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We have over 111 essays for "Peter Singer"

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Famine Affluence and Morality 1972 by Peter

Words: 1487 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25682272

Famine, Affluence, and Morality" (1972) by Peter Singer introduces its readers to numerous social issues that Singer states have been vastly ignored. The issues deal with the lack of progress in the betterment of society and although the article was originally written more than four decades ago, the situation around the globe remains unchanged. Singer's goal in this article is to present a side not widely taken. To him, the social problems infesting the lives of individuals seem to be quite obvious, yet his discontent with people's attitudes is quite apparent in this article. His primary argument in the article however, is that in order to solve the issues that he sees as being obviously manageable is to give to those who need it most. Throughout the article he points out to these exact societal problems and the financial turmoil that various communities around the world were facing at the…… [Read More]

References:

BBC. (2013). Ethics Guide: Argument against charity. BBC. Retrieved 22 April 2013 from  http://www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/charity/against_1.shtml 

Gallager, M. (2011). The world at seven billion. BBC News Magazine. Retrieved 22 April 2013 from
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Singer's Goal Is a Very Noble One

Words: 1389 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3556410

Singer's goal is a very noble one. Through his article, Singer is attempting to dispel many of the more common notions of moral obligation and charity. His article attempts to provide the reader with concrete notions of moral obligation as they relate to overall human behavior. He presents various notions such as the need to help others irrespective of proximity or geographic preference. Singer, through his article also provides evidence as to the absurd thinking prevailing in the developed nations regarding charity. I particularly applaud how Singer contrast's man's desire for clothes with the need to preventing starvation. In the article Singer shows how many unnecessarily spend money on items that provide no moral benefit to society, while others in neighboring countries are starving. The goal of this article is for those in the developed nations to rethink how they regard moral obligation and charity. The article's goal is also…… [Read More]

References:

1. Cottingham, John (1996). Western philosophy: an anthology. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 455-461. ISBN 978-0-631-18627

2. Shafer-Landau, Russ (2007). Ethical theory: an anthology. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 506-523. ISBN 978-1-4051-3320-3.

3. Pojman, Louis P. (2003). Moral philosophy: a reader. Hackett. pp.313- 344. ISBN 978-0-87220-661-8.
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Sanctity of Life and Utilitarianism

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58832636

SINGE

Euthanasia

The Singer debate 'are there some lives not worth living:'

The sanctity of life and utilitarianism

Professor Peter Singer is a well-known utilitarian who advocates the right of parents to commit infanticide based upon utilitarian premises: he argues that the resources expended by keeping such children alive are too great and it would make more sense to allow families to adopt instead healthy children with a greater chance at happiness. Disability activist Harriet McBryde Johnson, who says that she would not be alive if this type of calculus had been employed notes: "But like the protagonist in a classical drama, Singer has his flaw. It is his unexamined assumption that disabled people are inherently 'worse off,' that we 'suffer,' that we have lesser 'prospects of a happy life'" (Johnson 2003: 12). However, Johnson also argues against assisted suicide entirely, even with the consent of the person who feels…… [Read More]

References

Doerflinger, J. (1989). Assisted suicide: Pro-choice or anti-life?

Johnson, H. (2003). Unspeakable conversations. The New York Times.

Rachels, J. (1986). The morality of euthanasia.
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Sorrow Beyond Dreams Peter Handke's

Words: 1932 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 60031487



This postmodernist writing that finally ends up having a dialogue with itself reveals an idea common to most of the postmodern art: that language and formulations, as means of expression, are also a means of finding the meaning of something, and that most often, meanings do not reside out of language.

But, at the same time, Handke also demonstrates that the life can sometimes be to terrible to be expressed in language.

The book ends, significantly, with the same Handke sitting at his desk and reading the article about the suicide of a woman. It is not only that the writing turns upon itself, to reveal that the most important subject of the book has not been altogether elucidated and has not been given meaning to yet, but also, the fact that the author is in front if a piece if a newspaper article relating this event is crucial: the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Handke, Peter a Sorrow Beyond Dreams, New York: Farrar Straus and Giroux, 1975

Klinkowitz, Jerome the Self Apparent Word, Fiction as Language, Language as Fiction Illinois: Southern Illinois Press, 1994

Wertheimer, Alison a Special Scar: The Experience of the People Bereaved by Suicide, New York: Routledge, 2001
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Puff the Magic Dragon by Peter Paul

Words: 910 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98501814

Puff (the Magic Dragon)" by Peter, Paul, and Mary

During the 1960s, one of the revolutionary developments that changed the landscape of American culture and history was the establishment of the Hippie Movement. The Hippies, as the people of this movement were called, popularized the "apolitical counterculture," wherein the Hippies did not subsist to "materialism, convention (of the society), and authority." Instead, they resorted to their newfound ideal of a "communal" form of society and a culture driven and motivated by rock music, sex, and drugs (Microsoft Encarta 2002).

With drugs and rock music being the main motivators that shaped American culture during the 1960s, many music bands had emerged, which glorifies the new principle behind the Hippie Movement. esides rock music, traditional folk music came into being once again, only this time, a mixture of rock influence was infused with traditional folk music. One of these bands who have…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lipton, L. And P. Yarwood. E-text of "Puff (the Magic Dragon)." Available at  http://www.peterpaulandmary.com/music/f-02-05.htm .

Mikkelson, B. And D. Mikkelson. "Puff." 2001. Urban Legends Reference Pages Web site. 26 May 2003  http://www.snopes.com/music/songs/puff.htm .

United States (History)." Microsoft Encarta Reference Library 2002. Microsoft Inc. 1998.
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Family Affluence and Morality Famine Affluence Morality

Words: 1087 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73091335

Family Affluence and Morality

Famine, Affluence, Morality by Peter Singer

Peter Singer's article has been reviewed with the intention of understanding his basic ideas about poverty and hunger alleviation. Simultaneously the many criticisms associated with his arguments have also been highlighted with a view to rebutting them and proving the feasibility of Singer's noble ideas.

"Famine, Affluence, Morality" is a famous dissertation scripted by Peter Singer in 1971. It aims to modify the standard estern culture by urging people to perform acts of charity. It articulates that more affluent individuals are morally and ethically obligated to donate as much as they can to the people who need resources the most. It is as such, an essay that is considered a humanitarian doctrine of sorts which authentically argues over the reasons as to why one ought to give more. It is based on the less than favorable conditions of Bangladesh's ar…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coope, C.M. (2003, October). Peter Singer In Retrospect. The Philosophical Quarterly, 53. Retrieved February 2013, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/3542922

Singer, P. (1972). Famine, Affluence, Morality. Philosophy and Public Affairs. Retrieved February 2013

Singer, P. (1999). The Solution to World Poverty. The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved February 2013
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Is Abortion Justifiable According to Utilitarianism

Words: 2678 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33838520

Bioethics

Abortion ranks amongst the most widely questionable subjects examined and discussed all through the world today. Is it accurate to say that it is legitimate? Is it precise to say that it is not an ethical decision? These are simply a couple of the inquiries that arise thereto. One thought is that fetus removal is thought to be reasonable when viewed through the utilitarian viewpoint. The discussion that follows will contemplate on that.

Abortion (Debate Basics):

The premature birth deliberation questions if it can be ethically right to bring an end to pregnancy unnaturally (BBC Ethics). Thinker Ted Lockhart offers a practical answer for taking care of moral issues that can help decide whether to go in for abortion (BBC Ethics). Lockhart proposes that we ought to "exercise discretion based on ethically acceptable values" (BBC Ethics). Interpreted in a simplified manner this means that where we need to settle…… [Read More]

References:

1)

"Introduction to the Abortion Debate." BBC. Web. 19 Dec. 2014. .

2)

Singer, Peter. Rethinking Life and Death: The Collapse of Our Traditional Ethics. 1st ed. St. Martins, 1996. Print.
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Philosophy - Economic Ethics the

Words: 1476 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58863265

Further Consideration of the Issues:

Actually, Singer's use of the term absolute affluence is not perfectly analogous (because the corresponding analog to the conditions of absolute poverty are those of extravagant wealth not working class wealth), but the idea itself is still valid just the same. The point is simply that once human society in part of the world reached the point where even most of those considered "poor" receive adequate nutrition, shelter, and the most basic emergency medical care (etc.), a moral duty arises whereby helping the less fortunate should be more important than self-centered concerns about increasing one's wealth relative to others in the manner that different levels of affluence are defined in wealthier nations.

