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Policing Through Community-Oriented Police Techniques

Words: 2484 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 19790162



In addition, today's police officer faces different challenges from police officers of even two decades ago. One of these 21st century problems facing law enforcement is terrorism. Almost every community across the nation has some building or government location that could be considered a target of terrorism, and large metropolitan areas have many of these targets within their boundaries. Because of this, police models may have to change to be more involved in preventing terrorism from occurring, rather than responding once a terrorist act has been committed. Community policing can aid in this by allowing community police officers to become familiar with their neighborhoods and citizens, and knowing exactly what targets lay in their area. To create better police officers, training in terrorism and how to recognize typical terrorism suspects must be stepped up and addressed in all communities.

Perhaps the biggest challenge facing many officers is the use of…… [Read More]

References

Bucqueroux, B. (2007). Community criminal justice: What community policing teaches. Retrieved from the Policing.com Web site: http://www.policing.com/articles/ccj.html26 March 2007.

Gianakis, G.A., & Davis, G.J. (1998). Reinventing or repackaging public services? The case of community-oriented policing. Public Administration Review, 58(6), 485.

Glenn, R.W., Panitch, B.R., Barnes-Proby, D., Williams, E., Christian, J., Lewis, M.W., et al. (2003). Training the 21st century police officer: Redefining police professionalism for the Los Angeles Police Department / . Santa Monica, CA: Rand.

Leuci, R. (1999). 13 the enemies within: Reflections on institutionalized corruption. In Police and policing: Contemporary issues, Kenney, D.J. & McNamara, R.P. (Eds.) (2nd ed., pp. 216-219). Westport, CT: Praeger.
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Building Trust Between Police and Communities Police

Words: 1148 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58441676

Police: Building Trust Between Police and Communities

Building Trust between Police and Communities: Police

Police Trust, Integrity and Ethics in Bridging the Gap in Community elations

The death of Eric Garner in the hands of New York police, and the shootings of 12-year-old ice Tamir and Michael Brown in Ohio and Missouri respectively, have and continue to brew a wave of public mistrust in the police service. Such incidences often spur massive public protests that eventually destroy relations between police and the communities they serve. A study conducted by euters on 3,600 citizens between December 2014 and January 2015 found that a significant 27.6% of adult Americans do not trust the police to be fair and just (euters, 2015). In December, 2015, President Barrack Obama signed an executive order creating the Task Force on 21st Century Policing, whose primary aim is to build confidence and trust in the local police.…… [Read More]

References

IACP. (2010). Building Trust between the Police and the Citizens they Serve. The International Association of Chiefs of Police (ICAP). Retrieved from  http://www.theiacp.org/portals/0/pdfs/BuildingTrust.pdf 

Miller, L. & Hess, K. (2007). Community Policing: Partnerships for Problem-Solving (5th ed.). Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Raines, J. (2011). Ethics in Policing: Misconduct and Integrity. Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.

Reuters. (2015). Do Americans Trust their Cops to be Fair and Just? New Poll Contains Surprises. Reuters.com. Retrieved from  http://blogs.reuters.com/great-debate/2015/01/15/one-third-of-americans-believe-police-lie-routinely/
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Policing Policies Analysis This Study Seeks to

Words: 1831 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50058097

Policing Policies Analysis

This study seeks to strengthen the practice of policing by demonstrating the effectiveness of the problem-oriented policing. The information provided herein is useful to practitioners as it compares problem-oriented policing against community-oriented policing. Practitioners will be able to create much robust policing intervention when addressing real life situations within the field by grasping the theoretical mechanisms (Hess & Orthmann, 2011). In addition, by linking academic theories to policing, this review helps theoretical criminologists ponder about the most useful concepts for practical police level.

