in the SCD group…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kehl-Preutt, Wendy (2006) Deep Vein Thrombosis in Hospitalized Patients: A Review of Evidence-based Guidelines for Prevention. Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing March/April 2006. Vol. 25 No.2. Online available at  http://www.nursingcenter.com/prodev/cearticleprint.asp?CE_ID=636024 .

Chang, David et al. (2002) Compliance with sequential compression device prophylaxis in at-risk trauma patients: a prospective analysis. Am Surg. 2002 May;68:470-3 Online available at http://lib.bioinfo.pl/auid:1350109.

Practice Alert: Deep Vein Thrombosis Prevention" (2006 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses Journal " Vol. 23 No. 1 January 2006.

Morris, Rhys J. & Woodcock, John P. (2004) Evidence-Based Compression: Prevention of Stasis and Deep Vein Thrombosis. Ann. Surg. 2004 February 239(2): 162-171.
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Patient Noncompliance in Patients Advanced

Words: 4937 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 60710636



These studies demonstrate that there are several factors associated with patient noncompliance, regardless of the disease being treated. Medication side effects represent only one of these issues. Nurse practitioners could help to resolve many of these issues by being proactive and asking questions about side effects in patients at risk for becoming noncompliant. They may also be able to predict noncompliance in patients that are prescribed medications with known side effects. By informing the patient of the side effects and giving them practical ways to cope with them, the nurse practitioner can play an active role in helping to eliminate patient noncompliance.

Education was found to play an important role in patient noncompliance. The overall educational level of the patient was found to be important. The nurse practitioner can take positive action by being aware of the patient's overall educational background. Extra care must be taken with those of low…… [Read More]

References

Barber, N., Parsons, J., Clifford, S., Darracott, R., & Horne, R. (2004). Patients' problems with new medication for chronic conditions. Quality and Safety in Healthcare. 13(3): 172-175.

Chatterjee, J. (2006). From compliance to concordance in diabetes. Journal of Medical Ethics. 32(9): 507-510.

Chisholm, M., Lance, C. & Mulloy, L. (2005). Patient factors associated with adherence to immunosuppressant therapy in renal transplant recipients. American Journal of Health- System Pharmacy. 62 (17): 1775-1781.

Eastern, J. "Dismissing Patients Properly." 1 Jun 2006. OB/GYN News. Accessed 11 Sept. 2008.  http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0CYD/is_/ai_n26906768 .
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Education Nursing Ethics This Is

Words: 628 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93124740

Specifically, they failed to change gloves in-between cleaning incontinent patients and subsequently applying ointment to other parts of the body, and handling patients' clean bed linens, food trays, and personal belongings. One several occasions, I witnessed nurse's aides fail to change gloves in-between different patients. I saw a phlebotomist unnecessarily contaminate sterile dressings by careless handling. When questioned, she responded that her method was more time efficient. I also noticed everyone from nurse's aides to senior residents routinely place containers used for waste collection onto food carts, in some cases after picking them up off the floor.

In general, it seems to me that the routine of sometimes mundane or repetitive tasks -- even in the healthcare profession -- leads to carelessness and an apathetic attitude on the part of people entrusted to ensure the health and welfare of vulnerable patients.

Without condemning any of my colleagues for their lapses,…… [Read More]

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Education Situations

Words: 385 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 26368068

Education Situations

Observing Nonverbal Communication

When observing a group of preschool students between the ages of three to four years old, one common nonverbal communication observed was violent physical contact. When one child wanted a toy that the other child had, this child hit him until he let go of the toy. In another instance, one child said something that was upsetting to another, and the response was getting punched.

This nonverbal communication was quite blatant. The child that was doing the hitting was communicating that he was very upset with the other child and wanted something. In the first instance, the child was communicating that he wanted to have the toy that the other child was playing with. The second child eventually understood this and handed over the toy. In the second instance, the child was communicating that he did not like what the first child had said.

In…… [Read More]

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Patient Assessment and Analysis

Words: 825 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89222306

Patient Assessment

DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT PLAN

Diagnosis and Disease Processes

Using an appropriate patient assessment form (Sample Forms, 2013), D.M. has been found to have uncontrolled Type 2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, uncontrolled hypertension, chronic anemia, and probable hypothyroidism (Sample Forms).

Diabetes Type 2

is most probably on a poorly controlled diet of high cholesterol and high simple sugars. Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a metabolic disease wherein the body is not able to properly use ingested food because of insulin resistance. If more simple or refined sugars are consumed, the less the body is able to process them as nutrients. These tend to stay and float in the blood stream, un-used, and in this condition, they cause trouble in the different parts of the body. These include the end organs, such as the brain, the eyes, the kidneys, the heart, and even the feet. A poorly controlled diet and the lack…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Glasgow, R.E., et al. (2005). Development and validation of the patient assessment of chronic illness care. Vol. 43 # 5, Medical Care: PuMed. Retrieved on October 15,

2014 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15838407 

Sample Forms (2013). Patient assessment form. Sample Forms.org. Retrieved on October 15, 2014 from  http://www.sampleforms.org/patient-assessmentform.html
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Education Politics Factors That Mitigate

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 36907660

2009).

his is largely due to the eating patterns established in poverty; lack of food during childhood has the tendency to increase over-eating when food is available, and instills a strong compulsion to avoid food insecurities in adulthood, leading to unhealthy eating habits (Olson et al. 2007). Such habits obviously cause health deterioration, which limits productivity and creates bigger expenses, and so assists in the intergenerational perpetuation of poverty and the likely creation of similar or related issues in the children of the adult overeaters. his also ties into other social factors of adult life that stem from issues related to childhood poverty.

Employment in adulthood can be heavily affected by poverty in childhood, as noted above. here are several complex and interrelated ways in which this can occur. First, there is a strong indication that childhood poverty creates a pattern of psychological stress that becomes all but inescapable in…… [Read More]

This is largely due to the eating patterns established in poverty; lack of food during childhood has the tendency to increase over-eating when food is available, and instills a strong compulsion to avoid food insecurities in adulthood, leading to unhealthy eating habits (Olson et al. 2007). Such habits obviously cause health deterioration, which limits productivity and creates bigger expenses, and so assists in the intergenerational perpetuation of poverty and the likely creation of similar or related issues in the children of the adult overeaters. This also ties into other social factors of adult life that stem from issues related to childhood poverty.

Employment in adulthood can be heavily affected by poverty in childhood, as noted above. There are several complex and interrelated ways in which this can occur. First, there is a strong indication that childhood poverty creates a pattern of psychological stress that becomes all but inescapable in adulthood (Evans & Kim 2007). The prolonged stress that this can lead to has been linked to many health problems, like any other form of prolonged stress, but the cumulative effects of continued conditions of poverty often exacerbate the problem still further (Evans & Kim 2007). It can even lead to a lack of ability to fully regulate stress, and this leads to many issues in the employment world, including memory issues, the ability to handle work-related stress including deadlines and other common features of modern jobs, which simply leads to more stress and again, reduced productivity (Evans & Schamberg 2009). The problems of childhood poverty easily become self-perpetuating due to the reduced productivity of adults that grew up in poverty.

