Play Therapy Essays (Examples)

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Music Therapy

Words: 706 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80647306

Music therapy involves incorporating music into therapist-patient relationship development for promoting the latter's physiological, psychological, emotional and social health. One can consider music therapy to be a part of creative arts treatment, clinical treatment, or supplementary treatment relative to the conventional medical model. It encompasses numerous techniques such as playing a musical instrument, singing a song, listening to music and improvisation (McCaffrey 42). Autism spectrum disorder represents a lasting developmental disability which evolves at different levels of severity. The condition has been marked by the following three key characteristics: challenges when it comes to forging social bonds; intense limited fanatic interests; and issues when communicating verbally and non-verbally (National Autistic Society 1)

The Benefits of Music Therapy for Children with Autism

Autistic kids depict greater sensitivity to anxiety as compared to non-autistic ones, since they cannot effectively filter out any triggering stimulus. Steady rhythmic music or classical songs are considered…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Autism Science Foundation. "Music Therapy May Help Children with Autism." ASF Blog. N.p., 30 Aug. 2013. Web. 27 June 2017.

Manfred, Theodoros. "Music Therapy for Autistic Children." HealthGuidance.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 27 June 2017.

McCaffrey, Triona. "Music Therapy Hits Right Note." Irish Medical Times, vol. 40, no. 49, 2006, pp. 42, Business Premium Collection.

National Autistic Society: National Autism Charities Join Forces to Fight for Autism during the General Election Campaign." M2 Presswire, Apr 18, 2005, pp. 1, Business Premium Collection.
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Cognitive Therapy Provides a Structured Framework for

Words: 1239 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76925730

Cognitive therapy provides a structured framework for change. Describe your understanding of how this form of therapy works.

According to Cherry (2012), cognitive behavior therapy, also known as CBT focuses on helping clients to understand the thoughts and feelings that create their behaviors. If such behaviors are problematic, the client is encouraged to work on the way they think and feel about certain situations, which, it is assumed, would then also create change in the behavior. Commonly, phobias, addiction, depression, and anxiety are treated by means of CBT. This type of therapy is generally used to create short-term solutions to very specific problems, which focus on helping people to change by focusing on destructive or disturbing thought patterns that influence their behavior negatively.

The underlying cause for disturbed behaviors is then regarded as thoughts and feelings, more than repressed subconscious disturbances created by the individual's past. As such, these are…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2012). What is Cognitive Behavior Therapy? Retrieved from: http://psychology.about.com/od/psychotherapy/a/cbt.htm

Haggerty, J. (2006). Psychodynamic Therapy. PsychCentral. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2006/psychodynamic-therapy/
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Dialectical Behavior Therapy Dbt Dialectical

Words: 2722 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12226336

For them to survive crisis they are equipped with the skills to; self-soothing, thinking of the pros and cons, improving the moment and looking for destructive things to do. They can also exhibit acceptance skills by turning the mind to accept, radical acceptance and willingness vs. willfulness.

Individuals with under this therapy are taught how to regulate their emotions. This is because most of those suffering from this disorder are known to be angry, depressed, intensely frustrated and anxious among other behaviors. The steps taught towards emotional regulation include; identification and labeling of emotions, identification of obstacles to any change of emotion, reducing of vulnerability to having an emotional mind, by having more positive emotional events, giving the patient the ability to control the current emotions and wherever a negative one presents itself he/she can take the opposite action, and lastly, he/she can apply the distress tolerance techniques taught (Heard,…… [Read More]

References

Clarkin, J.F., Levy, K.N., Lenzenweger, M.F., & Kenberg, O.F. (2007). Evaluating Three Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Multiwave Study. The American Journal of Psychaiatry, 164(6).

Heard, M.A.S.H.L. (2009). Dialectical behaviour therapy: distinctive features: Routledge.

Westen, D. (2000). The efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder. Clinical Psychology. Science and Practice, 7(1), 92-94.

Willem H.J. Martens. (2012). Therapy on the borderline: effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy for patients with borderline personality disorder. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association.
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Maggot Debridement Therapy Is Maggot

Words: 2057 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94862551

Given the frequency of pressure ulcers, the strategies used in mitigating those wounds must be effective. Sherman reports that 61 ulcers in 50 patients got maggot therapy and 84 ulcers in 70 patients did not receive maggot therapy (instead, those wounds received traditional care). The results showed that "eighty percent of maggot-treated wounds were completely debrided" but only 48% of conventionally-treated wounds were "completely debrided" (Sherman, 208).

(Qualitative) Laura Jean van Veen presents a case in the Journal of ound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing; a 59-year-old woman (a Jehovah's itness) was seriously injured in an auto accident in Vancouver. In order to save her legs (her religion did not permit blood transfusions) the family asked for maggot therapy. After applying maggots weekly for 6 weeks, "…the patient [was] now free of infection" and had skin graft surgery (van Veen, 2008, 432).

(Qualitative) Another case study in the Journal of ound,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Courtenay, M., Churdh, J.D.T., and Ryan, T.J. (2000). Larva therapy in wound management.

Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, Vol. 93, 72-74.

Fenn-Smith, P. (2008). Case Study: Maggot Debridement Therapy. Wound Practice and Research, 16(4), 169-170.

Paul, Aaron G., Ahmad, Nazi W., Lee, H.L., Ariff, Ashraff M., Saranum, Masri, Naicker,
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Feminist Therapy and Postmodern Approaches

Words: 1662 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21054697

A teen might be asked to tell their own story from the point-of-view of other people they know, looking at themselves from other viewpoints. These clients are freed to invent stories and play parts in that serve the purpose of providing a framework of meaning and direction for themselves. The stories are never singled out as "true" or "false," but a recognition that truth is complex and no one story can encompass all of the truth aids the client in seeing him or herself as a complex and meaningful role-player. And in that context, since one story may not be claimed to be the whole truth, no one story may not dominate a person's life. Life, to the client and narrator of these "stories" becomes an adventure in which trials are meant to be overcome and designed to prepare one for the future, rather than to defeat. The religious story…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Laura S. Feminist Therapy, Part of the Systems of Psychotherapy, APA Psychotherapy Video Series (2006)

Brown, L.S. (1994). Subversive dialogues: Theory in feminist therapy. New York: Basic Books.

Bruner, J. (1986) Actual Minds, Possible Worlds, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Dutton-Douglas, M.A., & Walker, L.E.A. (Eds.). (1988). Feminist psychotherapies: Integration of therapeutic and feminist systems. Norwood NJ: Ablex Publishing.
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Application of Personality Theories to Counseling and Therapy

Words: 2507 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86383313

Personality Therapy

Personality is very complex. Individuals can differ considerably from one another, because of the wide variety of traits possible. In addition, a person can act a certain way in one situation and completely different in another, or have internal processes that manifest themselves through very different external actions and behaviors. Because of this diversity and complexity, psychologists have developed a number of theories to explain personality phenomena, as well as suggest yet unknown possibilities. This report, based on the book Perspectives on Personality by Charles Carver will discuss these theories and how they can be applied for behavioral change through therapy.

Two theories fall under the dispositional perspectives category, which emphasize that people display consistency or continuity in their actions, thoughts and feelings: The "trait and type" theory and the "needs and motives" theory. The first concludes that people can be divided into different types or categories. Nomothetic…… [Read More]

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Crystal Therapy Crystal Healing and

Words: 3700 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66936769

Red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet thus correspond to the seven chakras located along the spinal column." (Fuller 242) Crystal therapy is therefore based on the control and manipulation of these energies so that there is the "correct" or appropriate and balanced amount of this energy in each of the chakras.

The most touted of New Age healing techniques has been the use of crystals. Enthusiasts claim that because rock crystal is almost entirely devoid of color, it is an almost perfect capacitor of divine white light. Explanations of exactly how crystals wield their healing powers vary from practitioner to practitioner. Some maintain that the unique properties of crystals make them excellent receptors of metaphysical energies.

Fuller 242/3)

rief history of crystal therapy

As has already been mentioned, the history of this form of therapy is to be found in many historical documents and in myths, stories and…… [Read More]

Bibliography www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102478367

Albanese, Catherine L. "Chapter 6 the Magical Staff: Quantum Healing in the New Age." Perspectives on the New Age / . Ed. James R. Lewis and J. Gordon Melton. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1992. 68-84. Questia. 11 Mar. 2007 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102478457.

Bachelor B. Alternative therapies. 11 Mar. 2007. http://www.barcelona- metropolitan.com/Article.aspx?TabID=2&MenuID=8&ArticleID=146

Blanchard a. Alternative medicine and herbal use among university students. Journal of American College Health. 2006. 11 Mar. 2007. http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-155567732.html www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108566203

Bix, Amy Sue. "Engendering Alternatives." The Politics of Healing: Histories of Alternative Medicine in Twentieth-Century North America. Ed. Robert D. Johnston. New York: Routledge, 2004. 153-180. Questia. 11 Mar. 2007 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=108566390.
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Reality and Feminist Therapy Order

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28642336

"Briefly, feminists believe the personal is political. Basic tenets of feminism include a belief in the equal worth of all human beings, recognition that each individual's personal experiences and situations are reflective of and an influence on society's institutionalized attitudes and values, and a commitment to political and social change that equalizes power among people. Feminists are committed to recognizing and reducing the pervasive influences and insidious effects of oppressive societal attitudes and society" (Chappell 2000). In its current incarnation, feminist therapy's stress upon liberating individuals from oppressive social attitudes does not just pertain only to gender, but all negative social attitudes. Thus, at its most universal, feminist therapy's central tenant that the personal and political are intermeshed, and that one's political reality creates one's cognitive reality, can be applied to many contexts beyond gender.

Although it deals with the psychology created by oppression, feminist therapy still stresses personal choice…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chappell, Marcia. (2000). Feminist therapy code of ethics. Feminist Therapy Institute.

Retrieved August 14, 2009 at http://www.feminist-therapy-institute.org/ethics.htm

Reality therapy. (2008). International Journal of Reality Therapy.

Retrieved August 14, 2009 at http://www.journalofrealitytherapy.com/realitytherapy.htm
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Theory Therapy Levy Meehan Kelly

Words: 4158 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86662734



Kellogg & Young in Schema Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder offer a comprehensive explanation of the use of Schema Therapy for patients with BPD, by first explaining the disorder and how it is particularly prime for the use of schema therapy as the disorder itself and the behavior and emotions exhibited from it can be seen as an individual traversing through a short list of schemas and are reflective of the childhood origins of BPD. The modes of BPD are described by the authors as consisting of the angry and impulsive child mode, the detached protector mode, the punitive parent mode and lastly the healthy adult mode. According to the authors if these modes are lacking in integration and emotions cannot be traversed across each, or if the modes are significantly unbalanced they become schemas that override normal adult behavior. The particulars of Schema Therapy are then described after a…… [Read More]

References

Clarkin, J.F. Levy, K.N. Lenzenweger, M.F. Kernberg, O.F. (June 2007) Evaluating Three Treatments for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Multiwave Study Ameican Journal of Psychology 164:6, 922-928.

Clarkin, J.F. & Levy, K.N. (April 2003) a Psychodynamic Treatment for Severe Personality Disorders: Issues in Treatment Development Psychoanalytic Inquiry 23:2 248-268.