Zero tolerance Policing

Zero-tolerance policing lacks a specific definition; it can be understood in various ways. The recent definition entails non-discretional and strict enforcement of law regardless of the magnitude or circumstances of the crime. While this approach involves positive police actions, it does not equate to automatic arrests of trivial crimes. This is the most aggressive policing approach and cannot be equated to…… [Read More]

References

Wakefield, A., & Fleming, J. (2008). The SAGE Dictionary of Policing. London: Sage Publications.

Palmiotto, M. (2009). Community policing: A policing strategy for the 21st century. Gaithersburg, Md: Aspen.

Do-lling, D. (2013). Community policing: Comparative aspects of community oriented police work. Holzkirchen/Obb: Felix.

Ikerd, T.E. (2007). Examining the institutionalization of problem-oriented policing: The Charlotte-Mecklenburg police department as a case study.
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Policing Operations Hidden Dangers Real Weapons and

Words: 1323 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54409918

Policing Operations:

Hidden Dangers, Real Weapons, and Potential Technologies

Police officers are, undoubtedly, society's primary protectors. These individuals undertake assignments knowing that they could be placed in lethal danger, and do so in order to help complete strangers and keep a community safe. For this reason, police officers ought to be very much admired. Despite the personal and professional satisfaction that comes with being a great police officer, these individuals are also well aware that, as mentioned above, there are various aspects affecting their daily professional routines, many of which are not present in other careers, and many of which involve great risks. Yet despite knowing this, many police officers absolutely love their job. The paragraphs below will thus discuss policing operations in detail in order to better understand this particular and very important field of work. The essay will be separated into five sections focusing on the dangers of…… [Read More]

Shreeve, J.L. (2012). CSI Foils Felons. Police Technology. Retrieved January 14, 2012, from .

Scheider, M. & Chapman, R. (2003). Community Policing and Terrorism. Homeland Security Wesite. Retrieved January 14, 2012, from .

Simon, S. (2011). Former LAPD Chief Bill Bratton Predicts the Future of Policing. National Public Radio (NPR.com). Retrieved January 14, 2012, from .
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Community Oriented Policing

Words: 6694 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 38020628

Community Oriented Policing

new and comprehensive strategy against crime: Community Policing:

For the purpose of reducing neighborhood crimes, creating a sense of security and reduce fear of crimes among the citizens and improving the quality of life in the community, the community policing strategy will be proved to be the most effective one. The accomplishment of all these objectives to develop a healthy and clean society can be done by combining the efforts of the police department, the members of the community and the local government. "The concept of community policing is not very new however it has gained attention in last few years. It is an approach to make a collaborative effort between the police and the community in order to identify and solve the problems of crime, societal disorder and disturbances. It combines all the element of the community to find out the solutions to the social problems.…… [Read More]

References

Gordon: Community Policing: Towards the Local Police State?: Law, Order and the Authoritarian State, Open University Press, Milton Keynes, 1987, p. 141.

O'Malley and D. Palmer: Post-Keynesian Policing, Economy and Society: 1996, p 115.

Bright: Crime Prevention: The British Experience: The Politics of Crime Control: Sage, London, 1991. p. 24-63.

MacDonald: Skills and Qualities of Police Leaders Required of Police Leaders Now and in the Future: Federation Press, Sydney, 1995. p. 72
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Community-Based Policing and Problem Solving Its History and Results

Words: 643 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 80953563

Community-Based Policing, Problem-Solving History and esults

The objective of this study is to examine community-based policing, problem-solving history and results. Towards this end, this work will review literature in this area of study.

