Physical Anthropology Essays (Examples)

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Thus, in order to study a concept with which he or she is familiar with in some way, a physical anthropologist will most probably employ a typical anthropological analysis, which he or she uses every time they study a culture. Using physical anthropology as a form of studying evolutions means that you have to refrain from expressing biased opinions and treat the matter similarly to how you treat any anthropological study (Chapter 4, p. 98).
The Human Genome Project was an international scientific research attempt to discover the cycle of chemical base pairs which compose the DNA. The project was also meant to recognize and map the genes of the human genome. The Human Genome Project brought notable progress to the study of evolution, given the fact that it can assist future studies in finding differences between people (Richards & Hawley, 2005).

Linguistic anthropologists study how language influences society and how….

hat was black in 1940 is different from what is black in 2000. Certainly, with the evolution of whiteness, what was white in 1920 - as a Jew I was not white then, but I'm white now, so white has changed tremendously" (Goodman 2003).
The views of biological anthropologists on race have varied widely throughout the ages, almost as much as human physical differences of dress, skin, hair, and size. Yet beneath the skin, modern science reveals, we are genetically far more alike than different. In contrast to the old, culturally-justifying racism of the past, physical anthropologists today look to science to 'set us free' as a species with the truth -- that race is a cultural construction, not a biological fact. This once conservative field now takes one of the most radical views of the human condition of all the social sciences.

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Gravlee, Clarence, C.H. Russell Bernard, & illiam….

evolution is in terms of physical anthropology .
Physical anthropology deals with the twin questions of how we became human and what it means to be human. o understand these questions, we need to turn to evolution and so evolution describes how synthesis of adaption to environment and mutation of genes, that transpired over the cause of millions of years, shaped the human race in a virtually all ways from physical, to psychological, to social and so forth.

Seeing our relatedness to the animal race makes us realize that we are not a distinct, or rather, separate species but that we are linked in relationship to all other genera in the world and it is these roots that shape our particular humanoid characteristics

wo concepts, in other words, shape the discipline of physical anthropology and both of these come from our understanding of the impact of evolution. he first is the concept….

Physical Anthropology
PAGES 2 WORDS 788

evolution of man from the earliest australopithecine through to the three branches of the "family tree" to the dead end species of neanderthalensis and finally to modern homo sapiens:
The Ancestry of Man

Modern man has only been active within the archaeological time scale for a relative short time. Yet anatomically modern man did not just spring up from nowhere, he comes from a long line or hominids that extends back many millions of years. The species of Ardipithecus ramidus (sometimes known as Australopithecus ramidus) is the earliest known fossil of a hominid found, dating back to around 4.5 million years ago (mya) small hominid that stood upright, had teeth and skull closer and similar to that of apes, this gives them a closer lineage to those of chimpanzees than to humans. A.amidus only had a thin capping of enamel over his teeth, this is also a clear indication that his….

One can run up against the barriers of entrenched social class, or perhaps lack certain required distinctions or certifications that readily confer status. hile few modern nations claim to possess hereditary classes, most do possess groups of individuals who control vast amounts of family wealth, and the power that goes with it. Many other individuals, by virtue of the social status of their families possess at least the resources to obtain college degrees, or open businesses of their own - all things that will improve their social status. Others lack these things and seem, despite socio-political theories to the contrary, to be condemned to a life as low status individuals. As in the past, inequality exists today, even in a supposedly equal society.
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Angle, John. "The Surplus Theory of Social Stratification and the Size Distribution of Personal ealth." Social Forces 65.2 (1986): 293-326.

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Maisels, Charles Keith. Early Civilizations of….

I try not to pry into what I see as the private business of others. Privacy, I believe is something that is strongly valued in America -- in other societies, older societies, what one did was of interest to the community, even if it took place behind closed doors. However, despite or even because of the privacy and freedom given to me, I try to uphold my high moral standards, even when I do not feel that there is someone like a priest or a policeman 'watching' over my shoulder.
However, I do think that given that we live in an age where life is growing even more private, maybe too private, as so many people spend the little leisure time they have surfing the net, pretending to be anonymous individuals in the virtual and disembodied space of the Internet. It is easy to profess one set of morals at….

Neanderthal Anthropology
PAGES 4 WORDS 1064

Neanderthal man
he debate on Neanderthal man's place in human evolution has continued unabated since the discovery of the first Neanderthal fossil in 1856. One camp believes Neanderthal man is a human ancestor and should be classified as a subspecies of modern man -- homo sapien neandertalis. he opposing view argues that Neanderthal man is a distinct species - homo neandertalis - a species entirely separate from modern humans. his paper argues that Neanderthal man is indeed related to modern humans by looking at key elements of the Neanderthal physiology, behavior and cultural life.

DNA evidence

Recent findings on the mitochondrial DNA taken from the right humerus of a Neanderthal skeleton failed to show significant similarities with the mitochondrial DNA of modern humans. According to the study, one sequence of Neanderthal DNA shows significant variances from the same sequence in moderns. From this, researchers concluded that Neanderthals diverged about 600,000 years ago….