Kellogg, S.H. Young, J.E. (February 2006) Schema Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder Journal of Clinical Psychology 62:4 445-458.

Kimball, J.S., & Diddams, M. (2007). Affect Regulation as a Mediator of Attachment and Deliberate Self-Harm. Journal of College Counseling, 10(1), 44.
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Trend in Occupational Therapy

Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26623002

Occupational Therapy

The medical field is constantly undergoing significant changes in response to the changing health and social needs of Canadians, as well as health care delivery systems. Occupational therapy is an integral part of this process, as it has expanded from traditional hospital settings to home and community care.

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists identifies some of the existing trends as affecting occupational therapy:

• an aging population

• increased awareness of the needs of people with disabilities

• higher survival rates from accidents and injuries

• increased emphasis on health promotion and prevention to keep health care costs down

• higher incidence of mental health and family problems

• changes in work conditions such as job stress and early retirement

• a more informed public regarding health and health concerns

In my opinion one of rapidly evolving trends in occupational therapy in Ontario is its increasing role in…… [Read More]

References

Ontario Long-Term Care Association. (2011). Elements of an effective innovation strategy for long-term care in Ontario. The Conference Board of Canada. Web. http://www.oltca.com/Library/march11_cboc_report.pdf
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Cognitive Therapy

Words: 1275 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86397297

Evolution and Development of Cognitive Therapy

Psychology is a relatively young science. Though it has roots in philosophy and other humanities, it has only been an official science for a little over a century. Moreover, the different treatment modalities in psychology are also relatively new. However, in a short period of time, some treatments have grown to preeminence in the field, so much so that, even though they are relatively young, they are considered the standards by which other treatments are judged. These two approaches are psychoanalysis and behavior therapy, and they have been used, with some success for decades. However, in the 1960s, a new therapeutic approach emerged: cognitive therapy. Cognitive therapy focused on the role that thoughts played in behavior and disorders, with the premise that changing thoughts would result in behavior and symptom change.

Of course, like other areas of psychology, it is important to understand that…… [Read More]

References

Beck, A. (1993). Cognitive therapy: Past, present, and future. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 61(2), 194-198.

Gluhoski, V. (1994). Misconceptions of cognitive therapy. Psychotherapy, 31(4), 594-600.

Montgomery, R. (1993). The ancient origins of cognitive therapy: The reemergence of stoicism.

Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy, 7(1), 5-19.
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Behavior Therapy

Words: 1338 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48431061

Evolution and Development of Behavioral Therapy

The 20th century approach to psychology is notable because, while there was an emphasis on the medical approach to treating psychological disorders, there was also a focus on nonphysiological therapies that began to gain some credence in the medical profession. While nonmedical interventions were generally dismissed, "at least some nonmedical practices were no longer widely regarded by either professionals or the general public as quackery. An important contributor to the increased acceptance and status of nonmedical therapies was their enhanced relationship with science" (O'Donohue & Krasner, Year). These nonmedical therapies gained greater and greater usage in the mental health arena, and eventually came to be regarded not only as complementary treatments to standard medical interventions, but as "necessary components in the treatment of problems such as depression, attention deficit disorder, schizophrenia, and many of the anxiety disorders"(O'Donohue & Krasner, Year). One of the areas…… [Read More]

References

Fishman, D. & Franks, C. (Year). The conceptual evolution of behavior therapy. In Book Title.

City: Publisher.

Glass, C. & Arnkoff, D. (Year). Behavior therapy. In Book Title. City: Publisher.

O'Donohue, W., & Krasner, L. (Year). Introduction. In Theories of behavior therapy:
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Personal Theory of Therapy the

Words: 1766 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78835853

These three seminal perspectives may possess a lot of similarities, yet each of them has contributed novel ideas that are consistent with its theoretical underpinnings. In many of the substance abuse treatment arenas, the significant aspects of all these three approaches are blended to provide for a cognitive-behavioral model that gives the best result in terms of all the other therapies. (Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy)

Three theorists who have influenced the behaviorist theories are:

1. Watson J.B. - One of the originators of behaviorism and a proponent of the reductionist approach to the study of human behavior.

2. Skinner B.F. - He was the one most responsible for the spread of the behaviorist philosophy.

3. Wolpe, Joseph. The method of systematic desensitization to deal with fear was created by him. (Theories and Theorists)

eferences

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy." NIDA. etrieved at http://www.addictionalternatives.com/philosophy/briefcbtherapy.htm. Accessed on February 15, 2005

Bush, Winston John. (December 22,…… [Read More]

References

Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy." NIDA. Retrieved at http://www.addictionalternatives.com/philosophy/briefcbtherapy.htm. Accessed on February 15, 2005

Bush, Winston John. (December 22, 2003) "Learning theory: A fuller-fuller explanation of CBT" Retrieved at http://www.cognitivetherapy.com/learning.html Accessed on February 15, 2005

Cognitive Therapy for Depression" Retrieved at  http://www.psychologyinfo.com/depression/cognitive.htm . Accessed on February 15, 2005

Grohol, John M. (July 21, 1995) "Theoretical Orientations and Practices of Therapists"
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Solution Focused Brief Therapy Sfbt

Words: 1994 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14165036

Thus, giving the patient a 'bird's eye view' of his/her life gives him/her a chance to reconsider past actions committed and change these to improve his/her relations with a partner or family member. As in family brief therapies, reconstructing a family's life according to each member's interpretation and reflection helps the therapist identify the family member who adopts a constructive or destructive view of the 'reconstructed family life.' Through SFT, the therapist is able to create a therapeutic process that would be time-efficient and beneficial to patients.

itter and Nicoll (2004) elucidated effectively the effectiveness of brief therapy treatment for couples and families (64):

brief therapists seek to establish in their clients a renewed faith in self as well as optimism and hope for their immediate and long-term futures. It is caring, however, that guarantees the client support and a safe return in a future session, now matter how the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bury, D. (2000). "Constructivist paradigms in other therapies." Journal of Constructivist Psychology, Vol. 13, Issue 4.

Bitter, J. And W. Nicoll. (2000). "Adlerian brief therapy with individuals: process and practice." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 56, Issue 1.

____. (2004). "Relational strategies: two approaches to Adlerian brief therapy." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 60, Issue 1.

Disque, J.G. And J. Bitter. (2004). "Emotion, experience, and early recollections: exploring restorative reorientation processes in Adlerian therapy." Journal of Individual Psychology, Vol. 60, Issue 2.
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Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow Treatment Approach for Out Patient Therapy

Words: 2609 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55179211

Carl ogers and Abraham Maslow Treatment Approach for Outpatient Therapy

Carl ogers and Abraham Maslow treatment approach for out-patient therapy.

The study of human psychology is important in understanding personality of individuals. One can study personality of individuals, but there is no scientific method of studying personality of the whole humanity. Human are different from person to person and vey unique to some degree. This paper prompts a thesis, and it digs into the psychology of humans. It dwells on the person-Centered approach by Carl ogers and on the Humanistic Approach by Abraham Maslow.

Both Carl ogers and Abraham Maslow have an influence on today's outpatient therapy. Both scholars have had an influence on the humanistic psychology and personal centered approach to therapy. Although humanistic psychology gained its popularity in the mid 20th century, both scholars have further entrenched theories and practices that make it important in today's outpatient therapy.…… [Read More]

References

Kazantzis, N., Reinecke, M.A., Freeman, A. (2009). Cognitive and Behavioral Theories in Clinical Practice. New York: Guiford press

Clark, A.J. (2010). Empathy: An integral model in the counseling process. Journal of Counseling & Development, 88(3), 348-356.

Wong, P.T. (2011). Reclaiming Positive Psychology A Meaning-Centered Approach to Sustainable Growth and Radical Empiricism. Journal of Humanistic Psychology,

51(4), 408-412.
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Glbt Substance Abuse Therapies the

Words: 3295 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76452211

Indeed, the lack of "recognition and protection" by schools in general contributes to the "critically high level of suicide" among this community of minority students (146).

Surely alert, competent, contemporarily up-to-date school counselors understand that they have the "daunting but imperative obligation to become social activists for gay, lesbian, and bisexual students" since these students are the most "stigmatized members of school environs," Stone continues. There is no doubt that certain legal and ethical issues come in the way of school counselors' being free to help LGBT adolescents with their difficult decisions.

It is a "complex landscape" for counselors indeed, and they need to use caution in discussing birth control, abortion, drug abuse and more with straight and gay / lesbian students; moreover, since parents have the ultimate authority when it comes to counseling their children on important matters (the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed that fact in several cases),…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cabaj, Robert Paul, and Smith, Mickey. (2008). Overview of Treatment Approaches, Modalities,

and Issues of Accessibility in the Continuum of Care. Center for Substance Abuse

Treatment. Retrieved August 27, 2011, from     http://www.samhsa.gov    .

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (2008). A Provider's Introduction to Substance Abuse
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Creative Arts Therapy 1 Discussion

Words: 1473 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5298098

There are many instances of art acting as a means of enabling people back to health. This healing aspect of creativity is, I believe, due to the fact that we are liberated from the restrictions of the world in the process of creativity and because artworks are in a sense the residue of the experience of spiritual and expanded consciousness.

There are numerous clinical studies which show the effective of art therapy. For example, a number or art therapists have studied the affect of art therapy on people who have experienced loss. "Art therapists consistently observe the power and potential of art to help identify, cope with, and heal the pain experienced during the grief process..." (Hill, M.A.)

However, the healing process in creativity can best be explained by the deeper meaning of spontaneity.

Nachmanovitch asks the important question: "How does one learn improvisation?" The answer to this question is…… [Read More]

References

Hill M.A. Healing grief through art: art therapy bereavement group workshops. Retrieved 8 September, 2006, from Malinda Ann, M.A http://www.drawntogether.com/healing.htm

Nachmanovitch, S. (1990) Free play: The Power of Improvisation in Life and the Arts. Los Angeles: Jeremy P. Tarcher.

Wordsworth W. LINES COMPOSED a FEW MILES ABOVE TINTERN ABBEY,

ON REVISITING the BANKS of the WYE DURING a TOUR. JULY 13, 1798. Retrieved September 7, 2006, at  http://www.bartleby.com/145/ww138.html
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Reality Therapy a New Approach

Words: 1682 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58158231



He realizes and wants the reader to realize that those roots have merit and modern day approaches simply that the field of mental health to the next step or next level of the industry, but he stresses the importance of action therapy not reflection therapy. Each step is a building block toward the eventual goal of having answers more quickly and more accurate than the past answers, however without Freud and those who came after him the new theories would not be possible.

he book is a refreshing approach and puts Glasser's reality therapy into play by acknowledging the others who have developed theories and giving them their dues before moving on to examine the next step which he believes is his approach.

Glasser's book is based on an individual's power to choose. hey can choose how they react to life, they can choose how they react to people and…… [Read More]

This book is written in a style that a mental health professional can read it and pick up the underlying meanings and ideas but a layman can also read it and gain valuable insight about how to change the way they have been approaching their life. It is an exciting how to for those who are ready to use their power to choose and get their lives on track toward success and happiness.

