Patient Privacy Essays (Examples)

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Patient's Guide to the Internet

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25873378

This can be as relatively minor as a night without sleep every few weeks or a continual struggle to sleep every night. Curing insomnia by just trying to Google a response to the problem only unleashes a flood of websites that offer all sorts of over-the-counter and prescription medications. The person wants to find relaxation techniques and also understand how they can overcome the insomnia on their own without having to take the trouble of going into a physician's clinic. In choosing which website to trust, using the evaluation criteria provided will be very useful. An example of a website that meets the criteria as defined is WebMD.com. Let's take a look at this website to see why. First, the website makes it clear they have an editorial policy, and their mission and purpose are to provide accurate, valid healthcare information to its website visitors. The WebMD Medical eview Board…… [Read More]

References

Lorence, D., & Abraham, J. (2008). When medicine tails: evaluating website quality tor interpretation of uncertain diagnoses. International Journal of Healthcare Technology & Management, 9(1), 19.

Stvilia, B., Mon, L., & Yi, Y. (2009). A model for online consumer health information quality. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 60(9), 1781.
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Privacy Violations and Malpractice at the Okc VA Medical Center

Words: 2020 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89366269

Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Today, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) operates the nation's largest healthcare system through the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), including 152 medical centers (VAMCs), 800 community-based outpatient clinics and numerous state-based domiciliaries and nursing home care units (About VA, 2016). As the second-largest cabinet agency in the federal government, the VA's budget exceeds the State Department, USAID, and the whole of the intelligence community combined) with more than $60 billion budgeted for VHA healthcare (Carter, 2016). One of the VHA's largest medical centers that provides tertiary healthcare services to eligible veteran patients is the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center (OKC VAMC) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Like several other VAMCs, the OKC VAMC has recently been implicated in a system-wide scandal concerning inordinately lengthy patient waiting times and misdiagnoses which may have contributed to the deaths of some veteran patients and jeopardized…… [Read More]

References

About the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. (2016). Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. Retrieved from http://www.oklahoma.va.gov/about/.

About VA. (2016). Department of Veterans Affairs. Retrieved from http://www.va.gov / about_va/vahistory.asp.

Breen, K. J. & Plueckhahn, V. D. (2002). Ethics, law, and medical practice. St. Leonards, NSW: Allen & Unwin.

Carter, P. (2016). How to fix the VA. Slate. Retrieved from http://www.slate.com/blogs / the_works/2016/03/25/slate_s_infinite_scroll_implementation_explained.html.
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Privacy and Ethics in Medical Testing

Words: 772 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78003301

Ethics

Incidental findings are fairly common in the course of medical testing, occurring in around one-third of all tests (Ofri, no date). Yet, the medical field is torn about what the ethical implications of such findings are. In particular, it can be difficult to determine whether reporting such findings is important, and therefore medical practice seeks to establish a threshold of what should and should not be reported. This particular finding, that the son is not the biological son of the father, does not appear to be medically relevant. First, it is not relevant to the question at hand, which is whether the people in the family have the marker for Huntington's Disease. The child could or could not, and his parentage is not relevant to that question. Second, who is or is not his biological father is not a matter of medical health, and especially not an immediate matter.…… [Read More]

References

Illes, J. & Kirschen, M. (2014). Unexpected findings. Monitor on Psychology. Vol. 45 (3) 54.

Meiser, B. & Dunn, S. (2000). Psychological impact of genetic testing for Huntington's disease: An update of the literature. Journal of Neuroology and Neurosurgery Psychiatry. Vol. 69 (2000) 574-578.

Ofri, D. (no date). Ethical implications of incidental findings. Danielle Ofri. Retrieved April 2, 2016 from http://danielleofri.com/ethical-implications-of-incidental-findings/
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Patient Guide to the Internet

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63679863

There is also relevant information for specific sectors of society such as women and seniors. The MedlinePlus Magazine includes several links to asthma information. The bottom of the page includes links that contain information such as disclaimers, copyright, and privacy information. It also contains links that provide information on the contributors of information to the Website. The privacy statement clearly provides visitors and subscribers with the assurance that their information will not be shared. All the information on the site is therefore provided on the basis of full disclosure, both of the information itself and on information providers.

This Website is therefore very reliable, and also includes information on a myriad of other health topics, which will be helpful for Amy if she wants more information on her other conditions as well.

Suspicious Website: http://www.asthmaanswersonline.com/cures-asthma/

This Website indicates that asthma can in fact be cured. Prominently displayed at the top…… [Read More]

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Availability and Portability vs Privacy

Words: 966 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68267387

Portability vs. Privacy

Electronic Medical ecords (EM) refers to the digital version of papers containing all the medical history of a patient. EMs are mostly applied in healthcare institutions for treatment and diagnosis.

Benefits of Electronic Medical ecords

The following are some of the benefits associated with electronic medical records (Thede, 2010). EMs are more efficient than paper records because they encourage providers to:

Track patient's data over time

Spot clients who are due for screening and preventive visits

Conduct patient monitoring to measure their parameters including blood pressure and vaccinations

Improve the overall quality of service provision in the practice

Electronic medical records store information in a manner that makes it impossible for outsiders to access. It might be necessary to print patients' medical records and delivered through the mail to other health care members or specialists.

HIPAA egulations and EM

The federal government passed the Health Insurance Portability…… [Read More]

References

Thede, L. (2010). Informatics: Electronic health records: A boon or privacy nightmare? Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, 15(2), 8.

http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofCon

Jacques, L. (2011). Electronic health records and respect for patient privacy: A prescription for compatibility. Vanderbilt Journal of Entertainment & Technology Law, 13(2), 441-462.  http://www.jetlaw.org/wp-content/journal-pdfs/Francis.pdf 

Stanhope, M., & Lancaster, J. (2012). Public health nursing: Population-centered health care in the community. Maryland Heights, Mo: Elsevier Mosby.
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PHI Security and Privacy

Words: 2053 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69546787

PHI Security and Privacy

Privacy and security is significant for any institution operating under offices because of clients, which prompts for the need of protecting the flowing information. In the context of a hospital, there is need for protecting the client's information in order to assure them of their privacy and security. Privacy is always important when attending to the clients since it provides an environment where the latter can open up to their doctors. Privacy refers to what the protected; information about the patient and the determination of the personalities permitted to use while security refer to the way of safeguarding the information through ensuring privacy to information (odrigues, 2010). The patients also need security because of the inevitability of serene environment for their recovery. Even though St. John's hospital presents good strategies in terms of their sound policies, this is not enough in ensuring confidentiality in the information…… [Read More]

Reference.

Harman, L.B., & American Health Information Management Association. (2006). Ethical challenges in the management of health information. Sudbury, Mass: Jones and Bartlett

Publishers.

Nass, S.J., Levit, L.A., Gostin, L.O., & Institute of Medicine (U.S.). (2009). Beyond the HIPAA

privacy rule: Enhancing privacy, improving health through research. Washington, D.C:
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Security Privacy in Health Care the Protection

Words: 2180 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29161614

Security Privacy

In health care, the protection of confidential patient information is an important key in to addressing critical issues and safeguarding the privacy of the individual. To provide more guidance are federal guidelines such as: the Health Care Insurance Affordability and Accountability Act (HIPPA). On the surface, all facilities are supposed to have procedures in place for discarding these kinds of materials. ("Summary of HIPPA Privacy ule," 2102)

In the case of St. John's Hospital, they have become known for establishing practices of innovation (which go above and beyond traditional safety standards). Yet, at the same time, there are no critical internal controls governing how this information is thrown away. What most executives are concentrating on: is meeting these objectives from an external stakeholder perspective.

This is creating problems inside the facility, as the custodial staff able to go through the garbage and read this information. The reason why,…… [Read More]

References

Summary of HIPPA Privacy Rule. (2012). HHS. Retrieved from: http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/summary/index.html

Alguire, P. (2009). The International Medical Graduate's Guide. Philadelphia, PA: ACP Press.

