Patriarchy Essays (Examples)

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Because he si a man, he thinks that he is entitled to decide upon which of the women ought to receive the award. This is a clear piece of evidence supporting androcentrism, but also patriarchy. Through his gesture the man does nothing but put himself at the centre of everyone's attention. Symbolically, his is a declaration that the male is the central value of society hence having the authority to declare and to impose what he considers to have most value.
It is true that the award remained in Taylor's possession, but Kanye's gesture was such a blow that her morals were completely down and she was not able to continue her speech, feeling humiliated. In fact afterwards, Beyonce who receives another award will call her out on the stage to have her moment. In the scene under discussion we are dealing with a behavior pattern in which a man….

Rise of Patriarchy
In Riane Eisler's classic, the Chalice and the Blade, she writes,

It would seem only logical that the visible dimorphism, or difference in form, between the two halves of humanity had a profound effect on Paleolithic systems of belief. And it would seem equally logical that the fact that both human and animal life is generated from the female body and that, like the seasons and the moon, woman's body also goes through cycles led our ancestors to see the life-giving and sustaining powers of the world in the female, rather than the male form.

Even after much of the overt worship of goddesses had been changed and surpressed, the forms remain in the Shekhina of Hebrew tradition and of course, the Catholic Virgin Mary. The Mother remains, in disguise. For about 5000 years, society has been run on increasingly male-dominated and patriarchal lines with, it seems increasingly destructive….

Women and Patriarchy
PAGES 10 WORDS 2880

omen and Patriarchy
Across the world, the secondary position of women in society remains a virtual constant. This preferential treatment for men is embedded in social and political structures in various countries and societies.

This paper examines how patriarchal structures remain in three important social structures - marriage, household and family life, and in the economy.

The first part of the paper compares the marriage practices among the Yanomamo Indians in northern Brazil, the Sherpa people of the Himalayas and the!Kung Sen people of the Kalahari desert. These ethnographic examples were selected because of their geographic and racial diversity.

The second part of the paper examines the gender relations and division of labor within the household, and how such traditional gender structures in the home are being affected by the growing number of women who work outside the home, both by choice and by economic need.

The last part of the paper examines women's participation….

Growth of Patriarchy in Ancient Societies
Patriarchy is a term used to denote an ideological and social construct that deems the patriarchs (males) to be superior to females. In the patriarchal social system, men's role as principal authority figures forms a crucial element of social organization, with men holding authority over material assets, women, and children. This construct enforces femininity and masculinity trait stereotypes in communities, thus reinforcing unfair power relationships between males and females (Rawat 44). This essay will discuss the role of diverse ancient civilizations in developing correlation factors associated with patriarchy's growth.

In alby's opinion, patriarchy comprises of six interdependent components that constitute the basis for exploitation, namely, the household, the State, violence perpetrated by males against females, paid employment, cultural institutions and sexuality (alby 1-5). alby's definition of a patriarchal household is the domestic environment in which the homemaker and her efforts towards smooth management of family….

There would be an overwhelming institutional force underlying policies of inequality and hatred that finds common ground with the same as expressed in Atwood's work.
The notion of the government as a 'bigger brother' in this story is produced in the ironic insidiousness of 'family' as it is formed in the handmaids' quarters in Gilead. Here, we are given the impression of a society that is rigidly imposed upon its inhabitants by force presenting itself as simultaneously benevolent and formidable in its authority. From the perspective of our protagonist, we learn both of the oppressive nature of this society and of brand of sardonic observation which Atwood will bring to the proceedings. Describing her surroundings, Offred observes that "Aunt Sara and Aunt Elizabeth patrolled; they had electric cattle prods slung on thongs from their leather belts." (Atwood, 4) the seamless convergence of the warm familial title 'aunt' with the twisted….

