Physician Assisted Suicide Essays (Examples)

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Physician Assisted Death

Words: 533 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44936731

Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide" by Bernard Gert et. al.

In Part III of the book, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics (6th ed.), Bernard Gert, Charles Culver, and K. Clouser provided an analysis of how voluntary passive euthanasia (VPE) can serve as an effective form of an alternative to physician-assisted death in the article, "An Alternative to Physician-Assisted Suicide."

The authors also discussed in the article the process of VAE (voluntary active euthanasia) as a form of PAS, particularly focusing on the morality of the said method as compared to VPE. Gert et. al. posits that VPE as a form of PAS is another method that can be subsisted, especially is VAE is unacceptable according to the moral standards of the patients. Through VPE, patients will not be fed with water and any kinds of food. The authors also state how VPE is not a form of killing (as compared to VAE),…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Provider Assisting a Terminal Ill Patient With an Assisted Suicide

Words: 1008 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27117305

Morality of Assisted Suicide

Assisted suicide for terminally ill patients may be one of the most morally complex issues facing today's society, with a particular impact on modern healthcare workers. Modern medicine has progressed to a point where, in many instances, life can be prolonged for significant periods of time, well beyond when people would have died of terminal diseases in prior times. However, there have not been similar advances on the other side of the issue; death remains a relatively unchartered part of the healthcare spectrum, and there have not been significant advances in helping patients who no longer wish to extend their lives, but hasten the end of their lives and end their suffering. The choices remain limited for healthcare workers, who, in providing any type of euthanasia are seen as assisting suicide. This is a deeply morally complex issue. The taboo against the taking of human life,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Medical Association. Opinion 2.211- Physician-Assisted Suicide. AMA . N.p.

1994. Web. 7 Dec. 2013.

Andre, Claire and Manuel Velasquez. Assisted Suicide: A Right or a Wrong? Santa Clara

University. N.p., 1987. Web. 7 Dec. 2013.
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Decision Made in Support for Physician Assisted Death

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53176042

Judgment on Physician Assisted Death

Prosecutions, where the state stands as the main complainant, are held up as criminal prosecution. A State prosecutor is duty bound to prove sufficiently that the action of the accused was inconsistent with the existing laws. In the case of the physician who gave a lethal dose to assist a terminally ill patient in dying it is the duty of the prosecutor to defend the existent law. The prosecutor ought to present to the court sufficient information regarding the law on physician assisted deaths.

Decision Taken and Justification

The legality and legality of physician-assisted death have raised numerous debates some leading to the Abolishment of laws against assisted suicide others upholding the law. The different state has differing justification on assisted suicide with some allowing physician-assisted suicide on grounds of the patient's quality of life and others assessing the palliate care measure explored to determine…… [Read More]

References

Quill, T. E., & Battin, M. P. (2004). Physician-Assisted Dying: The Case for Palliative Care and Patient Choice. eds., . Baltimore, Maryland U.S.: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2004.

William, B. (2000). Depression, Hopelessness, and Desire for Hastened Death in Terminally Ill Patients with Cancer. Journal of the American Medical Association, 284(22), 2907-2911.
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Legal Implications of Assisted Suicide

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30108900

This has sparked many debates in social and political arenas in regards to personhood, self-determination and human autonomy.

Any time a person wants to intentionally end his or her life, it is considered suicide. Suicide, in itself is now legal (Manning, 1998), but proponents of euthanasia argue that suicide may not be an option for the terminally ill, the hospitalized or physically disabled. These people may not have the strength or the means to end their lives alone, therefore, they cannot exercise the option of suicide and consequently are being discriminated against (Gifford, 1993).

I personally agree with those on the pro-euthanasia side of the camp, who believe that suicide is not an appropriate term for this issue because suicide is often associated with desperate emotion whereas euthanasia is based on a "cogent and deliberate form of relief from a painful and hopeless disease" (Adams, 1992). As opposed to suicide,…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Adams, Robert. "Physician-Assisted Suicide and the Right to Die With Assistance." Harvard Law Review 105:2021-2040, 1992

Gifford, Edward. "Artres Moriendi: Active Euthanasia and the Art of Dying." UCLA Law Review 40:1545-1583, 1993.

Manning, Michael, MD, Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Killing or Caring? Paulist Press, Mahwah, NJ, 1998

Olen, Jeffery & Barry, Vincent. Applying Ethics: A Text With Readings (6th ed.) Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1999.
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ethics euthanasia physician assisted death

Words: 1635 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62607163

Euthanasia comes from the Greek phrase meaning "good death," ("Euthanasia" 112). The various practices that fall under the general rubric of providing a person with the means for a "good death" include physician-assisted death, also referred to as physician-assisted suicide. Until recently, all forms of euthanasia were illegal in the United States and in most other developed countries but within the past generation, these laws have been liberalized so that citizens in democratic societies increasingly have access to a "good death." Physician-assisted suicide occurs under the guidance of an experienced and qualified physician, who is not legally obliged to agree to the practice. Therefore, no coercion takes place. The doctor is not permitted legally or ethically to coerce a patient into dying prematurely and the patient is likewise not ethically or legally allowed to persuade their doctor to intervene on their behalf. hat physician-assisted death laws do allow is for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Euthanasia." Chapter 10.

Lee, Richard. "Kant's Four Illustrations." Retrieved online: http://www.uark.edu/campus-resources/rlee/iethsu06/oh/k-4egs.html

"State-by-State Guide to Physician-Assisted Suicide." Retrieved online: http://euthanasia.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000132

Warren, Mary Anne. "On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion."
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ACA Assisted Suicide

Words: 1518 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34616216

Laws and Health Care

The health care industry has undergone massive overhaul in recent times and the impact of the laws and regulations that accompany this change have deep and resounding effects on the way professionals approach their industry. The purpose of this essay is to explain the role of governmental regulatory agencies and their effect on the health care industry.

This essay will first provide two examples of laws and regulations that have empirically demonstrated a noticeable and impactful transformation of the system. The next section of this essay is how these laws have personally affected me and my environment in Samaritan Hospital and how these regulations both serve and detract from our overall objectives of patient quality and healing those who seek our help.

Example 1: Affordable Care Act

Laws and regulations are present at many different levels within the health care industry. Private practices surely have their…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, A. (2014). The Impact of the Affordable Care Act on the Health Care Workforce. The Heritage Foundation, 18 Mar 2014. Retrieved from http://www.heritage.org/research/reports/2014/03/the-impact-of-the-affordable-care-act-on-the-health-care-workforce

Emanuel, E.J., Daniels, E.R., Fairclough, D.L., & Clarridge, B.R. (1996). Euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide: attitudes and experiences of oncology patients, oncologists, and the public. The Lancet, 347(9018), 1805-1810.

McClanahan, C. (2012). Cliffs Notes Version of the ACA. Forbes, 9 July 2012. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/carolynmcclanahan/2012/07/09/cliffs-notes-version-of-the-affordable-care-act/

Pereira, J. (2012). Legalizing euthanasia or assisted suicide: the illusion of safeguards and control. Current Oncology, Apr 2011, 18 (2). Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070710/
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Assisted Euthanasia

Words: 647 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14377959

Physician-assisted suicide or death has emerged as a major controversial and medical-ethical issue in the modern health care system. This issue has attracted huge concerns and debates among policymakers, medical practitioners, and the public. These concerns and debates have led to the emergence of arguments and counter-arguments in support and opposition to physician-assisted suicide. In addition, physician-assisted suicide has become a topic of research by various scholars based on these concerns and its benefits and/or disadvantages. An example of a research that focuses on the issue is the study by Timothy E. Quill on why physician-assisted suicide should be allowed. The author argues for the acceptance of physician-assisted suicide based on his experience as a primary care physician and the assistance he provided to many patients to die with their full consent. Quill's research article is helpful in providing justification for the overall legalization and acceptance of physician-assisted suicide.

The…… [Read More]

References

Messer, T. (2012, October 29). Physician-Assisted Death: In Consideration of the Right to Die.

Retrieved September 30, 2014, from http://www.nyam.org/social-work-leadership-institute-v2/geriatric-social-work/hppae/for-students/Physician-Assisted-Death-Paper-Submission-10-29-12-1.pdf

Quill, T.E. (2012). Physicians Should 'Assist in Suicide' When it is Appropriate. Journal of Law,

Medicine & Ethics, 40(1), 57-65.
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Assisted Dying Over Time Those in Support

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28440232

Assisted ying

Over time, those in support of assisted dying or what is more commonly known as physician-assisted suicide and those opposed to the same have presented strong and convincing arguments and counterarguments in support of their positions. In most cases, the term assisted dying is used synonymously with euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Assisted suicide in the opinion of Morrison "refers to when a patient intentionally and willfully ends his or her own life, with the assistance of a third party" (223). Whichever way one looks at it, life is sacred and therefore it should be preserved at all costs. In my opinion, permitting euthanasia would be in total disregard of the sanctity of human life. In the section below, I analyze some of the arguments that have over time been presented in support of assisted dying.