The Bureau of Justice Assistance document entitled "Understanding Community Policing: A Framework for Action" states that community policing is, "in essence, a collaboration between the police and the community that identifies and solves community problems." Additionally stated in the Bureau of Justice Assistance work is that problem-solving "is a broad term that implies more than simply the elimination and prevention of crimes. Problem-solving is based on the assumption that 'crime and disorder can be reduced in small geographic areas by carefully studying the characteristics of problems in the area and then applying the appropriate resources…" and on the assumption that "Individuals make choices based on the opportunities presented by the immediate physical and social characteristics of an…… [Read More]

References

Understanding Community Policing: A Framework for Action. Bureau of Justice Assistance. August 1994. Retrieved from:  http://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/commp.pdf 

Philosophy and Principles of Community-Based Policing (2006) SEESAC 2006. Retrieved from:  http://www.seesac.org/uploads/studyrep/CBP_ENG_3rd_edition_FINAL.pdf 

Eck, John E., and William Spelman, et al. (1983) Problem Solving: Problem-Oriented Policing in Newport News. Washington, D.C.: Police Executive Research Forum. 1987:pp.xvi -- xvii. See also Clarke, Ronald V. "Situational Crime Prevention: Its Theoretical Basis and Practical

Scope." Crime and Justice: An Annual Review of Research, eds. Michael Tonry and Norval
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Police Reform in Post Authoritarian Brazil

Words: 12011 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 41646569

Police eform in Post-Authoritarian Brazil

A majority of new democracies entail an unbelievable illogicality of an immensely feeble citizenship coalesced with a stern description of the constitutional guarantees. In order to explicate this disparity it would be prudent to contemplate the significance of political institutions regarding representation of citizen, which were prevalent subsequent to the military establishments attributed as troublesome and a majority of the new restrictions. A few defined in the autocratic establishment, were implemented by quite a few new establishments prominently by the Brazilian Constitution of 1988 (Pinheiro, 1996).

The prominence out of such institutions of Brazil were the excessive illustration of lesser populated regions on the contrary to the regions with greater population: Sao Paulo in recent times incorporates 60 Congressmen (which is analogous to 11.9% of the entire constituents of a Congress) depicting a voting strength of 20,774,991. This strength makes up 21.9% of the entire…… [Read More]

References

Amnesty International (2002). 'Subhuman': Torture, overcrowding and brutalization in Minas Gerais police stations. London, Amnesty International.

Bailey, Willian C. 1984. "Poverty, Inequality and City Homicides Rates." Criminology. Vol. 22. no0 4. November.

Beato F., C.C. Accion y Estrategia de las Organizaciones Policiales In: Policia, Sociedad y Estado: Modernizacion y Reforma Policial en America del Sul.1 ed.Santiago: Centro de Estudios del Desarrollo, 2001a, p. 39-56.

Beato F., Claudio Chaves, Renato Martins Assuncao, Braulio Figueiredo Alves da Silva, Frederico Couto Marinho, Ilka Afonso Reis, Maria Cristina de Mattos Almeida. 2001. "Conglomerados de homicidios e o trafico de drogas em Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil, de 1995 a 1999." Cadernos de Saude Publica. Rio de Janeiro: v.17, n.5, p.1163-1171, 2001b.
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Police in Society Organizational Structure

Words: 1975 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24317557

Patrol crafts would be deployed along the coastal areas waiting to act upon any information provided to confiscate drugs and arrest drug traffickers. For this purpose, the city police would be armoured with 2 well-equipped fast patrol crafts. Communication services between the stations and the patrol crafts would be state of the art including GPS systems and radar networks to facilitate identifying and tracking down of suspicious activity in the coastal waters. Further, the use of latest thermal imaging and laser optics tools would provide effective supervision at nights.

Conclusion

The police department has immense responsibility in maintaining law and order and providing safety and security would necessitate a strong police force based on a clear and sound organizational philosophy. As a coastal city with its growing population, the urban city of Metropolis is faced with numerous problems, in particular the high drug trade activity along the coastal regions. The…… [Read More]

Bibliography

NCWC, " Police in Society," Accessed 16th Apr 2007, Available online at, http://faculty.ncwc.edu/toconnor/205/205lects.htm

Author not Available, "Community Policing," Accessed 15th Apr 2007, available at  http://law.jrank.org/pages/1648/Police-Community-Policing-Definition-community-policing.html 

James T. Quinlivan, Burden of Victory: The Painful Arithmetic of Stability Operations, Available Online at,  http://www.rand.org/publications/randreview/issues/summer2003/burden.html 