Cultural traits can refer to the familiar systems and institutions present throughout human societies including religion, family structures, gender roles and norms, methods and meanings of education, language, and politics or governmental systems. Anthropologists frequently engage in the act of comparing and contrasting cultural traits and practices to show how societies are either similar or different from one another. Although an objective analysis potentially provides an unbiased social scientific perspective, anthropologists also risk ethical relativism when drawing conclusions about the effectiveness or pervasiveness of various cultural traits and practices such as patriarchal institutions. Patriarchy is in fact one of the most pernicious and ubiquitous cultural traits. In fact, there are a host of sub-traits that are linked to patriarchal power and social norms including the division of labor and the social status stratification of labor in multiple societies. Differences between the gendered division of labor in traditional agrarian societies like….

built into the question, "hy are there no great women artists?" First, the question assumes that there have never been great women artists, which of course, is false. The second assumption is that "artists" are different from "women artists." Saying "women artists," in this sense, is like saying "lady doctor." Third, the question uses the term "great" vaguely. Does great mean famous? Or does great mean technically good? Or does great mean something else? Finally, the question itself is broad. Does it refer to women artists in Europe? North America? Asia? The question also neglects the deeper assumption: that the patriarchal society has defined the terms of greatness, and has defined the terms of art. Therefore, the question is fundamentally flawed.
As Nochlin puts it, simply presenting the question is a sign of gross misogyny, and responding to it defensively is exactly the wrong response. An appropriate response is not….

“Submit to one another out of reverence for Christ,” (Ephesians 5:21). This outstanding sentence clarifies one of Paul’s main objectives in outlining the household codes of Ephesians. Christ is the head of the Church, to which all Christians belong. However, Paul quickly shifts focus to the patriarchal marriage union to model Christian social norms: “Now as the church submits to Christ, so also wives should submit to their husbands in everything,” (Ephesians 5:24). Paul therefore uses the household code partly as an opportunity to provide a “theological justification and motivation for the subordination of wives, children and slaves to the head of the household,” (MacDonald, n.d., p. 341). Yet somewhat mysteriously, Paul switches back again and states, “This is a profound mystery—but I am talking about Christ and the church,” (5:32). Modern readers should not take Paul’s message about marriage customs and gender roles seriously, but should pay close attention to….

Sociology and Feminist Theories on Gender Studies
Postmodern Feminism in "Cherrie Moraga and Chicana Lesbianism"

In the article entitled, "Cherrie Moraga and Chicana Lesbianism," author Tomas Almaguer analyzes and studies the dynamics behind Moraga's feminist reading of the Chicano culture and society that she originated from. In the article, Almaguer focuses on three elements that influenced Moraga's social reality as she was growing up: the powerful effect of the Chicano culture, patriarchal orientation, and homosexuality that she experienced within the context of her nationality.

Chicano culture centers on race as an indicator of one's cultural orientation, while patriarchy serves as the ideology that is prevalent in Moraga's social reality. Homosexuality, particularly, lesbianism, is Moraga's release from the somewhat repressing role that she perceives women receive in her culture. Thus, lesbianism becomes Moraga's alternative sexual orientation to a heterosexually conservative Chicano culture. Using the following factors concerning the cultural, social, and gender realities of….

Old Nurse's Story
Elizabeth Gaskell's "The Old Nurse's Story" uses gothic imagery and Victorian themes to elucidate the role and status of women. Online critics claim the story is filled with themes of "male domination, females' sense of powerlessness due to this dominance, and the ambiguous results of women's struggle against males in the Victorian era," ("The Damning Effects of a Patriarchal Society in "The Old Nurse's Story" and "The Yellow allpaper"). Indeed, these three core elements are absolutely evident in this haunting tale about rediscovering personal identity via encounters with the past. The motif of haunting allows the past to return to the present in eerie ways. Relying on ghosts allows the author to present the suggestion that the past haunts the lives of all individuals, and that women have trouble extricating themselves from negative situations because of the constraints of dead social institutions and norms.

However, Hughes and Lund maintain….