What does racism means if race has no biological basis?

Race may have no biological basis, but anthropology does not study biology alone -- race is also a cultural construction. An African-American man might have the physical DNA of European, Caucasian individuals within his genetic code, but because he is subject to the racial classification and potential discrimination within America, because America holds race to be an extant category, this does not mean that race lacks significance as a subject of cultural study. Race may be a constructed fiction, but racism, or the hatred that the cultural fiction of race has spawned, is real.

It is important to remember the lack of true 'races' in the world, however, when analyzing potential associations between groups. For example, even though they may be considered different 'races' by society, groups of marginalized persons subject to the culturally constructed notion of racism may wish to band….

The new division of these apartments that was thought to be a main feature of modern housing was not a solution to the problem of privacy. Most of the families only got a small bedroom with a small living space. Males and females often had to share the same rooms and in fact there was no room for children and guests (Bounrdieu, 1960).
This definitely shows the need for negotiating for modern space and daily life within el-Masaakin.in an analysis by an anthropologists he came to the conclusion that modern housing would not be sufficient for the production of modern articles and dispositions. However there are objective conditions which structure individual's appropriation of modern apartments. He maintained a clear distinction between the less and more privileged sections of the working class. Adopting modern housing is bound by cultural transformation where the segments of those who earn low incomes can not….


It would be easy to assume, then, that biologists are making a mistake by rejecting the race concept because that rejection would force them to also ignore such biological variation. However, this assumption would be false. Most intelligent anthropologists are not rejecting the idea of biological variation or a geographical/genetic component to that variation. On the contrary, they reject the idea of "race" specifically because it is not flexible enough to accurately model the full range of biological variation and therefore lumps all geographic/genetic variable populations together based on a small subset of their traits.

The race concept would lump together, for example, both the small and slightly darker Mediterranean body build with the robust, blond Nordic body build as both "White" while assuming that all the wide variety of genetic, facial, and morphological differences in Africa rendered a single "Black" race. The critical anthropologists would have to reject such a….

Votive deposition, religion and the Anglo-Saxon furnished burial ritual." In this article, Crawford examines burial practices for what they tell us about early religious belief's systems. View the following video by the anthropologist Nick Herriman; he describes the logic underneath belief systems. He does this with a few different societies. Explain what Nick Herriman examples provides to Crawford's article which is focused on burial evidence. Overall, connect the two sources to explain the ways that anthropologists are interested in uncovering clues about a group's belief system.
Video link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CpgAtylzMQE

According to Crawford (2004), gravesites are often seen as physical reflections of abstract spiritual belief systems. In her analysis she "questions the distinction between grave sites and other sacred places" and "whether deposits should only ever be interpreted as reflections of social structure."[footnoteRef:1] The focus of anthropologists upon burial grounds and surrounding rituals, as noted in the video narrated by anthropologist Nick….

Sociology and Anthropology
Because sociology and anthropology are both social sciences, one might assume that the same research methods would be utilized in the different fields. However, while some of the same approaches can be used in both fields, it is important to realize that the differences in the fields make different approaches possible for each discipline. Sociology specifically examines social life, social change, and the social factors that contribute to individual behavior. Sociologists use surveys, interviews, experiments, observation, and secondary analysis (Sociology.com, 2013). Cultural anthropology examines human culture. Anthropologists employ the following research methods: participant observation, cross-cultural comparison, survey research, interviews, archival research, media analysis, and historical analysis (Donahue-Lynch, 2000). Clearly, the disciplines are related; however, they are not the same. As a result, some approaches that are appropriate for one discipline would not be appropriate for the other discipline. This paper will investigate the different research methods used….

Ethnology: Balinese vs. The Lahu
Gender and Sex in Anthropology

Anthropology 203

A Case Study in Comparative Ethnology: Balinese vs. The Lahu

Defining Sex and Gender

The definition of sex is generally treated as a category by both biologists and cultural anthropologists, a category with mainly two choices: male or female (orthman 597-598). From a biologist's perspective sex is the exchange of genetic material and the requisite biological functions required for successful procreation activities. For example, sperm and ovum are supplied by males and females, respectively, and women are the only ones capable of gestation and lactation. Primates, including humans, are generally required to make significant investments in child-rearing activities, so parental investment, in addition to mating investment, is thought to be required of both sexes (McIntyre and Edwards 84). The form that parental investment takes can in turn be heavily influenced by social norms, and accordingly sex helps to define what gender roles….

Urban Anthropology
PAGES 3 WORDS 932

Urban Anthropology
Our urban metropolises are no longer the vibrant or essential centers they used to be. The mass migration of the wealthy into the suburbs has left our cities with reduced tax bases and less stability and in turn the cities have rapidly begun decaying. Our cities today are decadent and dangerous. Cites are the remnants of the industrial age and that time is gone. Breaking down or getting a flat tire in the wrong block will get an unfortunate traveler an introduction into the horrors of street crime and the illegal narcotics industry. Our cities are just not nice places any more. "Residents air their complaints in community meetings (of block dubs, police beats, the Local School Council, church groups, the Chamber of Commerce). Gangs and gang bangers top the list of their concerns." (Pattillo) This report will attempt to present an anthropological answer to the culture of poverty….