According to Norman et al., one of the arguments that have been presented…… [Read More]

Devettere, Raymond J. Practical Decision Making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts. 3rd ed. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2009. Print.

Morrison, Eileen E. Health Care Ethics: Critical Issues for the 21st Century. 2nd ed. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2009. Print.

Van Norman, Gail A. et al., eds. Clinical Ethics in Anesthesiology: A Case-Based Textbook. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Print.
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Suicide and Nurses Role

Words: 2674 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56480455

Physician-Assisted Death

Importance of Physician Assisted Deaths

My Ethical Position on Physician Assisted Deaths as a Nurse

The Legal isks for Nurses

The Opposing View

Summary of Arguments in Favor of My Position

Importance of Physician-Assisted Deaths

Careful reflection is needed for physician-assisted deaths and euthanasia as they often always involve complex issues related to the family, the physician and the nursing staff. The critical question is about ethics that a nurse needs to follow when a patient asks for physician-assisted death. Also important are issues related to the personal professional values of the nursing staff. Though made legal in Canada, physician-assisted deaths still involve careful evaluation -- both medically and ethically, while deciding to agree to be a part of physician-assisted deaths. While there are several perspectives and often conflicting arguments to physician-assisted deaths, most agree that the issue of ethics is of prime importance while deciding on physician-assisted…… [Read More]

References

Chochinov, H. (2016). Physician-Assisted Death in Canada. JAMA, 315(3), 253. http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2015.17435

Downar, J., Bailey, T., & Kagan, J. (2014). Why physician-assisted death?. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 186(10), 778-779. http://dx.doi.org/10.1503/cmaj.114-0048

Landry, J., Foreman, T., & Kekewich, M. (2015). Ethical considerations in the regulation of euthanasia and physician-assisted death in Canada. Health Policy, 119(11), 1490-1498. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2015.10.002

Paterson, C. A History of Ideas Concerning Suicide, Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. SSRN Electronic Journal. http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1029229
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Suicide and the Use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Words: 1709 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44560601

Cognitive Therapy and the Dutch/Anglo Patient

Clinical, Ethical and Legal Issues

Suicide and the patient's request for assistance in the state of Oregon are the main issues herein raised. The health issue is that the patient is alone and suffering from Parkinson's which will only further debilitate him in the coming years. He has no interest in suffering through it. He appears to suffer from hopelessness, which can be clinically assessed as being the main cause for suicide ideation (Beck, Kovacs, Weissman, 1975, p. 1146).

Deal with Patients Presenting with Issues of Suicide

Cognitive therapy (CT) or cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) as it is also called would be useful in dealing with the patient's presenting issues of suicide because "a substantial body of research supports" this model's application "to be effective in reducing symptoms and relapse rates" in cases of depression (Beck, 2005, p. 953). The patient in this case…… [Read More]

References

Asamsama, O., Dickstein, B., Chard, K. (2015). Do scores on the Beck Depression

Inventory-II Predict Outcome in Cognitive Processing Therapy? Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice and Policy, 7(5): 437-441.

APA. (2010). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. American Psychologists Association.

Beck, A. (2005). The Current State of Cognitive Therapy. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 62:
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Death Unnaturally Euthanasia Suicide Capital Punishment

Words: 2931 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74469083

death: suicide, euthanasia and the death penalty. Looking at certain aspects of each and discussing the issues concerning society. Also providing a sociological out look and economic basis for the arguments.

Death: Three Chances

Suicide is not a new phenomenon it has been around as long as mankind. The causes of suicide have been discussed on many occasions, and different theories have merged regarding the reason for which someone would commit suicide. There have been many studies undertaken in order to understand the phenomena in greater detail. Certain social factors were identified as being causal or contributing to this phenomenon, and suicides was broken down into different types, with different causes.

Henslin just as Durkheim before has looked at suicide, which Durkheim defined as any action which, leads subsequently to the death of the individual, either through positive action, such as hanging oneself or shooting oneself, or by way of…… [Read More]

References

Conwell Yeates, MD; Caine Eric D., MD 'Rational Suicide and the Right to Die: Reality and Myth' (1991 Oct 10); The New England Journal of Medicine, pp 1100-1103

Callahan J 'The ethics of assisted suicide' (1994 November);Health and Social Work, Vol. 19, PP. 234-244.

Donchin, Anne Autonomy, interdependence, and assisted suicide: Respecting boundaries/crossing lines. Bioethics. 2000 Jul; Vol 14(3): 187-204.

Haralambos and Holborn, (2000), Sociology; Themes and Perspectives, London, Collins.
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Euthanasia Should Physicians Be Allowed to Assist

Words: 2286 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20322552

Euthanasia: "Should physicians be allowed to assist in patient suicide?" (No)

Euthanasia is, quite literally, a "life and death" issue. It is no surprise, therefore, that it evokes heated debate among doctors, lawyers, philosophers, academicians as well as the general public all over the world. Although, recent developments in modern medicine have given it a new dimension, euthanasia is by no means an exclusively modern-day concern. Even the ancient Greeks had pondered over the issue centuries ago, albeit without reaching a definite conclusion about its merits or otherwise. In more recent times, euthanasia has been the subject of discussion in various forums including the Supreme Court of the United States with similar inconclusive results. Despite considerable debate and weighty arguments by either side, several key euthanasia questions remain unresolved such as "Should physicians be allowed to assist in patient suicide?" which is the subject of this paper. In the following…… [Read More]

References

Angell, Marcia. "The Supreme Court and Physician-Assisted Suicide -- The Ultimate Right," Article reproduced in "Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Bioethical Issues," pp. 80-87

Evans, Hilary M.D. "Pitfalls of physician-assisted suicide" (September 1997) Physician News Digest. Retrieved on October 28, 2003 at http://www.physiciansnews.com/commentary/997wp.html

Foley, Kathleen M. "Competent care for the Dying Instead of Physician-Assisted Suicide." Article reproduced in Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Controversial Bioethical Issues," pp. 88-95

Hendin, Herbert "Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia in the Netherlands: Lessons from the Dutch," 277 Journal of the American Medical Association, (June 4, 1997), p. 1720-1722
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Suicide Has Been of Interest From the

Words: 3406 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88414902

suicide has been of interest from the beginning of Western civilization. For philosophers, clergy and social scientists, the subject raises myriad of conceptual, theological, moral, and psychological questions, such as What makes a person's behavior suicidal? What motivates such an action? Is suicide morally permissible, or even morally required in some extraordinary circumstances? Is suicidal behavior rational? How does suicide affect those that remain? The fictional books Virgin Suicides and Norwegian Wood address some of these topics, only to find, as in real life, that each situation differs and the ones who are left must find a way to personally resolve their confusion and move on.

The definition of suicide is confusing. People have long looked at suicide in a negative fashion, although someone who dies to save others is more likely to be seen in a better light than someone who has done so to relieve mental or physical…… [Read More]

References Cited

Amundsen, D."Suicide and Early Christian Values." Suicide and Euthanasia: Historical and Contemporary Themes, Ed. B. Brody. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1989.

Curtin, J. Sean. Suicides in Japan: Part 10-Youth and Rural on Rise. Glocom Platform

14, November 2005.  http://www.glocom.org/special_topics/social_trends/20040813_trends_s78/ 

Fairbairn, G. Contemplating Suicide: The Language and Ethics of Self-Harm, London: Routledge, 1995.
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Tried to Expand on Areas

Words: 1629 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96301073

Freedom of choice includes the right to die and the right to choose assisted suicide.

3. An older argument in favor of assisted suicide that has been recently resurfaced with the implementation of a national health care bill could be termed the "economics argument" which states that the costs of keeping people alive who are going to die anyway is exceedingly high, higher than the benefit that the money and energy to maintain life bring. Life prolonged unnecessarily is costly to society and that money and those resources are being wasted and could be used more productively.

4. In essence, the final common argument us used in a number of legal and ethical situations and pretty much states that assisted suicide is already being performed in many hospitals, hospices, and nursing homes by physicians and nurses. It makes sense to formally legalize it so people will not have to sneak…… [Read More]

References

Block S.D. & Billings J.A. (1994). Patient requests to hasten death. Evaluation and management in terminal care. Archives of Internal Medicine, 154, 2039 -- 2047.

Gomez, C.F. (1991). Regulating death: Euthanasia and the case of the Netherlands. New York: Maxwell McMillan.

Kane, L. (2010). Doctors struggle with tougher-than-ever dilemmas: Other ethical issues. Medscape Today News, http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/731485_7, accessed 5-21- 2011.