It is important that Singer acknowledges the difference between ideals that people should uphold and ideals that people must uphold, because it is likely impossible to establish a logical justification for compelled charity,…… [Read More]

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Ethics and Development

Words: 3006 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59694757

Ethics and Morality -- Ethics and Development

The problem of "development" (or, perhaps "progress" and "advancement" also fits in this context) is that while many millions of citizens of the world have been blessed by dramatic progress (technological, industrial, and communications) over the past few decades, many millions are being left behind. Indeed, while millions are living better, living more comfortable lives, countless millions are not benefiting in the least from this social and economic development. In fact, the gap between the "haves" and "have-nots" is said to be widening, and this is a cause for great concern.

Millions of African children are AIDS and HIV victims, simply because they were born to mothers who suffered from AIDS and HIV; millions of other African people are suffering malnutrition, starvation, and live in hopelessness and dread. Millions of people in Third World countries do not have clean reliable drinking water or…… [Read More]

Resources Defense Council. 2003. EPA Officially Rolls Back Clean Air Act

Protections [online]; available from  http://www.nrdc.org/bushrecord/articles/br_1409.asp?t=t .

Singer, Peter. 2002. One World: The Ethics of Globalization. New Haven: Yale

Basudeb Biswas, "Development as Freedom," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, February 2002, 252.

Andrew Davidson, "Amartya Sen, Development as Freedom," Social Analysis, 46 (Summer 2002): 161.
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Life A Philosophical Perspective the

Words: 1400 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78082988

In this example, morality is decided by the gain, pleasure, and other self-interest of the individual donning the ring. Such individuals would more than likely obtain this gain by committing illicit activities, such as robbing a bank, but use their winnings for fairly self-absorbed means to further their consumption of whatever suits their fancy. Houses, cars, women and other material items would more than likely be procured, for the simple fact that the individual is sating his own personal desires. In this case there is no need to act ethically, since the bearer of the ring is outside of the judgment (both literally and figuratively) of others, whose morals no longer apply to that individual.

The Rashomon effect describes the degree of subjectivity involved in the recollection of a memory, and is what is attributed to the fact that different people may recall the same incident with conflicting descriptions of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Singer, Peter. How Are We To Live? (1995). New York: Prometheus Books
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Aid the United States Has Been One

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66752717

Aid

The United States has been one of the most affluent countries of the world. Because of this fact, the country has established a history of providing aid and comfort to other groups around the world who are suffering because of economic, agricultural, or other turmoil for whatever reason, whether it be failure of government, war, or natural disaster. Some advocate that this is the rightful position of more wealthy countries and populations, to provide assistance to those who are less fortunate. This is certainly true to some extent. However, when a nation is in times of difficulty itself, like the United States is currently embroiled in, it is more important that the government provide aid to its own citizens than looking at what it can do outside the nation's borders. On an individual level, it would certainly be nice for wealthy persons to assist their fellow men and women…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Narveson, Jan. "We Don't Owe Them a Thing." The Monist. 86:3. 419-433. Print.

Singer, Peter. "Famine, Affluence, and Morality." Philosophy and Public Affairs. 1:1. 1972. 229-

243. Print.
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Spider Life Is Sacred No

Words: 1499 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92118557



Is Ahimsa workable?

The author on the one hand says that the Jains are ideal in respecting the sacredness of life but one the other hand they are too impractical. Even Gandhi himself claimed to follow ahimas yet he had to allow use of DDT to kill mosquitoes. Thus, the idea of ahimas is impractical for protecting lower species because they often kill too many people. Thus the workability of an idea depends on the balance. If the idea of behaving positively to members of species means to respect their light to live than every specie should be allowed to live without harming the other and the one harming the other. And the answer given by the Jainism to author's question is not perfect.

How to React?

The author of the essay does not only give an overview of how people behave but he also tells how they people should…… [Read More]

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Heifer International to Jo Luck

Words: 396 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52913847

She has committed herself to helping people in difficult circumstances help themselves. hile in prison Stewart volunteered at the omen's Venture Fund, teaching poor women how to start their own businesses, and has continued to show an interest in empowering former female inmates since her release ("Stewart aims to lighten sentence with charity," 2004, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel).

Since she is barred from serving as the CEO of her own company, Stewart does not formally have an organization to run, thus adding the stewardship of Heifer to her portfolio might be an attractive offer for the successful businesswoman. She would bring added publicity to the cause's mission. It would draw a larger donor base for Heifer, as Stewart's traditional Macy and Kmart shopping audience would hear about the organization through Stewart's website and media broadcasts.

orks Cited

Leadership Team." (2007). Heifer International. Retrieved 14 Feb 2007 at http://www.heifer.org/site/c.edJRKQNiFiG/b.201524/

Singer, Peter and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Leadership Team." (2007). Heifer International. Retrieved 14 Feb 2007 at  http://www.heifer.org/site/c.edJRKQNiFiG/b.201524/ 

Singer, Peter and Jim Mason. (2007) the Way We Eat. New York: Rodale.

Stewart aims to lighten sentence with charity/." (2004). Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved 14 Feb 2007 at  http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4196/is_20040601/ai_n10965437
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Evidence You Draw From One

Words: 1961 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91859024

As the world grows more affluent, it will want more, rather than less meat.

Additionally, meat raised on farms such as Salatin's will likely cost more money. Pollan dismisses this fact, stating: "For my own part, I've discovered that if you're willing to make the effort, it's entirely possible to limit the meat you eat to nonindustrial animals. I'm tempted to think that we need a new dietary category, to go with the vegan and lactovegetarian and piscatorian." Pollan calls the taking of the life of the animal a sacred, special act that must be done with reverence, much like ancient priests used to, and sees the human slaughterhouse at Salatin's farm to be a model for the future. If only people knew what went on behind closed doors, he says, "Tail-docking and sow crates and beak-clipping would disappear overnight, and the days of slaughtering 400 head of cattle an…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Pollan, Michael. "An animal's place." The New York Times Magazine. 20 Nov 2002.

 http://michaelpollan.com/articles-archive/an-animals-place  / [22 Sept 2012]
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Infanticide as a Charge and a Defense

Words: 4613 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 77353952

Infanticide in Australia

Infanticide is the act or practice of killing newborns or infants. It has been committed or performed in every continent and in every level of culture from the poorest hunters and gatherers to the richest and most advanced classes of people and from the time of our ancestors to modern age (Milner 1998). The act or practice has been so rampant that there is enough evidence on record to show that it has been more the rule than an exception and this evidence reflects that parents themselves kill their infants under distressing and stressful situations. The practice or act was so frequent in England in the 19th century that both the medical and the private communities had to think of ways to control the crime (Milner) described by medical practitioners as savage in a contradiction to human progress.

But infanticide is not a modern creation. It was…… [Read More]

References

Burleigh, M. (1994). Return to the planet of the apes? - peter singer in Germany. History Today.  http://www.findarticles.com/articles/p/m_mi1373/is_n10444/ai_15912728 

Cooray, M. (2004). Human rights in australia. Youth Matrix. http://www.youthmatrix.com/art_philos_humanrights.htm

Hammoud, AAM. (2004). Status of women in islam. Australian Muslim Community. http://al-emaan.org/wrights1.htm

Knight, K. (2004). Australia. The Catholic Encyclopedia, volume II, online edition.  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/02113b.htm
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Zoos Are Categorically Utilitarian in

Words: 649 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 90118739

Singer would also claim that there is no actual utility in abusing animals in this way, and that it does not promote the greatest good for the greatest number for either the animal or human communities. Even if an individual animal has no inherent rights (as Tom Regan would claim), the human being has a moral duty to respect all animals with the capacity for suffering.