American Anthropology
PAGES 9 WORDS 2827

American Anthropology
Jaguars and Were-Jaguars:

Conceptions and Misconceptions in Olmec Culture

There is not a question that jaguars were important to Mesoamerican religion and culture. The Olmecs were no exception to this rule. However, it seems that previous interpretations of Olmec art and architecture have erroneously placed more emphasis on the jaguar than is actually due. While a significant part of Mesoamerican culture, the jaguar did not play quite the all-encompassing role that many archaeologists have attributed to it. Specifically, the so-called "were-jaguar" motif might be representative of something other than a jaguar, or at least, contain elements of other animals in addition to the feline. Among others, it has been suggested that the "were-jaguar" babies were, instead, crocodilians, toads, deformed human children, snakes, or iguanas. This essay will look at the most convincing of these arguments, in particular, the possibility of the "were-jaguar" actually representing congenitally deformed babies, were-crocodilians, and toad mothers.

Background

The….

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3 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Physical Anthropology Language and Evolution

Words: 861
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

Thus, in order to study a concept with which he or she is familiar with in some way, a physical anthropologist will most probably employ a typical anthropological…

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5 Pages
Thesis

Anthropology

Physical Anthropology Human Variation Physical

Words: 1805
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Thesis

hat was black in 1940 is different from what is black in 2000. Certainly, with the evolution of whiteness, what was white in 1920 - as a Jew…

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3 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Evolution Is in Terms of Physical Anthropology

Words: 1267
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Essay

evolution is in terms of physical anthropology . Physical anthropology deals with the twin questions of how we became human and what it means to be human. o understand…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Evolution

Physical Anthropology

Words: 788
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

evolution of man from the earliest australopithecine through to the three branches of the "family tree" to the dead end species of neanderthalensis and finally to modern homo…

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6 Pages
Term Paper

Family and Marriage

Anthropology Origins of Inequality Human

Words: 1886
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Term Paper

One can run up against the barriers of entrenched social class, or perhaps lack certain required distinctions or certifications that readily confer status. hile few modern nations claim…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Family and Marriage

Anthropology the Process of Enculturation

Words: 1470
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

I try not to pry into what I see as the private business of others. Privacy, I believe is something that is strongly valued in America -- in…

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4 Pages
Term Paper

Evolution

Neanderthal Anthropology

Words: 1064
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Neanderthal man he debate on Neanderthal man's place in human evolution has continued unabated since the discovery of the first Neanderthal fossil in 1856. One camp believes Neanderthal man…

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2 Pages
Term Paper

Anthropology

Anthropology Its Holism or Its

Words: 615
Length: 2 Pages
Type: Term Paper

What does racism means if race has no biological basis? Race may have no biological basis, but anthropology does not study biology alone -- race is also a cultural construction.…

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5 Pages
Essay

Family and Marriage

Anthropology Lessons Anthropology Is Actually

Words: 1662
Length: 5 Pages
Type: Essay

The new division of these apartments that was thought to be a main feature of modern housing was not a solution to the problem of privacy. Most of…

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1 Pages
Term Paper

Race

Anthropology and Race Concept it

Words: 434
Length: 1 Pages
Type: Term Paper

It would be easy to assume, then, that biologists are making a mistake by rejecting the race concept because that rejection would force them to also ignore such biological…

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6 Pages
Essay

Archeology

Anthropology and the Subject of Religion and Animism

Words: 2130
Length: 6 Pages
Type: Essay

Votive deposition, religion and the Anglo-Saxon furnished burial ritual." In this article, Crawford examines burial practices for what they tell us about early religious belief's systems. View the…

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4 Pages
Essay

Anthropology

Sociology and Anthropology Because Sociology and Anthropology

Words: 1253
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Sociology and Anthropology Because sociology and anthropology are both social sciences, one might assume that the same research methods would be utilized in the different fields. However, while some…

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4 Pages
Essay

Women's Issues - Sexuality

Gender and Sex in Anthropology

Words: 1421
Length: 4 Pages
Type: Essay

Ethnology: Balinese vs. The Lahu Gender and Sex in Anthropology Anthropology 203 A Case Study in Comparative Ethnology: Balinese vs. The Lahu Defining Sex and Gender The definition of sex is generally treated…

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3 Pages
Term Paper

Sociology

Urban Anthropology

Words: 932
Length: 3 Pages
Type: Term Paper

Urban Anthropology Our urban metropolises are no longer the vibrant or essential centers they used to be. The mass migration of the wealthy into the suburbs has left our cities…

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9 Pages
Research Paper

Drama - World

American Anthropology

Words: 2827
Length: 9 Pages
Type: Research Paper

American Anthropology Jaguars and Were-Jaguars: Conceptions and Misconceptions in Olmec Culture There is not a question that jaguars were important to Mesoamerican religion and culture. The Olmecs were no exception to this…

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