This is not merely evidenced from a medical and psychological perspective, but by direct economic research as well. Writing in the New York Times, Eckholm (2007) details recent findings that adults who were raised in poverty not only end up less productive, but typically also have higher costs associated with health problems and other issues. Intervention, then, must occur early and must come form an outside source if the cycle is to be broken. It is, of course, unfortunately impractical to think that poverty could simply be alleviated, but there are ways to mitigate the effects of childhood poverty so that they are not as exposed to risks either in childhood or in adulthood, giving greater
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Nurse as a Patient Educator

Words: 1266 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 8671124



Health Information Technology has significant impacts on nursing policy and practice including the role of these professionals in patient education. Actually, the Information Technology development process in healthcare is based on the nurses' ability to understand the community and provide distinctive insights about patient education among other factors (Effken & Abbott, 2009). Since nurses are important elements of the healthcare system, they are critical in ensuring that the confidence of patients in the health providers is maintained even as technology mediates interactions.

The main impact of the emergence of Health Information Technology on the role of a nurse in patient education is that technology mediates interactions between patients and their care providers. As a result, nurses are required to ensure that the role technology plays in mediating these interactions does not affect the insights provided in the process or the delivery of improved patient care. Moreover, through Health Information Technology,…… [Read More]

References:

Adams, K., Greiner, a.C. & Corrigan, J.M. (2012). Chapter 5 -- Patient Self-Management

Support. Retrieved from the National Academies Press website:  http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=11085&page=57 

Bastable, S.B. (2008). Nurse as educator: principles of teaching and learning for nursing practice (3rd ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Effken, J.A. & Abbott, P. (2009, August). Health it-enabled Care for Underserved Rural
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Management of Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Words: 3435 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Article Paper #: 7686776

Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Management OF OSTEOMYELITIS IN THE DIABETIC PATIENT

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone or bone marrow which is typically categorized as acute, subacute or chronic.1 It is characteristically defined according to the basis of the causative organism (pyogenic bacteria or mycobacteria) and the route, duration and physical location of the infection site.2 Infection modes usually take one of three forms: direct bone contamination from an open fracture, puncture wound, bone surgery, total joint replacement, or traumatic injury; extension of a soft tissue infection such as a vascular ulcer; or hematogenous (blood borne) spread from other infected areas of the body such as the tonsils, teeth or the upper respiratory system.2(p807) Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli are the most common causative agents of the disease, although viruses, parasites and fungi may also lead to the development of osteomyelitis.3

Patients…… [Read More]

References

1. Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 27th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000.

2. Butalia S, Palda V, Sargeant R, Detsky A, Mourad O. Does This Patient With Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?. JAMA: Journal of The American Medical Association [serial online]. February 20, 2008; 299(7):806-813. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

3. Lavery L, Peters E, Armstrong D, Wendel C, Murdoch D, Lipsky B. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds. Diabetes Research & Clinical Practice [serial online]. March 2009; 83(3):347-352. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

4. Turns M. The diabetic foot: an overview of assessment and complications. British Journal of Nursing [serial online]. August 12, 2011;:S19-S25. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.
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Diabetes Education

Words: 2046 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 97209519

Diabetes Education

What is Diabetes?

Interventions

Management

Self-Care

Diabetes Education

Clinical Practice ecommendations

Diabetes Education

Diabetes is considered to be a chronic disease which really needs some kind of long-term nursing and medical intermediations. esearch shows that patients likewise need to take a part that is active in their own treatment and management, and the alter their lifestyles in order to keep their metabolic state at a level that is normal (Sperl-Hillen, 2010). One of the transformations in education is recognized as being electronic learning. This technique is interesting because it has all of these unique features which users are interested in using, and has made it possible to learn anywhere. It facilitates individual as well as group learning, and makes it conceivable to familiarize the material as stated by the users' needs. However, in the last 10 years, it has been very obvious that the Internet has turned out…… [Read More]

Reference:

EIJJ, V. (2009). Interventions for improving adherence to treatment recommendations in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The Cochrane Library, 44(8), 1-44.

Marjatta Kelo, M.M. (2011). Self-care of school-age children with diabetes: an integrative review. JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, 2096-2105.

Marzieh Moattari, M.H. (2012). The impact of electronic education on metabolic control indicators in patients with diabetes who need insulin: a randomised clinical control. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 22, 32 -- 38.

Sperl-Hillen, J. (2010). Are benefits from Diabetes Self-Management education Sustained? American Journal of Managed Care is the property of Intellisphere, 104-113.
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Orem's Nursing Model Patients Perception

Words: 1355 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34445373

" (Meade, nd) The studies were conducted in various medical settings and with various patient-types and as well some were "very scientific designs assigning patients to control and intervention study groups, while others were less scientific and more qualitative." (Meade, nd)

The report of Meade states that: "it is clear the findings reveal that discharge follow-up phone calls provide an invaluable opportunity to evaluate patient education, identify trends that may require improvements in practice, improve patient quality of care, determine patient's compliance with discharge instructions and access overall impressions of hospital performance." (Meade, nd) In fact many of the studies show that discharge phone calls."..significantly increase patient satisfaction when compared to those not receiving discharge phone calls." (Ibid)

In the study of Ahrens, et al. (2003 in the work entitled: "Improving Family Communication at the End of Life: Implication for Length of Stay in the Intensive Care Unit and Resources…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Orem Theory of Nursing (2006) Wikipedia Online available at  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orem_model_of_nursing 

Banfield, Barbara E. (1997) A Philosophical Enquiry of Orem's Self-Care Deficit Nursing Theory. UMI ProQuest Digital Dissertations. Online available at  http://wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations/preview_all/9815271 

Mayo, Ann (nd) Orem's Self-Care Model: A Professional Nursing Practice Model. Online available at  http://members.aol.com/annmrn/nursing_portfolio_I_index.html 

Value of Technology to transfer Discharge Information (2005) Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Jan 2005. Online ClinicalTrials.gov located at  http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct/show/NCT00101868?order=2 .
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Discharge Education After HF

Words: 2817 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 24277540

Discharge Education to Promote Self-Efficacy in Heart Failure

An Education Intervention For Patients With Heart Failure

Management of congestive heart failure (CHF) continues to be a financial burden on the economy of the United States of America (USA); responsible for multiple hospital admissions and readmissions of patients with HF within thirty days post discharge. The disease has been associated with personal, physical, and economic challenges. As the population increases, the number of individuals affected with this condition is also increasing. According to the American Heart Association (2009), an estimated 400,000 to 500.000 new cases occur annually, with additional annual cost of more than $33 billion dollars added to the U.S. economy.