Meier, D.E., Emmons, C.A., Wallenstein, S., Quill, T., Morrison, R.S., & Cassel, C.K. (1998). A national survey of physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine, 338, 1193 -- 1201.
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Biological Aspects of Aging

Words: 2241 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67278801

Biological Aspects of Aging

I can honestly say that I have been extremely affected by this course in terms of general knowledge related to the death, dying and grieving process. Prior to taking this class, I was largely ignorant of the various processes that all people (who live long enough) go through relating to their interminable procession towards the grave. One of the most salient aspects about this particular course was the ramifications of improvements in science, technology, and medical care that has allowed for an increasingly aging population. With many baby boomers now headed towards their latter stages of life, the relevance of this class, its textbook, and additional course materials has never been greater. In certain ways, I feel as though I am much more cognitively prepared for what is to come in the future. Yet one of the benefits of this class is that it has also…… [Read More]

References

Ferrini, R.L., Ferrini, A.F. (2008). Health in the Later Years. New York: McGraw-Hill.

No author. (2001). "Types of euthanasia." PregnantPause.org. Retrieved from  http://www.pregnantpause.org/euth/types.htm
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Young Most of Us Do Not Think

Words: 2216 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13981506

young, most of us do not think about making a conscious decision to die. e look forward to years of long and healthy life, and if death ever seems appealing it is as an antidote to depression. It does not often, if ever, occur to us that there will be a time when we look forward to the "good death" promised by euthanasia.

But it is inevitable that for many of us there will come a time in our lives when suicide may indeed seem appealing because we are fighting a losing battle against a certainly fatal disease that fills our remaining days with pain and despair. In such a position many of us may wish to have our doctors help us die by prescribing for us drugs that when we ourselves take them will prove to be fatal. Or we may wish that other people should have this option…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Callahan, Daniel, "Good Strategies and Bad: Opposing physician-assisted suicide," Commonweal, December 3, 1999, sec1. 7+.

Cassel, Christine K. "AMA Guidelines for Caring for Patients in the Last Phase of Life.," CQ Researcher 7 (1997): 774. (http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/amn_97/edit0721.htm)

Humphrey, Derek. Euthanasia: Essays and Briefings on the Right to Die. Los Angeles: Hemlock Society, 1991. http://deathwithdignity.org/euth_us2htm.

Orric, Sarah. "House Judiciary Committee Rationale." Congressional Digest 77 (1998); 263-264.
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Ethical Issues Raised by Biomedical

Words: 1736 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62814486

As the narrow policy discussions regarding Physician-Assisted Suicide continue, we ought to encourage all presently existing and legal methods of reducing the painful sufferings during the last phase of life.

eferences

Drickamer, Margaret, a; Lee, Melinda. a; Ganzini, Linda. (1997, Jan 15) "Practical Issues in Physician-Assisted Suicide" Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 126, no. 2, pp: 146-151.

Emauel, Ezekiel. (1997, Mar) "Whose right to die?" The Atlantic Monthly, vol. 17, no. 2, pp:

Hayden, Laurel a. (1999, Apr) "Ethical Issues: Helping Patients with End-of-Life Decisions"

The American Journal of Nursing, vol. 99, no. 4, pp: 2401-2403.

Kaplan, Kalman. J; Harrow, Martin; Schneiderhan, Mark. E. (2002, Spring) "Suicide, physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia in men vs. women around the world: The degree of physician control" Ethics and Medicine, vol. 21, no. 1, pp: 14-20.

Quill, Timothy E; Meier, Diane. E; Block, Susan. D; Billings, Andrew. J. (1998, Apr) "The

Debate over Physician-Assisted…… [Read More]

References

Drickamer, Margaret, a; Lee, Melinda. a; Ganzini, Linda. (1997, Jan 15) "Practical Issues in Physician-Assisted Suicide" Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 126, no. 2, pp: 146-151.

Emauel, Ezekiel. (1997, Mar) "Whose right to die?" The Atlantic Monthly, vol. 17, no. 2, pp:

Hayden, Laurel a. (1999, Apr) "Ethical Issues: Helping Patients with End-of-Life Decisions"

The American Journal of Nursing, vol. 99, no. 4, pp: 2401-2403.
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Terminally Ill People the Debate

Words: 1633 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34228014

For instance, the Independent Commission on Assisted Dying recommends that doctors "be allowed to prescribe drugs to end the lives of terminally ill patients who have fewer than 12 months to live" (Beckford, n.p.) However, the commission according to Bedford further points out that such individuals must be "judged to have the mental capacity and clear desire to die." In such a case, physician-assisted suicide will be available to only a select few. ith the right mechanisms in place, fears over 'death on demand' or concerns regarding the 'commercialization of death' will be put to rest. In their own words, Kopelman and De Ville point out that "one very important factor affecting the potential for abuse of any practice is what safeguards are erected to guard against the abuses most feared and likely" (64). ith that in mind, the relevance of proper safeguards when it comes to physician-assisted suicide cannot…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Battin, Margaret P. Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005. Print.

Beckford, Martin. "Allow Assisted Suicide for Those with Less Than a Year to Live." The Telegraph. N.p., 5 January 2012. Web. 6 August 2012.

Bryant, Clifton D. Handbook of Death and Dying. Volume 1. California: SAGE, 2003. Print.

Devettere, Raymond J. Practical Decision making in Health Care Ethics: Cases and Concepts. 3rd ed. Washington: Georgetown University Press, 2009.
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Euthanasia Pro Debates Regarding the

Words: 3344 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2927528

He argues that if society were to allow the terminally ill to commit suicide, then it would be a small step to allow other members of society -- like the handicapped -- to do so as well. This is not a completely trivial argument for two reasons: first, it is the point-of-view held by the majority of the Christian right -- a powerful political force in the Untied States; and second, if we accept his principle that life is intrinsically valuable, regardless of individual's rights over their own bodies, then we should be inclined to believe that active euthanasia is always wrong. Yet, Otremba is willing to concede that passive euthanasia may, sometimes, be permissible; this, however, only under the conditions of extreme suffering and impending death.

Fundamentally, it is a precarious moral position to contend that each and every human life demands society's active preservation. Otremba, and many others,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Callahan, Daniel. (1992). "When Self-Determination Runs Amok." Hastings Center Report, March/April.

Dworkin et al. (2003). "Assisted Suicide: the Philosophers' Brief." Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine: Sixth Edition. London: McGraw-Hill. Pages, 382-393.

Emanuel, Ezekiel J. (1994). "The History of Euthanasia Debates in the United States and Britain." History of Medicine, Vol. 121, Issue 10.

International Anti-Euthanasia Task Force. (2000). "Arguments for Euthanasia are Unconvincing." Euthanasia: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego: Greenhaven Press.
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Autonomy and Medical Practice What

Words: 1470 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47813173

3). How does a caregiver justify making decisions such as those mentioned above, decisions that are based on the caregiver's values and beliefs? Harris is very clear in this regard that these issues are both moral and philosophical, and the real problem is in how the issues are resolved and based on what standards and morals.

It's not merely about understanding the "natural of moral problems," John Harris explains (p. 4), and it's not just about what is right and what is wrong with reference to medical and human issues. But rather the answers following a decision that is framed in a morally right or wrong context have to be followed up with a good autonomous reason as to "why this is so," Harris continues (p. 4). It is Harris's assertion that a person can only claim that the action they took or the decision they made was based on…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beckwith, Francis J. "Absolute Autonomy and Physician-Assisted Suicide: Putting a Bad Idea

Out of Its Misery," in Suicide: A Christian Response: Crucial Considerations for Choosing

Life, Eds. T. Demy ad G. Stewart.

Bickenback, Jerome E. "Disability and Life-Ending Decisions," in Physician-Assisted Suicide:
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Death & Dying - Euthanasia

Words: 1165 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67399499

On the other hand, it is much less clear what the presumed logical basis is of governmental intrusion into the choice to end one's life where that decision is made by a sane person who is not responsible for others.

In medicine, that dilemma arises only among patients whose choice to end life is motivated by the understandable desire to escape untreatable physical pain or discomfort.

In some cases, it is not necessarily pain per se that the patient, but physical or cognitive debilitation that patients wish to escape by authorizing their physicians to end their lives painlessly. Typically, Dr. Kevorkian's patients suffered from incurable illnesses and congenital diseases that caused them more pain than they wished to endure until their natural death. All of Dr. Kevorkian's patients suffered from incurable conditions that either caused continual physical pain that could not be relieved by any medical treatment or they wished…… [Read More]

References

Humphry, D. (2002). Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying. Junction: Norris Lane Press.

Levine, C. (2008). Taking Sides: Clashing Views on Bioethical Issues 12th Ed. Dubuque Iowa: McGraw Hill.

Martindale, M. (2007). Kevorkian: Jail Reform Is His New Cause. The Detroit News, August 8/07.