Johnston, A. (2012). State Hospitals become more Transparent. Times Record News. Retrieved from: http://www.timesrecordnews.com/news/2012/jan/13/state-hospitals-become-more-transparent/

Kilipi, H. (2000). Patient's Autonomy. Amsterdam: ISO Press.
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Strategies to Encourage Patients Independence

Words: 934 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1854540

Nursing Strategies to Encourage Patient Independence

Nurses have a vital role to play in the hospital-based emergency care to home-based hospice care settings. Nurses have evolved from being simple supportive caregivers to having a central role in ensuring optimal care provision for patients. Today's nurses are not only expected to develop critical thinking skills but also to focus on nursing strategies that are designed to promote patient independence, individuality, and dignity as these qualities positively influence patients coping and recovery and minimize their discomfort during the period of their illness. Holistic nursing care includes addressing the emotional needs of the patients as very much a part of the nursing care plan. A brief overview of the nursing strategies that are designed to promote such a holistic care with a discussion of the benefits of such a nursing approach would provide more insight into the topic.

Patient Independence

Nursing role is…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Mark H. Beers, MD & Thomas V Jones MD et.al, (June 2006) 'The Merck Manual of Geriatrics: Chapter 8: Nursing', Pub by Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.

2) Dennis Gyomber, Nathan Lawrentschuk & Peter Wong et.al (Mar 2010), 'Improving informed consent for patients undergoing radical prostatectomy using multimedia techniques: a prospective randomized crossover study', BJU Vol 106, Issue 8, pg 1152- 1156.

3) Ann Marie Rosland, (2009), 'Sharing the Care: The Role of Family in Chronic Illness', retrieved Jan 17th 2011, from, http://www.chcf.org/~/media/Files/PDF/F/PDF%20FamilyInvolvement_Final.pdf

4) Royal College of Nursing, (2008), 'Defending Diginity: Challenges and opportunities for nursing', retrieved Jan 17th 2011, from, http://www.rcn.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/166655/003257.pdf
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Promoting Patient Safety Through Bedside Handoffs

Words: 2142 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88671893

business plan provides a process change for bedside patient handoffs at Samaritan Medical Center, Watertown, New York. An overview of the medical center is followed by its mission and vision statements, and organizational values. A discussion of the assumptions involved together with a breakdown of associated costs involved in the business plan are followed by a discussion of the importance of timely patient handoffs and a description of the proposed bedside handoff protocols for Samaritan Medical Center.

Overview of Samaritan Medical Center:

"Samaritan Medical Center (Watertown, New York) is a 294-bed not-for-profit community medical center, offering a full spectrum of inpatient and outpatient healthcare services. From primary and emergency care to highly specialized medical and surgical services, such as cancer treatment, neonatal intensive care, behavioural health and addiction services, and imaging services, Samaritan Medical Centre and its team of healthcare professionals proudly serves the medical needs of our civilian and…… [Read More]

References

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2008). Facts sheet: HCAHP facts. Retrieved from http://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Fact-sheets/2008-Fact-sheets-items/2008-03-28.html?DLPage=4&DLSort=0&DLSortDir=descending

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. (2013). HCAHPS facts sheet (CAHPS hospital survey). Retrieved from  http://www.hcahpsonline.org/Facts.aspx 

Friesen, M.A., White, S.V., & Byers, J.F. (2008). Handoffs: Implications for nurses. In Hughes, R.G. (Ed.). Patient safety and quality: An evidence-based handbook for nurses,

(pp. 2-285 -- 2-332). Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.
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Data Privacy and Security

Words: 2026 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70051448

ecurity Management Plan

John's Hospital

Privacy of client information is an assurance that every patient wants and this assurance is what the hospital can build patient confidence on. The lack of it therefore may have consequences such as loss of confidence in the hospital, loss of clientele and the emergence of a poor reputation. This paper looks at the t. John's Hospital which has experienced the leakage of confidential information a problem that needs to be addressed. It highlights the steps the hospital must take in its management plan. In the first step, hospital must identify how widespread the problem is and where exactly there are weaknesses in the system. econdly, the hospital's staff must receive adequate training in methods to deal with confidential information especially its destruction. A culture must be developed to deal with this information discreetly. In this same breadth breach must be understood by all staff…… [Read More]

Shred it (2013), Security Breach, Shred --It making sure it is secure, http://www.shredit.com/en-us/document-destruction-policy-protect-your-business (Retrieved 16/11/2015)

Scallan T. (2013), Disaster recovery solutions underscore the importance of security, Health Management Technology, http://www.healthmgttech.com/disaster-recovery-solutions-underscore-the-importance-of-security.php (Retrieved 16/11/2015)

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) (2000), Health information privacy, HHS.gov, http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/srsummary.html (Retrieved 16/11/2015)
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The Importance of Space in Patient Recovery

Words: 1254 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73386816

oom Size Matters in Behavioral Health Outpatient Facilities

The following proposal highlights the considerations that must be satisfied in planning the size of rooms to serve behavioral health situations in an outpatient environment. The housing facilities contribute a great deal to the smooth recovery of patients in a hospital and healthcare nursing homes alike. In outpatient healthcare services, the room size for consultation and residential should meet certain standards. This proposal focuses on the space planning criteria that would help to develop an environment that suits the goal of every behavioral health environment.

Components of a research study

a) The comfort of the patient: The nature of rooms that will host the clients should not come out in a way that makes the clients uncomfortable. The influence of the size of rooms on the behavioral health of a child patient is not the same as that of an adult patient.…… [Read More]

References

Bland, K. I., & Copeland, E. M. (2009). The Breast: Comprehensive Management Of Benign And Malignant Diseases. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders/Elsevier.

Craig, L., Dixon, L., & Gannon, T. A. (2013). What Works In Offender Rehabilitation: An Evidence-Based Approach To Assessment And Treatment.

Devlin A. S. (2015). Transforming the Doctor's Office: Principles from Evidence-Based Design Contributor. Routledge Hall, S. S. (2006). Size Matters: How Height Affects The Health, Happiness, And Success Of Boys -- And The Men They Become. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.
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Patient's History the Expanding Roles That Nurses

Words: 1373 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72918111

Patient's History

The expanding roles that nurses play in the healthcare field include taking the health history of patients. There are many important components to the task of taking patient histories, and this paper reviews those important aspects and components that are published in the Nursing Standard article by Lloyd H. Craig.

Craig says taking the history of patients is "…arguably the most important aspect of patient assessment" (Craig, 2007, p. 42). The reason it is so vital to the practitioner (or doctor) is that every healthcare issue or concern that the patient has encountered in his or her past -- recent or not -- may have implications for how the patient is to be treated.

Nurses do not always see the patient in a doctor's office or a hospital patient room. The nurse might encounter patients in the following environments, according to Craig: a) in an accident scene or…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Craig, Lloyd H. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22(13), 43-48.
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Patient Histories Can Often Provide a Great

Words: 1078 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87376546

Patient histories can often provide a great deal of information about their condition and what the underlying causes may be. As such, taking an accurate patient history can be one of the most important aspects of a patient's visit to a medical facility. There are a number of factors that are important with respect to taking a patient's history, and they include one's ability to gain accurate information, one's ability to have a rapport with the patient that encourages trust, honesty and openness, and being very thorough, so as to not miss important information, such as current medications or past medical events. The following is a review of an article presented in Nursing Standard concerning the details of how to take a patient's history.

Summary

The article is very thorough in its instructions on how to take a proper patient history. The article begins by emphasizing the importance of taking…… [Read More]

References

Craig, L.H. (2007). A gudie to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard, 22(13), 42-48.
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Patients and as it Professionals

Words: 614 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56347705

Examples of 'red flag' usage include logging in during odd hours (over the weekend and in the middle of the night) or unusual activity not typical of specific users. Cloud computing can also lessen the risks by making it more difficult to actively 'transport' data away from secure premises. "According to an HHS database, more than 40% of medical data breaches in the past two and a half years involved portable media devices such as laptops or hard drives" (Schultz 2012)

Q3. How can we minimize injury and harm after such incidents occur?