Discharge education, which attempts to reduce readmission rate, has become a valuable metric in the provision of health care. For effective management of heart failure symptoms, patient education is a necessity (Gruszczynski, 2010). Sara Paul (2008) discussed the importance…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, C., Deepak, B.V., Amoateng-Adjepongn, Y.,Zarich, S., (2005). Benefits of Comprehensive inpatient education and discharge planning combined with outpatient

Support in elderly patients with congestive heart failure. Congestive Heart Fail, 11(6),

315-321

Annema, C, Luttik ML, Jaarsma, T, (2009), Reasons for readmission in heart failure:
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Self-Efficacy in Patient Management

Words: 2521 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 16101227

Discharge Education to Promote Patient Self-Efficacy

Care and concern for the patient's health and well-being after being discharged from the hospital or clinic does not end for healthcare providers. Particularly for chronically ill patients, post-discharge care is more critical to ensure that in the course of the patient's daily routine and activities, all medical requirements are adhered to and all medications needed are complied with. This is why more often than not, patients receive discharge education as the healthcare provider's continuing effort to ensure that the patient and his/her family members or caregivers will be well-capacitated to continue care and treatment at home.

However, the above-mentioned scenario is the ideal rather than the actual. In real life, healthcare providers are often fraught with the dilemma of patients who are constantly hospitalized or have witnessed the worsening of their patient's condition as a result of non-compliance to their medications and other…… [Read More]

References

Baker, D., D. DeWalt, D. Schillinger, V. Hawk and B. Ruo. (2011). "The effect of progressive, reinforcing telephone education and counseling vs. brief educational intervention on knowledge, self-care behaviors and heart failure symptoms." Journal of Cardiac Failure, Vol. 17, No. 10.

Barnason, S., L. Zimmerman and L. Young. (2011). "An integrative review of interventions promoting self-care of patients with heart failure." Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 21.

Castelnuovo, G. (2010). "TECNOB: study design of a randomized controlled trial of a multidisciplinary telecare intervention for obese patients with type 2 diabetes." BMC Public Health, Vol. 10.

Conn, V., A. Hafdahl, S. Brown and L. Brown. (2008). "Meta-analysis of patient education interventions to increase physical activity among chronically ill adults." Patient Education Counseling, Vol. 70, No. 2.
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Clinic Education

Words: 2614 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82306713

center23002311409410012100center818008227695Name
Class
941009200 Name
Class
center700007040880 Abstract
Physical Examinations are an integral part of preventative care, learning how to perform and evaluate during a physical examination is key to learning about the patient's current status and their overall health.
9410010000 Abstract
Physical Examinations are an integral part of preventative care, learning how to perform and evaluate during a physical examination is key to learning about the patient's current status and their overall health.
center300003017520 LESSON PLAN FO PHYSICAL EXAMINATION
With Literature eview
9410036300 LESSON PLAN FO PHYSICAL EXAMINATION
With Literature eview


Intended Audience
This classroom lesson plan is intended for nursing students. It is meant to teach them how to properly conduct physical examinations. More often than not, nursing students have questions related to proper handling of patients. A lot of times nursing students forget the basics such as confirming a patient's identity by asking them for their full name…… [Read More]

References
Idler, E. L., & Benyamini, Y. (1997). Self-rated health and mortality: a review of twenty-seven community studies. Journal of Health and Social Behavior , 38(1), 21-37.
Issenberg, S. B. (1999). Simulation Technology for Health Care Professional Skills Training and Assessment. Jama-journal of The American Medical Association, 282(9), 861-866. doi:10.1001/jama.282.9.861
Jarvis, C. (2008). PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT EXAMINATION STUDY GUIDE. Retrieved from e Kentucky Public Health Practice Reference website:  http://nursing.wright.edu/sites/default/files/page/attachements/Physical%20Assessment%20Exam%20Study%20Guide.pdf 
McGonigle, D., & Mastrian, K. (2012). Nursing Informatics and the Foundation of Knowledge. Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.
Pincus, T., Summey, J. A., Soraci, S. A., Wallston, K. A., & Hummon, N. P. (1983). Assessment of patient satisfaction in activities of daily living using a modified stanford health assessment questionnaire. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 26(11), 1346 - 1353.
Wendel-Vos, G. C., Schuit, A. J., Saris, W. H., & Kromhout, D. (2003). Reproducibility and relative validity of the short questionnaire to assess health-enhancing physical activity.Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 56(12), 1163 - 1169. doi:10.1016/S0895-4356(03)00220-8

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Critcal Analysis Paper on Patient'satisfaction

Words: 1460 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 78256183

patient satisfaction with the care provided by nursing staff and physicians, as well as how satisfaction can be improved through better communication among physicians and nurses, and with their patients. It will, in particular, deal with a nursing student's own clinical experience with patients and their perception of healthcare provider-patient communication. In addition, the paper will examine the student's project which considered the strategy of updating white boards in patient rooms regularly for better communication.

Ten medical surgical ward patients were interviewed during rounds by a student, who rated patient satisfaction and tried to discover some common theme. While patients expressed satisfaction with how nursing staff delivered care, they felt physicians didn't keep them informed. A number of patients were visited by two or more doctors. However, there was no communication between doctors, leading to issues such as a patient being marked "not ready for surgery" by the cardiologist, owing…… [Read More]

References

(2008). Home - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Improving Patient-Staff Communication Through White Boards - Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Retrieved August 6, 2016, from  http://www.rwjf.org/en/library/articles-and-news/2008/06/improving-patient-staff-communication-through-white-boards.html 

(n.d.). Institute for Healthcare Communication. Impact of Communication in Healthcare - Institute for Healthcare Communication. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from  http://healthcarecomm.org/about-us/impact-of-communication-in-healthcare/ 

(2011). JBI COnNECT+. Effective communication between registered nurses and adult oncology patients in inpatient settings. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from  http://connect.jbiconnectplus.org/Viewsourcefile.aspx?0=7112 

(n.d.). Journal of Nursing - RN Journal. The Importance of Communication and Education toward Patient Literacy. Retrieved August 2, 2016, from http://rnjournal.com/journal-of-nursing/the-importance-of-communication-and-education-toward-patient-literacy
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Impact of Education on Hcahp Scores

Words: 539 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34584573

Education Affects HCAHP Scores

Patient Education regarding the diagnoses and medications based on a decline of competent staff having the disposition to speak to patients in a professional level can be challenging, which can create a misunderstanding of patient information. Meanwhile, it is important to assess the patient's understanding by collecting their feedback through survey question. Essentially, it is critical to ask the question randomly to minimize prejudice, increase the patient understanding and avoid misinterpretation of information. While the average high school graduates read when at 7th grade, however, patient education and written materials should start at a 5th grade. Discharging information and education need to be more elaborate and user- friendly based on the patient's educational level.

Although it is challenging for an urban hospital to initiate the project, nevertheless, providing patient education at a 5th-grade education level can improve the patient experience and ultimately increase the hospital's HCAHPS…… [Read More]

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Impact of the Electronic Health Records on Patient Safety in King Khalid University Hospital

Words: 1373 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Methodology Chapter Paper #: 93875701

Electronic Medical ecords (E-SIHI) in King Khalid University Hospital on Patient Safety

The objective of this study is to demonstrate the impact of e-SIHI (Electronic Medical ecords) on patients with regards to their security and safety. The King Khalid University Hospital has implemented the e-SIHI since May 2015 for all departments. Two weeks after the implementation, QMD (Quality Management Department) conducted an audit to measure a compliance for the system and ascertain whether the e-SIHI can improve health and safety of patients. However, the QMD found that there are many areas requiring improvement in the system. The paper discusses the methodology used to evaluate the system to ascertain whether e-SIHI is beneficial to the patient.

esearch Methodology

The research methodology reveals research design discussing the method of data collection, sample population, sample size, and project tool.