Tong, R. (2007). New Perspectives in Health Care Ethics: An Interdisciplinary and Cultural Approach. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.
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Healthcare -- Legal Issues Medical

Words: 2029 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70244625

1993). Within medical settings in particular, physicians and supervisors are often too over-burdened with their myriad formal responsibilities to take note of minor irregularities in protocols and procedures. Because coworkers are often in the best possible situation to notice inadequacies, it is important for all levels of employees to be equally involved in the overall CQI process.

Optimal implementation of an effective CQI process also requires a culture of openness to suggestion and confidentiality with respect to reporting more serious issues such as those that result from negligence or willful misconduct on the part of co-workers.

11. The textbook states that "an organization's most vital component in costly resource is its staff." With this being the case, the human resource function plays a very important role. Should the human resource function be part of the senior management team?

In terms of policy implementation and organizational philosophy, the human resources function…… [Read More]

References

Horine, P.D., Pohiala, E.D., Luecke, R.W. (1993) Healthcare Financial Managers and CQI: Implementing Continuous Quality Improvement; Healthcare Financial Management.

Humphry, D. (1991) Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying. Secaucus: Carol Publishing

Russell-Walling, E. (2005) Fifty Management Ideas You Really Need to Know. London: Quercus
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Person Is in Inexorable Pain

Words: 1279 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30294992

Certainly in nature, one who was too ill to move would not last long. They would certainly not be placed on a feeding tube, having a machine breathing for them, mechanical devices doing all but forcing their heart to beat. Does having the power to extend life mean that physicians then have a duty to do so? According to Lachs, "Medicine does not surrender its vocation in serving the desires of individuals: since health and continued life are among our primary wishes, its career consists in just this service." If the primary duty of a physician is to honor their patient's wishes for health, then if a patient desires death as an end to suffering, that physician does not have a duty to prolong that patient's life. Rather, prolonging life against the wishes of the patient breaches the duty of the profession.

hy, then, do physicians continue to take incredible…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Ethics." Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 19 March 2011.

The Hippocratic Oath; Modern Version. PBS.com. 19 March 2011.

Lach, John. "When Abstract Moralizing Runs Amok." (please insert the book information, as it was not on the pages sent)

Singer, Peter. "Voluntary Euthanasia: A Utilitarian Perspective." (see note, above)
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Father's Death and Her Father Requesting That

Words: 1039 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80235024

father's death and her father requesting that treatment be accorded him so that he speedily is delivered from his pain, Ms. Wolf is faced with the dilemma of whether or not to accede. Always a staunch opponent of any euthanasia-assisted program, she realized that the choice was not so simple and that sometimes suicide or euthanasia exists in the gray zone.

Ultimately, nature, as she puts it, helped her out and her father lingered on long enough to enjoy his last remaining moments with her and die comfortably and at peace.

In those last few hours, she sang to him, reminisced about his time with her, they shared loving and tender recollections (he moved his jaw three times inferring that he loved her); the father had a chance to see his other loved ones and his death was more of a closure. More so, during that period of time, he…… [Read More]

Sources

Hare, R.M. Moral Thinking, U.K: Oxford, 1981.

Kant, I. Groundwork for the metaphysics of morals New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002.

Sharon, G. Sharon: the life of a leader. New York: Harper, c2011.
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argument in favor of the right to die

Words: 780 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49143048

person has the right to live their lives with dignity and freedom, a person also has the right to die with the same dignity and freedom. A person who has been diagnosed with a terminal illness, for which there is no cure and which causes certain pain, should not be forced to suffer. Likewise, a person should be allowed to choose whether or not to keep their body on life support indefinitely, even if they are in a persistent vegetative state from which no meaningful recovery. The collective issues known loosely as "right to die" comprise various types of physician-assisted suicide, in which a medical doctor can help a terminally ill patient to end their suffering. ight to die legislation, like that recently passed in the state of California, helps not only the patients but also their families ensure all Americans have access to the quality of life they deserve.…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Jennifer. "Right-to-Die Initiative Headed for Colorado's November Ballot." The Denver Post. July 5, 2016. Retrieved online: http://www.denverpost.com/2016/07/05/right-to-die-colorado-ballot/

Parker, Kathleen. "Is 'right to die' Becoming a Form of Health Care?" The Denver Post, 13 June 2016. Retrieved online: http://www.denverpost.com/2016/06/13/is-right-to-die-becoming-a-form-of-health-care/

"Right to Die," (n.d.). Justia. Retrieved online: http://law.justia.com/constitution/us/amendment-14/35-right-to-die.html

Waimberg, Joshua. "Does the Constitution Protect a Right to Die?" Constitution Daily. 2 Oct, 2015. Retrieved online: http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2015/10/does-the-constitution-protect-a-right-to-die/
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Death With Dignity

Words: 1074 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37478350

Death With Dignity: A ight or Not?

The issue of "euthanasia" is a matter of great controversy today. It is often difficult to judge who the "right" to die under the influence of euthanasia without the "power of attorney" should be afforded. eligiously, one cannot predict the "miracle" of God in daily life. For a patient to live through feeding-tube for the rest of his/her life in the hospital or nursing home does not show any dignity to our beloved ones. This paper will examine the issue of death and dignity from the perspective that all patients deserve to die with dignity, but face many obstacles in doing so.

One of the more frequent arguments against voluntary active euthanasia in the media and in literature is that "the push for a legalized right to die with medical assistance is a radical movement" carrying with it "alarming implications" for society (Ballis…… [Read More]

References:

Bachman, J.G. (1996). "Attitudes of Michigan physicians and the public toward legalizing physician-assisted suicide and voluntary euthanasia." New England Journal of Medicine, (334) [HIDDEN]

Ballis, P.H. & Magnusson, R.S. (1999). "The response of health care workers to AIDS

patients' requests for euthanasia." Journal of Sociology, 35(3):312

Datlof, S.B. "Beyond Washington v. Glucksberg: Oregon's death with dignity act analyzed from medical and constitutional perspectives." Journal of Law and Health, 14(1):23
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Euthanasia - The Right to

Words: 1637 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63975840

A person should always have the opportunity to die with dignity and perhaps even "discover the meaning of one's life" as pointed out by Pythia Peay.

At the very least, those that hold contrasting opinions on euthanasia should be able to come to an agreement that medical treatment must never be superseded by moral treatment. Even though the science of medicine is often highly specialized, it must never go against the moral ideals of the terminally-ill patient. Undoubtedly, there are many risks associated with euthanasia, but in the end, it should be the patient who decides. But in cases where the patient cannot respond nor make decisions, a living will appears to be the best solution, for this document clearly states the wants and desires of the person in case their lives turn for the worse and if they end up connected to a machine in order to stay alive,…… [Read More]

References

Athanaselis, Sotiris. (2002). "Asphyxial Death by Ether Inhalation and Plastic Bag Suffocation Instructed by the Press and the Internet." Internet. Vol. 4. Issue 3. Article e18. Journal of Medical Internet Research. Accessed May 1, 2005.  http://www.jmir.org/ 

2002/3/e18.

Brock, Dan W. (2002). "Physician-Assisted Suicide is Sometimes Morally Justified." Physician-Assisted Suicide. Ed. Gail N. Hawkins. San Diego: Greenhaven Press.

Euthanasia.com -- Definitions." (2005). Internet. Euthanasia.com. Accessed May 1, 2005.  http://www.euthanasia.com/definitions.html .
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Right to Die Why Patients

Words: 1794 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94621099



Fact sheet on end-of-life care. American Psychological Association. http://www.apa.org/pi/eol/factsheet1.pdf

Fact sheet on end-of-life care, published by the American Psychological Association discusses the adult's mental health needs near the end of life and the obstacles they confront to having a comfortable death.

Foley, K.M., (1995). Pain, Physician assisted dying and euthanasia. Pain 4, 163-178.

Foley discusses how access to and delivery of pain treatment are seriously deficient in the present health care systems in the United States. The author advocates expanding services and resources to care for the dying patient.

Isaacs, S.L. And Knickman, J.R (1997). To improve health and health care. San Francisco, CA: Jossey ass.

Isaacs and Knickman examine programs of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, a health care philanthropy. They reports its history, evaluates its effect, and discusses lessons learned as well as provide a frank discussion of why some problems can't be easily solved.

Langer, G. (2003,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bernstein, S. (1997, September 30). An act of mercy or murder?

 http://www.aish.com/societywork/sciencenature/Doctor-Assisted_Suicide.asp 

Bernstein includes opinions (both pro and con) on whether services be available to any patient who is terminally ill and facing certain death within six months.

Coleman, C.H. And Miller, T.E. Stemming the tide: Assisted suicide and the Constitution.  http://law.shu.edu/faculty/fulltime_faculty/colemaca/pdf_docs/coleman_miller_watermark.pdf
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Constitution and the Declaration of

Words: 1007 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82733291

How can we trust physicians to weigh pros and cons of so many health decisions, but impose judicial authority upon them on end-of-life issues?