Anna Quindlen's "The Name is Mine," the author uses a personal anecdote to convey her experiences grappling with battling patriarchy. Marge Piercy presents a much more pessimistic view of female empowerment in "Barbie Doll," a poem in which the central subject is completely consumed by the catastrophic effects of a sexist society. Both these works of literature make powerful social commentary about the source and nature of sexism and patriarchy. However, Quindlen and Piercy use dramatically different literary strategies to achieve their respective, unitary goals. In "The Name is Mine," Quindlen uses the first person point-of-view and a straightforward narrative prose. In "Barbie Doll," Piercy uses a poem written in third person. In "The Name is Mine," Quindlen's tone is lively and upbeat, ultimately optimistic and encouraging. On the contrary, Piercy's tone in "Barbie Doll" is bitter, scathing, and righteously angry. Their tone and point-of-view might be different but….

Female Friendships
PAGES 11 WORDS 3298

ed Tent
Anita Diamant's fiction, "The ed Tent (1997)," is her interpretation of the activities in the red tent, where the Canaanite wives of the first patriarchs dwelt and celebrated the facets of womanhood, such as menstruation and childbirth. There, they were shielded from their men's outside affairs and cares. These patriarchs were Abraham, Isaac and Jacob and the wives were Sara, ebecca, Leah, achel and their maids Zilphah and Bilhah. It assumes that these women were priestesses of goddess-worshipping tribes of the Canaan region who practiced and perpetuated rituals, traditions and habits until obliterated by their only daughter, Dinah, because of her violation by an Amorite and the murder of the Amorites by two of her 12 brothers (Diamant)

The novel is told from the first person viewpoint of Dinah, the only daughter and last child of Jacob and Leah and the last in the maternal line that should have sustained….

Women's and Gender Studies
PAGES 10 WORDS 3367

omen and Gender Studies
Of all the technologies and cultural phenomena human beings have created, language, and particularly writing, is arguably the most powerful, because it is the means by which all human experience is expressed and ordered. As such, controlling who is allowed to write, and in a modern context, be published, is one of the most effective means of controlling society. This fact was painfully clear to women writers throughout history because women were frequently prohibited from receiving the same education as men, and as the struggle for gender equality began to read a critical mass near the end of the nineteenth century, control over women's access to education and writing became a central theme in a number of authors' works, whether they considered themselves feminists or not. In particular, Charlotte Perkins Gilman's 1892 story The Yellow allpaper features this theme prominently, and Virginia oolf's extended essay A Room….

Virginia oolf
In "A Room of One's Own," Virginia oolf argues that writing is a means by which women can empower themselves, and in so doing, subvert patriarchy. oolf uses symbolism throughout the essay, namely in the central concept of a room. A room, or a physical space, provides the power of place from which to launch probing inquiry and social commentary. Rather than dwell inside the confines of a patriarchal, pre-defined social space, the woman creates a room of her own. This room is both a public and a private sphere; it is a room in the sense of having one's privacy. It is also a room to speak in a public forum, which oolf does when she delivers the essay. oolf speaks on behalf of all women, which is one of her rhetorical strategies. Specific literary techniques other than symbolism, such as irony, add depth to oolf's argument. The….

Elisa Allen is the protagonist of John Steinbeck's short story “The Chrysanthemums,” and Louise Mallard is the protagonist of Kate Chopin's “The Story of An Hour.” Both Elisa and Louise are products of their social and historical contexts, particularly when it comes to gender norms. Elisa and Louise are passive protagonists, because patriarchy has stripped them of political agency. By creating passive protagonists in their respective short stories, Steinbeck and Chopin make powerful social commentary about the role of women in their private and public lives.
Both Elisa and Louise feel stuck in their marriage, but perceive liberation as impossible within the confines of their culture. In both short stories, nature symbolizes wasted potential. For example, Elisa is capable of so much more than gardening: "The chrysanthemum stems seemed too small and easy for her energy," (Steinbeck). Similarly, Louise realizes that she has wasted her life when she sees nature through….

image
2 Pages
Term Paper

Sports - Women

Androcentrism and Patriarchy The Purpose

Words: 607
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Because he si a man, he thinks that he is entitled to decide upon which of the women ought to receive the award. This is a clear piece…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Sports - Women