Study Design: The team audits the e-SIHI using a checklist to verify whether the…… [Read More]

Reference

AlAswad, A.M. (2015). Issues Concerning the Adoption and Usage of Electronic Medical Records in Ministry of Health Hospitals in Saudi Arabia. School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) the University of Sheffield.

Bowman, S. (2013). Impact of Electronic Health Record Systems on Information Integrity: Quality and Safety Implications. Perspectives in Health Information Management, 10.

Jang, J., Yu, S. H., Kim, C., Moon, Y. et al. (2013). "The effects of an electronic medical record on the completeness of documentation in the anesthesia record, International journal of medical informatics, 82(8):702-707.

Kazley, A. S. & Ozcan, Y. A. (2009). Electronic medical record use and efficiency: A DEA and windows analysis of hospitals, Socio-economic planning sciences, 43(3): 209-216.
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Dedicated to Providing Patients With

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 2304084



I also need to know the length of time that I have scheduled to speak since professional research conventions usually allocate 10 minutes to 90 minutes for a presentation. If only a short time, I may be advised to present highlights and to give handouts of my presentation. Visual images also facilitate the learning. I will need to build in time for question and discussions.

With each audience, I should consider their specific interests and structure the speech accordingly. With non-health laypeople, for instance, I can structure it to the challenges of dealing with relations with dementia and the kind of characteristics they should look for in caregivers as well s ways that can give them less stress and give their patients more comfort in dealing with them. I should also present it in a creative way in order to make it more interesting.

When approaching journals (and there are…… [Read More]

Sources

Byrne, M. Disseminating and presenting qualitative research findings - Research Corner

 http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0FSL/is_5_74/ai_81161396/ 

 http://www.rcn.org.uk/development/researchanddevelopment/kt/dissemination
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Analyzing Hypertensive Patient Case Study

Words: 845 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 16542010

Hypertensive Patient Case Study

Specific physical examinations in any hypertensive patient

Accuracy in the measurement of blood pressure is the basic aspect of diagnosis. Therefore, we take it over several weeks. On each visit, normally at least three blood pressure readings are taken with the difference of 2 minutes using mercury manometer.

Palpation of all peripheral pulses should necessarily be carried out. Absent, weak, or delayed femoral pulses are the sign of coarctation of the aorta or serious peripheral vascular disease. To identify any symptom of initial or extreme stage of chronic or severe hypertensive retinopathy along with arteriovenous nicking or difference in vessel wall, we conduct funduscopic examination of the eyes (Madhur & Maron, 2014).

Why order Laboratory work up

Initial laboratory tests include urinalysis; fasting blood glucose or A1c; this is due to an increase in cardiovascular risk linked with a decreased GF level and with albuminuria. If…… [Read More]

References

Madhur, M. S., & Maron, D. J. (2014, September 30). Hypertension Clinical Presentation. Retrieved from Medscape:  http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/241381-clinical#b3 

WebMD. (2016). An Overview of High Blood Pressure Treatment. Retrieved from Web MD:  http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/hypertension-treatment-overview 

WebMD. (2016). Hypertension/High Blood Pressure Health Center. Retrieved from Wed MD:  http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/hypertension-symptoms-types
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Important Factors in Treating Huntington's Disease Patients

Words: 6558 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 22789764

Huntington's disease (HD) was the first autonomic dominant disorder for which genetic prediction became possible" (Harper, et al., 2000, Journal of Medical Genetics, p. 567). HD is a disease that occurs due to an inherited disorder leading to the death of brain cells. A diagnosis of HD is accomplished through genetic testing which can be implemented at any age regardless of whether the symptoms manifest or not. Although, the specific symptoms vary between people, nevertheless, symptoms can start with people between 35 and 45 years of age and can also start in some individuals at even anearlier age. The disease may affect successive generations if health interventions are not implemented (Mandel, 2016).

Additionally, "the cause of HD is due to a dominant mutation of autosomal form of the gene called Huntington. This shows that a child born by an affected person has a 50% chance of developing or inheriting the…… [Read More]

References

Causes and risk factors. (2016). Health Communities. Retrieved from http://www. healthcommunities.com/huntingtons-disease/cause.shtml.

Denbo, S. M. (2013, January 1). Balancing the rights of children, parents and the state: The legal, ethical and psychological implications of genetic testing in children. Southern Journal of Business and Ethics, 5, 188-190.

Domaradzki, J. (2015, January 1). Lay constructions of genetic risk. A case-study of the Polish Society of Huntington's Disease. Polish Sociological Review, 189, 107-111.

Draper, B. (2004). Dealing with dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
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Reducing Readmission for Diabetes Patients

Words: 2695 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37664548

Quality Improvement Project

Diabetes -- Chronic Condition Background

Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

isk factors for type 1 diabetes

isk factors for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes

isk factors for gestational diabetes

The ationale for Selection

The Target Population

Intervention Plans

Target Goals

It has been estimated that in New York there is roughly two million people, or over twelve percent of the population, that have diabetes; furthermore, of this population, over half a million people have the condition but are not aware that they have it (American Diabetes Association, N.d.). It is further estimated that nearly five and a half million people, or over a third of the population, have prediabetes. Diabetes and diabetes-associated cardiovascular diseases have become the leading cause of death in the region accounting for roughly two-thirds of the deaths and the rates of diabetes has lead this trend to be referred to as the…… [Read More]

References

American Diabetes Association. (N.d.). Health Disparities. Retrieved from American Diabetes Association:  http://www.diabetes.org/advocacy/advocacy-priorities/health-disparities.html 

American Diabetes Association. (N.d.). New York, New York. Retrieved from American Diabetes Association:  http://www.diabetes.org/in-my-community/local-offices/new-york-new-york/ 

CDC. (2013). Diagnosed Diabetes, Age Adjusted Rate (per 100) Adults - Total 2013. Retrieved from Center for Disease Control:  http://gis.cdc.gov/grasp/diabetes/DiabetesAtlas.html 

Department of Health. (N.d.). Diabetes. Retrieved from New York State: https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/conditions/diabetes/
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Calculating Dosage for Patient

Words: 532 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 89979432

medications before administering to patients. What are the six medication rights?

The six rights are Medication, oute, Time, Client, Dosage and Documentation. Medication of course, is about verifying that the right medication is being given, oute is about how the medication is being given, whether be orally, via a gastric tube for something else. Timing speaks about how often the medication is given and how much time must pass between each dosage. The client is the person who is receiving the medication and why they are receiving it. Dosage is how much is being given and documentation is a recording of what was given and when so that anyone (the same professional or someone else) knows exactly what was given and when.

Discuss interventions that can reduce the risk of making medication errors.

Interventions that would do the job would include taking one's time, double-checking the measurements, looking at the…… [Read More]

References

Elkin, M., Perry, A., & Potter, P. (2007). Nursing interventions & clinical skills. St. Louis, Mo.:

Mosby.