Of course, opponents argue that this will be a slippery slope to allowing rampant assisted suicide. However, with any freedom, there are always some limitations. Giving individuals freedom of speech has not created a 'slippery slope' where individuals can be slandered. Even regarding First Amendment free speech, there are limits upon citizens in terms of revealing state secrets or using speech as a weapon -- the example of calling 'fire' in a crowded theater comes to mind. There could be limits upon the circumstances to ensure physicians could not assist severely depressed or mentally incompetent individuals to commit suicide, for example.

There are also practical considerations which the court does take into consideration when deciding many issues of social policy, as it did in Brown v.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

The U.S. Constitution. Cornell Law School. May 11, 2009.

http://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/constitution.table.html#amendments
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Statistics Healthcare and Human Resources Leadership

Words: 1034 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58212522

Healthcare/Statistics/Human esources Leadership

Unit 3-Assignment Details: Statistic

Empirical probability of an occurrence is essentially an estimate that this occurrence will take place on the basis of how frequent the occurrence takes place subsequent to the collection of data or conducting an experiment. Empirical probability is grounded distinctively on direct observations or experiences. On the other hand, theoretical probability of an occurrence is the number of ways that the occurrence can take place divided by the total number of outcomes. In other words, it is trying to find the probability of occurrences that emanate from a sample space of known equally probable outcomes (Anastas, 1999). The law of large numbers is considered to be one of the main theories of probability and asserts that the sample mean converges to the distribution mean as the sample size rises. The law of large numbers offers a clarification on the manner in which empirical…… [Read More]

References

Anastas, J. W. (1999). Research Design for Social Work and the Human Services. New York: Columbia University Press.

Asch, D. (1996). The role of clinical care nurses in euthanasia and assisted suicide. New England Journal of Medicine, 334 (21); 1374 -1379.

Boudreau, J. D., Somerville, M. A. (2014). Euthanasia and assisted suicide: a physician's and ethicist's perspectives. Medicolegal and Bioethics 2014, 4:13-14

Hatch, M. J. (1993). The dynamics of organizational culture. Academy of Management Review, 18(4), 657-693.
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applying ethical principles to nursing

Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73006604

Combining morphine and Ativan (lorazepam) can be deadly, making the Primary Care Physician (PCP) statement seem contradictory to medical ethics. The specific medical ethical issues addressed in this case include patient autonomy, beneficence, and nonmaleficence. However, there are other ethical issues and dilemmas raised by this case. The nurse faces professional ethical dilemmas in terms of the conflicts between Provision 2 and Provision 8 in the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of Ethics. Provision 2 indicates that nurses have a primary commitment to the patient, followed by Provision 3, which calls for the professional nurse to actively advocate for and protect the "rights, health, and safety of the patient," (ANA, 2015). However, Provision 8 indicates that the nurse also "collaborates with other health professionals and the public to protect human rights, promote health diplomacy, and reduce health disparities," (ANA, 2015). This case shows how the nurse's primary obligation to protect…… [Read More]

References

American Nurses Association (ANA, 2015). Code of Ethics. Retrieved online: http://www.vcuhealth.org/?id=1220&sid=13

International Council of Nurses (2012). The ICN Code of Ethics for Nurses. Retrieved online: http://www.icn.ch/images/stories/documents/about/icncode_english.pdf

"Patients' Bill of Rights," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www.aapsonline.org/patients/billrts.htm
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Financial Management at Mayo Clinic

Words: 1243 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59957037

Financial Management

A major part and linchpin of any medical and/or research firm is the financial management aspects of the organization. Financial management of any major medical outfit would be overseen by the officers of the treasury and finance departments. They would, by extension, also direct the financial activities of the clinic. The activities completed would include bookkeeping, investing, and developing projects. The depth and breadth of these operations would touch upon a number of important things such as the methods of funding to be used, research issues, quality control, ethics, accreditation, awards, regulation, marketing, strategic management choices, branding and involvement with the employees and community. All of the above applies to the organization that is being focused on in this report, that being the Mayo Clinic. While all businesses and organizations have to focus on financial matters of some degree or form, the complexities and intricacy of the Mayo…… [Read More]

References

Haughorn, J. (2014). Knowledge Management in Healthcare: It's More Important Than You Realize. Health Catalyst. Retrieved 26 July 2016, from https://www.healthcatalyst.com/enable-knowledge-management-in-healthcare

HIMSS. (2014). Infor Maximizing the Value of Human Capital in Healthcare. HIMSS. Retrieved 26 July 2016, from http://www.himss.org/infor-maximizing-value-human-capital-healthcare?ItemNumber=34438

Mayo. (2016). Regulatory Support - Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCaTS) - Mayo Clinic. Mayo.edu. Retrieved 26 July 2016, from http://www.mayo.edu/ctsa/resources/consultative-resources/regulatory-support

Weiner, S. (2001). I can't afford that!. J Gen Intern Med, 16(6), 412-418. http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1525-1497.2001.016006412.x
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Right to Die

Words: 2264 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20769695

Anti) Right to Die

Science and technology has allowed humans to treat a myriad of diseases that were previously terminal. This is illustrated in the controversy over the case of Terry Schiavo, the Florida woman at the center of a right to die dispute between her husband and her parents.

Schiavo, who has been in a vegetative state for the past 13 years, brings a face to the legal question of when can a third party decide the fate of patients who cannot decide for themselves. According to Schiavo's husband, Terri would not want to live in her present state. Schiavo's parents, however, disagree (Stern and Goddard).

The conflict illustrates the lack of precedent regarding the legal status of patients like Terri Schiavo. There are many more like her, who are comatose, unconscious and with no hope of recovery. Science and technology has allowed humans to treat a myriad of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. "Effective Pain Management Can Prevent Assisted Suicide." Suicide. Tamara L. Roleff, Ed. Opposing Viewpoints® Series. Greenhaven Press, 1998. Opposing Viewpoints Database.

Bresnahan, James. "Palliative Care or Assisted Suicide?" America, March 14, 1998. EBSCO database.

Emanuel, Ezekiel et al. "The Practice of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States," Journal of the American Medical Association. August 12, 1998. EBSCO database.

Hendin, Herbert. Seduced by Death: Doctors, Patients and the Dutch Cure. New York and London: W.W. Norton and Company, 1997.
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Against Euthanasia

Words: 3770 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6685658

Against Euthanasia

Death has always been shrouded in mystery, the constant litanies of myth, science, curiosity, magic, fear, and of course, religion. Just as myths have always wound down to the pragmatic, the real, and core accurate factual reporting - summarily losing the romantic, whimsical, and magical elements - so has the inevitability of human death.

Death is the central theme to life, vitality, order of society, and even powers - through the use of fossil fuels - our industry! When one, therefore, examines death objectively, he or she finds that death is a catalytic contract propelling the core beliefs and motivations of a group of people.

This evaluation seeks to isolate one aspect of death - euthanasia and a person's right to choose the time, place, and circumstance of their death without interference from legal, moral, religious, family, or other groups of social or punitive nature - and defend…… [Read More]

1974 The Euthanasia Society in New York renamed the Society for the Right to Die. The first hospice American hospice opens in New Haven, Conn.

1975 Deeply religious Van Dusens commit suicide. Henry P. Van Dusen, 77, and his wife, Elizabeth, 80, leaders of the Christian ecumenical movement, choose to die rather than suffer from disabling conditions. Their note reads, "We still feel this is the best way and the right way to go."

1975 Dutch Voluntary Euthanasia Society (NVVE) launches its Members' Aid Service to give advice
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Why Euthanasia Should Be Legal

Words: 3408 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77877098

Euthanasia Should e Illegal

Euthanasia is the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing death, as by withholding extreme medical measures, a person or animal suffering from an incurable, often painful, disease or condition (Euthanasia, Infoplease.com). Today, medical advances have made it possible to prolong life in patients with no hope of recovery, and the term negative euthanasia has arisen to classify the practice of withholding or withdrawing extraordinary means (e.g., intravenous feeding, respirators, and artificial kidney machines) to preserve life. Positive euthanasia, on the other hand, has come to refer to actions that actively cause death such as administering a lethal drug.

Much debate has arisen in the United States among physicians, religious leaders, lawyers, and the general public over euthanasia (Euthanasia, Infoplease.com). Pro-euthanasia societies were founded in 1935 in England and 1938 in the United States. The Hemlock Society is one group that has pressed for right-to-die…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Active Euthenasia - A Kantian Perspective." PlanetPapers. 07 Dec. 2003. http://www.*****/Assets/1710.php.