First and foremost, it is important to inform the affected patients of the nature and extent of the security breach. Patients can take action by putting a credit freeze on their accounts, if they are at risk for identity theft. Offering patients free credit protection might be one way to reduce anger and concern. Passwords must be…… [Read More]

References

Schultz, D. (2012). As patients' records go digital, theft and hacking problems grow

Kaiser Permanente Health News. Retrieved: http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Stories/2012/June/04/electronic-health-records-theft-hacking.aspx
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Patient's History Involves More Than

Words: 1038 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91918676

Another way to put the patient at ease during moments like this is for the nurse to be absolutely certain that she is not showing any signs of being judgmental. If this happens, it could throw the patient off guard and create an uncomfortable situation where the patient no longer feels comfortable being honest with the nurse. Once this happens, the nurse will have an inaccurate patient history and the patient runs the risk of not being treated properly for the underlying symptoms.

In order for the history to be as accurate as possible, the nurse should ask questions regarding several issues that may affect the patient's health. The patient's past medical history is vitally important to the process because it can serve as a guide to what has worked in the past and what treatments are ineffective. The patient's mental health is also important. This will give the nurse…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lloyd, H. And Craig, S. (2007). A guide to taking a patient's history. Nursing Standard. 22(13),
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Privacy Protection Commenting on the

Words: 2121 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6734567



Confab, howeve, is an achitectue that is able to bypass these limitations and combine both appoaches. It is limited, though, and a tue pevasive envionment calls fo complex pefeences that can be easily manipulated by the end use.

Moeove, all these appoaches ae not completely sufficient in meeting the challenges mentioned in section 3.2. Fo instance, PETs and pivacy models do not explicitly contibute in a eduction of data collection, no is that thei intent o pupose. Although anonymous data collection is based on the assumption that if data is collected anonymously then it cannot be linked with any individual, and if data cannot be elated to an individual then it poses no theats in tems of pivacy. Thus, detailed pivacy policies and safeguads fo data ae not seen as citical in this model. By collecting anonymous data, one may ague that a tue minimum amount of pesonal data is…… [Read More]

references that can be easily manipulated by the end user.

Moreover, all these approaches are not completely sufficient in meeting the challenges mentioned in section 3.2. For instance, PETs and privacy models do not explicitly contribute in a reduction of data collection, nor is that their intent or purpose. Although anonymous data collection is based on the assumption that if data is collected anonymously then it cannot be linked with any individual, and if data cannot be related to an individual then it poses no threats in terms of privacy. Thus, detailed privacy policies and safeguards for data are not seen as critical in this model. By collecting anonymous data, one may argue that a true minimum amount of personal data is being collected. However, ensuring complete anonymity remains both technically and practically difficult.

For example, mix zones and changing pseudonyms are used to maintain anonymity but it is also possible to break the anonymity and track a user in a mix zone. Pervasive computing, then, needs other, more robust means to minimize the amount of data collection. Moreover, there are usability and efficiency issues that arise with any of these approaches. Testing, for example, is typically done in a controlled environment under limited conditions. The effectiveness of many of these solutions, then, has not been adequately tested under typical, real-world, conditions. In a true pervasive computing environment, users will move extensively between different computing environments and will interact with various devices (e.g. starting from small portable hand held device to large wall sized displays), and applications. It is difficult to predict how privacy solutions will perform in a true user-environment under more typical conditions.

Thus, it will be necessary to find and incorporate a unique privacy model that accentuates both social and legal norms, while ensuring the technical ability to protect privacy.

Newman, a. 2008, Protectors of Privacy: Regulating Personal Data in the Global Economy, Cornell University Press.
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Patient Electronic Access Implementation Plan

Words: 1758 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39977613

Patient Electronic Access

The objective of this study is to investigate the application of the electronic health record at the inner City health hospital. The goal of implementing the program is to allow patients to have easy access to their health data and information to assist them sharing their health information with other healthcare and personal care providers. This study investigates the application of Measure 1 Stage 1 for the City Health organization. Following the benefits of the electronic health records, the City Health has decided to implement the new program. The program will allow patients to access their information on demand through PH (personal health record). However, the City Hospital will be able to derive benefits from the program by setting aside $170,000 for the implementation costs and $90,500 maintenance expenses. Moreover, the City Hospital should organize a training program for the staff to make the program be successful.…… [Read More]

Reference

ASCRS (2015). Patient Portal Requirement in Meaningful Use Guidance for Providers. ASOA.

CMS (2016). EHR Incentive Programs in 2015 through 2017 Patient Electronic Access. EHR.

Department of Labor (2015). Computer and Information Technology Occupations. Occupation Handbook Outlook.

Fleming, N.S. Culler, S.D. Mccorkle, R. et al. (2011). The Financial And Nonfinancial Costs Of Implementing Electronic Health Records In Primary Care Practices. Health Affairs. 30 (3): 481-489.
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Privacy Concerns Regarding DNA

Words: 1748 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63770822

DNA Fingerprinting

The subject of DNA fingerprinting has become a prominent issue on several fronts. The applicable paradigms involved include law enforcement, privacy concerns and immigration, just to name a few. A few questions and concerns about DNA will be included in this repot including what precisely DNA fingerprinting is, how it is done, the step-by-step methods of fingerprinting, how DNA is compared on an electrophoresis (EPG), what precisely EPG is, whether the author of this report agrees with DNA fingerprinting everyone for medical reasons, why DNA is considered potential evidence in a court of law and whether the author of this report aggress with the government wanting to DNA-fingerprint everyone so that they can learn about disease propensity and other pieces of information. hile DNA fingerprinting has and will continue to render a large amount of benefit, the privacy and other rights of people to be fingerprinted are a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aarli, Ragna. "Genetic Justice And Transformations Of Criminal Procedure." Journal Of

Scandinavian Studies In Criminology & Crime Prevention 13.1 (2012): 3-

21. Academic Search Premier. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.

Ai, Bingjie, et al. "The Elimination Of DNA From The Cry Toxin-DNA Complex Is A
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Privacy Restrictions on Use of Patient Data

Words: 570 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95422380

Clinical Activity: Maintaining Alignment to Legal Changes

Policy and Procedures on Information System

My organization's priorities are maintaining the confidentiality of patients and also protecting the organization as a whole from any security impingements. All information is password-protected with strong passwords requiring six characters or more, at least one capital letter and one lower case letter, a number and a symbol of some kind. Passwords are also regularly changed. There is also an additional level of screening with security questions.

Employees are prohibited from using their work email address to conduct personal business. All work emails are monitored to ensure that employees do not disclose private data of patients, work passwords, or open up potentially corrupted files that could damage the system. Mobile devices must likewise be secured and data must only be accessed on secured networks. All employees are prohibited from disclosing any private data about patients with any…… [Read More]

References

HIPAA. (2016). HHS. Retrieved from: http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/

HIPAA: Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) Rule. (2016). ASHA. Retrieved:

http://www.asha.org/practice/reimbursement/hipaa/hipaa_edi_faq/

Your rights under HIPAA. (2016). HHS. Retrieved from:
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Patient Diversity

Words: 597 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49621684

Health-Related Interactions:

The cases of Todd vs. Mr. Gomez

When dealing with a situation in which communications between a patient and a physician is difficult -- for example, if the patient has limited English proficiency or is deaf -- inevitably barriers are created which prevent a fully patient-centered communications process. Physicians often cite limited time as a reason for being insufficiently patient-focused. In the case study of Todd, the interaction was challenging because of the lack of the presence of an ASL interpreter. This was a lose-lose situation for both the patient and the physician. The physician was frustrated because of the extra time needed to complete the interaction by writing everything down; the patient was frustrated because of the fact the physician often misunderstood him and tried to lip-read as a shortcut or ask him yes and no questions which did not sufficiently address his concerns.

Perhaps the area…… [Read More]

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Employee Privacy Torts

Words: 7119 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96826900

Employee Privacy Torts

Issues relating to employee privacy have been at the forefront of businesses for many years. This has been fuelled by the dynamic workplace which changes constantly and also by employees and employers being more litigation-conscious. Technology has also spurred on employee privacy issues with e-mail and the internet being related to heightened concerns about vulnerability of employers to litigation. Many employers have thus exacerbated their concerns relating to employee privacy and especially monitoring of employee behavior. Employee privacy is respected in many of the large corporations. However, there still exist some breaches in employee privacy. Small business owners are at most risk as a result of their increased monitoring practices and close employer-employee interaction.