Immunize.org,. (2016). How to Administer Intramuscular and Subcutaneous Vaccine Injections

to Adults. Immunize.org. Retrieved 27 February 2016, from  http://www.immunize.org/catg.d/p2020a.pdf
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Education and How My Education Has Transformed

Words: 1210 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25883416

education, and how my education has transformed my life by improving my self-confidence, upgrading my skills, and expanding my opportunities for personal and career success. his reflection and evaluation paper analyzes critically the value of my education at the University of Phoenix. I will discuss where I was before commencing the program, where I was during the program, and where I expect to be after graduation. In addition to discussing the peculiarities associated with receiving an online degree, I will outline my short-term and long-term goals as they relate to my course of study.

Before I began my studies at the University of Phoenix, I received most of my life skills, professional training, and character building through the American military. he military helped me to discover my talents and preferences with regards to a career, and brought out both my strengths and weaknesses. My professional career was steeped in military…… [Read More]

The University of Phoenix has offered me a firm foundation for my education and career. I appreciate the instructors and the hard work they have put into developing the courses that are suitable for adults like me who need to learn about how to apply skills and training to the marketplace. With my University of Phoenix degree, I will become the qualified professional I envisioned for myself, will continually improve my skills, and will dedicate my life to helping others.

Reference

National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers (2013). Retrieved online:  http://www.caremanager.org/
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Patients Undergoing Mechanical Ventilation Contract Ventilator Associated

Words: 2974 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20462057

patients undergoing mechanical ventilation contract Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP). This acute medical condition always results in increased death rates and associated medical costs among patients. This article reviews several literatures that try to enlighten masses on the diagnosis, medical treatments and VAP prevention methods. In addition, this article outlines recommendations medical practitioners can implement in their daily practices to curb VAP and offers an insight on controversies that usually arise during VAP diagnoses, treatment plans and prevention methodologies. This article defines VAP to be the causative agent of approximately 25 to 54% mortality rates among patients undergoing mechanical ventilation in ICUs. Factors responsible for VAP among patients include patients' population in ICUs, hospital stay durations and antimicrobial treatments. Even though antimicrobial medications are confirmed to reduce VAP casualties, further studies should be undertaken such as the ones outlined in the literatures below to help in early identification and treatment of…… [Read More]

References

Arroliga, A.C., Pollard, C.L., Wilde, C.D., Pellizzari, S.J., Chebbo, A., Song, J., et al. (2012).

Reduction in the Incidence of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia: A Multidisciplinary

Approach. Respiratory Care, 688-696.

Camargo, L.F., De Marco, F.V., Barbas, C.S., Hoelz, C., Bueno, M.A., Rodrigues Jr., M., et al.
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Education Is an Important Part

Words: 3476 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 74152867

Indeed, dental issues are a big problem, but in fact they are just the top of the iceberg which is the American medical system. Even if there have been serious attempts to reform the system and introduce a universal means of publicly financing medical care for all people, "Americans have fewer doctors per capita than most Western countries. We go to the doctor less than people in other Western countries. We get admitted to the hospital less frequently than people in other Western countries. We are less satisfied with our health care than our counterparts in other countries. American life expectancy is lower than the Western average. Childhood-immunization rates in the United States are lower than average." (Gladwell, 2005) Indeed, given the fact that the U.S. is considered to be the most advanced country in the world it is rather peculiar the lack of a reasonable medical care system, one…… [Read More]

References

Ellis, J, and Celia Hartley. (2004). Nursing in today's world: challenges, issues and trends. New York: Lippicott Williams&Wilkins.

Gladwell, M. (2005) The moral hazard myth. The bad idea behind our failed health-care system. In The New Yorker. Retrieved 15 January 2007, at  http://www.newyorker.com/fact/content/articles/050829fa_fact 

Jarvis, W. (2001). Infection Control and Changing Health-Care Delivery Systems, in Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol 7, No 2. Retrieved 15 January 2007 at  http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol7no2/jarvis.htm 

Kikuchi, J, and Helen Simmons. (1994). Developing a philosophy of nursing. New York: Sage Publications.
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Patient Perceptions of Participation in Treatment Several

Words: 873 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 33417295

Patient Perceptions of Participation in Treatment

Several studies have revealed that patients generally prefer to learn everything they can about their illness and the proposed treatment plan, and even have some control during the planning stage (reviewed in Lund, Tamm, and Branholm, 2001). On the other hand, studies have found that occupational therapists typically underestimate this desire and tend to perceive patients as passive and uncooperative. The gap between the patient's wishes to actively participate and the therapists' perceptions of that willingness can result in a number of problems, including patient compliance with treatment plans and goals. Strategies to minimize the size of this gap could therefore lead to more effective rehabilitation of the patient's disability.

A study was conducted in Sweden that examined patients' experiences as a rehabilitation patient and the professional's view of the interaction (Lund, Tamm, and Branholm, 2001). Patients were enrolled from acute care in surgery,…… [Read More]

References

Lund, Maria Larsson, Tamm, Maare, and Branholm, Inga-Britt. (2001). Patients' perception of their participation in the rehabilitation planning and professionals' view of their strategies to encourage it. Occupational Therapy International, 8(3), 151-167.

Skidmore, Elizabeth R., Whyte, Ellen M., Holm, Margo B., Becker, James T., Butters, Meryl A., Dew, Mary Amanda et al. (2010). Cognitive and affective predictors of rehabilitation participation after stroke. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 91(2), 203-207. Retrieved May 3, 2011 from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.ezproxy1.lib.asu.edu/pmc/articles/PMC2824912/pdf/nihms153354.pdf
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Patient Autonomy

Words: 1416 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 85670763

Patient Autonomy

The concept of patient autonomy, as opposed to medial paternity, is one that has gained much ground in recent years; "... about 30 years ago, issues began to appear that were difficult to solve using traditional ethics. New medical and reproductive technologies, research controversies, and a societal ethos that questioned all authority posed difficult questions." (Czaplyski, Larry, 2002)

At issue in this paper is the meaning and significance of patient autonomy and the way in which is relates to medical paternity. As the discussion will outline, the case for patient autonomy is not only ethically valid but also essential for the moral and practical balance in the medical profession. Underlying this view is the fact that the issue of patient autonomy does not exist in isolation or in the medical field alone - but relates to other issues and ethical problems in the society at large. These larger…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernstein Maurice, (2004) Social/Political Paternalism vs. Patient Autonomy.

Retrieved October 4, 2004 from Bioethics Discussion Blog: Web site: http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2004/07/socialpolitical-paternalism-vs.-patient.html

Bradley, Gerard V. (1989). "Does autonomy require informed and specific

Refusal of life-sustaining medical treatment." Issues in Law & Medicine, December 22, 1989. Czaplyski, Larry. (2002)
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Patient Negligence and Nursing Malpractice

Words: 1859 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91885317

Responsibilities of Nurses to Patients

Why is it important

The role of nurses has a direct implication on the patients. For example, nurses observe and provide direct care to the patients. The physicians give orders and thus are the role of the nurses to implement (Aiken et al., 2014). Often, the work of the physicians is not complete without the help of the nurses. The nurses are responsible for changing clothes and giving the medications to patients. Often, the patients are unable to do basic tasks, and therefore the roles of nurses become very important. Nurses keep medical records for the patients and therefore give medications to the patients in time and monitor their progress.