It is important to alleviate suffering, and therefore important to liberate the animals in their collective condition of oppression in an exploitative zoo. Tom Regan would argue that the exploitative zoo infringes on the rights of the individual animals -- as Regan does claim that animals have the same rights as human beings. Therefore, it is more likely that Regan would denounce all zoos including those designed for species preservation -- because Regan would not place any perceived utility before rights. Regan's thesis is…… [Read More]

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Utilitarianism and the Case of Perdue Farms

Words: 1995 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75717076

Perdue Farms

Personal & Organizational Ethics

Perdue Farms practices are in question for being inhumane. In my opinion, their form of advertisement is deceitful and false advertisement. It is advertised in this manner to instill trust in the company's ethics and chicken factory farming process. Its products are promoted as chickens that are raised cage free, on an all vegetarian diet, with no animal by-products, no antibiotics EVE, and humanely raised (CompassionUSA, 2014). It is important that the consumer perceives the process of farm-raising the chicken as humanely as possible. After all, how many people do you know who do not eat chicken? Perdue operates under the utilitarianism theory which our text states is "the theory that an action is morally right if the consequences of the actions are more favorable than unfavorable to everyone" -- or, in other words, that emphasize making ethical decisions as long as it benefits…… [Read More]

References

Text

Fieser, J. (2015). Introduction to business ethics [Electronic version]. Retrieved from  https://content.ashford.edu  / •Chapter 2: Capitalism

Articles

Friedman, M. (1970, September 13). The social responsibility of business is to increase its profits. New York Times Magazine. Retrieved from  http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/dl/free/0073524697/910345/Appendices.pdf
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Rawls & Bernard Williams

Words: 2941 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 31741908

Utilitarianism

The author of this report is to offer a fairly extensive essay about three general questions relating to utilitarianism. The first question pertains to John awls and his deconstructions of utilitarianism and what came to be known as "the analogy." The second question pertains to the views of Peter Singer as stated and enumerated in Famine, Affluence and Morality. Last up will be Bernard Williams. Like awls, he generally viewed utilitarianism poorly and offers specific examples and explanations of why he did not agree with the subject. For all three questions, there will be a critique or criticism of the overall argument. While cases can be made for both utilitarianism and its opposite, there are some rather gaping holes in the logic that justifies utilitarianism and how it works.

Questions Answered

Of all of the ethical and moral philosophers out there, awls is certainly one of the more notorious…… [Read More]

References

Rawls, J. (1971). A theory of justice. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard

Singer, P. (1972). Famine, Affluence, and Morality. Philosophy and Public Affairs, 1(1).

Smart, J., & Williams, B. (1973). Utilitarianism; for and against. Cambridge [England:
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Person Is in Inexorable Pain

Words: 1279 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30294992

Certainly in nature, one who was too ill to move would not last long. They would certainly not be placed on a feeding tube, having a machine breathing for them, mechanical devices doing all but forcing their heart to beat. Does having the power to extend life mean that physicians then have a duty to do so? According to Lachs, "Medicine does not surrender its vocation in serving the desires of individuals: since health and continued life are among our primary wishes, its career consists in just this service." If the primary duty of a physician is to honor their patient's wishes for health, then if a patient desires death as an end to suffering, that physician does not have a duty to prolong that patient's life. Rather, prolonging life against the wishes of the patient breaches the duty of the profession.

hy, then, do physicians continue to take incredible…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Ethics." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 19 March 2011.

The Hippocratic Oath; Modern Version. PBS.com. 19 March 2011.

Lach, John. "When Abstract Moralizing Runs Amok." (please insert the book information, as it was not on the pages sent)

Singer, Peter. "Voluntary Euthanasia: A Utilitarian Perspective." (see note, above)
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Ethics Is a Branch of Philosophy That

Words: 555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 34929578

Ethics is a branch of philosophy that deals with what areas of human interest?

life after death b-god c-morality

The answer is c. Ethics is the branch of philosophy that deals with moral questions, or the question of what actions are considered to be right or wrong. Moral rightness and moral wrongness are philosophical areas of inquiry, requiring analysis and debate. The ethics of an action can be debated on the intentions of the actor, the consequences of the actions, or on other factors. There are many different approaches to the study of ethics, which is why there are so many different ethical and moral philosophers.

Ethics depends on the study of religion, or needs to be based on religious knowledge, true or false.

False. Although some philosophers, like Kant, refer to God in their philosophical treatises, there is no need for a philosophy of ethics to be grounded in…… [Read More]

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Common Property and Animal Testing

Words: 726 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89483570

Q1. List ten real-world common property resources with which you are familiar. Describe an example of one of these common property resources that is not (tragically) overexploited (use the term “institution/s” in your discussion).

The so-called tragedy of the commons is defined as the fact that people tend to exploit common resources to the maximum degree possible for their own benefit, thus indirectly harming other or future people who could benefit from the resource (“Tragedy of the Commons,” 2018). Examples of common property include public parks, fish in the ocean, public monuments, highways, clean water, clean air, public bathrooms, trees, schools, and public playing fields. Although some of these resources are, indeed, exploited, this is not the case with all of them.

For example, public monuments are usually relatively respected by individuals (although there is a risk of them being defaced). But one of the reasons for this may be…… [Read More]

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Indictment of the Moral Offense of Animal

Words: 1676 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 89130367

Indictment of the Moral Offense of Animal Cruelty

Animals think. Animals feel emotion. Animals experience pain. Yet there are members of our human society that find these facts irrelevant. In fact there are many people that have no problem disregarding these facts entirely as long as they are able to reap some type of personal reward or benefit from an animal. hether that benefit is in the form of food, clothing, or testing the latest new lipstick, it is always at the expense of the animal's well-being. In this paper I argue that the abuse of animals is morally wrong and therefore animals ought to be afforded rights which place the same consideration on their sentience as is placed on human beings.

Sentience is a term used to describe the fact that animals feel pain and emotions in much the same fashion as human beings. It is also used as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arluke, Arnold. Just a Dog: Understanding Animal Cruelty and Ourselves. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. 2006.

Cohn, Priscilla. In John M. Kistler's People Promoting and People Opposing Animal Rights: In Their Own Words. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. 2002.

Kolber, Adam. "Upright: The Moral and Legal Standing of Humans and Other Apes." Stanford Law Review, 54.1 (2001): 163-204.
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Euthanasia Morality & Ethics in

Words: 317 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87419859

In this case, there would be little benefit to society as compared to the individual's right to be free from pain and to make autonomous decisions. According to Singer's utilitarianism, euthanasia is therefore the ethical choice.

Sarah Banks writes on the practical application of these ethics, with a special focus on the caring professions. For Banks, codes of ethics are not rigid rulebooks with prescriptions on the minutiae of professional practice. This thus opens the possibility that there are cases where social workers could find euthanasia to be the ethical choice, such as cases of extreme pain and suffering for terminally ill patients.

Since euthanasia is largely a question of morality and ethics, addressing this question through legislation will do little to quell the debate. The only certainty is that as science continues to advance, society will continue to grapple with the moral questions raised by…… [Read More]

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Masson Jeffrey Moussaieff and Mccarthy

Words: 1698 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79764450

One of the humans working with her used sign language to ask her what she should do for an upset stomach. Koko signed back "stomach you there drink orange," "there" being the refrigerator, which Koko pointed at. Amazingly, ten days later Koko apparently remembered this and used sign language to find out if the woman was feeling better (p. 159). In another remarkable story, a chimpanzee learned to draw and sought the activity out although she was never rewarded for doing so (p. 203). The authors note that the animal may have started drawing to relieve the boredom of being in captivity, but point out that the animal still showed the desire to be creative artistically.

Ultimately the authors plainly state what they have been leading the readers to: "In the end, when we wonder whether to ascribe an emotion to an animal, the question to ask is not, 'Can…… [Read More]

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Consequences of Factory Farms Annotated Bibliography Armstrong

Words: 676 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 70675512

Consequences of Factory Farms

Annotated Bibliography

Armstrong, S.J. & Botzler, R. (Eds.). (2003). he Animal Ethics Reader. New York, NY: Routledge.

his anthology that has a comprehensive review of the factory farming debate. he book is also especially useful to me given its consideration of both sides of the debate. For instance, some contributors present and effectively counter some of the arguments that have been presented by those in support of factory farming. In this case, the contributors who include but are not limited to Mary Madgley and Peter Singer are leading luminaries in this particular field. I found the introduction offered by the editors before each chapter particularly useful in helping one digest the contents of the chapter.