Rise of Patriarchy in Riane Eisler's Classic

Words: 1048
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Rise of Patriarchy In Riane Eisler's classic, the Chalice and the Blade, she writes, It would seem only logical that the visible dimorphism, or difference in form, between the two…

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10 Pages
Term Paper

Family and Marriage

Women and Patriarchy

Words: 2880
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Term Paper

omen and Patriarchy Across the world, the secondary position of women in society remains a virtual constant. This preferential treatment for men is embedded in social and political structures in…

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5 Pages
Essay

History

Growth of Patriarchy in Ancient Societies

Words: 1565
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

Growth of Patriarchy in Ancient Societies Patriarchy is a term used to denote an ideological and social construct that deems the patriarchs (males) to be superior to females. In…

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4 Pages
Research Paper

Drama - World

Parallels Between Gilaedean Patriarchy and

Words: 1234
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Research Paper

There would be an overwhelming institutional force underlying policies of inequality and hatred that finds common ground with the same as expressed in Atwood's work. The notion of the…

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4 Pages
Essay

Archeology

Cultural Traits and Patriarchy in India

Words: 1426
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Cultural traits can refer to the familiar systems and institutions present throughout human societies including religion, family structures, gender roles and norms, methods and meanings of education, language, and…

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2 Pages
Essay

Art  (general)

gender and art history and patriarchy

Words: 674
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

built into the question, "hy are there no great women artists?" First, the question assumes that there have never been great women artists, which of course, is false.…

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2 Pages
Essay

Religion

bible patriarchy paul and ephesians metaphor

Words: 676
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

“Submit to one another out of reverence for Christ,” (Ephesians 5:21). This outstanding sentence clarifies one of Paul’s main objectives in outlining the household codes of Ephesians. Christ is…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Women's Issues - Sexuality

Sociological Theories Sociology of Gender

Words: 1087
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Sociology and Feminist Theories on Gender Studies Postmodern Feminism in "Cherrie Moraga and Chicana Lesbianism" In the article entitled, "Cherrie Moraga and Chicana Lesbianism," author Tomas Almaguer analyzes and studies the…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Sports - Women

Old Nurse's Story by Elizabeth Gaskell

Words: 1943
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Old Nurse's Story Elizabeth Gaskell's "The Old Nurse's Story" uses gothic imagery and Victorian themes to elucidate the role and status of women. Online critics claim the story is filled…

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image
3 Pages
Essay

Literature

Anna Quindlen's The Name Is Mine the

Words: 937
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Anna Quindlen's "The Name is Mine," the author uses a personal anecdote to convey her experiences grappling with battling patriarchy. Marge Piercy presents a much more pessimistic view…

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image
11 Pages
Term Paper

Family and Marriage

Female Friendships

Words: 3298
Length: 11 Pages
Type: Term Paper

ed Tent Anita Diamant's fiction, "The ed Tent (1997)," is her interpretation of the activities in the red tent, where the Canaanite wives of the first patriarchs dwelt and celebrated…

Read Full Paper  ❯
image
10 Pages
Research Paper

Sports - Women

Women's and Gender Studies

Words: 3367
Length: 10 Pages
Type: Research Paper

omen and Gender Studies Of all the technologies and cultural phenomena human beings have created, language, and particularly writing, is arguably the most powerful, because it is the means by…

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image
3 Pages
Essay

Literature

Room of One's Own by Virginia Woolf Found in the Seagull Reader

Words: 989
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Virginia oolf In "A Room of One's Own," Virginia oolf argues that writing is a means by which women can empower themselves, and in so doing, subvert patriarchy. oolf uses…

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image
2 Pages
Essay

Literature

comparing the protagonists in chopin and'steinbeck

Words: 710
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Essay

Elisa Allen is the protagonist of John Steinbeck's short story “The Chrysanthemums,” and Louise Mallard is the protagonist of Kate Chopin's “The Story of An Hour.” Both Elisa and…

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