Another important role of the nurse is assessing the response of the patients to medications. Keep the records for the progress of patients is an invaluable practice. The records help the nurses to monitor how…… [Read More]

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Patient Mrs Gulcin Ozdemir Primary

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67648867

It should be noted that Mrs. Ozdemir's problems are not entirely physical in nature. Her loneliness and isolation in a country in which she has limited command over English have caused her to pour her energies into cooking traditional, heavy meals for her family and using overeating as a coping mechanism.

Seeing a counselor who speaks her language and can aid her in talking about her cultural adjustment issues seems essential. Without psychological support, it is unlikely that Mrs. Ozdemir will feel sufficiently motivated to change her lifestyle. Ideally, diabetes education at the secondary level should also be culturally sensitive, and provide dietary and exercise-related suggestions. Proposed menus can reflect Mrs. Ozdemir's culture, such as Mediterranean dishes that emphasize vegetables and beans, rather than sugary sauces and meats. Also, walking rather than taking public transportation is a potential source of exercise. Ozdemir should receive regular lipid screening, and, if warranted,…… [Read More]

References

Peeples, Malinda & Seley, Jane Jeffries. "Diabetes care: The need for change."

American Journal of Nursing. June 2007. 107.6 (June 1007):13-19. 7 Apr. 2011.



"Primary care." A Dictionary of Nursing. 2008. Encyclopedia.com. 7 Apr. 2011
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Education Nursing Education Why Variability

Words: 329 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93980830



For Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN), many nursing schools offer 'fast track' flexible programs that these allow working nurses to balance school and job demands to become Registered Nurses (RN)s. Often these programs offer degree credit for the student's previous experiences in the field. Approximately 30% of BSN graduates every year come from such programs. Even prospective nurses without undergraduate nursing degrees can enter the profession through Accelerated RN Baccalaureate Programs. These programs offer a path to becoming an RN with only one or two years of intensive education training. "According to the 2004 National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, over 20% of the RN population had completed additional academic nursing or nursing related preparation after graduating" (Upgrading, 2009, All Nurses)

orks Cited

Anderson, Sue. (2007). The perks of nursing as a second career. Reality RN.

Retrieved June 26, 2009 at http://www.realityrn.com/more-articles/managing-your-career/the-perks-of-nursing-as-a-second-career/266/

Upgrading your nursing degree. (2009). All Nursing Schools. Retrieved…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Sue. (2007). The perks of nursing as a second career. Reality RN.

Retrieved June 26, 2009 at  http://www.realityrn.com/more-articles/managing-your-career/the-perks-of-nursing-as-a-second-career/266/ 

Upgrading your nursing degree. (2009). All Nursing Schools. Retrieved June 25, 2009.

 http://www.allnursingschools.com/faqs/upgrading.phphttp://www.allnursingschools.com/faqs/upgrading.php
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Education at Valencia College Where I Am

Words: 1824 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 8455278

education at Valencia College, where I am studying to be a respiratory therapist. I want to continue my education, with the hope of attending the University of Central Florida. The University of Central Florida does not offer a Bachelor of Science degree in respiratory therapy, but does offer a wide range of degrees related to the medical field. I intend to pursue a B.S. In Health-Sciences, Pre-Clinical undergraduate degree. I feel that this will give me the educational background I need to place me in a competitive position for graduate or professional training, while exposing me to a wide variety of occupations in the medical field.

The four-year university that I have selected is the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida. It is a competitive university with a student body of just under 50,000 (49,900) students (Petersons, 2013). The average in-state tuition rate seems reasonable at $6,247 per academic…… [Read More]

References

Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2013). Respiratory therapists. Retrieved March 7, 2013 from the Occupational Outlook Handbook website:  http://www.bls.gov/ooh/healthcare/respiratory-therapists.htm 

Petersons. (2013). University of Central Florida. Retrieved March 7, 2013 from Peterson's website:  http://www.petersons.com/college-search/university-of-central-florida-000_10000671.aspx 

University of Central Florida. (2013). Health-sciences, pre-clinical. Retrieved March 7, 2013

from University of Central Florida website: http://www2.cohpa.ucf.edu/health.pro/prospective_students.shtml
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Patient Was Admitted Due to a Broken

Words: 1175 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90551981

patient was admitted due to a broken hip which required a total hip replacement (TH). This injury has required two weeks of in-hospital rehabilitation to this point, and Mr. Trosak will probably need more physical rehabilitation to completely recover from the injury. Since there are secondary concerns (such as some loss of cognitive function (text, 462)) after a fall, it will be necessary to monitor M. Trosak. The falling incident could also reoccur due to the fact that the patient resides on the second floor of his apartment building. It will be necessary to ensure that Mr. Trosak understands the risk of a recurrence, and that he has sufficient assistance.

Prior to being hospitalized for the fall, Mr. Trosak was not taking any prescription medication, and he has not had a physical examination for more than ten years. While admitted, the patient was found to have chronic hypertension, which is…… [Read More]

References

Smith, M., & Segal, J. (2011). Depression in older adults and the elderly. Retrieved from  http://www.helpguide.org/mental/depression_elderly.htm 

Vanwanseele, B. (2009). To rehab or not to rehab following a total hip replacement. Retrieved from  http://sydney.edu.au/research/opportunities/opportunities/561 

Text.
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patient named Eliza

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34952976

Part 1    

Eliza, a patient aged eighteen, is enrolled at the City University and resides in a dorm with friends. The patient is currently seeking treatment for stress/anxiety and low self-image (Eliza Intake Document Provided by Customer). Eliza has not indicated any life stressors. Her father, Burt, drives a truck for a living, whereas her mom, Joan, is an elementary school secretary. While the father-daughter relationship appears to be quite strong, Eliza appears to have issues that need working on, when it comes to her relationship with her mother. As of now, Eliza is not taking any mental health medication. 
Psychosocial assessment forms a key component of all nursing evaluation, as it aids nursing professionals by informing the disorder management and patient care plan. Individuals usually display diverse kinds of surgical or medical issues. Further, social or psychological aspects might impact their adherence to therapy and their recovery (Conducting…… [Read More]

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Patient with Chest Pain

Words: 1466 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36149593

1. Subjective
Patient’s chief complaint: A man aged 69 comes to the emergency room with a sharp pain to his chest’s left side, lasting between 30 and 40 mins and then subsiding.
History of present illness: The pain has woken him up thrice in the last 7 days. He claims the pain first started roughly six months ago. Initially, however, the pain used to surface only occasionally, commonly while he was doing gardening. The patient’s past medical history reveals a diagnosis of hypertension twenty-five years back.
Precipitating/alleviating factors: The patient has been smoking a half-cigarette pack daily for the last forty-five years.
Family History: The patient has lost two brothers and his dad to heart disease. The patient does not report any other significant illness history in the family.
Social History: His typical pastimes include sharing a drink with pals and gardening.
Review of Systems: From a physical examination of…… [Read More]

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Education Experience Compassion

Words: 955 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63139138

Canadian Nursing: The equirements of Quality Nursing Care

Critical Success Factors in Nursing

In order to become a good nurse, one must have a good education, experience, and compassion. Not one of these factors is more important than the other; rather a good nurse must demonstrate competency in all three in order to influence patient outcomes in a positive manner and be successful in the nursing field.