DeGrazia, D. (2002). Animal Rights: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Like Armstrong, DeGrazia also examines one of the most consistent arguments that has been presented in support of…… [Read More]

This is one of the books that successfully offer a comprehensive look at the most urgent global issues facing us today. In addition to factory farming, Seitz and Hite examine several other global concerns affecting us on the social, political as well as economic arena. On factory farms, the authors in brief offer a candid "look at factory farms and the anticipated consequences that have come with the adoption of factory techniques to produce animals for human consumption." Seitz and Hite are respected academics and professionals in their diverse fields with both offering their services as instructors at Wofford College and at the School of Advanced International Studies respectively.

Weber, K. (Ed.). (2009). Food, Inc.: How Industrial Food is Making Us Sicker, Fatter and Poorer -- And What You Can Do About it. New York, NY: Public Affairs.

This is yet another anthology that basically expands and complements subjects covered in the Food Inc. documentary. The book succeeds in challenging the reader's perception of food. In regard to factory farms, the contributors successfully highlight the harmful effects of industrialized farming to not only the affected animals but also to the environment and consumers. The only problem I have with the book is the occasional loss of focus. Although a majority of the chapters are largely concerned with the issues at hand, i.e. The factory/industrial food system, some other chapters occasionally deviate from the book's central focus. Contributors in this case are individuals and organizations of repute.
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Geniuses History Will Never Even Be Aware

Words: 2692 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74847366

geniuses, history will never even be aware that most people even lived at all, much less that their lives had any real purpose, meaning or worth. All ideas of human equality and natural rights are just pious little myths and fables, since only a handful will ever have the talent and intelligence to be recognized as standing out from the anonymous masses. This world is a very cruel and Darwinian place in which only a handful achieve success and recognition, at least by the material and monetary standards that the capitalist system values so highly. In short, the majority of people who ever lived have simple been drones and worker bees, and if they have any talents or worth, few will ever notice them outside of their narrow little spheres of existence. Many people may have certain natural talents but make little effort to develop them, and through bad luck…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Boss, Judith. Perspective on Ethics, Second Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2002

Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (SEP).  http://plato.stanford.edu/
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Human Behave Toward the Members

Words: 1536 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6510421

However, by looking at the eyes of an animal, one can find compassion or hate because predators do not require good eyesight, peripheral vision or binocular focus. David killed the numerous baby black widows not because they had tiny eyes that could not prompt his actions towards them, but because he dreaded them. David says the sight of the black widows struggle for space and life disturbed him, but he did not assure the reader that he would repeat or not repeat such behaviour again. His thoughts permit the reader to go through both internal and external feelings and thoughts of the narrator and all the activities in the essay.

Conclusion

The question, "How should a human behave toward the members of another species" helps in structuring the essay. The question has instigated several ideas from different philosophers and different people. It has prompted the issue of animal rights and…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Quammen, David. The Flight of the Iguana. NY: Touchstone, 1988
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Immigration Ethics and Social Responsibility Immigration and

Words: 2435 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 71959597

Immigration

Ethics and Social esponsibility:

Immigration and Amnesty in the United States

The question of immigration, especially in this country, is ever-present. From our past, and well into our future, the United States will be a nation of immigrants. However, as political candidates raise a number of questions relating to immigrants south of the border, one must wonder about how immigration has grown into such a hotly debated issue, and how it is separating this country. Though it is true that the United States needs immigration reform, one must also look at the traditions of the country, and how they can protect the less fortunate, especially in the area of immigration. The reason this must happen is because most come here with notions of a better place, where they can live safely and freely, and prosper as individuals. This nation ought to offer that to all individuals, for that is…… [Read More]

References

Amnesty International. "USA must fight anti-immigration sentiments in nine states" (2010). Amnesty International. <  http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/press-releases/usa-must-fight-anti-immigrant-sentiment-in-nine-states >.

Baier, K. (1990). "Egoism" in A companion to ethics, Ed., Peter Singer. Blackwell: Oxford.

Cox, A., & Posner, A. (2007). The second-order structure of immigration law. 809,

822-23.
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Truth to Tell

Words: 417 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96957299

Telling Patients the Truth

In regards to the permissibility of deception on the part of Sokol, the writer (2006) ultimately argues that "withholding…information from…patients would be ethically permissible and, more generally, that honesty is not always the best policy" (p. 19). Sokol reaches this conclusion by evaluating a real life case study in which a daughter is willing to donate her kidney to an individual whom she believes is her father. However, while medically evaluating the former for compliance with kidney transplant criteria, the doctors determined that the pair cannot be biologically related. The critical determinant in Sokol's conclusion (2006) is that "The testing was not done to establish paternity and, from a medical point-of-view, the findings do not preclude…donating" (p. 19). Essentially, the author utilizes this case study to reason that informing the patients of this situation could provide too many unnecessary complications which could negatively impact the kidney…… [Read More]

References

Higgs, R. (1985). On telling patients the truth. In Bioethics: An Anthology. Ed. Helga Kuhseand Peter Singer. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing. 2006.

Sokol, D.K. (2006). Truth-telling in the doctor patient relationship: a case analysis. Clinical Ethics. 1.3.
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Tom Regan Animal Rights

Words: 744 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36678960

To be an “experiencing subject of a life” means to be something that is here, now, alive, in this world, being part of the grand mystery that is life. So basically anything that exists has life—from people to birds to trees to grass to even water and rocks. There is a grace and power and beauty and soul that is woven through all of it. To disregard something as not worth our concern or as something that can be annihilated or abused is to be disconnected from this grand harmony.
However, I do not think that being the subject of a life means that one has equal inherent value. As a human being, I feel that we can derive a sense of our value from religious teachings—particularly the traditional Christian teachings that hold that we are created in the image and likeness of God. This teaching points to a special…… [Read More]

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Elvis and Black Music the

Words: 4658 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 86227731

Blues music however did not cross racial lines, with the majority of famous blues musicians still residing in New Orleans and various other well-known black music entertainment venues of the South.

Gospel music has been an African-American church tradition with influences from traditional African music and especially prevalent during the slavery era. Later (most likely because of those particular ignominious associations and all they implied, especially in the South) gospel music was strongly discouraged within mainstream society and actively suppressed.

Similarly, blues music represented a blending of black musical traditions with a centuries-long history originating from the earliest days of American slavery. Sammy Davis Jr. And Nat King Cole, were and remain today among the best-known of early black entertainers within the (then) up-and-coming rock 'n roll genre of the 1940's. Each had a heavy influence upon Elvis himself.

Obviously, though, the blending of Southern musical traditions was not started…… [Read More]

Works Cited

African-American Musical Tradition." (June 9, 1998). Retrieved January 9, 2007,

From:  http://www.questia.com/html .

Bane, Michael. White Boy Singin' the Blues: The Black Roots of White Rock.

Harmondsworth, Eng: Penguin, 1982.
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Battlefield Contractors the Use of Private Contractors

Words: 3943 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82145735

Battlefield Contractors

The use of private contractors to assist the U.S. military forces in times of conflict is not a new concept. According to author Gordon Campbell, ashington has "always" used contractors in times of war. There are many contemporary issues and potential problems when the U.S. military signs deals with private contractors, as it did in Iraq and is currently doing in Afghanistan. The main issue revolves around the concept of hiring 180,000 private contractors to support and in some cases substitute for U.S. service personnel in the war zone that was Iraq and is today Afghanistan. Is the hiring ethical, is it practical, and does it help the war effort? This paper reviews those issues and provides perspective from both sides of the issue using the available literature on this topic.

The Ethics of Paying Civilians to Enter Harm's way

The American military hired private contractors to pull…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Campbell, Gordon L. (2000). Contractors on the Battlefield: The Ethics of Paying Civilians to Enter Harm's Way and Requiring Soldiers to Depend upon Them. A paper prepared for Presentation to the Joint Services Conference on Professional Ethics 2000. Retrieved June

17, 2012, from http://isme.tamu.edu/JSCOPE00/campbell00.html.