Historical background

oberson v. ochester Folding Box Company

One of the major cases that brought employee privacy to the limelight was oberson v. ochester Folding Box Company

Franklin Mills Co. decided to appeal…… [Read More]

References

Anderson v. City of Philadelphia, 845 F. 2d 1216 (1988).

Borse v. Piece Goods Shop, 963 F.2d 611 (1991).

Burlington Industries, Inc. v. Ellerth, 524 U.S. 742 (1988).

City of Ontario v. Quon, 130 S.Ct. 2619, 560 U.S. (2010).
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The Freedoms of Patienst and the General Good

Words: 585 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91574340

Patient Privacy ights and the elated Scientific esearch

The medical research and the use of data collected from patients is not a strange phenomenon in the medical field across the globe, with most medical trend and infections or disease being handled and controlled based on the information collected from patients. Mr. Oberman found himself in a dilemma since being a medical practitioner, he had the internal and professional urge to do anything that would contribute to the furthering of medical research and well being of the population in general. Yet on the other hand, being an individual from the society which he treated its members, he felt that their right to privacy and concealing of private information when they so wished nodded to be respected. All his colleagues were against the legislation that restricted the kind of questions that could be asked of a patient and wanted the pregnant women…… [Read More]

Reference

Salmon D.A. & Omer S.B., (2006). Individual freedoms versus collective responsibility: immunization decision-making in the face of occasionally competing values. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1592474/
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Health Care Law Privacy and

Words: 5626 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3283668

S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011). Furthermore, subpart C explains the privileges and the protections of confidentiality that is attached to the patient's record along with much exception (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011).

The penalty for anyone who breaks confidentiality is imperative. In "November, 23, 2009" was increased to $11,000 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2011). This goes for anyone in the medical field or has access to this information. A person has to follow HIPAA precisely or face a huge fine. If one thought of this ahead of time, whether or not they own a business, then no issues would arise legally. However, sometimes this does occur, especially for those who want to harm another person, yet in the medical field the goal is not to do this to any individual, regardless, otherwise he or she could face losing their license in…… [Read More]

References

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Civil Rights. (2011). Your health information privacy rights. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from U.S. Department of Health and Human

Services Civil Rights:

http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/consumers/consumer_rights.pdf.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2011). Health information privacy. Retrieved May 3, 2011, from U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:
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Ethics of Privacy Is a

Words: 2370 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24199871

This information, stored on a computer and used to correlate with other data could be considered invaluable by many researchers, but the patients have a right to keep certain information private, and to suggest anything else would be an ethical violation of the patient's privacy.

Because computer ethics is such a volatile issue, an entire branch of study has grown up around computer ethics, which proponents who believe the computer age caused these ethical issues, and others who believe these issues would have surfaced anyway. One of the proponents of computer ethics, who actually was the first to teach the concept, Walter Maner, from Old Dominion University, is a proponent of the computer creating brand new ethical issues. An expert quotes Maner, "For all of these issues, there was an essential involvement of computing technology. Except for this technology, these issues would not have arisen, or would not have arisen…… [Read More]

References

Adams, H.R., Bocher, R.F., Gordon, C.A., & Barry-Kessler, E. 2005 Privacy in the 21st Century: Issues for Public, School, and Academic Libraries. Libraries Unlimited, Westbrook, CT.

Bynum, Terryl 2008 Computer and Information Ethics, Stanford University, URL=" http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/ethics-computer/ "

Fisher, C.B. 2006 Privacy and Ethics in Pediatric Environmental Health Research-Part I: Genetic and Prenatal Testing. Environmental Health Perspectives, 114(10), 1617+.

Rennie, John 2008 Who's Watching You: The Future of Privacy, Scientific American, URL="http://www.sciam.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=28825D7D-D772-2192-12177C05B4B2AED7"
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Civil Rights -- Privacy vs

Words: 1176 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81231649

They would subsequently call them at home, leave literature and fetus dolls at their door, and even call families and distant relatives of the patients to inform them of the patients' plans to ask them to intercede. The Pro-Life advocates argued that they were lawfully exercising their right of free speech on public property (such as across the street fro doctors' offices) to verbally attack patients by name as they exercise their equally important right to personal physical autonomy under the recognized privacy penumbras.

The Value of the Legal Approach Suggested by the Article

The Yale Law Journal article (Clapman, 2003) explained various ways that the general right of free speech is limited by more important privacy rights. For example, truth is ordinarily an affirmative defense to defamation. However, existing law already recognizes that certain statements, despite being truthful, serve no valid purpose besides injuring another person, such as by…… [Read More]

References

Clapman, A. "Privacy rights and abortion outing: a proposal for using common-law torts to protect abortion patients and staff." The Yale Law Journal. Yale University,

School of Law. 2003. Retrieved May 25, 2010 from HighBeam Research:

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-101613885.html

Dershowitz, A. (2002). Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. New York:
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Obese Patients Have More Psychosomatic

Words: 3158 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82551024



References

Boulton, Martha (2005) Exploring alexithymia, depression, and binge eating in self-reported eating disorders in women. Perspectives in Psychiatric Care

Dahm, Lori (2005) Obesity update: are we getting any thinner?(Special Report)

Private Label Buyer

Merrick, Joav (2005) Psychosomatic reasons for chronic pains.(Editorial)

Southern Medical Journal

____(2006) Obese people may be more sensitive to pain.(NEWS Breaks)(Brief article) Nutrition oday

PORER, LAWRENCE C. WAMPLER, RICHARD S (2000) Adjustment to Rapid Weight Loss. Families, Systems & Health

Rubin, Jay J. (2005) Psychosomatic pain: new insights and management strategies.(CME opic: Psychosomatic Pain) Southern Medical Journal

ucker, Miriam E. (2005) Depression tied to poor adherence to cardiac Rx: results of two studies show that use of aspirin and [beta]-blockers was lower in depressed patients.(Psychosomatic Medicine) Clinical Psychiatry News

MEHODOLOGY

his study will seek to determine whether or not obese post operative patients have a higher incidence of psychosomatic disorders and illnesses than non-obese post op…… [Read More]

The need for this study is evident. The cost factor of psychosomatic illnesses may be reduced if it can be determined whether or not the obese patient population has a higher incidence of psychosomatic illness in post op. If it does then future steps can be taken to better prepare the obese patient population for surgery to reduce the incidence of post op psychometric illness.

REFERENCE

Tucker, Miriam E. (2005) Depression tied to poor adherence to cardiac Rx: results of two studies show that use of aspirin and [beta]-blockers was lower in depressed patients.(Psychosomatic Medicine) Clinical Psychiatry News
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Rights of Patients Patients' Rights

Words: 944 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66504084

" (South Australia, p. 8)

This demonstrates the balance which is necessary in protecting the rights of the patient and simultaneously ensuring that physicians have the freedom necessary to perform to the best of their abilities. In a respect, this underscores the nature of the strategies used for the protection of patients' rights. The intention is primarily to provide a basic forum for the constructive interaction of patient and physician with legal recourse serving as a failsafe. So is this implied by the LSCSA, which indicates that the demands of existing Patients' Rights standards are designed to make the physician actively accountable to the patient's interests. Therefore, the LSCSA indicates a strategy for preserving the right to consent, reporting that "although the first step usually should be to speak to the doctor or other health care provider who has treated the patient, if any doubts remain, a patient should not…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Legal Services Commission of South Australia (LSCSA). (2010). Patients' Rights. Law Handbook.sa.gov.au.

South Australia (1995). Consent to Medical Treatment and Palliative Care Act 1995. Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002.

South Australia1 (2009) Mental Health Act 2009. Legislation Revision and Publication Act 2002.
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Nursing Respect for Patient's Common

Words: 1136 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13111416

The modern nurse must then be willing to move beyond a simple catch-all of medical jargon and bureaucracy and become someone who is both supportive and critical of the system. This may seem dichotomous, but in reality is not. The system is designed with beneficence in mind -- to help the patient at all costs. It is thus up to the nurse advocate to ensure that that actually happens (Sheldon, 2009).