Bopp, James, and Coleson, Richard. "The Constitutional Case Against Permitting Physician-Assisted Suicide for Competent Adults with "Terminal Conditions." Oregon Right to Life. 07 Dec. 2003. http://www.ortl.org/suicide/constitutional_case_2.html.

Burke, J. Balch and O'Steen, David N.. "Why We Shouldn't Legalize Assisting Suicide." National Right to Life Committee. 08 Dec. 2003. http://www.nrlc.org/euthanasia/asisuid4.html.

Chastain, Jane. (2003, Sept. 4). "Another 9-11 Date With Death." WorldNetDaily.com. 08 Dec. 2003. http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=34416.
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Right to Die Legal and Ethical Issues Concerning the Withdrawal Withholding of Treatment

Words: 2116 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90932592

Right to Die

For the last few decades, the issue of a person's right to choose the time and method of his or her own death has been one of passionate debate in the United States, with emotions running high on both sides of the controversy as the meanings of liberty and freedom of choice, the morality of taking one's own life, the ethics of people involved in such actions, and the laws related to this issue take center stage in the arguments.

Since civilization began, suicide has existed in one form or another, with varying degrees of acceptance, such as the ancient Greeks who held tribunals for elderly people who requested to die, and if approved, were given hemlock and during the first century B.C. actually held annual banquets where the elderly were allowed to attend and drink poison if they felt they had lived long enough.

Moreover, "traditional…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brennecke, Shari J. "Right to Die: An Overview" Gerontology Manual. http://otpt.ups.edu/Gerontological_Resources/Gerontology_Manual/Brennecke.html.(accessed 12-03-2003).

Chachere, Vickie. "Judge appoints professor as guardian for brain-damaged woman in Florida." AP Worldstream. November 01, 2003. http://ask.elibrary.com/getdoc.asp?querydocid=1P1:86544618&dtype=0~0&dinst=0&pubname=AP+Worldstream&author=VICKIE+CHACHERE%2C+Associated+Press+Writer&title=Judge+appoints+professor+as+guardian+for+brain%2Ddamaged+woman+in+Florida&date=11%2F01%2F2003&query=Terry+Schiavo+and+the+State+of+Florida%2E&maxdoc=30&idx=2&ctrlInfo=result%3ASR%3Aprod.(accessed 12-03-2003)

Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Dept. Of Health." Citation: 497 U.S. 261 (1990)

Concepts: Right to Die/State Police Powers. http://www.tourolaw.edu/patch/CaseSummary.html.(accessed 12-03-2003).
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Right to Die

Words: 4327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85813109

right to die. The writer uses analytical skills to dissect and argue several right to die cases that have been presented in court in America. The writer discusses the ethics of the practice as well as presents ideas about the future "right to die" arguments and cases. There were eight sources used to complete this paper.

Through the advances of medical science people are living longer than ever before. Those who are chronically ill are being helped in the quest to alleviate symptoms and those who might have become ill in the past are being cured. The medical science advances have also allowed those who would have died in the past from head injuries, car crashes, gun shots wounds and other accidents to live. All of the advances that have been made have worked in favor for millions of people who otherwise would have died. The advances are also providing…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Physician-Assisted Suicide: The Legal Slippery Slope (accessed 1-19-2003) from Cancer Control: Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/409026_7

Cases in history (accessed 1-19-2003)

http://www.euthanasia.org/cases.html
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Euthanasia Against in North America Most People

Words: 1892 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85154634

Euthanasia (against)

In North America most people die that can be called a bad death. A study found that "More often than not, patients died in pain, their desires concerning treatment neglected, after spending 10 days or more in an intensive care unit" (Horgan, 1996).

The term Euthanasia has originated from the Greek language: eu meaning "good" and thanatos meaning "death." However, according to the Netherlands State Commission, another meaning given to the word is "the intentional termination of life by another at the explicit request of the person who dies" (Netherlands State Commission).

Thus, the word euthanasia generally means that the person who wishes to commit suicide must commence the action. However, according to some people definition, euthanasia comprises both voluntary as well as involuntary execution of life. According to the moral, religious, ethical terms, the word "euthanasia" has many meanings, resulting in mass confusion. Therefore, it is vital…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Horgan, John. Right to Die. Scientific American, May 1996.

Netherlands State Commission on Euthanasia. Definition of Euthanasia.

DeathNet. Oregon Death With Dignity Act. http://www.rights.org/~deathnet/ergo_orlaw.html

Matas, Robert. Oregon Reconsiders Death-With-Dignity Law. The Globe and Mail Newspaper, Toronto ON, Nov 3, 1997 (p. A1)
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Ethics and Euthanasia the First

Words: 2170 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1934237

"

The question of death ceases to be a personal experience, a family experience, and becomes a societal decision. It suggests that the values that one inherits through the experience of dying and dearth are without merit, and do not serve to better humanity. It reduces the human body that holds life to a commodity, and the decision of whether or not the body's continued living is profitable to the bottom line.

There are many questions that arise when we talk about death in terms of being better for society as a whole. Questions such as to what extent would a solider feel compelled to fight for the lives of his fellow countrymen if the society in which he lives makes decisions about the value of life being measured by wealth? To what extent would a stranger reach out to save the life of another person if economics becomes the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gibbs, David and DeMoss, Bob. Fighting for Dear Life: The Untold Story of Terri

Schiavo and What it Means for All of Us. 2008. New York, Bethany House.

Print.

Humphry, Derek. Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide
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Euthanasia the Foremost Contentious Concern Lately Has

Words: 4959 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97241063

Euthanasia

The foremost contentious concern lately has been the issue of granting legal status to the right to die with dignity, or euthanasia. Similar to the issue of death sentence or suicide, euthanasia is contentious as it entails killing an individual through a conscious decision. (The right to a dignified death - need for debate) "Euthanasia" derived from the Greek term implying "good death" is some activity we perform or otherwise which results in, or is planned to result in death, to liberate a person from pain. This is occasionally known as "mercy killing." (Reflections on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide) Giving a legal sanction to euthanasia is a vital referendum upon the social standing of those incapacitated in America nowadays. (Euthanasia: The Disability Perspective on the Right to Die Movement) Euthanasia can be attained either though an intentional process, or by refraining to take an action intentionally. In any one…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abergavenny, Roger Dobson. (22 February, 2003) "Society should accept that euthanasia is a personal decision, report says." British Medical Journal. 326:416. Retrieved from http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/326/7386/416/d Accessed on 4 May, 2005

"Arguments against Euthanasia: Euthanasia is against the word and will of God." Retrieved from http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/ethics/sanctity_life/euthagod.shtml Accessed on 3 May, 2005

"Arguments against Euthanasia" Retrieved from  http://www.euthanasia.com/argumentsagainsteuthanasia.html  Accessed on 3 May, 2005

'Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia" Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=cmed.section.17469 Accessed on 3 May, 2005
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In Support of Euthanasia

Words: 1827 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27114240

Euthanasia is an emotionally charged topic of debate, and it is easy to lose sight of the facts when people talk about wanting to kill themselves for whatever reason. Most of the people that seek physician-assisted suicide are suffering from terminal illnesses that cause them a great deal of pain that cannot be properly controlled with medications. For these individuals, the relief of death is preferred to their continuing suffering. The ethical debate over euthanasia, though, is colored by millennia of human thinking concerning the value of life and biblical proscriptions against suicide in any form. This paper examines the arguments in support of euthanasia as well as arguments against the practice to determine the facts and to provide rationale in support of legalizing euthanasia.

2.

Introduction:

Humans can be said to really own one thing outright: their lives. There are laws in most countries, though, that prevent people from…… [Read More]

References

Keown, J. (2002). Euthanasia, ethics, and public policy: An argument against legalization.

Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Marcoux, I. & Mishara, B.L. (2007, May/June). Confusion between euthanasia and other end-

of-life decisions. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 98(3), 235.
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Dying With Dignity

Words: 1240 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11463124

Dying with dignity is a controversy argued in two perspectives by death scholars. Some scholars argue that dying with dignity is expiring without unnecessary physical pain while others argue that it is dying in the socially accepted ways. eaching these arguments was in light of changing health care demands and diverse customary practices. This controversy dated back to the ancient civilizations when many Greeks believed that taking one's life was better than experiencing endless suffering. This made physicians give poison to the terminally ill patients. However, with the advent of Christianity, the Hippocratic School that was against giving deadly drugs to patients acquired considerable acceptance. Therefore, euthanasia, as called in the fifteenth century was suicide and thus immoral. As time passed, reintroduction of the use of euthanasia continued, and it has even been largely accepted in various medical institutions.

In the perspective of dying with dignity as dying without any…… [Read More]

References

Beauchamp, T.L., & Childress, J.F. (2009). Principles of biomedical ethics (6th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

Gentzler, J. (2003). What is a death with dignity? The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, 28(4), 461 -- 487.