City of Phoenix, 'Police Officer Processing Procedures', Accessed Apr 16th 2007, available at http://www.ci.phoenix.az.us/POLICE/pdjob3.html
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Police History Structure and Functions

Words: 1013 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71182572

Police: History, Structure, and Functions

The policing system's development in Britain was closely followed by a similar development in America. Policing by the initial colonizers assumed two forms: "The Big Stick" (for-profit, private agency policing) and the "Watch" (communal as well as informal) (Spitzer, 1979). Community volunteers primarily charged with warning citizens of imminent danger made up the latter system. The night watch was first implemented in the year 1636 in Boston. New York and Philadelphia implemented night watch system in the years 1658 and 1700, respectively. This system did not prove particularly successful in controlling crime. Supplementing the "watch" mode of policing was a group of official law enforcers, labeled "constables," who were often salaried by a fee system, based on number of warrants served by them. Policing's informal procedure continued for several years following the 1765-83 American evolution. Only in the 1830s did the U.S. first introduce a…… [Read More]

References

Davis, Rowenna. (2009). Policing the police, The Guardian. Retrieved from  https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/libertycentral/2009/feb/28/convention-modern-liberty-police  on October 5, 2016.

Lewis, M.A. (2011). "Perspective: Peel's Legacy," FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin. The FBI. Retrieved from  https://leb.fbi.gov/2011/december/perspective-peels-legacy  on October 5, 2016.

Lundman, Robert J. (1980). Police and Policing: An Introduction, New York, New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Spitzer, Stephen, (1979). The Rationalization of Crime Control in Capitalist Society, Contemporary Crises 3, no. 1.
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Policing Community- and Problem-Oriented Policing Have Risen

Words: 1300 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56835327

Policing

Community- and problem-oriented policing have risen as the most important mediums for improving the efficiency of police efforts in communities and as ways of reformation of police organizations.

Community-oriented Policing

Community-oriented policing has turned out to the symbol of police in America. In every area of the United States, community policing has emerged as an adaptive style of policing. It is considered as a powerful organizing vehicle for the public protection. If truth be told, it has become an accepted principle for law enforcement agencies. Community-oriented policing promises to thoroughly change the relationship among the police department and the public, deals with community problems, and improves the living conditions of the neighborhoods (Greene, 2000).

The main idea behind community-oriented policing is that the enforcement of law should be focused, proactive and sensitive to the community. It tends to break down the barriers between the law enforcement department and the…… [Read More]

References

Greene, J.R. (2000). Community Policing in America: Changing the Nature, Structure, and Function of the Police. Criminal Justice, 3, 299-370. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from  https://www.ncjrs.gov/criminal_justice2000/vol_3/03g.pdf 

Stephens, G. (2005). Policing the Future: Law Enforcement's New Challenges. The Futurist, 39(2), 51+. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from  http://www.questia.com/read/1G1-129170684/policing-the-future-law-enforcement-s-new-challenges 

The Key Elements of Problem-Oriented Policing (n.d.). In Center for Problem-Oriented Policing . Retrieved December 15, 2012, from  http://www.popcenter.org/about/?p=elements 

"What is POP?" (n.d.). In Center for Problem-Oriented Policing. Retrieved December 15, 2012, from  http://www.popcenter.org/about/?p=whatiscpop
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Police Relations

Words: 1221 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 10706032

police forces are run, and Thibault et al. take examine some of the important issues that have prompted these changes. Their work on police management, and the research that they have pursued on the ways in which police departments are constituted, have helped to created the kinds of community-based, progressive forms of policing that are becoming more and more widely used - even if they are still in the minority overall in this country.

In the preface to their work, the authors argue for three elements to be included in every progressive police department:

First, we believe that sound management is management based on a combination of theory and practice. Practice without analysis will cause us to repeat the mistakes of history, so our theoretical analysis must be directed toward the practical for implementation into the day-to-day rigors of operating a police department.