REFERENCE

Glasser, William (1989) Reality Therapy: A New Approach to Psychiatry Harper Paperbacks
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Founding Principles Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Words: 671 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74961496

Cognitive behavioral therapy strategy employs treatment that zeros in on the relationships between "thoughts, feelings, and behaviors," according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). This paper delves into the founding and sustaining principles of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

There are certain patterns of thinking that can (and do) lead to "self-destructive actions," the NAMI website points out. These negative thoughts are often driven by beliefs that are not healthy, and hence, the CBT solution is a kind of psychotherapy that departs from traditional psychodynamic psychotherapy (NAMI). For example, the difference between CBT and other therapies is that the therapist and the client (patient) "…will actively work together to help the patient recover" from mental illness (NAMI).

Sometimes a person that is depressed develops an attitude that he or she is worthless; and on occasion a person with a panic disorder feels that "I am in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cherry, Kendra. (2013). What Is Cognitive Behavior Therapy? About.com. Retrieved February

21, 2013, from http://psychology.about.com.

National Alliance on Mental Illness. (2013). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Retrieved February

21, 2013, from  http://www.nami.org .
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Cog Beh Therapy With Respect to the

Words: 786 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8109043

Cog Beh Therapy

With respect to the businessman who comes to see the therapist about the problems in his marriage, there are two issues immediately apparent from the brief case history. The first is the man's unwillingness to accept any responsibility for the success of the relationship. He is immediately defensive, blaming his wife for all their problems. He claims that she is hypercritical and that she is "probably" suffering from PMS. Without getting the wife's side of the story, it is impossible to know the extent of her complaints against her husband, the degree to which she feels they need help, and the amount of effort she is willing to expend -- and has already expended -- to put the marriage back on track, if that is in fact what she wants. It is unlikely she has had a formal diagnosis of PMS. Used in this context, "PMS" is…… [Read More]

References

"Alcoholism: Definition." (2012). Mayo Clinic. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com

/health/alcoholism/DS00340

Hodge, D.R. (2011). Alcohol treatment and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Social Work 56(1),

pp. 21-31.
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Policy and Recommendation on a Child's Unstructured Play

Words: 1909 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69189844

UNSTUCTUED PLAY AND CHILDEN'S DEVELOPMENT

Unstructured play in childhood

POLICY BIEF

The effect of lack of unstructured play on children's development

Unstructured play as a form of therapy for children was readily accepted when it was first introduced in both homes and schools. In fact, sand-play in its early form was used to allow children interact, enhance their creativity and develop their social skills (Frost & Norquist, 2007). esearch shows that a fundamental aspect of human development is attained in the early childhood stages. As such, any measures to facilitate future development of an individual needs to be cultivated in the early stages of their lives (Miller & Almon, 2009). Over time, unstructured play -- once a highly regarded child development measure -- has lost its meaning and place (Miller & Almon, 2009). Increasing cases of poor child development evidenced by volumes of mental illness antisocial behaviors and physical challenges…… [Read More]

References

Barros, R.M., Silver, E.J., & Stein, R.E. (2009). School recess and group classroom behavior. Pediatrics, 123(2), 431-436.

Campbell, K.J., & Hesketh, K.D. (2007). Strategies which aim to positively impact on weight, physical activity, diet and sedentary behaviours in children from zero to five years. A systematic review of the literature. . Obes Rev., 8(4), 327-338.

Cleland, V., & Venn, A. (2010). Encouraging physical activity and discouraging sedentary behavior in children and adolescents. J Adolescent Health, 47(3), 221-222.

Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness, & Council on School Health. (2006). Active healthy living: prevention of childhood obesity through increased physical activity. Pediatrics, 117(5), 1834-1842.
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Stigmatization and Therapy Counseling of Gay Men

Words: 1517 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42174177

Freeview Company / e-Launch of Freeview

Analysis of Interpersonal Skills

Leadership

Team Building

Motivation

Communication

Influencing

With over 19 million subscribers Freeview is the most subscribed or popular digital television service in the United Kingdom. ecently they launched Freeview Play enabling their subscribers even more control and choice. Freeview Play has a catch up TV feature, too. The greatest selling point for Freeview is the fact that it free. Subscribers do not have to pay anything to subscribe to its channels. The company was launched in the year 2002 by DTV Services Limited, a firm that is jointly owned by Arqiva, BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Sky. When the company was launched in 2002 it had just twenty five channels but now it has grown to include over sixty free-to-view channels and twelve high definition (HD) channels (Freeview, 2015).

Summary of Case Study

In the last few years, there has…… [Read More]

References

Freeview. (2015). About. Retrieved from http://googleweblight.com/?lite_url=http://www.freeview.co.uk/about-uson 9th November, 2015.

Moorhead, G., & Griffin, R.W. (2009). Organizational Behavior Managing People And Organizations. New Delhi: Dreamtech Press.

Project Management Institute (PMI). (2013). A guide to the project management body of knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). (5th Ed.). Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute (PMI). 513.

Rowe, W.G., & Nejad, M.H. (2009). Strategic Leadership: Short-Term Stability and Long-Term Viability. Ivey Business Journal. Retrieved from http://iveybusinessjournal.com/publication/strategic-leadership-short-term-stability-and-long-term-viability / on 19th November, 2015.
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Personal Theory of Therapy

Words: 1899 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83171191

personal theories about change and therapy as part of developing a personal therapeutic approach and process. The exploration begins with examining personal beliefs regarding health, normalcy, and change. The author also includes a discussion about the theoretical foundations influencing personal style of therapy. A description of a personal therapy process and culturally responsive therapy is also included in the article. The final section provides a theory of therapy diagram based on cognitive behavioral therapy.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Michael White and David Epston have played a crucial part in explaining family therapy for nearly two decades through contributing to the emergence of numerous concepts in textbooks and handbooks of family therapy (amey et. al., 2009, p.262). One of the concepts in family therapy is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, which is used to treat people with several problems including mental health issues. The use of such theoretical approaches is based on the fact…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J. (n.d.). Frequently Asked Questions. Retrieved April 23, 2015, from http://www.beckinstitute.org/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/#q-n-a-1773

"Cognitive Behavior Therapy." (n.d.). Beck Institute. Retrieved April 23, 2015, from http://www.beckinstituteblog.org/cognitive-behavioral-therapy/

Hays, P.A. (2012). Culturally responsive cognitive-behavioral therapy in practice. Washington,

D.C.: American Psychological Association.
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Animal Assisted Therapy Animals When

Words: 2537 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31991308

69). Petting a dog lowered blood pressure and respiratory rate -- even if the dog was somebody else's. Pet owners that have heart surgery recover faster and stand a better chance of full recovery. Touching a warm furry animal gives them relief.

Moreover, pet ownership is a predictor of survival after hospitalization for any serious illness (Gunter & Furnham, 1999).

Demello (1999) found that the "mere presence of an animal" could lower blood pressure and that the effect persisted even after the animal was gone. Visual contact with an animal, although it helped, was not as good as touching. Heart rates decreased significantly in a three-minute period of physical contact with the animal (Demello, 1999).

A story in Time magazine (2001) tells how a brain-injured man needed help to get back his sense of balance. Ginger, an Australian shepherd, liked to fetch, so physical therapy for this man was to…… [Read More]

References

Brodie, S., Biley, F.C., and Shewring, M. (2002). An exploration of the potential risks associated with using pet therapy in healthcare settings. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 11 (4), 444-456.

Demello, L. (1999). The effect of the presence of a companion-animal on physiological changes following the termination of cognitive stressors. Psychology & Health, 14 (5), 859.

Gunter, B. And Furnham, a. (1999). Are pets good for our physical well-being? In Pets and People: The Psychology of Pet Ownership, Chapter 5, 6. London: Wherr Publishing, 66-81/

Hooker, S.D., Freeman, L.H., and Stewart, P. (2002). Pet therapy research: A historical review. Holistic Nursing Practice, 16 (5), 17-23.
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CBT Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Case Study

Words: 5334 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41705783

Cognitive Behavior Therapy- A Case Study

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) Case Study

Case report

K is a forty-eight-year female who referred to Midlothian's clinical psychology psychosis service. K has a twenty-year history of mental health conditions. She first decided to contact mental health services because of the episodes of paranoia and severe depression she had experienced. During her initial contact with the mental health services she was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 1996. When she was first referred to the mental health services department she was a single. She told of having only two close relationships in her past life. She however also said that she found these relationships challenging when it came to intimate contact. She also generally described that she found it somewhat difficult to form friendships or to trust people in her life. Despite the mental health conditions her general physical well-being was good. K was prescribed…… [Read More]

References

Bladek, M. (2014). Against memory: Acts of remembering in Jamaica Kincaid's My Brother. Retrieved from http://criticism.english.illinois.edu/2007%20Fall%20Documents/Affect%20Abstracts/Abstracts.htm

DeJong, P. & . Berg I.K (1998): Interviewing for solutions. Thomson: Brooks/Cole.

Drisko, J. (2014). Research Evidence and Social Work Practice: The Place of Evidence-Based Practice. Clin Soc Work J. 42:123-133 DOI 10.1007/s10615-013-0459-9

Freud, S. (1924) A general introduction to psychoanalysis. New York: Boni & Liveright.
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How to Provide Positive Therapy for a Depressed Anxious Person

Words: 2810 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67558079

afternoon, light rain falling and predictions of thunder storms on the way. Client was eight minutes late to his appointment. "It doesn't matter that you're a few minutes late, I am glad to see you -- but is everything going okay this afternoon?" he was asked by therapist.

Client seems defensive when no pressure at all is put on him. First he said his watch stopped, then he admitted he lost track of time because he was into playing a new video game. He asked if video games are a bad thing and was assured that entertainment was his choice.

"Oh, also," he added. "After I was in my car I went back to my apartment to get my umbrella." Client is trying to maintain a good relationship with the therapist.

The client was sweating when he sat down, and it was humid in the room so we agreed the…… [Read More]

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Comparison of Cognitive Therapy and Client Centered Therapy

Words: 2861 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88201580

personality and psychotherapy theories, namely, client-centered therapy (CCT) and cognitive therapy. The first section of the paper takes up CCT (or ogerian therapy), giving a brief overview of the theory's key points, including its founder and the views of the founder. Sub-sections under this section explore, in brief, the areas of personality structure under the theory, theory architecture, and an approach to intervention using the theory (or in other words, how the client is dealt with using the CCT model).

The second section of the paper follows a similar exploration of the theory of cognitive therapy (CT), developed by A.T. Beck. Sub-sections follow similar lines, concisely dealing withpersonality structure under CT, architecture of the theory, as well as interventions for helping out clients under this model, supported by literature in the field.

Finally, the paper takes up a comparative discussion, in the last section, highlighting the key elements that are…… [Read More]

References

Beck, A. T. (1991). Cognitive therapy: A 30-year retrospective. American Psychologist, 46(4), 368-375. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.46.4.368. (Saybrook University library: PsycARTICLES database.)

Bozarth, J. D. (1997). Empathy from the framework of client-cantered theory and the Rogerian hypothesis. In A. C. Bohart, L. S. Greenberg, A. C. Bohart, L. S. Greenberg (Eds.), Empathy reconsidered: New directions in psychotherapy (pp. 81-102). Washington, DC, U.S.: American Psychological Association. doi:10.1037/10226-003

Cahill, J., Barkham, M., Hardy, G., Rees, A., Shapiro, D. A., Stiles, W. B., & Macaskill, N. (2003).Outcomes of patients completing and not completing cognitive therapy for depression. British Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 42(2), 133.