Poroch, N.C. (2012). Kurunpa: Keeping spirit on country. Health Sociology Review, 2i (4), 383-395.
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Gonzales vs Oregon Case Analysis

Words: 1338 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62398852

According to eno congress had not intention "to displace the states as the primary regulators of the medical profession and as not to override a states' determination of that which "constitutes legitimate medical practice in the absence of a prohibitive federal law.

In November of 2001 Attorney-General Ashcroft "issued an interpretive rule, known as the Ashcroft Directive that reversed his predecessor's legal analysis of the conflict between the DWDA and the CSA." (Pew Forum on eligion & Public Life, 2005) The Ashcroft Directive "asserts the authority of the attorney general to identify and establish a uniform national definition of 'legitimate medical purpose' as used in the CSA and its implementing regulations" (Pew Forum on eligion & Public Life, 2005)

That very same year the Supreme Court made a decision in the case United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers' Coop. (2001) which gives weight to the Directive. Furthermore, the Office of…… [Read More]

References

Stevens, Kenneth R., Jr. M.D. (2005) Community Conversation Panel: Assisted Suicide v. Death with Dignity. University of Oregon Online available at http:.//wwww.pccef.org/articles/art42UofO.htm.

Supreme Court Considers Challenge to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act: Gonzales v. Oregon and the Right to Die (2005) The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. September 2005.

Hamilton, N. Gregory et al. (2005) Competing Paradigms of Response to Assisted Suicide Requests in Oregon. Physicians for Compassionate Care Educational Foundation Online available at  http://www.pccef.org/articles/art39.htm .

New Court Mulling Assisted-Suicide Law (2005) Catholic Sentinel 6 October 2005 Online available at http://www.sentinel.org/articles/2005-40/14227.html.
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Euthansia and Its Unfairness to the Poor

Words: 964 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71924958

Euthanasia has become a hotly contested subject in the last few decades. Some are against euthanasia or assisted-physician suicide. Others are for it. The essay titled: "Vulnerable People: Practical ejoinders to Claims in Favor of Assisted-Suicide," written by Cohn and Lynn favors against legalizing physician assisted-suicide. I will argue that Cohn and Lynn's argument for denying legalization for physician-assisted suicide is sound.

The first argument explains physician-assisted suicide may be something that people fear instead of favor due to the notion that someone else will dictate a person's life. To think that costs and excessive suffering could become the basis for determining whether a person should live or die is frightful. The authors especially made note of those who are poor when considering such thoughts. The poor cannot afford medical expenses like the middle or upper classes can. Therefore, if expenses contribute to the greenlight for a physician-assisted suicide, many…… [Read More]

References

AMA,. (2016). Opinion 2.21 - Euthanasia. Ama-assn.org. Retrieved 7 April 2016, from http://www.ama-assn.org/ama/pub/physician-resources/medical-ethics/code-medical-ethics/opinion221.page?

Fiano, C. (2014). Lithuanian health minister pushing for euthanasia of the poor -- Live Action News. Live Action News. Retrieved 7 April 2016, from http://liveactionnews.org/lithuanian-health-minister-pushing-for-euthanasia-of-the-poor/
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Do-Not-Resuscitate and Ethical Standards

Words: 2568 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77640356

Resuscitate (DNR)

What is a Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order?

First used about fifty years ago, the do not resuscitate (DNR) order continues to elicit questions and discussion among medical experts and patients. The do not resuscitate order is a directive from a patient who specifically refuses consent for certain forms of medical interventions related to life-saving actions by hospital personnel. The presence of the DNR order makes it important that informed discussions between a specific patient, family, and physicians and staff are made regarding their medical conditions. In the modern day world, advances made in medical therapy that include end-of-life treatments, have made the presence of a DNR order even more crucial.

Epidemiological research has greatly enhanced our knowledge of the different forms and outcomes of resuscitation. However it is the physicians, patients, and institutional (hospital) policies that greatly influence the occurrence of DNR orders (Loertscher, Reed, annon, &…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barlow, C. (2014). What does DNR/DNI really mean? Nursing, 65. Retrieved from:  http://journals.lww.com/nursing/Citation/2014/08000/What_does_DNR_DNI_really_mean_.20.aspx 

Beauchamp TL, Childress JF. (1994). Principles of biomedical ethics (4th ed). New York, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Goel, V. (2008). Euthanasia - A dignified end of life! International NGO Journal, 224. Retrieved from:  http://www.academicjournals.org/article/article1380895703_Goel.pdf 

Hanson LC, Danis M, Garrett J. (1997). What is wrong with end-of-life care? Opinions of bereaved family members. J Am Geriatr Soc; 45: 1339-44
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Ethics Argument Against Euthanasia Refers

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81125106



Possibly the only exception to the immorality of suicide arises as a function of the philosophical impossibility of violating the fundamental right of the individual - both at law and in moral principle - of refusing medical treatment. Adults who are mentally competent to make decisions for themselves cannot be compelled to accept medical treatment unless their illness presents a health risk to others, such as in the case of infectious tuberculosis (Miller 1984). In that case, it is not suicide specifically that is the issue, since it would be conceptually impossible to allow the (competent) refusal of defining medical procedures deemed "necessary for continued life" first, and second, to require an individual to seek unwanted medical care for some conditions but not others.

However, even if the mentally competent individual may refuse life-saving medical care himself, allowing the same decision made for an incapacitated person by another by proxy…… [Read More]

References

Abrams, N., Bruckner, M.D. (1985) Medical Ethics: A Clinical Textbook and Reference for the Health Care Professional. Massachusetts: MIT.

Breitman, R. (1998) Official Secrets: What the Nazis Planned, What the British and Americans Knew. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Dershowitz, a.M. (2002) Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. New York: Little Brown & Co.

Garner, B.A. (2001) Black's Law Dictionary. St. Paul: West Group.
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Terri Schiavo Conflict

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86343865

Terri Schiavo- a Case of Life-Ethics

Mercy Killing, euthanasia, life support, brain damage are some of the hotly debated issues today in medical and legal circles. When is a person really dead? Why should life support system be provided? When can it be removed? Under what circumstances a person can be killed by the medical staff? There questions, as disturbing as they may be, are high pertinent to the case of Theresa Schiavo, the 41-year-old woman who died on March 31st, this year after her feeding tube was removed. (BBC News)

Terri Schiavo, as she is popularly known now, suffered a serious brain injury in a cardiac arrest in 1990 which may have been triggered by her suspected bulimia. She was then married to Michael Schiavo and apparently living a happy life. Terri's parents, obert and Mary Schindler, wanted to keep her alive with the use of a feeding tube.…… [Read More]

References

1) Disabled state - special legislation for Terri Schiavo -- 39-year-old woman in vegetative state since 1990 Christian Century Nov 29, 2003

2) Robert Marus, Florida dispute renews life-ethics controversy - News Terri Schiavo Christian Century Nov 15, 2003

3) Excerpts from the Supreme Court decision in Washington v. Glucksberg allowing states to ban doctor-assisted suicides "The State Has an Interest in Preventing Suicide . . . And Treating Its Causes', Washington Post, Friday, June 27, 1997; Page A18

4) "Brain-damaged Terri Schiavo dies" Story from BBC NEWS: http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/americas/4398131.stm Published: 2005/03/31
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Death With Dignity Is a

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81160923

Both doctors feel physician-assisted suicide is a compassionate alternative to living the remainder of life filled with pain and suffering. Many others agree, and there are even published documents instructing loved ones and physicians how to go about assisting in a death with dignity suicide. In fact, many physicians feel that physician-assisted suicide could help keep health care costs in check as the baby-boomer generation ages. Unfortunately, statistics are lacking in the area of terminally ill patients and how many would end their lives if given the choice. Statistics do show, however, that many physicians receive requests for medications that will hasten death, or requests for lethal injections, and that a small number to comply in some cases.

Many physicians oppose the practice because they feel it goes against the oath they took to always save lives, while some do sympathize with terminally ill patients. here are also similar considerations…… [Read More]

Two of the most well-known advocates of physician-assisted suicide are Dr. Jack Kevorkian and Dr. Timothy Quill. Moral conservatives oppose euthanasia because they believe it is morally wrong, and is the same as ending life-sustaining treatment. Both doctors feel physician-assisted suicide is a compassionate alternative to living the remainder of life filled with pain and suffering. Many others agree, and there are even published documents instructing loved ones and physicians how to go about assisting in a death with dignity suicide. In fact, many physicians feel that physician-assisted suicide could help keep health care costs in check as the baby-boomer generation ages. Unfortunately, statistics are lacking in the area of terminally ill patients and how many would end their lives if given the choice. Statistics do show, however, that many physicians receive requests for medications that will hasten death, or requests for lethal injections, and that a small number to comply in some cases.