Lardner, Richard. (2010). DynCorp, Other Private Contractors in Afghanistan Behaving

Badly. Huff Post. Retrieved June 17, 2012, from  http://www.huffingtonpost.com .
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Technological History of Jazz in

Words: 1575 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 62474668



This were then replaced with larger big band orchestras as technology allowed such large groups to be clearly recorded, "As the swing era began, shorts were made of many of the top orchestras," (Yanow 2). Big band orchestras began showing up in all the major Hollywood productions. They featured pre-recorded songs where the musicians lip singed. It is interesting to have such a crucial period on film. The Swing Era "was fortunately captured for feature films and short subjects at the time it was all happening," (Behlmer 1). Big bands became incredibly popular in feature films during the 1930s and 40s. Benny Goodman, "The King of Swing," had a movie- Hollywood Hotel in 1937 "the full orchestra plays an abbreviated version of that quintessential Swing Era arrangement of 'Sing, Sing, Sing' in the film," (Behlmer 1). From big Hollywood productions came popularity on the small screen. As televisions became the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Behlmer, Rudy. "Big Bands in the Movies." Turner Classic Movies. 2009. Retrieved 16 Nov 2009 at  http://www.tcm.com/thismonth/article/?cid=199314 

Gridley, Mark C. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 9th ed. Prentice Hall. 2006.

History Link, "The Jazz Singer, the First Successful Feature Film with Sound, Debuts in Seattle at the Blue Mouse on December 30, 1927." The Free Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at  http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=2485 

Schoenherr, Steven E. "Recording Technology History." San Diego University. 2005. Retrieved 16 Nov 2009 at http://history.sandiego.edu/GEN/recording/notes.html#origins
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Management Karl Marx Is Highly Regarded as

Words: 2589 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4431206

Management

Karl Marx is highly regarded as one of the foremost authorities in economics and social structure. It is through his beliefs that the thought process of Marxism was created. Although very controversial in this thoughts and beliefs, Marx outlined, what he believed to be, a social framework for society. According to Marx, society often begins a series of transformations directly related to the primary flow of labor and production (Singer, 200). Through division of labor each organizational structure has a central conflict. According to Marx, each organizational structure is characterized with conflict among different parts of society with particular emphasis on economic status. Marx focused a disproportionate amount of his research on the social relationships between the economic classes prevailing in society (Marx, 1990). Marx tended to focus on the relationships between entry level workers and those of their immediate supervisor. Marx identified historical epochs from the beginning of…… [Read More]

References:

1) Curtis, Michael (1997). Marxism: the inner dialogues. Transaction Publishers. p.201- 291. ISBN 978-1-56000-945-0

2) David McLellan 1973 Karl Marx: His life and Thought. New York: Harper and Row. pp. 189 -- 190

3) Engels, Frderick "Principles of Communism" contained in the Collected Works of Karl Marx and Frederick Engels: Volume 6 (International Publishers, New York, 1976) pp. 341-357.

4) Enrique D. Dussel; Fred Moseley (2001). Towards an unknown Marx: a commentary on the manuscripts of 1861 -- 63. Psychology Press. pp. 33 -- 67. ISBN 978-0-415-21545-9.  http://books.google.com/books?id=-Ld9fM0DOYQC&pg=PR33 .
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Folk Music the Evolution of Folk Music

Words: 1302 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62504215

Folk Music

The Evolution of Folk Music Vocals

By its definition, folk music technically refers to indigenous forms of music created by local, regional or native populations as a way of engaging in cultural expression. This means that at its core, folk music is not intended to command a commercial value nor is it necessarily folk music by definition once a form has been co-opted by an outside culture. However, this is also a definition for folk which has long been rendered obsolete by the aesthetic and vocal qualities that listeners tend to associate with the genre today. This is because the most historically significant instances in which folk music converged with the commercial zeitgeist would come to produce a highly distinctive set of sounds.

Indeed, when we think of folk music, one tends instantly to conjure image of a young Bob Dylan with harmonica rack and guitar, wheezing his…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

EW. (2013). The Great Folk Rock Revival: how bands like Mumford & Sons and the Lumineers are leading a global phenomenon. Entertainment Weekly.

Holden, S. (2013). When They Hammered Out Justice in the '60s. The New York Times.

Jacobs, P. (2006). Bringing It All Back Home -- The Folk Music Revival. Rewind the Fifties.

McCormick, N. (2011). Folk Music: A Quiet Revolution. The Telegraph.
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Humor Studies Comparative Review on

Words: 1105 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 2468717

Each author subsisted to two (2) different kinds of perspectives, which make up the second and third critical elements of the comparative analysis component of this paper.

Berger analyzed humor based on social and political perspectives. Usage of these perspectives was most useful in discussing the two typologies of humor he thoroughly discussed in the book: satire and folly. Satire as a type of humor drew upon important concept that makes up its core: "militant irony" (158-9). Folly, meanwhile, was best characterized through the concepts "absurd" and "reality in a looking glass" (176).

Satire gives humor a political aspect to it, as illustrated in the term "military irony," which Berger defined as "a term derived from war, it is an attitude of attack that is part of a campaign against someone or something." Interestingly, the author qualified that satire need not have the 'brutality' that comes with military irony; however,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berger, P. (1997). Redeeming Laughter: the Comic Dimension of Human Experience. Walter de Gruyter.

Critchley, S. (2002). On Humour. Routledge.
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Bob Dylan Annotated Bib Honneth Axel Liberty's

Words: 841 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Annotated Bibliography Paper #: 23404322

Bob Dylan Annotated Bib

Honneth, Axel. "Liberty's Entanglements: Bob Dylan and His Era." Philosophy Social Criticism.

Sage Publications. 36:77. 2010. 777-783. Print.

This article acts as a panegyric to Bob Dylan, describing him as representing "a hardly imaginable synthesis, combining the longings of a social romantic, the pride and arrogance of an individualist outsider, the derision of a satirist and the bitterness of an apocalyptic prophet" (777). Honneth then goes on to describe how Dylan fits each of these roles. He likens Dylan to something greater than a simple songwriter or performer, but like a prophet or great spokesman for a generation. Art, he explains, has the ability to transcend its cultural moment and speak to a greater truth than has heretofore been understood. All artists, he states, have made a contribution to this popular culture. Dylan, however has the ability to include subtle messages of autonomy and freedom, unlike…… [Read More]

Russell, Craig H. Notes. Music Library Association. 50:3. 1994. 929-933. Print.

This article is a review of the book Positively Bob Dylan: a Thirty-Year Discography. Actually, the article deals with the many different texts about Bob Dylan that had appeared on the landscape at that time. Russell points to several different texts and judges their effectiveness by the information that they provide. Of all, he seems to be most fond of Clinton Heylin's book Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades. Most of Heylin's book is based on personal accounts and interviews with the singer/songwriter. This favorable review of Heylin is counterpointed with a negative review of a book by Richard Williams. This book, entitled Dylan: A Man Called Alias, he argues is not as truthful as the Heylin book. On accusation is levied that Williams "adopts some commonly held misconceptions without reexamining the primary evidence" (931). He also describes a third book, Richard Wissolik's Bob Dylan, American Poet and Singer which he defines as the most scholarly of the three texts.

The article is useful in that it illustrates one Dylan scholar's perspective on two potential sources. It gives a third point-of-view in a dialogue between Heylin and Williams. For someone trying to write a researched analytical paper on Bob Dylan, it is helpful to have another opinion about which sources should be relied upon over others. There are so many different sources out there in the world that it is very easy to get overwhelmed and to rely on information that is potentially false. By examining this article, not only do I get Russell's impressions of those other two books, but his own experiences and understanding of Dylan himself. The article goes on to describe some other books and texts that would be helpful for a scholarly paper discussing Bob Dylan. This is a valuable asset for someone searching for viable sources.
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Music and Dance in Indian Films in

Words: 2575 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 30617024

Music and Dance in Indian Films

In sheer quantity, INDIA produces more movies than any other country in the world-over 900 feature-length films in at least 16 languages, according to a recent industry survey. This productivity is explained by several factors: the size of the Indian audience, low literacy rates, the limited diffusion of television in India, and well-developed export markets in both hemispheres. (http://worldfilm.about.com/cs/booksbolly/)

In its historical development, India's film industry paralleled that of the West. Dadasaheb Phalke's Raja Harishchandra, the first silent film for popular consumption, appeared in 1913; Alam Ara, the first "talkie," was released in 1931. ut the Indian cinema derived its unique flavor from the older Indian musical theater-particularly from the Urdu poetic dramas of the late nineteenth century. The influence of this tradition ensured that Indian movies would favor mythological or legendary-historical stories, that their dialogue would carry an Urdu flavor even in languages…… [Read More]