Dattilio, F. M., & Hanna, M. A. (2012).Collaboration in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. Journal Of Clinical Psychology, 68(2), 146-158. doi:10.1002/jclp.21831
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Limited Therapy Effects of Managed

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20624228



Gervaise et. al, (1999) point out that increasingly financial reimbursement restrictions from managed care agencies play a critical role "in the quality of patient care" (1). According to the researchers, "complicated contractual arrangements among multiple providers obstruct rather than facilitate provisions for continuity of patient care" (Gervaise, et. al, 1).

New Advances In Modern Care - Addressing Time Limited Therapy

In the short- and long-term it is likely that limits on therapy will remain. Thus new treatment models must be developed to ensure adequate care. New requirements and restrictions placed by managed care organizations necessitate change in the health care field. Much of the research available supports more training for psychologists so they learn techniques for succeeding using group therapy practices (Drotos, 1997; Kent, 2000; Joseph, 1997). Group oriented approaches enable successful time limited treatments and cost effective services that health maintenance organizations are more likely to support.

There is…… [Read More]

References

Ackley D.C. (1997). Breaking free of managed care. New York: Guilford.

Bistline, J.L, Sheridan, S., & Winegar, N. (1992). "Implementing a group therapy program in a managed care setting: Combining cost effectiveness and quality care." The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 73(1): 30.

Drotos J.C. (1997). "Upheavals in the land of the giants." Behavioral Health

Management, 17 (8), 39-40.
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Constructive Therapy Constructivism Is a Theoretical Perspective

Words: 3489 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13177749

Constructive Therapy

Constructivism is a theoretical perspective that asserts that people attempt to make sense of the world by developing their own set of personal individualized constructs. Personal experience, interpretation, social context, and linguistic factors define a person's subjective reality. Constructive psychotherapy focuses on individual experience, personal resilience, change, and the therapeutic relationship to assist people with change. The current article asserts that constructivism and constructive psychotherapies heavily draw from principles of past theorists such as George Kelly and Kurt Lewin, and constructivism and constructive psychotherapies do not represent facets of a new paradigm. In this sense constructive psychotherapy is not a unified form of psychotherapy but instead a form of integrated psychotherapy. Finally the article applies five basic principles of constructivism: activity, order, the self, social-symbolic relations, and lifespan development in the proposed psychotherapy of Sam, a man who is experiencing frustration and anger-management issues at his work and…… [Read More]

References

Arkowitz, H. (1992). Integrative theories of therapy. In D.K. Freedheim, H.J. Freudenberger, J.W. Kessler, S.B. Messer, D.R. Peterson, H.H. Strupp, & E.L. Wachtel (Eds.), History of psychotherapy: A century of change (pp. 261-304). Washington, DC: APA Press.

Chiari, G., & Nuzzo, M.L. (1996). Psychological constructivisms: A metatheoretical differentiation. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 9, 163-184.

Dollard, J. & Miller, N.E. (1950). Personality and psychotherapy: An analysis in terms of learning, thinking, and culture. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Kelly, G.A. (1955). The psychology of personal constructs (Vols. I & II). New York: Norton.
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Solution-Focused and Narrative Therapy Techniques

Words: 641 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18735580

Postmodern Therapy

What Corey describes as "postmodern" therapy is, in reality, largely a series of evolutionary changes. Recalling how evolution works -- in which organisms change form ultimately as an adaptive mechanism -- might be useful here, insofar as many of these "postmodern" approaches seem adaptive in terms of the actual climate of opinion concerning psychotherapy and its medical utility. The chief example that I am thinking of here is "solution-focused brief therapy."

The notion of "solution-focused brief therapy" would have caused Sigmund Freud to spin in his grave, considering Freud devoted an entire book, entitled Analysis Terminable and Interminable, to the question of whether psychotherapy should ideally last forever. However the widespread cultural rejection of the Freudian paradigm is, perhaps, one reason why the notion of long-term Freudian analysis has come to be replaced with the fast food approach. But the chief reason appears to be adaptive: increasingly health…… [Read More]

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Methods for Couples and Family Therapy

Words: 2219 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51024945

family counseling requires a broad and diverse set of tools and techniques. Those tools and techniques should be adaptable to suit the needs of each family, individuals within that family, and also the contextual or environmental variables that impact families. Using a wide range of exercises and interventions, therapists can provide effective and evidence-based practice, as well as offer ongoing assessments and maintenance.

Techniques and exercises that may be particularly useful for families and couples include the oyal Flush exercise for families with young children, the family-based school interventions for children with behavioral or academic performance problems, and the "altering the abyss" exercise for couples. Each of these exercises is rooted in fundamental family practice theory, and each can also yield measurable outcomes that improve the efficacy of the treatment.

oyal Flush

The "royal flush" technique is named as such because it uses picture cards, similar to those used in…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association (2015). Managing stress for a healthy family. Retrieved online: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/managing-stress.aspx

Brimhall, A.S. & Gardner, B.C. (n.d.). Altering the abyss.

Friedman, B.D. & Allen, K.N. (n.d.). Systems theory. Retrieved online: http://www.sagepub.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/32947_Chapter1.pdf

Gergen, K.J. (1985). The social constructionist movement in modern psychology. American Psychologist 40(3): 266-275.
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Integrative Relational Feminine Jungian Therapy

Words: 3276 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25042074



Human beings are manifest as male and female. The long absence of a female deity has resulted in the repression of the female energy as subordinate and less important than that of the male. However, Woodman's suggestion of the Goddess Kali and Shearer's suggestion of Themis could serve as bases for reconciliation within the self and between the genders on a collective level.

Ann Shearer (in Huskinson, 2008, p. 49) notes that Themis provides a point of reconciliation between the male and the female. Her name means "right order," and she represents the relationship of the human with the divine. As a Titan, she predates the split between the male and female and represents the healthy psychological being. Indeed, the author compares her with Jung's concept of the "Self," where an instinctual psychological being is present, where the male and female aspect are in harmony with each other. As archetype,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Austin, Sue. (2003, 22 Nov.). Women's Aggressive Fantasies: A Feminist Post-Jungian Hermeneutic. The Jung Page. Retrieved from http://www.cgjungpage.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=75&Itemid=40

Shearer, Ann. (2008). The myth of Themis and Jung's concept of the Self. In dreaming the myth onwards: new directions in Jungian therapy and thought edited by Lucy Huskinson. New York: Routledge.

Woodman, M. And Dickinson, E. (1996). Dancing in the Flames: The Dark Goddess in the Transformation of Consciousness.
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Creoles Professionals Involved in Therapy and Counseling

Words: 4095 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95784591

Creoles

Professionals involved in therapy and counseling with members of the Creole culture of New Orleans and southern Louisiana should be aware of the history and traditions of this group that make it distinctive from all others in the United States, and indeed from the French-speaking Cajun communities in the same region. In Louisiana, Creoles are not simply the white descendants of the early French and Spanish colonists, although in the post-Civil War era of Jim Crow there was a major attempt to redefine them as 100% white. This was never the case in history since they are a mixed-race people descended from Europeans, Native Americans and African slaves during the 18th Century and occupied a special caste in pre-Civil War Louisiana. They spoke their own language known as Creole French, as do tens of thousands of their descendants today, and in appearance have often been able to 'pass' as…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ancelet, B.J. (1994). Cajun and Creole Folk Tales: The French Oral Tradition of South Louisiana. Garland Publsihing, Inc.

Dass-Bailsford, P. (2010). "Ignore the Dead: We Want the Living" in Dass-Brailsford, P., ed. Crisis and Disaster Counseling: Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina and Other Disasters. SAGE Publications.

Dominguez, V.R. (1997). White by Definition: Social Classification in Creole Louisiana. Rutgers University Press.

Dormon, J.H. (1996). "Ethnicity and Identity: Creoles of Color in Twentieth-Century South Louisiana" in Dormon, J.H. Creoles of Color in the Gulf South. University of Tennessee Press, pp. 166-86.
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Methods of Psychological Intervention or Therapy

Words: 1343 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7769579

amphetamines for the treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder. The writer explores the study, the method used, the results and other pertinent data. There were fours sources used to complete this paper.

Attention Deficit Disorder, commonly referred to as ADHD affects a significant percentage of the population. "Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by significant deficits in attention, impulse control, and activity level and affects 3% to 5% of the school-age population (Handen, 1999)." egardless of the number of people who have it, the symptoms are strikingly similar and can have a negative impact on the life of the ADHD patient. Social, business and other problems often erupt in the person who has ADHD, that can include being overly talkative, domineering, impulsive, immature and aggressive. All of these traits combine to make the person difficult to be around or do business with in many cases (Merrell, 2001). "Children in schools…… [Read More]

References

Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of single-dose amphetamine formulations in ADHD.(Statistical Data Included)

Efficacy of methylphenidate among preschool children with developmental disabilities and ADHD.(attention deficit hyperactivity disorder)

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in Children: Rationale for Its Integrative Management.

An investigation of relationships between social behavior and ADHD in children and youth: construct validity of the home and community social behavior scales.
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Children Run Hard and Play

Words: 1002 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63089467



E Nurses -- Evaluated situation, helped calm Hally, retook vital signs, prepared for NP

E Nurse Practitioner -- Examined Hally, ordered X-ay, reviewed all symptoms and signs; interpreted x-ray, with Nurse, administered muscle relaxer and anesthesia, set arm in cast.

X-ay Technetium -- Took X-ay films of Hally's right arm; processed for NP's review.

General Practitioner -- Follow up after E visit, watched for signs of infection or discoloration; insured blood flow to arm, managed pain and swelling medication. emoved cast at appropriate time.

ehabilitative Personnel -- Specialized to help Hally gain full use of her arm through exercise therapy, ultrasound, Jacuzzi, and massage therapy.

Part 3 -- in its very basic form, broken bones are quite common in children. However, there were a number of factors that needed to be assessed by health professionals during Hally's incident:

Location and type of Break -- Ensure no bone or part of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Kids and their Bones: A Guide for Parents. (January 2011). NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases National Resource Center. Retrieved from:  http://www.niams.nih.gov/health_info/bone/Bone_Health/Juvenile/default.asp 

Wrist Bone Connected to the…. (2011). Castoo.com. Retrieved from:

http://www.casttoo.com/Casttoo.com/Design_Catagories/Entries/2007/10/14_Bones_&_X-rays.html

Baniukiewicz, a., et.al., (2011). Broken Arm. EMedicineHealth. Retrieved from:
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Police Stress Christianity-Based Stress Therapy

Words: 1222 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18573592



However, another frequently unseen instigator in negative behavioral tendencies amongst officers is the incapacity to properly assimilate the stresses of the occupation. Indeed, a 2004 study, published by the Canadian Police College, outlines the conditions which tend most to provoke police extortion, embezzlement or other such malfeasant behaviors. Amongst its findings, the account asserts that, of those surveyed in its sample population, "officers who experienced frequent operational stress were more accepting of financial corruption." (Sunahara, 2) for some, the study elaborates, the heavy burden of anxiety, fear, discontent or nihilism which can be the reality of police work may inspire the rationalization of this misappropriation.