Undertake assessments which are sensitive to the needs of the patient- Assessment is one of the key factors in management of clinical medicine. The nurse is often at the forefront of that process simply due to the logistical nature of the situation -- taking vitals, preparing the patient for blood work, etc. However, it is in two particular areas that the nurse can be most effective when assessing the actual needs of the patient; culturally and when questions are…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Edwards, N., et.al. (2003). Aging, Heart Disease, and Its Management. Humana Press.

Lundy, K. And Janes, S. (2003). Essentials of Community-Based Nursing. Sudbury, MA:

Jones and Bartlett.

Miller, C. (2009). Nursing for Wellness in Older Adults. Philadelphia, PA:
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Magnetic Resonance System on Patients Magnetic Resonance

Words: 1278 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80574645

Magnetic esonance System on patients

Magnetic resonance System (Imaging), here after referred to as (MS), or nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (NMI), is a medical imaging technique widely used in radiology to visualize detailed internal structure and limited function of the body. It provides great contrast between the different soft tissues of the body, making it particularly useful in neurological (brain), musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and ontological (cancer) imaging. MS uses a powerful magnetic field to align the nuclear magnetization of (usually) hydrogen atoms in water in the body (Adams, 1989). To systematically alter the alignment of this magnetization, adio frequency (F) fields are used, enhancing the generation of a rotating magnetic field by the hydrogen nuclei that can be detected using a scanner.

MS can detect the chemical composition of diseased tissue and produce color images of brain function. This signal can be controlled by more magnetic fields to build up adequate…… [Read More]

References

Adams, R.D. & Victor, M. (1989). Intracranial neoplasm: Principles of neurology. (4th Ed.) New

York. McGraw-Hill.

Clark, C.A., et al. (2003). White Matter Fiber Tracking in Patients with Space-Occupying Lesions of the Brain: A New Technique for Neurosurgical Planning? Neuroimage 20: 1601-1608.

Hammell K. (1994). Psychosocial outcome following spinal cord injury. Paraplegia 32: 771 -- 779.
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Coverage a Patient Demands an

Words: 2517 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12381007



Discussion:

If I found myself in a conversation with a citizen from a country where healthcare is socialized, I would be more than likely to speak with candor by expressing my disapproval for the nature of America's healthcare industry. As the same time, I would connect this to the more general nature of America's economy, political culture and socioeconomic hierarchy. The healthcare industry's monetarily-based exclusivity is consistent with most other aspects of public life in America such as the distribution public services, access to education and infrastructural maintenance. The way that Americans experience all of these things is highly subject to socioeconomic status. That said, I would explain quite simply that this constitutes one of the single greatest flaws in American public governance.

Indeed, the problem of a lack of insurance for many is related to the problem of the cost of healthcare. So confirms the article by Consumer Reports…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Consumer Reports (CR). (2008). High Health Care Costs. Consumer Reports Health.org.

Gawande, A. (2009). The Cost Conundrum. The New Yorker.

Hussey, P.S.; Vries, H.D.; Romley, J.; Wang, M.C.; Chen, S.S.; Shekelle, P.G. & McGlynn, E.A. (2009). A Systematic Review of Health Care Efficiency Measures. Health Services Research, 44(3), 784-805.

Waldman, J.D.; Kelly, F.; Arora, S. & Smith, H.L. (2010). The Shocking Cost of Turnover in Health Care. Health Care Management Review, 35(3), 206-211.
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Business Ethics Our Patient Referral

Words: 948 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34913674

Clients' rights are not being overtly violated because when they register for our referral services, they do not divulge any sensitive information. One could say they are assuming risk when they fill out our forms. On the other hand, when the client sees the doctor, social worker, or therapist, he or she does divulge sensitive information and does expect total confidentiality. The office workers also keep the jokes, and especially client names, within office walls. From this point-of-view, clients' rights are not actually being violated at all.

Similarly, it would be almost impossible for the client, the brunt of the joke, to find out about or be hurt by the gossip because when employees joke they do so without any references to the client's address or other vital information. A utilitarian could therefore argue that because the gossip causes more pleasure for the employees than it does pain for the…… [Read More]

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Understanding Post Treatment Symptoms in Patients

Words: 1448 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36438841

RRL#1

The following questions pertain to:

McMillan, S.C., & Small, B.J. (2007). Using the COPE intervention for family caregivers to improve symptoms of hospice homecare patients. Oncology Nursing Forum, 34(2), 313-21.

What is the purpose of this research?

The purpose of this research was to describe the unexpected and distressing symptom experiences that women may have after undergoing breast cancer treatment, with the goal of enhancing follow-up care through practitioner education and an increase of the knowledge base.

What is the research question (or questions)? This may be implicit or explicit.

What symptoms may be experienced after breast cancer treatment that contribute to symptom distress and psychological stress that are may be temporal, situational, or attributive -- and that may be ameliorated during follow-up care?

What theories, frameworks, models or concepts may have influenced the researchers' choice of a research design?

The qualitative approach stems from a phenomenological philosophical background…… [Read More]

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Ethical Situations What Does the Patient Have

Words: 882 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4124087

Ethical Situations

What does the patient have the right to know?

What the patient has the right to know (regarding genetic tests) is: a complicated matter and many people, including experts, have varying opinions. The information patients receive from genetic testing can have significant consequences, especially if it leads a pregnant woman to have an abortion. The ethical principles that arise in situations like this are varied and are often in conflict with each other. The ethical decisions in genetic counseling would be fairly cut and dry if the principle of autonomy was the only one that was considered. However, by doing this a counselor may be ignoring the other ethical concerns like: what is best for society and being fair to other people (regarding who the patient's decisions are affecting).

Who should have decision making power in our society on issues of genetic / medical testing?

Regarding the "Dwarfism…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Biesecker, Barbara. "Future Directions in Genetic Counseling: Practical and Ethical Considerations." Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8.2 (1998). 145-160. Web.

Flackelman, Kathy. "Beyond the genome: the ethics of DNA testing." Science News. 5 Nov. 1994: 66-70. Print.

Flackelman, Kathy. "DNA dilemmas: readers and 'experts' weigh in on biomedical ethics." Science News. 5 Nov. 1994: 64-66. Print.
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Incarcerated Mentally Ill Patients it May Sound

Words: 2497 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62620579

Incarcerated Mentally Ill Patients

It may sound unbelievable, but on any given day, scholars estimate that almost 70,000 inmates in U.S. prisons are psychotic; and up to 300,000 suffer from mental disorders like depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorders. In fact, the U.S. penal system holds three times more people with mental illness than the nation's entire psychiatric hospitals (Kanapaux, 2004). Indeed one of the most telling trends, say some sociologists, is to incarcerate the mentally ill in order to remove them from society. This is sometimes the only alternative because public mental health hospitals have neither the space nor the funding to treat this special population. In fact, the very nature of incarceration tends to have a more traumatic effect on the individual, causing additional damage to their fragile psyche. omen, it appears, are especially vulnerable. These women have often been victimized during an abusive childhood and succession of relationships.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Majority of Mentall Ill Inmates Don't Get Treatment. (2010, April 7). Retrieved October 2011, from Physorg.com: http://www.physorg.com/news189882907.html

ACLU. (2007, January 30). Solitary Confinment Called Inappropriate for Mentally Ill. Retrieved October 2011, from ACLU.org: http://www.aclu.org/prisoners-rights/solitary-confinement-called-inappropriate-mentally-ill-prisoners-indiana

American Psychatric Assocaition. (2000). Psychiatric Services in Jails and Prisons. Washington, DC: American Psychatric Press.

American Psychiatric Association. (2006, December). The Use of Restraint and Seculusion in Correctional Mental Health Care. Retrieved October 2011, from Pysch.org: http://www.psych.org/lib_archives/archives/200605.pdf
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Data Security and Privacy

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57831752

Information Technology's Effect On Society

Technology has had, and continues to have, a significant impact on our day-to-day lives. Indeed, the role technology continues to play in the enhancement of efficiency in our modern society cannot be overstated. Although advances in technology have in some instances been blamed for a number of societal ills, I remain strongly convinced that the benefits of technology in this case by far outweigh the costs.