Bibliography

 http://worldfilm.about.com/cs/booksbolly/ 

National Identity in Indian Popular Cinema 1947-1987 (Texas Film Studies) by Sumita S. Chakravarty Univ of Texas Pr; (December 1993)

Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema by Ashish Rajadhyaksha (Editor), Paul Willemen (Editor) British Film Inst; Revised edition (September 1999)

Cinema of Interruptions: Action Genres in Contemporary Indian Cinema by Lalitha Gopalan British Film Inst; (July 1, 2002)
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Aligning Human Resources for Organizational Success

Words: 3510 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90347669

Strategy for Maximizing Human esources

In the current business environment, companies have increasingly used performance appraisal methods to align their human resources activities and policies in ensuring promoting the realization of organizational goals and objectives. Practice and research have shifted from their narrow focus on psychometric evaluation of issues to the developmental performance appraisal. Performance appraisal promotes the performance of a business by enriching the employees with experiences, attitudes, and skills. This contributes to the performance of a business by improving the effectiveness and efficiency within a business/organization. Performance appraisal aligns the efforts of employees with that of the organization. This forms the basis of designing organizational activities that focus on employee growth and development alongside enabling the business/organization to realize its objectives (Atwood, 2007).

Structure of this essay paper

This essay is divided into three sections. The first section discusses the benefits of performance appraisal to an organization. It…… [Read More]

References

Atwood, C.G. (2007). Succession planning basics. Alexandria, VA: ASTD Press.

Berke, D., & Center for Creative Leadership. (2005). Succession planning and management: A guide to organizational systems and practices. Greensboro, N.C: Center for Creative Leadership.

Edwards, M.R., & Ewen, A.J. (1996). 360 Feedback: The powerful new model for employee assessment & performance improvement. New York: Amacom.

Eeckhout, L. (2010). Computer architecture performance evaluation methods. San Rafael, Calif.: Morgan & Claypool Publishers
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Adorno David Cook's Permanent David Cook

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 86851202

"And there is, above all, that whole sphere of music whose lifeblood is standardization: popular music, jazz, be it hot, sweet, or hybrid" (Adorno, 2004, p. 212). Taking this definition, then within the line of disdainful art we must place hakespeare, Longfellow, even Hemingway; all of whom used a pattern to their writing, not simply for mass consumption, but as a skeletal structure of being. Within this rubric, then, "it is critical… to distinguish between the motivations for and the actual effects of listening" (Christenson, p. 103). Thus, despite the fact that Cook's "Permanent" follows a poetic pattern, the two major considerations again come forward: the motivation for writing and performing as a tribute to a specific occasion, and the relevance and commonality of reaching out for an emotional connection between humans.

Finally, for Adorno, the "vulgarization and enchantment… dwell together in the arrangements which have colonized large areas of…… [Read More]

Since this type of music is a commodity, and standardization means it follows a pattern that is familiar to audiences, it must have little social value, other than brief entertainment. "And there is, above all, that whole sphere of music whose lifeblood is standardization: popular music, jazz, be it hot, sweet, or hybrid" (Adorno, 2004, p. 212). Taking this definition, then within the line of disdainful art we must place Shakespeare, Longfellow, even Hemingway; all of whom used a pattern to their writing, not simply for mass consumption, but as a skeletal structure of being. Within this rubric, then, "it is critical… to distinguish between the motivations for and the actual effects of listening" (Christenson, p. 103). Thus, despite the fact that Cook's "Permanent" follows a poetic pattern, the two major considerations again come forward: the motivation for writing and performing as a tribute to a specific occasion, and the relevance and commonality of reaching out for an emotional connection between humans.

Finally, for Adorno, the "vulgarization and enchantment… dwell together in the arrangements which have colonized large areas of music" (Adorno, 2001, p. 41). That is to say that the only viable way art may exist is without entertainment value. This has some truth, one would certainly not argue that many of the films of the 1930s, for instance, showing synchronized swimming, lavish set productions of tap dance, and tuneful songs with very little soul, were nothing but grand escapes for the masses from the ravages of the Great Depression.

However, lighting, electronic enhancement, instrumentation,
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Traditional Se Asian Bamboo Flutes

Words: 28549 Length: 95 Pages Document Type: Dissertation Paper #: 64807002



Some Chinese researchers assert that Chinese flutes may have evolved from of Indian provenance.

In fact, the kind of side-blon, or transverse, flutes musicians play in Southeast Asia have also been discovered in Africa, India, Saudi Arabia, and Central Asia, as ell as throughout the Europe of the Roman Empire. This suggests that rather than originating in China or even in India, the transverse flute might have been adopted through the trade route of the Silk Road to Asia. In addition to these transverse flutes, Southeast Asians possessed the kind of long vertical flutes; similar to those found in Central Asia and Middle East.

A considerable amount of similarities exist beteen the vertical flutes of Southeast Asia and flutes from Muslim countries. This type of flute possibly came from Persians during the ninth century; during the religious migration to SEA. Likeise, the nose-blon flute culture, common to a number of…… [Read More]

works cited:

Purple highlight means reference from his thesis, chapters 1-5

Blue highlight means reference from his raw research that was sent (17 files)

Yellow highlight means that writer could not find reference; one of the 17 files received

Gray highlight means writer found this source
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Is Global Poverty a Global Responsibility

Words: 2226 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48905512

Global Poverty

The World Bank (2012) points out that "…nearly 1.3 billion people remain below the extreme poverty line with an income of U.S. $1.25 or less a day." The global financial institution further points out that "another 2.6 billion live on less than U.S. $2 a day, another common measurement of deep deprivation"(World Bank, 2012). It is important to note that although inequalities in terms of wealth exist regardless of which country one comes from, developing countries have been hit worst by the same.

In general terms, unemployment levels in Australia are relatively low. The levels of education in this case remain relatively high. Further, given the high average incomes of a vast majority of Australians, most citizens do not encounter many of the problems faced by millions of people from other nations. In a way, some of the most common problems the word's poorest people face are occasioned…… [Read More]

References

Deen, T. (2004). Development: Tied Aid Strangling Nations, Says U.N. Retrieved October 6, 2012, from the Inter-Press Service website:  http://www.ipsnews.net/2004/07/development-tied-aid-strangling-nations-says-un/ 

Galston, W.A. & Hoffenberg, P.H. (Eds.). (2010). Poverty and Morality: Religious and Secular Perspectives. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

Joseph, S. (2011). Blame it on the WTO? A Human Rights Critique. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Mizzoni, J. (2009). Ethics: The Basics. Malden, MA: John Wiley & Sons.
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Valkyrie Planning the 2008 Film

Words: 2072 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 14175649

As Baigent and Leigh point out, von Stauffenberg's co-conspirators were "aristocratic" men who despised what they now knew to be a murderous regime (26). However, it was Stauffenberg who was "the most active leader in the conspiracy against Hitler," which is exactly how Operation Valkyrie is portrayed (Hoffman xiv). The close relationship between Nina Stauffenberg and her husband is rendered thinly but at least accurately in the film, based on what historian Hoffman has to say. Although there are several other ancillary characters that were not addressed or developed in Valkyrie, the filmmakers chose what are arguably some of the most historically important in terms of the attempted assassination of Hitler.

Of course, the central event of Valkyrie is the attempted but failed assassination of Hitler. Interviews with Berthold von Stauffenberg, the Colonel's son, verify the accuracy of the historical events that shaped his father's life. For instance, Jones claims…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baigent, Michael and Leigh, Richard. Secret Germany: Stauffenberg and the True Story of Operation Valkyrie. Skyhorse Publishing Inc., 2008.

Brooks, Xan. "Valkyrie." The Guardian. 19 Jan 2009. Retrieved online:  http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2009/jan/20/valkyrie-tom-cruise-film-review 

Craig, John S. Peculiar liaisons: in war, espionage, and terrorism in the twentieth century. Algora Publishing, 2005.