The compensatory dissociation from the realities of law, order and ethical responsibility can, in such cases, be the cause of gross deviation from policy and procedure. Both within the insular social structure of a police department and in the employ of a responsibility which is…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Kurke, M.I. (1995). Police Psychology into the 21st Century. Hillsdale, New Jersey

Hove: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

O'Connor, Dr. T. (2001). Police Psychology. Forensic Psychology.

Stearns, G.M. & Moore, R.J. (1993). The Physical and Psychological
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Alternate Practice Therapy Experiment the Truant Individual

Words: 2370 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58543155

Alternate Practice Therapy Experiment

The truant individual also tends to manifest through dangerous behaviors and travel a path of extremity with sad endings and wasted lives. This chapter will serve to review literature that speaks to and of the problem of the truancy that is so highlighted in schools at the top of the 21st century. Extremely a progressive problem that is firmly within the very root of belief, thought and process as the truant has through reactionary events and then formation of environment. Then there were those who made a difference in the very experientially gained concepts or expressions of purpose.

The students love her and called her their teacher with red hair. Mrs. lack, the teacher who loved to read and then you follow. Those teachers who are of the teaching essence as so to captivate the child's mind are often barred from governance within the educational practice…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Kitching, Ruth "Violence, Truancy and School Exclusion in France and Britain Chameleon Press ISBN 0 9540118 0-5 [Online] available at: "http:/ / www.francobritishcouncil.org.uk.

Baker, M. et al. (2001) "Truancy Reduction: Keeping Students in School" Online] available at: http://www.ncjrs.org/html / jjdp/jjbul2001_9_1/contents.html

"Truancy Reduction Program: Working to Improve School Attendance, Increase Academic Performance, and strengthen families" KCSOS School-Community Partnerships [Online] at: http://kcsos.kern.org/schcom/trp#

Best Practice Number Eight: Reducing Crime and Supporting Education through a Comprehensive Truancy Reduction Strategy: [Online] available at: http://kcsos.kern.org/schcom/trp
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Familial Risk Factors Play an Important Role

Words: 562 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67000915

familial risk factors play an important role in adolescent suicide. While a number of individual risk factors such as depression make adolescents vulnerable to suicidal behavior, the influence of familial interactions on adolescent suicide is also significant.

Family theories of adolescent depression focus closely on the interaction of family and the adolescent, the need to find a functional balance between familial stability and flexibility (Nichols & Schwartz, 2004), and the importance of communication as both a cause of adolescent suicidality, and a potential area for therapy.

Familial risk factors in adolescent suicide include parental reaction, marital conflict, family communication, sexual abuse, abuse and the expendable child, non-suicidal loss of a family member, and a family history of suicidal behaviors. Each of these factors impacts adolescent suicide to differing degrees, with abuse (including sexual abuse) an important predictor of attempted suicide, and a family history of suicidal behaviors a significant risk…… [Read More]

References

Nichols, M., & Schwartz, R.C. (2004). Family therapy: Concepts and methods (6th ed.). Boston: Pearson.
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Progressivism Education Has Played a

Words: 342 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28393650



Jeffrey a. Daniels, C. Bradley, Daniel P. Cramer, Amy inlker, Kisha Kinebrew, and Deleska Crockett interviewed a counselor that dealt with a difficult hostage taking situation and talked the student involved into surrendering. Apparently, counselors are most qualified to deal successfully in this kind of situations.

Article critiques," written by Susan Student, examines several papers by counselors who touch the relationship between man and computer, which is taking dramatic proportions. The article is written in order to make counselors more aware of their present situation and it is supposed to emphasize the responsibilities that counselors have.

orks Cited

Sullivan, J. Engeland, J. (2008). Educational Theories.

Moyer, M. Sullivan, J. Student Risk-Taking Behaviors:hen Do School Counselors

Break Confidentiality?

Davis, T. Elementary and Middle Level Counselors' Courtroom Hearing.

Daniels, a.J., Bradley, M.C., Cramer D.P., inkler, a., Kinebrew, K., Crockett, D. In the Aftermath of a School Hostage Event: A Case Study of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Sullivan, J. Engeland, J. (2008). Educational Theories.

Moyer, M. Sullivan, J. Student Risk-Taking Behaviors:When Do School Counselors

Break Confidentiality?

Davis, T. Elementary and Middle Level Counselors' Courtroom Hearing.
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Health Literacy the Nurse Plays

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35885390

Therefore, I would tell the patient that their symptoms should not be considered in isolation of their whole person. Websites that address symptoms only are not taking into account the wealth of factors that can influence the diagnosis of a specific disease.

At the same time, patients have the right to know about alternative solutions other than those provided or suggested by the physician or health care organization. Sometimes insurance constraints prevent nurses and doctors from mentioning interventions, diagnoses, and cures. The insurance provisions should not come in the way of the patient seeking second opinions or investigating such things as alternative and complementary medicine.

The strategies for assisting patients in becoming informed consumers of online health information include creating brochures and pamphlets, as well as websites. These materials can offer patients helpful links to the CDC (2013) and similar credible resources related to health literacy. The nurse can also…… [Read More]

References

CDC (2013). Health literacy. Retrieved online:   http://www.cdc.gov/healthliteracy/  

Speros, C.I. (2011). Promoting health literacy: A nursing imperative. Nurs Clin North Am. 2011 Sep;46(3):321-33, vi-vii. doi: 10.1016/j.cnur.2011.05.007
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Use of Strategic Family Therapy

Words: 2356 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77118289

Dana is a young and beautiful woman with family members that seem to constantly put her down whenever they get together. They appear to be self-centered and attention seeking. The mother has set expectations she places on her family and seems angry whenever they do not meet those expectations. For example, the mother suggested Dana get breast enlargement surgery to appease her boyfriend Matt. Her sister, Joanie also commented on Dana's appearance, making sure to let Dana know she appeared overweight or had a large rear end. These comments can and do affect people's self-esteem especially when the source of such comments are from people that person loves or is supposed to trust.

Dana takes everything and says nothing, agreeing with the remarks and feeling like she truly is overweight even if objectively people see her as very attractive. She also cannot say how she feels even around her boyfriend.…… [Read More]

References

Arendt, K., Thastum, M., & Hougaard, E. (2015). Homework Adherence and Cognitive Behaviour Treatment Outcome for Children and Adolescents with Anxiety Disorders. Behavioural And Cognitive Psychotherapy, 44(02), 225-235. http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/s1352465815000429

Gingerich, W. & Peterson, L. (2013). Effectiveness of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy: A Systematic Qualitative Review of Controlled Outcome Studies. Research On Social Work Practice, 23(3), 266. http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049731512470859

Hayes, S., Levin, M., Plumb-Vilardaga, J., Villatte, J., & Pistorello, J. (2013). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Contextual Behavioral Science: Examining the Progress of a Distinctive Model of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. Behavior Therapy, 44(2), 180-198. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2009.08.002

Hofmann, S., Asnaani, A., Vonk, I., Sawyer, A., & Fang, A. (2012). The Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Review of Meta-analyses. Cognitive Therapy And Research, 36(5), 427-440. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10608-012-9476-1
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Use of Naturopathic Practice Interventions and Therapy

Words: 2761 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19204539

Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) Systems

Complementary and alternative medicine systems are health care approaches that are characterized by a history of use or origins that are external to mainstream medicine or health care practices. These health care systems or approaches have lasted for centuries since different kinds of complementary and alternative medicines have been reported. According to the World Health Organization, different types of complementary and alternative medicines have acted as the basic health practice in developing countries and are increasingly used in countries with predominant conventional medicine (Kramlich, 2014, p.50). CAM therapies have become common in the recent past and are used for treating various conditions including chronic pain conditions. Actually, several CAM therapies and practice interventions such as acupuncture and massage therapy are increasingly used in chronic pain management.

Naturopathic Medicine

Naturopathic medicine, which is also known as naturopathy or alternative medicine, is a term that is…… [Read More]

References

"History of Naturopathic Medicine." (n.d.). North Carolina Association of Naturopathic Physicians. Retrieved August 17, 2015, from http://ncanp.com/about-ncanp/history-of-naturopathic-medicine/

Kramlich, D. (2014, December). Introduction to Complementary, Alternative, and Traditional Therapies. Critical Care Nurse, 34(6), 50-56.

Pongparadee et. al. (2012, August). Current Considerations for the Management of Musculoskeletal Pain in Asian Countries: A Special Focus on Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors and Non-steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases,15(4), 341-347.

Schulenburg, J. (2015). Considerations for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Interventions for Pain. AORN Journal, 101(3), 319-326.
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Pap Smears Have Played a

Words: 848 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62890986

1997].

Presence of regional and distant metastases alters the stage of the disease and for these patients, standard therapy is inadequate [KEYS et al. 2004]. With the diagnoses of endometrial adenocarcinoma it is most likely that the patient in question is at an early stage of disease. To have a better prognosis, further surgical diagnosis to achieve a FIGO stage is needed as that will allow doctors to ascertain the level of myometrial muscle invasion, histological type, and differentiation grade [AMANT et al. 2005]. If the patient is at a FIGO stage one, the five-year survival rate stands at 85%, with stage II standing at 75%, stage III at 45%, and stage IV at 25% [GRISBY et al. 1992]. Treatment should follow the established regimen of hysterectomy along with radiation therapy.

References

Amant, F. et al. 2005. Endometrial Cancer. ancet, 366, pp. 491-505.

Boulet, G.A.V., et al. 2008. Human Papillomavirus…… [Read More]

Lazcano-Ponce, E. et al. 2008. Decreasing Cervical Cancer Mortality in Mexico: Effect of Papanicolaou Coverage, Birthrate, and the Importance of Diagnostic Validity of Cytology. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers, and Prevention, 17(10), pp. 2808-17.

Leitao Jr., M.M. et al. 2009. Comparison of D&C and office endometrial biopsy accuracy in patients with FIGO grade I endometrial adenocarcinoma. Gynecologic Oncology, 113(1), pp. 105-8.

Rubatt, J.M. et al. 2005. Development of metastatic endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma while on progestin therapy for endometrial hyperplasia. Gynecologic Oncology, 99, pp. 472-6.
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Medicinal Cuisine and the Dietary Therapy and What Are the Benefits

Words: 550 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82316734

DAOM Homework

What is the key question, problem, or need the project will address?

The key question this project will address is the history of food-as-medicine and the benefits of diet-as therapy. The focus will be on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) dietary therapy within the context of Korean traditional food and lifestyle; the kinds of medicinal cuisines still popular in modern Korean society today; and the actual benefits of TCM vs. people's beliefs.

Why is the project important?

Diet is an important factor in longevity and also in improving the quality of life. As well as prolonging life, there is a growing interest in the extent to which diet can reduce the risks of developing chronic conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease.

What data will be used, how will it be collected and how long will this take?