To begin with, thanks to technology, the cost of doing business has decreased significantly. Further, technology has also enhanced efficiency in the conduct of business. For example, unlike was the case a few decades ago, it is now easier to conduct business across the globe using various technological platforms such as ecommerce. Ecommerce according to Sharma and Gupta (as cited in Lubbe, 2003) "is defined as buying and selling of information, products, and services via computer networks or Internet"…… [Read More]

References

Lubbe, S. (2003). The Economic and Social Impacts of E-commerce. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing.

Zhao, V., Lin, S. & Liu, R. (2011). Behavior Dynamics in Media-Sharing Social Networks. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
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Jungian Psychotherapy in Patient Treatment

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 729287

Treating the Patient Using Jungian Psychotherapy

The theory that would be best suited for treating the client is the Jungian theory. This is because the theory would allow the analyst and the client to work together in order for the client to increase their consciousness, which would enable them to move towards achieving psychological wholeness and balance. The concepts that make the Jungian theory most appropriate include conscious, unconscious, archetypes, and individuation (Jung, 2014). These concepts would assist the client to attain relief and meaning to their psychological suffering. Since the client is evidently suffering from depression and anxiety, making use of this theory would ensure the client attains psychological growth. The Jungian theory is a well-rounded theory, and it offers the client an opportunity to access their unconscious thoughts and relate them to their current situation (Jung, 2014). The client has some reservations that are mainly related to her…… [Read More]

References

Hewison, D. (2014). Evidence for psychodynamic psychotherapy in specific mental disorders: a systematic review by Leichsenring, F., & Klein, S. Journal of Analytical Psychology, 59(4), 596-599.

Jung, C.G. (2014). The practice of psychotherapy (Vol. 16). New York, NY: Routledge.

Roesler, C. (2013). Evidence for the effectiveness of Jungian psychotherapy: a review of empirical studies. Behavioral Sciences, 3(4), 562-575.
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Using E-Therapy to Reach Out to Patients in Remote Areas

Words: 1723 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86195684

Technology and Health Care

E-therapy also know as online therapy, tele-therapy, or e-counselling is new method for mental health where the therapist offers support and psychological advice over the internet (Sucala et al., 2012). This can be done using email, online chat, video conferencing, or internet phone. E-therapy can be carried out in real-time via phone conversations and chat rooms. Using e-mail messages, the therapist offers the service in a delayed format. E-therapy cannot replace traditional therapy since it is not considered psychotherapy. E-therapy is only used for substituting traditional therapy in a situation where the therapist cannot access the patient. Using e-therapy a therapist can only offer advice to patients experiencing problems in work, life, or relationships. The therapist is not able to diagnose or treat mental illness using e-therapy. In situations where the therapist is unable to meet with the patient physically, e-therapy offers a means for the…… [Read More]

References

Loucas, C.E., Fairburn, C.G., Whittington, C., Pennant, M.E., Stockton, S., & Kendall, T. (2014). E-therapy in the treatment and prevention of eating disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy.

Postel, M.G., de Haan, H.A., ter Huurne, E.D., Becker, E.S., & de Jong, C.A. (2011). Characteristics of problem drinkers in E-therapy vs. face-to-face treatment. The American journal of drug and alcohol abuse, 37(6), 537-542.

Stasiak, K., Fleming, T., Lucassen, M., Shepherd, M., Doherty, I., & Merry, S. (2012). The journey towards new generation e-therapy for adolescents with depression. Neuropsychiatrie de l'Enfance et de l'Adolescence, 60(5), S144.

Sucala, M., Schnur, J.B., Brackman, E.H., Constantino, M.J., & Montgomery, G.H. (2013). Clinicians' Attitudes Toward Therapeutic Alliance in E-Therapy. The Journal of general psychology, 140(4), 282-293.
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Important Factors in Treating Huntington's Disease Patients

Words: 6558 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22789764

Huntington's disease (HD) was the first autonomic dominant disorder for which genetic prediction became possible" (Harper, et al., 2000, Journal of Medical Genetics, p. 567). HD is a disease that occurs due to an inherited disorder leading to the death of brain cells. A diagnosis of HD is accomplished through genetic testing which can be implemented at any age regardless of whether the symptoms manifest or not. Although, the specific symptoms vary between people, nevertheless, symptoms can start with people between 35 and 45 years of age and can also start in some individuals at even anearlier age. The disease may affect successive generations if health interventions are not implemented (Mandel, 2016).

Additionally, "the cause of HD is due to a dominant mutation of autosomal form of the gene called Huntington. This shows that a child born by an affected person has a 50% chance of developing or inheriting the…… [Read More]

References

Causes and risk factors. (2016). Health Communities. Retrieved from http://www. healthcommunities.com/huntingtons-disease/cause.shtml.

Denbo, S. M. (2013, January 1). Balancing the rights of children, parents and the state: The legal, ethical and psychological implications of genetic testing in children. Southern Journal of Business and Ethics, 5, 188-190.

Domaradzki, J. (2015, January 1). Lay constructions of genetic risk. A case-study of the Polish Society of Huntington's Disease. Polish Sociological Review, 189, 107-111.

Draper, B. (2004). Dealing with dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
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Healthcare Privacy and Security

Words: 769 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62912507

American History: Discussion

Today, the existence of America is often assumed to be obviously good because of the existence of American democracy and positive American democratic values exported all over the world. However, that was not always the case. The American colonists did not find untouched, virgin land but land that was already occupied by native peoples with unique cultural worldviews. Because the Indians did not 'own' land in a manner that was comprehensible to the Europeans the colonists viewed the territory as effectively 'up for grabs.'

The initial motivation of many of the early colonists was purely mercenary such as in Jamestown: "The colony was sponsored by the Virginia Company of London, a group of investors who hoped to profit from the venture. Chartered in 1606 by King James I, the company also supported English national goals of counterbalancing the expansion of other European nations abroad, seeking a northwest…… [Read More]

References

What is quality improvement? (2014). Duke University. Retrieved from:

http://patientsafetyed.duhs.duke.edu/module_a/introduction/contrasting_qi_qa.html
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Assessing Patient Health and Lifestyle

Words: 1292 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52498486

Health Promotion and Preventative Care Plan

The purpose of this paper is provide information about the process of conducting a health assessment and a care plan based on the findings of the several assessments that were conducted for the benefit of the patient. The paper will describe the health history consisting of a review of systems, and will provide information about the assessment and its relevance to the plan of care developed for the patient.

The patient (CM) is a 24-year-old single black female who was born in the Democratic epublic of Congo (DC) and arrived in the United States three years ago to pursue an education. CM lives at home with her siblings, nieces and nephews, and her parents who just moved to the U.S. five months ago from the DC. CM works in retail and has been working extra shifts in order to help with the expenses of…… [Read More]

References

Gulanick, M. (2012). Knowledge deficit: Patient teaching, health education. Elsevier Publishing.

Jarvis, C. (2012). Physical examination and health assessment (6th ed.). St. Louis, MO: Elsevier.
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Regulating Internet Policy Regulating Internet

Words: 957 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84684063

In the United States and other part of the world where internet is rapidly developing, cyber threats have continued to be on the increase. Essentially, online shopping has become a modern way of doing business, and in the United States, millions of people purchase goods and services online. To make an online shopping, individuals will need to submit their credit cards or other private information to make a purchase. Some private organizations even ask for the social security number and bank information of consumers before allowing them to make purchase of good and services. In the face of continuous use of internet for variety of activities, private consumers are increasingly facing the internet privacy threats because their private information could be compromised while sending their private data online. In the face of threats to internet privacy, effective regulations to enhance internet privacy are very critical. Although, the government have made…… [Read More]

Falzone, a. (2013). Regulation and Technology Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy. Vol 36.

Lugaresi, N.(2010). Electronic privacy within the workplace: Transparency & Responsibility. International Review of Law, Computers & Technology. 24 (2) 163-173.

Jacquelyn M. & Polito, R.(2012). Ethical Considerations within the Internet Use of the Electronic Protected Health Information. Neurodiagn J. 52:34-41.
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Activity Studies Found Common Features High-Performing Health

Words: 1147 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12396916

Activity Studies found common features high-performing health departments manage diabetes. These departments include receiving external funding programming, a -management education program recognized American Diabetes Association, partnership opportunities.