Hoffman, Peter. Stauffenberg: A Family History, 1905-1944. McGill-Queen, 2003.
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Karl Marx Marx's Impact Can Only Be

Words: 1141 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27018978

Karl Marx

Marx's impact can only be compared with that of religious figures like Jesus or Muhammad. Nearly four out of every ten people alive today live under governments which consider themselves Marxist" (Singer, 1). Many people may consider that account to be an overstatement of Marx's historical importance, nevertheless he was undoubtedly the greatest thinker and philosopher of his, and recent, times. His theories on life, and on the social and economic structure of nations, have revolutionized the way in which people think (McLellan, 8). His life contributed to the way people think today, and because of him people are more open to suggestion and are quicker to create ideas on political, economic, and social issues.

Karl Marx was born on May 5, 1818, in the Prussian town of Trier. His parents, Heinrich and Henrietta were comfortably off, but by no means wealthy, and held liberal, but not radical,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

McLellan, David. Karl Marx: The Legacy. London: BBC, 1983.

Singer, Peter. Marx. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1986.
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Authorship and Attribution in Early

Words: 3487 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 20745555

A certain feeling toward propriety and morality is stamped upon our sex, which does not allow us to appear alone in public, nor without an escort. Thus how can I present my musical work, to the public with anything other than timidity. The work of any lady…can indeed arouse a degree of pity in the eyes of some experts." (owers and Tick, 1987)

owers and Tick state that many composers of this time "Reichardt, Hensel, and Schumann -- published lieder under male authorship. A few of Reichardt's early songs were included in a collection of her father's lieder, 'Duetsche Lieder' and three of Hensel's early songs "appear in each of Felix's Opus 8 and Opus 9; the 'Allegemeine musikalische Zeitung' claimed that 'An des lust'gen runnenes Rand' a duet composed by Fanny, is the best song in the collection" of Opus 8. Additionally three of Schumann's lieder were "included in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Backer, Eric and Kranenburg, Peter van (2004) on Musical Stylometry- a Pattern Recognition Approach. Science Direct 2004 Elsevier.

Bowers, Jane M. And Tick, Judith (1987) Women Making Music: The Western Art Tradition, 1150-1059. University of Illinois Press, 1987.

Haynes, Bruce (2007) the End of Early Music. Oxford University Press. U.S., 2007.

Kranenburg, Peter van (2006) Composer Attribution by Quantifying Compositional Strategies. University of Victoria 2006.
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Benjamin Britten

Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 69469074

Benjamin Britten

Today, Benjamin Britten (1913-1976) is best known for his instrumental, choral, and operatic compositions as well as being the co-founder of the English Opera Group and the Aldeburgh Festival (Radloff 426). Although Britten's music is likely familiar to many modern observers, his name is probably unfamiliar to most and facts about his early life even less well-known. To determine these facts and the impact of his work, this paper provides a review of the relevant peer-reviewed and scholarly literature concerning the composer, Benjamin Britten, including an in-depth analysis of one of his compositions. A summary of the research and important findings concerning Britten and his work are provided in the conclusion.

Review and Discussion

On November 22, 1913 (St. Cecilia's Day), Edward Benjamin Britten was born in Lowestoft, Suffolk, England (Craggs 3). Benjamin was the youngest child of five sons and two daughters (Brann 2) born to Robert…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brann, Vincent. (2003). "(Edward) Benjamin Britten -- 22 November 1913-4 December 1976."

Stanford University College of Music. [online] available:  http://opera.stanford.edu/ 

Britten/bio.html.

Craggs, Stewart R. Benjamin Britten: A Bio-Bibliography. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 2002.
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Masters of Rock & Roll the Kingsmen

Words: 1313 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 33178378

MASTRS OF ROCK & ROLL

TH KINGSMN: Composed of Jack ly on guitar and vocals, Mike Mitchell on guitar, Dan Gallucci on piano, Bob Norby on bass and Lynn arton on drums, the Kingsmen are best known for their hit "Louie, Louie" and essentially began the form now known as the "garage band" sound in 1963. Also, the Kingsmen were one of the earliest bands from the Northwest, being Portland, Oregon, where many bands in the years to come would call home. One of their local rivals was Paul Revere and the Raiders who established the Northwest R& B. sound so popular in the mid to late 1960's.

PAUL RVR AND TH RAIDRS: Like the Kingsmen, Paul Revere and the Raiders came out of the Northwest. Singer Mark Lindsay, along with drummer Mike Smith, created a new sound based on traditional classical music interwoven with boogie-woogie which resulted in their…… [Read More]

ERIC CLAPTON: Best known for his involvement in the band Cream (Clapton on guitar, Jack Bruce on Bass and Ginger Baker on drums), Clapton was perhaps the first guitarist to successfully combine a free-from musical concept with mass appeal. He was also one of the first rock musicians to gain a large following based on his instrumental abilities and creative musicianship. Along with Jimi Hendrix, Clapton remains one the best examples of consistency as a lead guitarist in the rock field.

LED ZEPPELIN: In the mid-1960's, guitarist Jimmy Page joined the Yardbirds which soon led to the creation of Led Zeppelin, made up of Page, Robert Plant on vocals, John Paul Jones on bass and John Bonham on drums. As a band, Led Zeppelin exerted a profound and very recognizable influence on rock bands and guitar players both nationally and internationally. Page's carefully calculated guitar frenzy, engineered through the use of distortion, surrounded Plant's expressive vocals to create a tension and excitement rarely matched by Zeppelin's numerous emulators in the 1970's and beyond.

PINK FLOYD: Composed of original singer Syd Barret and later replaced by David Gilmour on guitar (along with original members Roger Waters on bass, Rick Wright on keyboards and Nick Mason on drums), Pink Floyd incorporated many new musical sounds based on the use of electronic effects and the synthesizer. Musically, the band created brand-new ways to express themselves on their various instruments and launched a very complex musical idiom based on experimentation and innovation. Their biggest hit album "Dark Side of the Moon," remained on the charts for more than twenty years and influenced a whole generation of experimental electronic composers.
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Use of New Fabrics in Fashion and New Textile Printing Techniques

Words: 3671 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35643660

Fashion

History of Fashion

The history of fashion can be dated back to the development of the fashion industry in different time eras. Fashion was taken and applied in different forms depending on the situation of that era. It has been noted that clothing from the oman and the Ancient Greek times is more dependent on the mere purpose of clothes rather than the style that was present. As it would be expected, in the olden times, clothes or fashion were merely a way of covering one's body. People did not think about the print, style or fabric when considering what they used to cover themselves. It has been seen that up till 400 A.D, clothing was never tight fitting nor was it loose or flowy. The basic idea was that drapes were used so that men and women could feel protected and secure. As it would be expected, the…… [Read More]

References

Felice, M. (2013). Materials through the ages: All dressed up - technical fabrics | IOM3: The Global Network for Materials, Minerals & Mining Professionals. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.iom3.org/feature/all-dressed-up-technical-fabrics  [Accessed: 1 Dec 2013].

Fenton, C. (2013). Neoprene looks good in the water. This fall it looks even better on the town. - BostonGlobe.com. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.boston.com/2013/10/22/neoprene/iBah3zTIfVctt5gmoe2BjJ/story.html  [Accessed: 5 Dec 2013].

Hemephill, S. And Suk, J. (2009). The Law, Culture, and Economics of Fashion . Stanford Law Review, 61 (5).

Jones, L. (2013). LIZ JONES FASHION THERAPY: PVC is all over the catwalks -- but can any woman look fantastic in plastic?. [online] Retrieved from:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2401797/LIZ-JONES-FASHION-THERAPY-PVC  -- woman-look-fantastic-plastic.html [Accessed: 5 Dec 2013].
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History of Construction Technology of

Words: 9139 Length: 24 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54599726

Staircase ramps which are comprised of steep and narrow steps that lead up one face of the pyramid were more in use at that time with evidence found at the Sinki, Meidum, Giza, Abu Ghurob, and Lisht pyramids respectively (Heizer).

A third ramp variation was the spiral ramp, found in use during the nineteenth dynasty and was, as its name suggests, comprised of a ramp covering all faces of the pyramids leading towards the top. Reversing ramps zigzag up one face of a pyramid at a time and would not be used in the construction of step pyramids, while lastly interior ramps that have been found within the pyramids of Sahura, Nyuserra, Neferifijata, Abusir, and Pepi II (Heizer, Shaw).

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greek architecture exists mainly in surviving temples that survive in large numbers even today and is tied into Roman and Hellenistic periods which borrowed heavily from the Greeks.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ackerman, J.S. "Architectural Practice in the Italian Renaissance." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (1954): 3-11.