This paper will consist of a review of the literature…… [Read More]

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Important Role Played by Forensic Psychologists During Divorce Cases

Words: 4688 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52776830

Forensic Psychologists in Determining the Award of Child Custody in Divorces

For a long time, children have been treated as personal property during divorce proceedings. This meant that the children were subject to subdivision amongst the parents like any other property the couple owned. According to Emery and Wyer (1987a), all personal property would revert to the husband. For this reason, children would become the property of the father. In the 1800s, the law started to change and begun awarding custody of children based on analysis of both parents. The tender years doctrine was adopted, which was used to award younger or tender children to the mother instead of the father (Gunsberg & Hymowitz, 2013). This was because the young children would still need their mother more, and she was considered a better parent due to her maternal nature. This preference was not cast in stone. If the father could…… [Read More]

References

Ballard, R.H., Rudd, B.N., Applegate, A.G., & Holtzworth-Munroe, A. (2013). Hearing the voice of the child in divorce. Psychology, Law, and the Wellbeing of Children, 121.

Blais, J., & Forth, A.E. (2014). Prosecution-retained vs. court-appointed experts: Comparing and contrasting risk assessment reports in preventative detention hearings. Law and human behavior, 38(6), 531.

Bollen, K.N., Verbeke, A.-L., & Euwema, M.C. (2013). Money or children? Power sources in divorce mediation1. Journal of Family Studies, 19(2), 159-173.

Drozd, L., & Flens, J.R. (2014). Psychological testing in child custody evaluations. New York, NY: Routledge.
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Counseling Therapy Counseling Problem Sexual Identity

Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62228722

Some other factors may also be addressed such as the client's perception of his or her role in homosexuality, if he comes from a culture where it is normal or acceptable for men to be sexually active with other men, so long as he is not sexually passive -- this may affect his sense of his sexual identity as well.

It must be stressed, above all, at the first session, that the counselor cannot provide the client with an all-encompassing answer to his or her dilemmas regarding family and identity. The counselor cannot be the person who gives permission to 'leave,' or the person who orders the individual to 'stay.' Rather, the counselor is there as a sounding board. At this early juncture, once the client's readiness to leave or not leave his current marital session is assessed, it may be helpful to have another counselor deal with the problems…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gladding, Samuel. (2005) Counseling Theories: Essential Concepts and Applications. New York: Prentice Hall
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Nurse's Role as Researcher the Nurse Plays

Words: 1671 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77211857

Nurse's ole As esearcher

The nurse plays a unique role as a researcher. This involves them focusing on the latest treatment options, how they affect patients and the best times specific techniques should be utilized. Moreover, they must understand the numerous side effects of different therapies and how this will affect the patients they are working with. These areas help them to serve as confidant in comprehending how and when to apply certain procedures. (Allan, 2005)

At the same time, the nurse will understand the psychology, customs, behavior and biological factors which are contributing to a host of conditions. This enables them to comprehend the challenges patients are going through and the lasting impact this is having on them. When this happens, they can reduce suffering and improve their ability to cope with the issues they are facing. These insights will help patients to make a full recovery with reduced…… [Read More]

References

Allan, J. (2004). Clinical prevention and population health. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27(5), 470-481.

Allan, J. (2005). Clinical prevention and population health curriculum framework: The nursing perspective.

Allen, D. (2002). The Changing Shape of Nursing Practice. New York, NY: Routledge.

American Academy of Nurses. (2009). Nurses transforming health care using genetics and Genomics. Washington, DC: Author.
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Emotions Stress Health Emotions and Stress Play

Words: 1043 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59884425

Emotions, Stress, Health

Emotions and stress play a strong role in the mental and physical health of a person. Some people react more strongly to the stress that they face in their life, and some people are much more emotional than others. The topic of emotions, stress, and health is an interesting one because it shows just how delicate and also how resilient people can be when it comes to their mental and physical health, as well as their ability to let go of stressful situations and their ability to face and deal with their emotions. The link between stress and health should be addressed and recognized by everyone, because taking steps to control emotions and mitigate stress is one of the ways in which people can help themselves to live longer and healthier lives. Often, stress is said to be a killer. While the actual act of getting stressed…… [Read More]

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Role Americans Disabilities Act 1990 Plays Hiring

Words: 732 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18322164

role Americans Disabilities Act 1990 plays hiring evaluation process police officers. 3. The ethical conflicts unique police psychologists.

Exhibition review:

Abelardo Morell At the indow: The Photographer's View

The Cuban-born photographer Abelardo Morell is best known for his photographic work using the technique known as camera obscura. This technique actually pre-dates contemporary photography and was used by the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as Leonardo. Camera obscura involves the use of "light passing through a pinhole into a dark room" which will "project and transpose an image of whatever lies outside" (Di Pero 2013). Morell has adapted this technique to cotemporary photography. He dates his fascination with the method to the birth of his son, in after which he became inspired to look at the world with the eyes of a child and desired to take a more domestic view of life. "I started making photographs as if I…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Camera Obscura: The Captivating Work of Abelardo Morell." Apartment Therapy. Oct 2013.

[8 Nov 2013]  http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/camera-obscura-150465 

Di Pero, W.S. "In a dark room: The photography of Abelardo Morell

San Diego Reader. 30 Oct 2013. [8 Nov 2013]
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Developmental and Growth Norms Music

Words: 330 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34985092

Musical play was designed to elicit greater responsiveness from the child in a fun setting and also to enhance the enjoyment of the adult involved in the activity. The aim of the activity was to encourage age-appropriate physical and speech-related activities as well as accustom the child to the sound of music. Rolling over while the music played, imitating the sounds and words were initiated by the adult, and when the child mimicked the adult, the child was told 'good job.' The activity was also designed to positively sensitize the child to instrumental and sung music in a social setting.

orks Cited

alworth, Darcy D. (2009). Effects of developmental music groups for parents and premature or typical infants under two years on parental responsiveness and infant social development. Journal of Music Therapy, 46(1), 32-52. Retrieved April 13, 2009, from ProQuest Medical Library…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Walworth, Darcy D. (2009). Effects of developmental music groups for parents and premature or typical infants under two years on parental responsiveness and infant social development. Journal of Music Therapy, 46(1), 32-52. Retrieved April 13, 2009, from ProQuest Medical Library database. (Document ID: 1667546041).
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Earlychildhood Norton B Et Al 2011 Somatic

Words: 660 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66849849

EarlyChildhood

Norton, B. et al. (2011) "Somatic Expressions of rauma in Experiential Play herapy" in International Journal of Play herapy, Vol. 20, No. 3, 138 -- 152.

Researchers have found connections between animal and human responses to trauma that are important in understanding somatic (non-verbal) cues and conditioning. Some research has been done that shows parallels between animal behaviors and child behaviors in cases of abuse and neglect, although the literature remains scant. Children act out trauma in play therapy, resulting in a building of "trauma energy," expressed through movement in the discharge, or surge, phase. Following is the "soothe phase," in which the child becomes calm as part of trauma processing. As the authors point out, some severely traumatized children must undergo the process several times during treatment.

hompson, E.H. et al. (2012) "School-Based Group Interventions for Children Exposed to Domestic Violence" in Journal of Family Violence, Vol. 27,…… [Read More]

The researchers videotaped twenty-three children, aged four to eight years, in individual 40 minute play sessions. Each of the children had been exposed to violent attacks. The children's play patterns were characterized in one of three ways: re-enactment with soothing, re-enactment without soothing, and overwhelming re-enactment. Further analysis of play was used to identify the contributions of play activity to healing and the factors that contribute to resilience in a child. The authors concluded that PTP is both complex and multilayered. A common factor in all three categories of PTP was the child's response to comfort. The authors call for further research into the human relationship factors that help provide the emotional balance children need as they move toward recovery.

Green, E.J. et al. (2010) "Counseling Children with Preverbal Trauma" in International Journal of Play Therapy, Vol. 19, No. 2, 95 -- 105.

According to researchers, unresolved early childhood trauma can have long-term psychological consequences manifest in problems with a child's social, emotional and academic development. Successful resolution of early trauma can help a child deal with anxieties associated with annihilation, abandonment and disintegration. For pre-verbal children, such successful resolution can be particularly problematic when their primary caretakers are the perpetrators of the trauma and do not acknowledge or recognize the link between trauma and later behavior problems. Literature on therapeutic intervention with preverbal trauma is scant. The authors briefly discuss the effects of early trauma on brain development. The positive effects of play therapy are explored. Children cannot usually use words to describe a preverbal experience, but memories can be re-enacted. Exploration of memories of positive attachment experiences in the preverbal period, when used in play therapy, can play an important part in repairmen.
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Dibs in Search of Self by Virginia

Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13859603

Dibs in Search of Self by Virginia Mae Axline is such a profoundly interesting book because it demonstrates one of the most challenging cases I've ever encountered within the realm of child psychology and an effective yet, gradual method of dealing with this case. Dibs to me represents a child stifled and overcome with emotions. He is so choked with emotions he's become almost completely uncommunicative. He did not socialize with other students in his class, and would not engage with any adults except by way of hysterics or tantrums. Dibs in many respects had checked out of life and out of all social situations: he would not speak, but would hide under tables or in isolation from the groups. Axline makes this apparent from the start of the book; the example that she uses in this case is extremely well representative of the behavior that Dibs engages in as…… [Read More]

References

Axline, V. (1964). Dibs in search of self. NY: Ballantine Books.

Berger, K.S. (2012). The developing person through childhood and adolescence (9th ed.).

NY: Worth Publishers.

Mearns, D. (2003). Developing Person-Centred Therapy. Thousand Oaks: Sage
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Too Afraid to Talk

Words: 973 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70186975

Afraid to Talk

The case study examined for this paper involved a seven-year-old girl who had been a witness to her 18-month-old sister dying after her stroller was struck by a car. The seven-year-old, Kathy, was also present at the hospital and saw her sister, Kim, when she died. The bulk of the case study involves Bruce St. Thomas, the psychiatrist, working with Kathy over a long series of sessions to resolve her emotional issues. The diagnosis for Kathy was post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and the doctor used play therapy and other techniques geared toward the counseling of young children to allow the child to work through her emotional issues. This paper looks at the diagnosis and its accuracy, the method of therapy and its true effect, and whether there were any personal disagreements with the case.

For many years it was believed that PTSD, and other mental health disorders,…… [Read More]

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Personal Counseling

Words: 2354 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17119225

Counseling

Develop your theoretical orientation to the counseling process and identify how this approach compares to Cognitive Behavioral theory

Since its inception nearly fifty years ago, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has become recognized as perhaps the most effective therapeutic approach. Indeed, CBT has myriad uses, and is applied in a number of situations, including depression, personality disorders, and wellness and rehabilitation. However, there also exist limitations to cognitive behavioral therapy, mainly surrounding treatment with patients from diverse cultures. This paper develops appropriate therapeutic orientations, discussing different therapeutic concerns and approaches. First, attention is paid to the nature of people; next, the role of the individual in families and other systems is addressed. Then, multicultural considerations, wellness and prevention, and the nature of problems are discussed. Finally, the paper addresses the process of change and how the orientations enacted are successful in practice.

The nature of people

People are diverse, not…… [Read More]

References

Beck, J., & Tompkins, M. (2007). Cognitive therapy. In Handbook of Homework Assignments in Psychotherapy. (pp. 51-63). New York: Springer Science.

Brown, J. (1999). Bowen family systems therapy and practice: Illustration and critique. A.N.J.Z. Family Therapy, 20(2), 94-103.

Lay, K.R., & King, L.J. (2007) Counseling strategies. In Drug Courts: A New Approach to Treatment and Rehabilitation. (pp. 166-182). New York: Springer Science.