Nurses within the Canadian health care system are traditionally responsible for carrying out many different functions at one time. Nurses are typically in the unique position of providing quality patient care on a one to one basis. Their interaction with patients is generally much more intimate than that of physicians, and patients often find themselves turning to their nursing care provider for guidance and support. Thus it is critical that a nurse not only have the ability to provide sound medical advice and…… [Read More]

References:

Al-Almaei, S., Albar, A.A., Hanif, M. & Mangoud, A."In comparison: A study of the competence of nurses and physicians in primary care practice." International Journal of Public Administration, 23(4):461

Campbell, D., Cascio, R., Clark, M., Rains, A. & Sandor, M.K. "Evaluating

critical thinking skills in a scenario-based community health course." Journal of Community Health Nursing, 15(1), 1998: 21.

Peternelj-Taylor, C.A. & Yonge, O. "Exploring boundaries in the nurse-client relationship: Professional roles and responsibilities." Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, 29(2), 2003: 55
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Patient Analysis for a Nurse Practitioner

Words: 2113 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58240668

1. Subjective
Patient’s chief complaint, reason for visit
Ms. Richards arrived complaining that she was experiencing severe anal pain, so much so that using a tissue was also proving impossible. She claimed the pain began a couple of days earlier and has aggravated considerably since.
History of Present Illness
Ms. Richards arrived complaining of anal pain which commenced a couple of days earlier and has aggravated since. With regard to her intimate relationships, Ms. Richards states that though she has a boyfriend, their relationship isn’t serious as the two are also seeing other people. According to internal assessment reports, patient has normal hair distribution, an intact perineum, and intact urethral meatus without any discharge or inflammation. However, patient experiences unbearable pain on vaginal opening palpation, redness, and edema. Further, a mass has been identified on the right, with spontaneous, dark-yellow, smelly secretion with palpation over the Bartholin's glands.
Physical examination…… [Read More]

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Education and Leadership in Perioperative Nursing

Words: 2256 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 84110234

Nursing Higher Education and Leadership
Clinical leadership is very important because of the problems that characterize the health care sector, including workforce shortage, high rates of change, staff chaos, quality issues, and safety concerns, among others. From history, the preparation of nurses for key roles in the health care delivery system is quite important and should not be overlooked. (Joseph & Huber, 2015). I am trained both as a clinical nursing educator and perioperative nurse. Clinical nurse educators attain that title after much experience in nursing. They mainly coach nursing students and the newly graduated ones. Perioperative nurses on the other hand are registered nurses who help in the surgical department in hospitals, day surgery units, physician’s offices and clinics. Their main work is to assist in planning, implementation and evaluation of treatment for surgical patients. (Turunen et al., 2017).
As such, the perioperative nurse starts her work immediately the…… [Read More]

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Patient and Coworker

Words: 341 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58254297

Communication Discussion Board Response

I would have to respectfully disagree with the idea that communication is mainly about being clear in one's verbal and nonverbal language. A nurse can clearly communicate how to follow a healthy diet to a diabetic -- or the need to stay clean to a drug addict -- but unless the nurse comprehends the patient's own view of his or her situation, such as the real medical need to follow the diet or the dangers of drug abuse, communication has not transpired in an effectual fashion. It is just as important that the nurse understand the patient's body language, to assess whether he or she is listening, and to ask the patient to restate the treatment plan, and to repeat what he or she feels about his or her condition.

Discussion

You make a very important point that the process of communicating with patients isn't about…… [Read More]

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Patient and Caregiver Education

Words: 671 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73496221

espiratory Care: Scenario

One of the most difficult ethical scenarios which may arise is when a patient is not fully compliant with treatment. In one of the cases I observed, a child had recently been diagnosed with asthma. Unfortunately, the parent was not able to offer the child the ideal environment for coping with his asthma. The parent and child lived in a very dusty environment and it was difficult for the parent to bring the child in for regular checkups. The child was frequently taken to the emergency room because of difficulties in controlling his asthma. There was heavy reliance upon inhaled corticosteroids and other medications primarily intended for short-term use. The parent was also reluctant to allow the child to participate in regular activities such as sports. The child was overweight and this caused a spiral of problems for the child: not being able to participate in normal…… [Read More]

References

Juniper E.F., Guyatt G.H., Feeny DH, Ferrie P.J., Griffith L.E., & Townsend M. (1996).

Measuring quality of life in the parents of children with asthma. Quality of Life Research,

5: 27 -34.

Providing parent and caregiver training. (2010). AARC. Retrieved from:
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Patient's Guide to Epinephrine Injection

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 84370481

In addition, epinephrine injection should not be used when women are in the second stages of labor. Furthermore, because the effects of this drug on pregnant women remain unclear, pregnant women should only use epinephrine injection when the risks to the mother outweigh the potential risks to the fetus (product insert).

hat not to do when taking this medication:

Although there are no specific recommendations provided by the manufacturer, patients who use this drug should be aware of the possible side effects and avoid strenuous activities that will cause additional increases in blood pressure or heart rates. Take it easy after using this drug!

In addition, patients should avoid using the same injection site repeatedly since it can adversely affect skin integrity (product insert).

You may experience the following side effects following an injection:

Headaches, fear, and hearts palpitations (these side effects are more common in patients who suffer from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Albertine, Kurt H. Anatomica. Willoughby,

NSW: Global Book Publishing Ptd

Ltd.

Barlow, David H. Anxiety and Its Disorders:
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Education and Frederick Douglass

Words: 2754 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68622403

Marketing Plan

Current Marketing Situation

Product

The personal computer (PC) is designed to increase convenience of computing aspects employed by consumers. In particular, this product is purposed to enable the consumer to undertake several functional and computing services through one device. IBM, the producer of the personal computer, is acknowledged as one of the key trailblazers in the technology industry. In particular, the company is one of the original founders and advancers of the personal computer versions that we perceive and use in the present day. PC manufactured by IBM facilitates not just the individual consumer at home, but also organizations as a whole in their business operations. The benefit of this product is that it enhances the convergence of technology being used within an organization. For instance, the computer works in tandem with other technologies, such as the internet, different software and cloud-based services. This is a user-friendly device…… [Read More]

References

Ferrell, O. C., Hartline, M. (2014). Marketing Strategy. Ohio: South Western Cengage Learning.

Intel. 2012. Retrieved from the web at  http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/company-overview/company-facts.html 

Jeffs, C. (2008). Strategic Management. California: SAGE Publications.

Kotler, P., Keller, K. L., Brandy, M., Goodman, M. & Hansen, T. (2009). Marketing Management, 1st edition, New York: Pearson Education.
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Education for Nurses How Does

Words: 3584 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 8879328

egardless of how one defines productivity, it is clear that one cannot be productive at work if one is not at work.