Alchermes, Joseph. "Spolia in Roman Cities of the Late Empire: Legislative Rationales and Architectural Reuse." Dumbarton Oaks Paper (1994): 167-178.

Allen, Rob. "Variations of the Arch: Post -- and lintel, Corbelled Arch, Arch, Vault, Cross-Vault Module." 11 August 2009. Civilization Collection. 5 April 2010 .

Anderson, James. "Anachronism in the Roman Architecture of Gaul: The Date of the Maison Carree at Nimes." Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (2001): 68-79.
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Improving Decision Making and Patron Service in the Library System

Words: 3698 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 93018445

Components contributing to the library's decision making process include the library per se; its purposes' its structure and organization' its functions and forms/kinds of data; its resources in/for staff/volunteers; its facilities; its equipment.

Management teams and other groups play a key role in strategic decision making," Nancy H. Leonard, Laura Beauvais, and Richard Scholl (2005) relate the importance of involving groups in strategic decision making. "These groups include top management teams (Hambrick and Mason, 1984), boards of directors (Forbes, 1999; Pettigrew, 1992), and planning task forces (Van de Ven, 1980)" (Leonard, Beauvais, and Scholl ¶ 2). To effectively manage work groups and decision-making teams, Leonard, Beauvais, and Scholl stress, managers must understand that underlying psychological cognitive styles and social interaction of an individual impact them and their decision making. hen mangers better understand the concept of group cognitive style, they may be able to create groups with various strengths based…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Burrows, Toby. "The 'digital library hammer'?" The Australian Library Journal. Australian Library and Information Association. 2004. HighBeam Research. 1 Mar. 2009  http://www.highbeam.com .

Carpenter, Kenneth E. "A Library Historian Looks at Librarianship." Daedalus 125.4 (1996): 77+. Questia. 1 Mar. 2009  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000447498 .

The Columbia World of Quotations. Columbia University Press. New York. 1996, 2 Jan. 2009. www.bartleby.com/66/.

Dunham, J.. Developing Effective School Management. Routledge. New York.. Questia. 1995. 1 Mar. 2009.  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108823897 .
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Classical Composers & the Impact

Words: 1322 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52619848

. . which fascinates by the mass of its beauties" (Goulding, 1995, 256). Much like Wagner, Tchaikovsky was influenced by several love affairs, first with Desiree Artot, an opera singer who deserted him to marry someone else and Nadezhda von Meck, a patroness of the arts. Thus, the relationship with Ms. Von Meck provided the stimulation Tchaikovsky needed for the completion of omeo and Juliet; she also was obviously his Juliet, a woman from a contrasting family (she provided him with much financial support) and someone that was out of reach for a simple composer.

Claude Debussy:

The piece known as Clouds is part of Debussy's Three Nocturnes for orchestra and as described by Debussy himself, Clouds represents "the unchanging aspect of the sky, and the slow, solemn movement of the clouds, dissolving into gray tints, lightly touched with white" (Goulding, 1995, 315). All of this is symbolized by the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Goulding, Phillip G. (1995). Classical Music: The 50 Greatest Composers and Their 1000 Greatest Works. Westminster, MD: Ballantine Books.

MUSIC & ENVIRONMENT
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Entomology of Village Life There

Words: 4732 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85182991



The internet is a primary source of entertainment, the different cultural music and arts are uploaded on the internet, making the different cultures more accessible to the diverse cultures in other parts of the world. Apart from music and movies, which are freely ready for download on the internet, there is plenty of news on the internet, both in print and video form, which can be accessed by those interested. There is a lot of rebellion towards the use of internet, as some people are of the perception that some of the information from the internet might be prone to human error, and might be misleading to the users. Some authors and researchers have also indicated that there are several negative implications brought about by the internet; these include health, social and interpersonal implications, just but to name a few. Regardless of the criticisms and concern by certain groups of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Rory, O'Connor. Friends, Followers and the Future: How Social Media and Changing Politics, Threatening Big Brands and Killing Traditional Media. New York: City Light Books Publishers, 2012. Print.

Paul, Pedersen. Routledge Handbook of Sport Communication. New York: Routledge Publishers, 2013. Print.

Weaver, D. & Willnat, L. The Global journalist in the 21st Century. New York: Routledge Publishers, 2012. Print.

Peters, C. & M.J. Broersma. Rethinking Journalism: Trust and Participation in a Transformed News Landscape. New York: Routledge Publishers, 2012. Print.
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Ras Gas Background The North

Words: 5016 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 76215572

The spirit of competition also negatively impacted the manner in which employees communicated. The lack of specific definition as well as the highly isolationist company mentality ultimately resulted in a communication breakdown which prevented the effective running of the company.

Knowledge Sharing: Mentoring and cross-training have been declining leading to less knowledge sharing and familiarization opportunities for younger less experienced staff. Section members lack the opportunity to share knowledge and to share in lessons learned. This enforced specialization of employees will ultimately result in poorer results. Cross discipline work is essential in the successful integration and most efficient use of employed experts (Forrester, 1971). It could potentially take months longer to reach a favorable outcome if indeed the most efficient and effective outcome is ever reached at all.

Compartmentalizing of Data and Ideas: There are silos / compartments of information that was not readily communicated across departments (ichmond, 2001). As…… [Read More]

References

1. Ackoff, R.L. 1981 Creating the Corporate Future. New York: John Wiley, and Son.

2. Ackoff, R.L., & Emery, F. 1972 On Purposeful Systems. Chicago: Aldine-Atherton.Beer, Stafford, Brain of the Firm. Harmondsworth: Penguin Press, 1967.

3. Boulding, K.E. 1956 The image, Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press

4. Churchman, C. 1971 Design of Inquiring Systems. New York: Basic Books.
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Television Addiction More Than a

Words: 2163 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 8004643

Therefore there should be more in-depth research into the types of content that are associated with television addiction.

The analysis of this article and other sources also raises the important issue of whether one can or even should avoid the influence of television in the information age. Television and other related media have become part of our everyday world and the problem of possible television addiction should be dealt with in terms of a healthy balance in television viewing. ather than a carte blanche condemnation of television there should be a more intensive focus on the negative forms of content that may lead to forms of addiction and other problem areas.

eferences www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=35619009

Bogart, L. (1956). The Age of Television: A Study of Viewing Habits and the Impact of Television on American Life (3rd ed.). New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing. etrieved August 12, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=35619009 www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002209433

Brock,…… [Read More]

References www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=35619009

Bogart, L. (1956). The Age of Television: A Study of Viewing Habits and the Impact of Television on American Life (3rd ed.). New York: Frederick Ungar Publishing. Retrieved August 12, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=35619009  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002209433

Brock, B.J. (1994). Recreation Programming for the '90S Family: Demographics and Discoveries. JOPERD -- the Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 65(6), 64+. Retrieved August 12, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002209433  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106449752

Bryant, J. & Bryant, J.A. (Eds.). (2001). Television and the American Family. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved August 12, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106449755  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5022193704

Gambling Ads on TV Will Fuel Addiction'. (2007, August 10). The Daily Mail (London, England), p. 1. Retrieved August 12, 2008, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5022193704  www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001238566
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Collective Cultural Shadow and Confrontation

Words: 4409 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19694367

10)."

Just as in the U.S. economy, where individuals have been economically left behind, such will be, and is, the case in the emerging global economy (p. 10). Ayres says that the impression, or the turning of society's blind eye towards the chaos of the economically disenfranchised, tends to cause the more affluent amongst us to believe that the term "global" means everybody will be a part of the emerging global economics, and this will produce an economic benefit that will be enjoyed by everyone (p. 10). That is not accurate, and, moreover, those people who presume to take a comfort in the economic globalization are not just turning a blind eye to the disenfranchised, but may find their selves vulnerable in a way that serves to be their light, much like Hank's in Monster's Ball. On this point Ayres says:

There is a popular impression, among the affluent and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000388341

Ayres, Ed. "The Expanding Shadow Economy." World Watch July-Aug. 1996: 10+. Questia. 3 Mar. 2008  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000388341 .

A www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105966243

Boin, Arjen. Crafting Public Institutions: Leadership in Two Prison Systems. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2001. Questia. 3 Mar. 2008  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105966245 .