While obesity and obesity-related complaints such as Type II diabetes are a problem all over the United States, in my home state of Georgia, the condition has been of particular, growing concern. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), "64.8% of adults were overweight, with a Body Mass Index of 25 or greater" and "29.6% of adults were obese, with a Body Mass Index of 30 or greater" in the state (Georgia's response to obesity, 2012, CDC). Even more worrisome, amongst adolescents who should be at the most active stage of their lives, "14.8% were overweight (>85th and < 95th percentiles for BMI by age and sex) 12.4% were obese (>95th percentile for BMI by age and sex)" (Georgia's response to obesity,…… [Read More]

References

Rivard, P. (2003). Accountability for patient safety: A review of cases, concepts, and practices.

Massachusetts Coalition for the Prevention of Medical Errors. Retrieved:  http://www.macoalition.org/Initiatives/docs/Accountability%20LitReview%20Final_Rivard_new%20copyright.pdf
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Relevance to Human Service Practice According to

Words: 2570 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41664585

elevance to Human Service Practice

According to Australian Government - Office of the Privacy Commissioner (2007), the Australian human services confidentiality is a major principle defining the relationship between the human service workers and the clients. In the two cases the human services have privileged the notion of confidentiality over the more fundamental right of privacy. They argue there is a persistent confusion between these two concepts and that privacy is an important but neglected ethical concept within human services. The two cases are examples of breach of confidentiality and privacy and implications.

Following her accident, Sara was liable to compensation from her insurer in accordance to the New South Wales road accident compensation scheme. In New South Wales, people who suffer personal injuries because of road accidents can claim compensation under the New South Wales Motor Accidents Scheme, which is administered by the Motor Accidents Authority. Motor accident compensation…… [Read More]

References

Australia. Human Rights Commission. (1983). Review of Crimes Act 1914 and Other Crimes Legislation of the Commonwealth. Australian Government Publication Service.

Australian Government - Office of the Privacy Commissioner. (2008). M v Commonwealth Agency [2008] PrivCmrA 13. Retrieved April Monday, 2012, from www.privacy.gov.au: http://www.privacy.gov.au/materials/types/casenotes/view/5929

Australian Government - Office of the Privacy Commissioner. (2001, November). Privacy in the Private Health Sector. Retrieved April Monday, 2012, from www.privacy.gov.au: http://www.privacy.gov.au/index.php?option=com_icedoc&view=types&element=guidelines&fullsummary=6517&Itemid=1021

Australian Government - Office of the Privacy Commissioner. (2005, March). Review Issues Paper. Retrieved April Monday, 2012, from www.privacy.gov.au: http://www.privacy.gov.au/index.php?option=com_icedoc&view=types&element=other&fullsummary=6728&Itemid=1021
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Health Insurance Portability and Accountability

Words: 1535 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15794025

The dilemma is often easier to resolve once those emotions and assumptions are put into their rightful context.

For this paper, critical thinking came into play was logic. It is understood that initially the nursing profession had issues with HIPAA. These issues were practical, however, and when the law was matched up against the underlying principles and the Code of Ethics, it became apparent that the guidelines that can be used for resolving any ethical dilemma are fairly consistent. There is still some leeway for professional judgment, as Lo et al. (2005) wrote but the Code of Ethics does a strong job of filling in the blanks left behind by the legislation. Once this was pieced together, the argument for easy resolution of ethical dilemmas became clear.

eferences:

American Nursing Association. (2009). Code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements. American Nursing Association. etrieved October 17, 2009 from http://nursingworld.org/ethics/code/protected_nwcoe813.htm#3.1

Bendix,…… [Read More]

References:

American Nursing Association. (2009). Code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements. American Nursing Association. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from http://nursingworld.org/ethics/code/protected_nwcoe813.htm#3.1

Bendix, J. (2009). News: New "red flags rule' focuses on medical identity theft. Contemporary OB/GYN. Retrieved October 17, 2009, from http://contemporaryobgyn.modernmedicine.com/obgyn/Modern+Medicine+Now/News-New-Red-Flags-Rule-focuses-on-medical-identit/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/597492

Lo, B.; Dornbrand, L. & Dubler, N. (2005). HIPAA and patient care: The role for professional development. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2005; 293: 1766-1771.

No author. (2003). What is HIPAA? HIPAAps.com. Retrieved October 17, 2009, from http://www.hipaaps.com/main/background.html
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Protection of Digital Health Information With Increase

Words: 1333 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1234850

Protection of Digital Health Information

With increase health information technology store access patient information, likelihood security breaches risen. In fact, Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ): In United States, a whopping 97% increase number health records breached 2010-2011

Ensuring that patient information is protected at all times is vital for any health care institution. Patient information records contain sensitive information that can be used for malicious purposes like identity theft, credit card fraud, and leaking of information for malicious intent. The advancement and use of technology has made it easier for patient information to be accessed within the health care facility Shoniregun, Dube, & Mtenzi, 2010.

This increases the speed of service delivery to the patient and improves the care given to the patient. Technology has allowed for the use of portable electronic devices by the healthcare practitioners in entering and accessing patient records and information. Portable electronic devices are small…… [Read More]

References

Green, M.A., & Bowie, M.J. (2005). ESSENTIALS OF HEALTH INFORMATION Management: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES: Principles and Practices. Independence, KY: Thomson/Delmar Learning.

Harman, L.B., & Association, A.H.I.M. (2006). Ethical Challenges in the Management of Health Information. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers.

Laurinda B. Harman, C.A.F., and Kesa Bond. (2012). Electronic Health Records: Privacy, Confidentiality, and Security. American Medical Association Journal of Ethics, 14(9), 712-719.

Shoniregun, C.A., Dube, K., & Mtenzi, F. (2010). Electronic Healthcare Information Security. New York / Heidelberg: Springer.
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Ethical and Legal Perspectives in

Words: 1275 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34717617



A deposition is "conducted by parties to a legal action to obtain information that cannot as readily be learned through written records or general investigation. During a deposition, the lawyer for one side orally questions a witness on the opposing side. In addition to the defendants named in a lawsuit being deposed, others called to deposition can be fact witnesses" (Preparing for a deposition, 2011, World Law). Above all, preparation is an essential component of preparing for a deposition. Before entering into the deposition the administrator should consult with the attorney about the specifics of the case and the law as they pertain to the issue at hand. Answers should not be memorized to likely questions, but the administrator should be aware of key talking points he or she wishes to communicate.

eferences

Meyer, C. (2013). Discovery. About.com. etrieved:

http://divorcesupport.about.com/od/yourlegalrights/ss/discovery_prose.htm

Preparing for a deposition. (2011). World Law. etrieved:

http://www.worldlawdirect.com/article/1020/preparing-deposition.html

Second…… [Read More]

References

Health care reform and health it stimulus: ARRA and HITECH (2009). AHIMA.

Retrieved: http://www.ahima.org/advocacy/arrahitech.aspx#difference
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Ruchi Tomar Disadvantages of Electronic

Words: 3472 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93872950



None of the findings are not surprising to a lot of experts. Apart from large systems that are integrated, like Kaiser Permanente in California and the Veteran's Administration, a lot of doctor practices are adopting different EMs. Also in so many different situations they do not talk to one another (Sittig & Singh 2012). So, a doctor's record is not necessarily able to get access notes from his regional hospital if different systems were utilized. A lot of doctors in that condition could just re-order a test, instead of going through all of the changes of finding the records from the hospital.

Actually many experts make the point that the true power of digital records come when using a sole, unified system that can be retrieved by altered health sites. With the exclusion of large combined health arrangements, there sometimes can be fragmented EMs. Experts mention that perhaps with the…… [Read More]

Reference:

Cook, P.J., Lawrence, B.A., Ludwig, J., & Miller, T.R. (1999). The medical costs of gunshot injuries in the United States. JAMA, 282(5), 447-54.

Eckman, B.A., Bennett, C.A., Kaufman, J.H., & Tenner, J.W. (2007). Varieties of interoperability in the transformation of the health-care information infrastructure. IBM Systems Journal, 46(1), 19-41.