Human resources

Of course, not all professional development is geared at reducing the impact of work-related stressors, but the reality is that that successful professional development should help relieve stress. In fact, professional development is considered a key element of establishing a healthy nursing work environment. According to the Florida Center for Nursing, professional development is one of the twelve essential elements of a healthy work environment. (Florida Center for Nursing, 2006). Obviously, a company's human resources department determines its policies regarding continuing education, including whether a company will offer in-office opportunities for continuing education, whether a company will pay for professional development, and whether nurses will be given time off in order to pursue continuing education. Therefore, it is important to understand the role of human resources…… [Read More]

References

Allen, M., Allison, M., and Stevens, S. (2006, April). Mapping the literature of nursing education. Journal of the Medical Library Association, 94(2 Suppl), E122-E127. Retrieved September 3, 2008, from Pub Med Central database.

Bowman, M. (1986). Nursing management and education. Dover: Croom Helm.

Ellis, J.R., and Hartley, C.L. (2004). Nursing in today's world: trends, issues, and management, 8ed. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Fabre, J. (2005). Smart Nursing. New York: Sheridan Press.
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Patient - Centered Nursing Techniques

Words: 546 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Paper #: 88642088

Inter and Intraprofessional Communication

Patient-centered practice is designed to address issues that usually appear as a consequence of nurses having a limited understanding of their role and as a result of patients not being provided with the opportunity to learn more about the attitudes they need to take in order to make the experience less painful for all individuals involved. One of the principal ideas related to this type of thinking is the fact that there is always room for innovation and nurses thus need to be proactive in their line of work. Considering that conventional strategies are likely to be ineffective in certain situations, nurses need to be able to adapt to stressing conditions and to get actively involved in trying to provide patients with the best service possible.

Through concentrating on intraprofessional and interprofessional practices, nurses can contribute to their understanding of their line of work in general…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Norgaard, B. "Communication with patients and colleagues," Retrieved May 29, 2015, from  http://www.danmedj.dk/portal/pls/portal/!PORTAL.wwpob_page.show?_docname=8390873.PDF 

"Interprofessional Education, Team, Intraprofessional Communication" Committee," Retrieved May 29, 2015, from  http://symposium.medicine.dal.ca/documents/Team2ReportIPE_Team_IntraprofessionalCommunication.pdf
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Patient Over Seventy Years of

Words: 873 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88339797



The Argument -- She Could be Given a Transplant

I could not find a prohibition against liver transplants for those 70 or over, but there is a good deal of information in the literature supporting transplants for older people. In the PubMed section of the National Institutes of Health a study of 1,446 "consecutive liver transplant recipients was conducted" and 241 elderly patients (over 60) in that group were compared with younger counterparts. The conclusion: "Low-risk elderly patients fare as well as younger patients after liver transplantation" (Levy, et. al, 2001).

Meanwhile, Dr. Gerald S. Lipshutz, assistant professor of surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California reports the results of the findings at the orld Transplant Congress in 2006. In a study of 62 patients (Group I) between the ages of 70-79 that had received liver transplants -- compared with a group of 864…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Flaman, Paul. "Organ and Tissue Transplants: Some Ethical Issues." St. Joseph's College, the University of Alberta. Retrieved June 23, 2011, from  http://www.ualberta.ca/-pflaman/organtr.htm . (2001): 1-14.

Kahn, Katherine. "Age Alone Does Not Affect Outcome of Liver Transplant in Elderly."

Medscape Medical News. Retrieved June 24, 2011, from  http://www.medscape.com . (2006): 1-2.

Levy, Marlon, Somasunder, Ponnandai S., Jennings, Linda W., Jung, Ghap J., Molmenti,
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Healthcare Education and Workforce

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 73655372

Education in Healthcare:

The health care system has been characterized with several issues in the recent past including increased costs, poor patient outcomes, shortage in the number of health workers across every category, and under-utilization of health workers. While lack of access to care and increased demand for health care choices are also major issues in this sector, workforce issues will continue to have tremendous impacts on health care delivery. According to the findings of a recent report, dysfunction in private and public health workforce policy and infrastructure contributes to vulnerabilities for health workers and puts the health of the nation at risk (Kreitzer, Kligler & Meeker, 2009). In addition, the current health care system consist inequities and misrepresentations that have continued to affect health workforce.

Health workforce is mainly influenced by the current system of healthcare education, which is characterized with certain challenges. The modern education in healthcare deters…… [Read More]

References:

Kreitzer, M.J., Kligler, B. & Meeker, W.C. (2009, February). Health Professions Education and Integrative Health Care. Retrieved from Institute of Medicine of the National Academies website: http://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Quality/IntegrativeMed/Health%20Professions%20Education%20and%20Integrative%20HealthCare.pdf

Morganti, N. (2013, September 13). What Does it Take to Ready a Healthcare Workforce for Transformation to a Patient Centered Team-based Care Model? Retrieved from Health IT website:  http://www.healthit.gov/buzz-blog/meaningful-use/ready-healthcare-workforce-transformation-patient-centered-teambased-care-model/
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Reducing 30 Day Readmissions

Words: 2030 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 95495647

Patient Eduation

Patients eduation

Patient eduation an be desribed as a proess by whih majorly health professionals and other related stakeholders impart information to patients together with their aregivers so that there an be improvement of health status and also alter health behavior of patients. Those who may be involved in health eduation may inlude physiians, pharmaists, registered nurses, psyhologists, speial interest groups, and pharmaeutial ompanies. Health eduation an also be used as a tool by managed are plans in general preventative eduation and health promotion. Some of the important elements that are supposed to be onsidered when dealing with patient eduation are skill building and responsibility. It is neessary for patients to know why, when and how they are required to make their lifestyle hange. This proess of patient eduation is apable of reduing healthare osts.

Looking at studies pertaining ost ontainment, it shows that patient eduation results to…… [Read More]

c) Having the ability to carry out normal roles and activities

According to a prospective random control study by Department of Child Health, 25% are re-admitted to hospital within a year, (Madge P, McColl J, Paton J. 1997). There was asthma home management training programme using children aged two years or over. About two hundred and one children became randomized to intervention group (n=96) that was receiving the teaching or control group (n=105). The study found out that there was a very significant-admission and significant lowered the intervention group that was made up of 25% to 8. Such reduction was never accompanied through any increase within subsequent emergency room attendance. Another area of intervention indicated reductions in a day as well as night mobility three to four weeks after hospital administration.

There are theoretical models where principles of self-management have been developed, mainly from the fields of behavioral and psychology science. Among the models, the one that is mostly referred to is Bandura's self-efficacy theory. Self-efficacy includes persons' believing in their capacity to fruitfully learn and carry out a specific behavior. When a patient feels a strong sense of self-efficacy, they feel they are in control and have the urge of continuing with new and complicated tasks, (Warsi A et al., 2004). Meaning that patients are empowered and motivated to have the courage to manage their health problems when they gain a feeling of confidence regarding their ability to