Shedler, J. (2010). The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy. American Psychologist, 65(2), 98-109.
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Counselor Supervision Counseling Supervision Represents

Words: 4878 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78712743

Supervisee should have a clear view on what to expect during the supervision process.

Supervisor: Are there any courses or resources that would develop your standards in relation to services delivery?

Supervisee: Learning provides room for improvement, and that would be no different to my scenario. I would attend to relevant courses to boost my confidence and expertise level in dealing with clients on a daily, weekly, and monthly basis. Structural coaching on relevant issues would enhance my development to tackling therapeutic problems in the clinical field of study. The structural coaching would supplement the pertinent information from this and the previous supervision programs. Much exposure such as working in large organizations would improve the level of standards in dealing with cultural problems among different clients.

Supervisor: What are the six dimensions of multicultural competencies supervision?

Supervisee: The first dimension is the Supervisor-Focused Personal Development that reflects examination of the…… [Read More]

References

Ancis, J.R., & Marshall, D.S. (2010). Using a multicultural framework to assess supervisees'

perceptions of culturally competent supervision. Journal of Counseling & Development,

88, 277 -284.

Ancis, J.R., & Landany, N. (2010). A multicultural framework for counselor supervision. In N.
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IQ Discrimination the Concept of General Ability

Words: 3541 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22745648

IQ Discrimination

The concept of general ability or intelligence has in the past been the most important single way of accounting for individual differences. IQ (Intelligence quotient) is usually assessed by measuring performances on a test of a number of different skills, using tasks that emphasize reasoning and problem solving in a number of different areas. Early assessments of IQ were done in France by Alfred Binet in 1905, as part of an attempt to identify children who needed specialist help to make educational progress. Interest in IQ testing continued in the U.S. By researchers such as Louis Terman.

IQ was thought to be fixed in these early years and so was often used in education in an attempt to predict children's future academic progress with different levels of measured intelligence being taken to imply the need for different forms of educational experiences. More able children are supposed to need…… [Read More]

References.

Bates, Steve. (2002). Personality counts: psychological tests can help peg the job applicants best suited for certain jobs. HR Magazine. Feb. 2002

Flynn, Gillian. (2002). A legal examination of testing. Workforce. June 2002

Newitz, Annalee. (2000). The personality paradox. Industry Stand. October, 2000.
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Multi-Modal Treatment of the Client's

Words: 4593 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 602220

Self-management is the goal of the client and the therapist works with the client to aid him or her in recognizing self-defeating thoughts or actions that will give negative results, and developing positive thoughts that will have positive results (Lazarus, 1997).

The first tenet that is examined is the one Lazarus calls "Positive Thinking."

Positive cognition is focusing on personal skills and strengths, on what is good in the world, believing in one's self and belief in one's ability to succeed. When this is the dominating thought, the client then acts in ways that bring him or her closer to success. Positive thoughts and images about one's abilities dramatically increase one's chances of succeeding. Believing that success is possible is a prerequisite for most achievements.

Thinking positively does not mean being unrealistically optimistic. Nor does it mean one is without limits, that others will only help and never hinder, or…… [Read More]

References

Christian Counselors. Wikipedia. Retrieved October 8, 2006 at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christian_Counselors.

Cox, R.H., Cox, B.E. And Hoffman L. (Eds) (2004) Spirituality and Psychological Health, Colorado Springs, Colorado School of Professional Psychology Press

Egan, K. (1998) the Skilled Helper. A problem-management approach to helping. 6e, Pacific Grove: Brooks/Cole.

Ellis, a. (1975). A Guide to Rational Living. Los Angeles: Wilshire Book Company
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Child Sexual Abuse

Words: 1318 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24838683

Child sexual abuse is a topic that has attracted must attention in the current years. Studies estimate that up to 33% of women and at least 20% of men are victims of child sexual abuse (Misurell & Springer, 2013). Sexual abuses excluding touch are often not reported. This suggests that the number of individuals who could be sexually abused in their childhood may even be greater. As a high percentage of individuals may have experienced child sexual abuse, there are high chances that most people pursuing therapy could record histories with sexual abuse. Evidently, counselors must be familiar and aware of the long-term effects and symptoms associated with child sexual abuse. This will help them in attaining a deeper understanding of the prerequisites of counseling. This study defines child sexual abuse, reviews the impact of child sexual abuse, and explores the long-term effects whilst identifying the appropriate treatments.

Childhood Sexual…… [Read More]

References

Brandon, L. & Kerryann, W. (2011). Their Children's First Educators: Parents' Views about Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, 21(1), 734-746. Retrieved September 16, 2013 from Ebscohost database.

Emmelin, M., Hogan, N., & Nystrom, Lennarth. (2011). Child Sexual Abuse: Community Concerns in Urban Tanzania. Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p. 196-217. Retrieved September 16, 2013 from Ebscohost database.

Misurell, J. & Springer, C. (2013). Developing Culturally Responsive Evidence-Based Practice: A Game-Based Group Therapy Program for Child Sexual Abuse (CSA). Journal of Child & Family Studies, 22(1), 137-149. Retrieved September 15, 2013 from Ebscohost database.

Misurell, J., Springer, C., & Tryon, W. (2011). Game-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (GB-CBT) Group Program for Children Who Have Experienced Sexual Abuse: A Preliminary Investigation. Journal of Child Abuse, 20(1), 14-36. Retrieved September 16, 2013 from Ebscohost database.
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CSA Child Sexual Abuse Is

Words: 4327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61552509

Rankin (2003) affirmed that the purpose of art therapy is to address the major affects of trauma on the child's life. Additionally, Rankin (2003) stated that art interventions begin with self-management, then proceed with safety planning, telling the trauma story, grieving traumatic losses, self-concept and world view revision and finally ends with self and relational development. Treatment progress and outcomes will vary from patient to patient, as therapy is an individualized process.

Although the amount of empirical research regarding art therapy is limited, the use of art therapy has been confirmed as a means for victims to express how they feel and find some closure. Art therapy has also become a type of intervention that is used in combination with other interventions. ith this understood, the preceding section of this discussion will focus on play therapy as an intervention.

Play Therapy

Play therapy is a long-established and highly effective treatment…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arcus, D. (2008). Child abuse, sexual and emotional. Encyclopedia of Childhood and Adolescence.

Brooke, S. (1995) ART THERAPY: AN APPROACH TO WORKING WITH SEXUAL

ABUSE SURVIVORS. The Arts in Psychotherapy, Vol. 22, No. 5, pp. 447-466, 1995

Brown, E. (2005). Correlates and treatment of stress disorder in children and adolescents. Psychiatric Annuals. 35 (9).
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Object Relation Attachment Theories and

Words: 26278 Length: 55 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34405449

During the next chapter of this clinical case study dissertation, the Literature eview section, this researcher relates accessed information that contributes a sampling of previous research to begin to enhance the understanding needed to help a patient "grow" not only in therapy, but also in life.

CHAPTE II

LITEATUE EVIEW

The theories and techniques used in psychoanalysis are very diverse; Freudian analysis is only one approach."

Thomas and McGinnis, 1991, ¶ 1)

Diverse Contentions

One recent University of New Hampshire study indicated that 63% of more than 3,000 surveyed American parents surveyed reported experiences of one or more instances of verbal aggression toward children in their homes. A Child Protective Services study, albeit reported that only 6% of child abuse cases involved "emotional maltreatment," form of abuse in which verbal abuse constitutes the most common form of maltreatment. The apparent low number of "official" verbal abuse cases likely relates to…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association, (2004). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Test Revised. Washington DC.

Blatt, S. (1974). Levels of object representation in anaclytic and introjective depression. New York: International University Press.

Bowlby, J. (1969) Attachment. Volume One of Attachment and Loss, New York: Basic

Books.
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Validating the Effectiveness of Participation in a

Words: 7348 Length: 27 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2865324

Validating the Effectiveness of Participation in a Time-Sensitive Closed Therapeutic Group for Preschool Aged Children Allegedly Sexually Abused

This paper will review existing research on allegedly sexually abused preschool aged children. The traumatic psychological effects of the abuse including low self-esteem, poor peer relationships, behavior problems, cognitive functioning and physical/mental health will also be evaluated.

The author notes the paucity of available material on sexually abused children. Very little therefore is known of the effectiveness of psychotherapy to assist in the treatment of the problems of this particular group of abused children - a population of 40 selected children with a mean age of 45, with their parents (either father or mother) and/or caregivers attending sessions in another session hall at the same time the children are undergoing therapy.

This proposed study will therefore focus on how mental health services are provided to preschool children with ages ranging between 4…… [Read More]

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Child Counseling

Words: 2053 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2474313

Child Counseling

The objective of this work is to provide viable research techniques to use in order to help a child and her family. This report represents a summary of Alicia Thomas, a nine-year-old African-American 4th grader with a series of legitimate medical as well as possibly psychosomatic physiological and psychological concerns. The young lady has been specifically diagnosed as having a duodenal ulcer with the inherent gastrointestinal symptoms including vomiting and intermittent pain. The pain has been linked to increased absenteeism from school, four hospitalizations, adverse sleeplessness, nightmare experiences with detail of dismemberment and professed fears of death for herself and for her family members.

The family consisted of eight total children and an intact parental situation but of these members, there has also been a history of mental retardation, depression and one sibling who has since deceased but in life was a main care provider. There is also…… [Read More]

References

Annunziata, Jane. (n.d.). "Play Therapy With A 6-Year-old With Jane Annunziata, PsyD." Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.apa.org

College of Agricultural Sciences (1999). Cognitive Development/Play-Overview. College of Agricultural Sciences, Penn State University. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://www.penpages.psu.edu/penpages_reference/28507/2850764.htmL

Ferguson, E.D. (1989). "Adlerian Therapy: An Introduction." Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada: Adlerian Psychology Association of British Columbia.

Wikopedia. (n.d.). Post-traumatic stress disorder. Retrieved May 10, 2005, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-traumatic_stress_disorder
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Ben From Stepmom Ben the

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21576084



One play therapy technique that I would use is to have Ben play with toy figurines of family members, so that he can act out events between family members. I would observe the types of events that are simulated and whether the behavior exhibited by the characters is conducive to a healthy familial relationship. After he has enacted a sequence, I would engage Ben in a dialogue surrounding the consequences of the actions portrayed in the sequence. This exercise would allow Ben to intellectually understand the consequences for the behavior that he exhibits, which will cause him to act with greater foresight and understand his conflicted emotional state. Helping Ben to understand the consequences of his actions borrows from the principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and my hope is that the play therapy will result in him using his cognitive faculties to regulate his emotional turmoil. I would also have…… [Read More]

References

Bratton, S. et al. (2005). The Efficacy of play therapy with children: A meta-analytic review of treatment outcomes. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 36(4), 376-390.
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Cognitive Modification the Needs of

Words: 1324 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82252365

"

Somewhat unsurprisingly, an instructional strategy that these teachers frequently used was modification. Our analysis identified the following modifications: reteaching the material, using instructional materials, prompting/cueing, modeling, changing the task, and giving students more practice on the task.... If the teacher believed that the modification was not sufficient in aiding student learning, she typically reevaluated the student's learning difficulty and state of mind and then selected a new modification to apply. (Stough & Palmer, 2003)

These are the types of decisions and criteria for the student with special needs that must be evaluated when attempting any type of no only cognitive modification, but any type of intervention.