Many physicians oppose the practice because they feel it goes against the oath they took to always save lives, while some do sympathize with terminally ill patients. There are also similar considerations for nurses and pharmacists who might be involved in the assisted suicide. The most famous proponent of physician-assisted suicide is Dr. Jack Kevorkian, now serving a prison sentence for the practice in Michigan.

The Supreme Court has upheld Oregon's right to die act, while striking down other rulings in other states. Their latest decision recognizes this is a state issue, rather than a federal one. The Oregon Act originated in 1994, and was finally passed in 1997. Since then, it has undergone several legal challenges, but continues to be upheld in the courts. It is interesting to note that in an Oregon study, not everyone who requests a lethal dosage of medication actually ingests the medication and dies. Some choose to keep their lethal dosage, and some die before they can use it. The numbers of requests for lethal doses each year have remained stable, as well.
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Social Work Policy Analysis the

Words: 968 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62291573

This is based on the theory, posed by citizens, that certain individuals afflicted with terminal illnesses should have the legal right to hasten their death.

As a result, individuals that acquire these disabilities often view death as an extremely viable solution.

The target population that the Oregon Death with Dignity statute involves are those that are terminally ill. There are both long and short-term effects of the statute on the rest of the population, as well as the target population. Oregon has the fourth highest rate of elder suicide in the United States, and the statute appears to be a short-term solution to a long-term problem. The statute gives physicians the long-term power to judge whether a particular suicide is rational, based on the physician's evaluation of the individual's quality of life. The short-term effect of the statute is that federal resources previously used to care for the elderly and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gil, D. (1976). A Framework and Synthesis of Social Policies. Unraveling Social Policy:

Theory, Analysis, Political Actions towards Social Equality. Cambridge, MA: 31-56.

Gil, D. (1992). Unraveling Social Policy. (5th Ed.) Rochester, VT: Schenkman.
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Active and Passive Euthanasia in

Words: 2320 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47727719

136).

A major factor underlying whether active or passive euthanasia is legal is whether the doctor intends to kill the patient or not (Lewis, 2009, p. 126). Rachels hits on the intent piece in one of his constructed examples, "Rather, the other factors - the murderer's motive of personal gain, for example, contrasted with the doctor's humanitarian motivation -account for different reactions to the different cases." The Colombian Constitutional Court actually ruled doctors are negligent if they ignore a terminally ill, competent patient's request for active euthanasia, a position which actually moves closer to Rachels' side of the debate (Michlowski, 2009, p. 192). The Canadian Medical Association's inquiry into Belgian euthanasia included asking about the doctors' "explicit intention of hastening the end of life or of enabling the patient to end his or her own life" (Chambaere et al., 2010, p. 896). This intent underlies the principle of "double effect,"…… [Read More]

Nor do professional associations provide a clear consensus to anyone outside their membership, because they often contradict each other. Many of them disagree with the AMA position Rachels frames his argument in terms of. The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) asserts "Most would choose to live if they had full confidence that the care system would serve them well," and so justifies continued prohibition of voluntary assisted suicide and monetary compensation for the practice thereof, using most of the criteria discussed in my research. On the other hand, the American Psychological Association's assertion that the cognition behind the terminally ill patient's decision to die differs from the logic employed by the clinically depressed in deciding to commit suicide is echoed by the American Public Health Association, the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and the American College of Legal Medicine, who justify their recommendation against the negative associations between suicide and what they describe as "the principles of personal autonomy and free will" on grounds of material difference long recognized by the U.S. Supreme Court (Tucker & Steele, 2007, p. 325).

A fourth commonality that runs through the discussion but with much less prominence is a qualification that a patient's decision can be overridden if euthanasia has significant effects on people other than the patient, although those effects are even more rarely, if ever, defined. The Columbian courts qualified their acceptance of personal autonomy as sovereign under the constitution with the competency requirement but also where the exercise of that autonomy carried only " private nonpublic effects" (Michlowski, 2009, p. 192). The petitioner who brought the Columbian complaint claimed in part that non-voluntary euthanasia ("mercy-killing" to the 1973 AMA) left the doctor free to "end the lives of those who are regarded as an obstacle, a nuisance, or whose health raises high costs" (Michlowski, 2009, p. 186), but the court took it upon itself to generalize this even farther. This 'externality' effect rarely appears in such abstract terms, but runs throughout the research and opinion on the ethics of euthanasia in various guises.

The newer AMA policy statement claims euthanasia "would pose serious societal risks," without elaborating specifically what those may be (1996). Numerous patients have included consideration of their family's emotional pain caused by prolonged terminal illness as a factor leading them to choose euthanasia (Chambaere et al., 2010, p. 897); but fewer overtly discuss the callous topic of monetary expense as a factor in that decision. Tucker and Steele mention that voluntary euthanasia consumers may consider the cost to their estate, but only in passing (2007, p. 322). Campbell (2005, p. 45) claims family concern is justified under some Buddhist and Hindu perspectives if the choice to take life is made out of compassion for
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Geriatric Right to Die the

Words: 2635 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10740441



One solution of this issue can be that the closest most guardians is given the permission and right to take the decision about the life of the patient who is not able to communicate or express his wish. The guardian who should be responsible to take this decision should be the one who will be having direct impact of the death of the patient.

Community & Health Care esolution

Different communities have varied opinions in regard to right to die for geriatric. Although few of the countries have legalized this matter and have given the right to patient to decide whether he wanted to live more or not, but still there are campaigns in those countries that do not support the way patients should be given death and is also considered another way of committing suicide. Communities think if the right is legalized it will give doctors the right do…… [Read More]

Reference

Gastmans C. & Lemiengre. J. (2007). Development and communication of written ethics policies on euthanasia in Catholic hospitals and nursing homes in Belgium (Flanders), Centre for Biomedical Ethics and Law, Faculty of Medicine, Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium. Vol 63, Issue 1. pp 188 to 195, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=06716113-81ca-4db0-a772-51ae3b6dd9ca%40sessionmgr15&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2009306329

Kenny, R.W. (2007). An effect of communication on medical decision making: answerability, and the medically induced death of Paul Mills., Department of Public Relations, Mount Saint Vincent University. Vol 22, issue 1, pp. 69 -- 78, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=c57afac0-3522-4bc8-8c8e-a0a7732261ee%40sessionmgr15&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2009640106

Lemiengre K. (2008). How do hospitals deal with euthanasia requests in Flanders (Belgium)? A content analysis of policy documents. Health Promotion/Education, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=37d04412-5a09-4727-92f0-398ccb54533a%40sessionmgr13&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2009908744

Levett, C. (2011). Dying with dignity -- the case for end of life choices, Australian Nursing Journal, vol. 18, issue 8, pp. 48, retrieved March 16, 2011 from http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?sid=078d26de-de1f-4206-80ba-d37b9a51f264%40sessionmgr14&vid=1&hid=19&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=rzh&an=2010954963
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Rise of Advanced Technologies in the Medical

Words: 1474 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44926912

rise of advanced technologies in the medical field, especially those that sustains life, has brought issues in the ethics and morality of those involved in the field of medicine. Most significant to these issues is the practice of Euthanasia on patients diagnosed to have no chance of surviving and regaining life after any treatment has been implemented. In view of the issues on Euthanasia, this paper aims to present a discussion of this medical practice by analyzing the stands and views of Ned Cassem, James Rachel, Sidney Hook, and Leon R. Kass. This paper also aims to explain the meaning of "good death" as mentioned by Ned Cassem.

On many medical books and dictionaries, "euthanasia" or "mercy-killing" is defined as ending a life of a terminally ill patient by ways such as removing life support machines or stopping treatments that somehow prolongs life. The basic reason why euthanasia is performed…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chung, Ken. On James Rachels and "Active and Passive Euthanasia."

Publish.Uwo.Ca. 28 Dec. 2002. http://publish.uwo.ca/~kchung23/rachels.htm

Hook, Sidney. "In Defense of Voluntary Euthanasia.."

The New York Times (1 Mar. 1987).
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Oregon Death Dignity Act Enacted

Words: 420 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57358647

What the physician must take into account when approving the lethal medication is more than just the patient's state of mind and medical condition. The patient's family can and should be taken into consideration. Any patient whose family strongly and vocally opposes the physician-assisted suicide might have a more difficult time convincing a physician that the choice to euthanize is the right one.

In addition to supporting the rights of the patient and his or her family and also protecting the doctor from being persecuted for a physician-assisted suicide, an important parameter of the act is education. The Act demands that statistics and data be gathered as part of an ongoing research initiative. The Oregon state government and any interested think tank, university, or public policy organization to learn from the statistics gathered as a requisite part of the Death with Dignity Act. One of the main objectives of the…… [Read More]

References

Death with Dignity Act National Center. Retrieved July 25, 2008 at http://www.deathwithdignity.org/

State of Oregon (nd). Death with Dignity Act. Retrieved July 25, 2008 at  http://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ph/pas