Heselmans, a., Aertgeerts, B., Donceel, P., Geens, S., Van, d. V., & Ramaekers, D. (2012). Family physicians' perceptions and use of electronic clinical decision support during the first year of implementation. Journal of Medical Systems, 36(6), 3677-3684.

Simons, W.V., Mandl, K.D., & Kohane, I.S. (2005). The PING personally controlled electronic medical record system: Technical architecture. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 12(1), 47-54.
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Healthcare Information Systems Databases and

Words: 959 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59218565

Here second question that is raised for the author is that till now and for the future, many healthcare architectures have been designed that increase the availability of the patient records, not only on the national but on an international scale as well. The author in the study has only focused on the national or local availability of the patient records.

Content of the article is strong and there are a number of important facts given in the article in relation to the importance of healthcare indexing systems. The healthcare indexing systems being used in U.S., UK and Australia have been mentioned as an example. The two models of the indexing architecture given by the author in the beginning have been linked by the author with the examples. The loopholes that can be noticed in these cases are the absence of any privacy and security concerns that may be an…… [Read More]

References

Liu, V., Caelli, W., Smith, J., May, L., Lee, H.M., Ng, H.Z., Foo, H.J., and Li, W. (2010). A Secure Architecture for Australia's Index-Based E-health Environment. Proc. 4th Australasian Workshop on Health Informatics and Knowledge Management (HIKM 2010), Brisbane, Australia, p. 7-16.
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Government Created a Committee an Electronic Health

Words: 985 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3030372

Government Created a Committee

An electronic health record is a digital record of a patient's health information generated from every medical visit a patient makes. This information includes the patient's medical history, demographics, known drug allergies, progress notes, follow up visits, medications, vital signs, immunizations, laboratory data and radiological reports. The EH automates and streamlines a clinician's workflow. (Himss, 2009)

Due to the multiple advantages of an EH, health care agencies have been aiming to push up this technology. In 2004, the FDA approved of an implantable EH microchip into patients. Each microchip has a specific code which is identified through sensors. The device is implanted under the skin, in the back of the arm, requiring a twenty minute procedure, without needing the use of sutures. ("Fda approves computer," 2004)

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, deaths due to preventable medical errors rank as the fifth most…… [Read More]

References

CDC. (2011, October 24). Deaths and mortality. Retrieved from  http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/deaths.htm 

Fda approves computer chip for humans. (2004, October 13). Retrieved from http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/6237364/ns/health-health_care/t/fda-approves-computer-chip-humans/

Himss. (2009, September 2). Implanet using ibm software to protect patients in the event of medical device recalls. Retrieved from  http://www.healthcareitnews.com/press-release/implanet-using-ibm-software-protect-patients-event-medical-device-recalls 

Prutchi, D. (2011, December 30). Verimed's human-implantable verichip patient rfid. Retrieved from  http://www.implantable-device.com/2011/12/30/verimeds-human-implantable-verichip-patient-rfid/
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Schneck Medical Center Provide a Description of

Words: 3208 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70543822

Schneck Medical Center

Provide a description of the company, its mission, and values

SMC (Schneck Medical Center) is a nonprofit healthcare organization that provides specialized and primary care services. The center was established in 1911 with a donation of five thousand dollars and a land from Mary Schneck (Jcr, 2007). It was established in memory of the founder's Husband to provide healthcare requirements to people of Jackson County. Initially, the center had a seventeen-bed capacity but it has now developed to ninety five-bed capacity. SMC celebrated its 100th centenary in 2011. This medical center is located in Jackson Country where it provides medical services to people of this area and the surrounding communities. Schneck Medical Center provides a full continuum of primary care services (Jcr, 2007). Particularly the medical center focuses on the health of women, noninvasive cardiac care, bariatric surgery, cancer care and joint replacement. Schneck Medical Center provides…… [Read More]

References

Biller, J. (2008). The interface of neurology & internal medicine. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins.

Cribb, A. (2005). Health and the good society: Setting healthcare ethics in social context. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Rahman, N., & de Feis, G.L. (2009). Strategic decision-making: models and methods in the face of complexity and time pressure. Journal Of General Management, 35(2), 43-59.

Johnson, K., Uecke, R., & Austin, R.(2006). The essentials of project management. New York: Harvard Business Press.
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Security and Control of Health Data

Words: 3766 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68825610

Health-Care Data at Euclid Hospital Security and Control: A White Paper

Protecting Health-Care Data

The efficiency of the modern healthcare system is increasingly becoming reliant on a computerized infrastructure. Open distributed information systems have been initiated to bring professionals together on a common platform throughout the world. It needs to be understood that easy and flexible methods of processing and communication of images; sound and texts will help in visualizing and thereby cure illnesses and diseases effectively. Another aspect is that the easy access and usage can risk patient privacy, accountability, and secrecy associated with the healthcare profession. Therefore, Information Technology -- IT must be able to focus mainly on improving the health of the patient and should not put the patient's health in danger. (IO Press)

This implies that right data has to be made available to the right person at the right time. IT strongly affects the confidentiality…… [Read More]

References

A WWW implementation of National Recommendations for Protecting Electronic Health

Information. http://medg.lcs.mit.edu/people/psz/secman.html

Accessed 21 September, 2005

IO Press. Retrieved from http://www.iospress.nl/loadtop/load.php?isbn=9051992661
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Electronic Medical Health Records Utilizing Electronic

Words: 5456 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39373512

However, because they make billing more efficient, the majority of large urban practice groups and hospitals have already made the switch to electronic records, according to Michael R. Costa, attorney and associate at Greenberg Traurig, LLP, in oston, Mass. However, he adds, most of these organizations maintain warehouses where they store paper records that have been transcribed to electronic form. "There is resistance from some about going to a completely electronic format because there are still some questions about privacy," Costa says. "There is definitely still a place for paper-based medical records, but the focus from now on will be on making sure that information can be adequately secured" (Fiske).

Frederick Geilfuss, partner in the health law department of Foley & Lardner, in Milwaukee, Wis. says that while many larger providers have already begun the shift, he has not encountered any institutions that have made a complete transition -- an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ball, Marion, Carla Smith and Richard Bakalar. "Personal Health Records: Empowering Consumers." Journal of Healthcare Information Management (2007): 76-83.

Brenner, Bill. "Secure Electronic Medical Records: Fact or Fiction?" 3 March 2009. The Standard. 10 April 2009 .

Bright, Beckey. "Benefits of Electronic Health Records." 29 November 2007. The Wall Street Journal. 10 April 2009 http://hfs.illinois.gov/assets/ilhie_112907.pdf

Byers, Jay. "Medical Records Scanning: Convert your paper-based patient records into electronic records." December 2008. EMR Services of Canada. 9 April 2009 .
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Ethical Responsibilities

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14300528

Ethics in Practicing Nursing

Nursing ethics is an important part of treating patients. It is important for nurses to understand and abide by the nursing ethical code of conduct. The Health Information Privacy Act (HIPAA) protects the patients' rights, and it protects their privacy. Health care professionals must adhere to the rules of HIPAA to ensure the rights of patients are not violated and their privacy is protected. In this paper I will discuss some strategies that can be employed to help nurses stay current in their practices. I will also discuss ethical practices in nursing, including confidentiality and privacy.

According to Silva & Ludwick (2006) ethics is one of the most important issues in nursing. Nurses should consider their ethical responsibilities when working with each patient in every aspect of practice. The fundamentals for practicing nursing are their social responsibility, their respect for the person, their commitment to do…… [Read More]

Reference

Erickson, J. & Millar, S. (2005). Caring for Patients While Respecting Their Privacy: Renewing Our Commitment. OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol. 10 No. 2, Manuscript 1. Retrieved on Jan 20, 2011 from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Volume102005/No2May05/tpc27_116017.aspx 

Silva, M. & Ludwick R., (2006). Ethics: Is the Doctor of Nursing Practice Ethical? OJIN: The Online Journal of Issues in Nursing. Vol. 11 No. 2. Retrieved on Jan 20, 2011 from  http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/Columns/Ethics/DNPEthical.aspx