Since the late nineties strategy interventions such as cognitive modification have been increasing in use in the area of special education. The has been an array of cognitive interventions put into practice such as, specific problem-solving skills, advanced organizational skills, approaching reading with…… [Read More]

References

Bouck, E.C. (2004). Exploring Secondary Special Education for Mild Mental Impairment: A Program in Search of Its Place. Remedial and Special Education, 25(6), 367-377

Bray, P., & Cooper, R. (2007). The Play of Children with Special Needs in Mainstream and Special Education Settings. Australian Journal of Early Childhood, 32(2), 37-48

Gersten, R., Schiller, E.P., & Vaughn, S. (Eds.). (2000). Contemporary Special Education Research: Syntheses of the Knowledge Base on Critical Instructional Issues. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Neenan, M., & Dryden, W. (2004). Cognitive Therapy: 100 Key Points. New York: Brunner-Routledge.
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Multicultural Counseling Competency a Counselor's Knowledge Awareness

Words: 639 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 123070

Multicultural Counseling Competency

A counselor's knowledge, awareness, and skills concerning multicultural differences can have a significant impact on their ability to provide quality care (Penn and Post, 2012, p. 14-17). These multicultural competencies have therefore been recognized by counseling scholars as increasingly important, especially since American society is becoming more ethnically diverse. A recent study examined multicultural competencies among play therapists and found self-perceptions of competency to be independent of training. More recently, Penn and Post (2012) expanded on this finding by attempting to identify the factors that influence a play therapist's perceptions of their multicultural competency.

Critique

Penn and Post (2012) surveyed 510 members of the Association of Play Therapy to assess self-reported levels of multicultural competency, then compared these self-reports to records of multicultural training. The first set of findings revealed self-reported multicultural knowledge was inversely correlated with ignorance about the racial issues that minorities face. The second…… [Read More]

References

Penn, Saundra L. And Post, Phyllis B. (2012). Investigating various dimensions of play therapists' self-reported multicultural counseling competence. International Journal of Play Therapy, 21(1), 14-29.
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Comorbid Diagnosis of ADHD & ODD

Words: 1701 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45991338

journal and literature review that all centers on the same single test case of a patient situation that is known to the author. Indeed, the case in question is one the author of this report is aware of from an internship as a social work intern. The specific case is that of a seven-year-old Hispanic male that has been diagnosed with both Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). The boy in question comes from lower socioeconomic status and, obviously, is of a racial minority group at the same time. The author will cycle through five different book excerpts and journal articles that pertain in whole or in part to the plight and diagnosis faced by the boy mentioned above and the learning gleaned from each source will be applied to his case. While the boy in question has a comorbid diagnosis and faces some societal roadblocks…… [Read More]

References

Corcoran, J. (2003). Clinical applications of evidence-based family interventions.

Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Drake, K., & Ginsburg, G. (2012). Family Factors in the Development, Treatment, and Prevention of Childhood Anxiety Disorders. Clinical Child And Family Psychology

Review, 15(2), 144-162. doi:10.1007/s10567-011-0109-0
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SIDS Counseling

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56162207

SIDS Counseling Treatment Plan

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: A Treatment Plan

The unexpected death of an infant is a heartbreaking tragedy. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) refers to the sudden death of a child which occurs without any known cause. While there are some risk factors for SIDS, little is known about the disorder. Sudden infant death syndrome is the leading cause of infant mortality in the United States (McClain, Arnold, Longchamp, & Shaefer, 2004). Families, who lose a child because of SIDS, require assistance in acknowledging their child's death and expressing grief in a safe and healthy manner. Christian grief counseling provides families affected by SIDS with the support and skills to identify and express their emotions after the sudden death of a child.

The purpose of Christian bereavement counseling is to promote the understanding of death and grief and the healthy expression of emotions. A treatment plan for…… [Read More]

References

(McClain M. Arnold J. Longchamp E. Shaefer J. 2004 Beareavement counseling for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and infant mortality: Core competencies for the health care professional) McClain, M., Arnold, J., LongchampNewman (2006), E., & Shaefer, J. (2004). Beareavement counseling for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and infant mortality: Core competencies for the health care professional. Retrieved April 7, 2011, from http://www.asip1.org/images/BerCouns -- CoreComp.pdf

(Newman W. 2006 Bible teaching about Christian counseling theory and practice) Newman, W. (2006). Bible teaching about Christian counseling theory and practice (Rev. ed.). Tacoma, WA: Newman International LLC.

(Worden J. 2009 Grief counseling and grief therapy: A handbook for the mental health practitioner) Worden, J. (2009). Grief counseling and grief therapy: A handbook for the mental health practitioner (4th ed.). New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.
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PTSD in Children and it Impacts

Words: 2227 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72431129

Child and PTSD

THE CURSE OF EMOTIONAL TRAUMA

Post-traumatic Disorder

Nature equipped the body with an inherent mechanism to avoid danger or defend oneself against it (NIMH, 2013). ut in some persons, this naturally protective mechanism goes haywire and the reaction to fight or flee remains even in the absence of real danger. This abnormal condition is called post-traumatic disorder (NIMH).

The condition grows out of a horrifying experience of physical violence or threat in the person, a loved one or even a stranger as witnessed by the person who later develops the condition (NIMH, 2013). PTSD was first recognized as a mental and emotional condition among returning war veterans. ut it can also develop from other traumatic experiences, such as rape, torture, beating, captivity, accidents, fires, road accidents or natural disasters (NIMH).

Social Workers and PTSD

The social worker performs a number of professional roles. They act as brokers,…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

AACAP (2013). Posttraumatic stress disorder. Number 70, Facts for Families"

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Retrieved on October 12,

2014 from http://www.aacap.org/AACAP/Families_and_Youth/Facts_for_Families/Facts_for_Families_Pages/Posttraumatic_Stress_Disorder_70.aspx

CSC (n.d.). Roles of a social worker. Chadron State College: Nebraska State College
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Dibs in Search of Self

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47213045

The room provided space and some materials that might lend themselves to the emergence of personalities of the children who might spend time there. The ingredients of experience would make the room uniquely different for each child. Here a child might search the silence for old sounds, shout out his discoveries of a self momentarily captured, and so escape from the prison of his uncertainties, anxieties, and fears. He brings into this room the impact of all the shapes and sounds and colours and movements, and rebuilds his world, reduced to a size he can handle. (Axline 1964, p.22)

Axline's observations of Dibs led to a demonstrative understanding of his fears and needs and the surrounding, i.e. play therapy gave him full permission to interact and react to the world as he saw fit, and to such a degree that his skills and actual intelligence became known. (pg. 219)

The…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Axline, V.M. (1986) Dibs in Search of Self. New York: Haughton Mifflin Co.
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Virginia M Axline's Dibs in

Words: 363 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73304807

His parents seem to perpetuate this sentiment: "She [his mother] said that she and her husband have accepted the fact that he is probably mentally retarded or brain damaged." (Axline 18). The boy is utterly unresponsive in the classroom; often times his teachers read to him or tell him stories as he lays face-down on the ground, apparently oblivious to their attempts to reach him.

Through subsequent therapy, and a handful of interactions with Dibs' parents, Axline comes to understand that the driving issues resulting in the boy's strange behavior come from his familial relationships. His mother eventually admits that she has often resented Dibs' existence because it changed her life so drastically, and effectually ruined her career. As he developed his mother became aware of his mental gifts, but also began to worry that he might be schizophrenic. Through play therapy, however, Dibs begins to show tremendous improvement at…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Axline, Virginia M. (1964). Dibs in Search of Self. New York: Ballantine Books.
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Single Mother With Signs of Alcoholism

Words: 2004 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88879327

Child Therapy

The author of this report has been asked to assess the situation of a single mother of three kids. The mother is very paranoid about losing her children but there are some very real concerns in terms of what the mother is apparently doing and how some of the children are acting. The author is asked to answer a number of questions. These include how the professionals could and should collaborate so as to best serve both the mother and the children involved in the situation, from an ethical and legal standpoint of course. The role of each professional in the situation will be discussed in detail. The function that each professional would serve will be discussed. The author is also going to place one's self as the "lead" person on the team and will then describe what could and should happen in relation to this situation and…… [Read More]

References

Fabia-czyk, K. (2011). Decision making on ambiguous stimuli such as prosody by subjects suffering from paranoid schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, and without psychiatric diagnosis. British Journal of Mathematical & Statistical Psychology, 64(1), 53-68.

doi:10.1348/000711010X492366

Lo, C. C., Monge, A. N., Howell, R. J., & Cheng, T. C. (2013). The Role of Mental Illness in Alcohol Abuse and Prescription Drug Misuse: Gender-Specific Analysis of College

Students. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 45(1), 39-47.
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Social Work Assessment From My

Words: 6527 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87836590

Therefore, today's society in the United States is diverse, which is something a social worker needs to understand and know how to deal with each diverse group. Furthermore, through research, it has been discovered most ethnic groups that live in the United States consist of young people, which means by staying in this country, they grow accustom to their surroundings. Once they have grown accustom to living here, they feel like this is their home to start a life with their own families. This continues the growing number of ethnic groups in this country.

Due to the educational accommodations that schools and college campuses make for students that have ethnic backgrounds, there is not enough prejudice of one group to let a Holocaust to occur in the United Stated. Furthermore, this country believes in freedom of speech to allow one ethnic to be isolated from the rest and condone any…… [Read More]

References

Dennen, Johan. THE 'EVIL' MIND: PT. 3. CRUELTY AND 'BEAST-IN-MAN' IMAGERY. Retrieved March 30, 2008, from http://rechten.eldoc.ub.rug.nl/FILES/departments/Algemeen/overigepublicaties/2005enouder/EVIL_CRU/EVIL_CRU.pdf

Citrome, Lesilie,. (2007). Aggression. Retrieved March 30, 2008, from http://www.emedicine.com/med/topic3005.htm

Hall, Kathy Jo. (1997). Carl Rogers. Retrieved March 30, 2008, from http://aolsearch.aol.com/aol/search?query=Throughout+this+Jim+knocks+the+clay+figurines+head+of+and+crushes+the+body+while+shouting&invocationType=spelling

Seal, B., A. Bradford, and C. Meston. 2009. The Association Between Body Esteem and Sexual Desire Among College Women. Archives of Sexual Behavior 38, no. 5, (October 1): 866-72. http://www.proquest.com.library.capella.edu / (accessed April 1, 2010).
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Child Life Specialist's Interview

Words: 1557 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56754386

Rachel Faybyshev

Foundations of Mental Health Counseling

Dr. Mary Owens

Interviewee -- April Slowenski BS, MEd, CCLS, CPMT

Please tell me your official job title and the length of time that you have held the Child Life Specialist degree.

I am a Certified Child Life Specialist and Certified Pediatric Massage Therapist. In February, it will be 7 years since I started working in this field.

What inspired your interest in the field of Child Life Specialist?

I've always wanted to work with children and at first I wanted to be a teacher. I was not aware of all the other professions that deal with children. I found out about child life specialists program by accident. While in undergrad, I majored in Education and took a psychology course. One day when I was going to class, there was a sign for a child life specialist's seminar right outside the classroom. Unfortunately,…… [Read More]