Second, we reject complete adherence to the…… [Read More]

References

Block, R. (1971). "Fear of Crime and Fear of the Police." Social Problems 19: 91-100.

Davis, M. (1998). Community policing: How to get started. Denver: Anderson Publishing.

Harris, D. (1997). "Driving While Black' and All Other Offenses: The Supreme Court and Pretextual Traffic Stops." Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 87: 544-582.

Thibault, E., Lynch, L. & McBride, B. (2000). Proactive Police Management. (5th ed.). New York: Prentice Hall.
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Police Officer Might Be One

Words: 2028 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35790299

In places such as Richmond, that have an already checkered past in their relationship with the public, the public perception is further damaged by the rise in crime. This is true of the police department in the rest of the country as well. The rise in crime affects the perception of the public with regard to the police department, and not the government. In actions such as racism and extralegal searches the police department and not President Bush is implicated. Many of the harmful effects of current police actions and policies are the result of government policies. The police has thus become somewhat of a scapegoat as a result of the latest government policies.

The profile of violent crimes has also changed dramatically and dangerously. Fewer police officers mean more violent criminals, which raises the crime rate.

Government policy, rising crime rates, and police actions have therefore combined into a…… [Read More]

Sources

Barbash, Fred (2005, June 28). Court Backs Town In Lawsuit Over Domestic Violence. In Washington Post online (Washingtonpost.com).

Lucas, Scott (2001, April 23). Good cop, bad cop - police violence against African-Americans - police in movies and TV - Timothy Thomas. In New Statesman.

Maclin, Tracey. (1998, Summer). Terry v Ohio's fourth amendment legacy: Black men and police discretion. In St. John's Law Review.

Seron, Carroll (2004, Dec). Judging Police Misconduct: "Street-Level" versus Professional Policing. Law & Society Review, Blackwell Publishers.
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Community Oriented Policing vs Problem

Words: 7854 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7099404

(1990) Municipal Government Involvement in Crime Prevention in Canada. This work provides insight into the way that municipal government interacts with the police in the organization of crime prevention structures and the delivery of crime prevention services and activities. (Hastings, 1990, p. 108)

The idea of municipal government interaction in crime prevention is shown to have been spurred on in Canada by "....the successes of locally organized and community-based initiatives in North America. In both cases, the involvement reflects a sense that, whatever crime prevention is, the police cannot do it alone." (Hastings, 1990, p. 108) This again attests to the prevailing theme in the literature that there is a general consensus that the police force faces problems that are complex and which require the interaction and the assistance of other local community and municipal structures.

Hastings emphasizes this sense of interaction in the field of community policing and particularly…… [Read More]

References

About Community Policing. Retrieved 16 August 2006, at  http://www.communitypolicing.org/about2.html 

BJA Bureau of Justice Assistance Fact Sheet. Comprehensive Communities Program: A Unique Way To Reduce Crime and Enhance Public Safety. (2000) Retrieved 18 August, 2006, at  http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles1/bja/fs000267.txt 

COMMUNITY ORIENTED POLICING. Retrieved 16 August 2006, at http://safestate.org/index.cfm?navID=7

Community-Oriented Policing: Blessing Or Curse? Retrieved15 August, 2006, from, http://www.wsurcpi.org/resources/citizen_invol/Community-Oriented%20Policing%20Blessing%20or%20Curse.htm
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Police Stress

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 7819846

Stress Before Referencing

hat are the primary points of this article or informational link? How could a forensic psychologist contribute to a positive outcome? hat type of psychological instrument could be of assistance in resolving the problems noted in this article?

Although the physical dangers of policing the community are well-documented on the evening news on almost a daily basis, the psychological difficulties police officers confront are often less publicized. Police officers, as representatives of the law, are seen as immune to the impact seeing violence and tragedy can have upon the psyche. But according to PBA psychologist Daniel Goldfarb, the 'Scrooge' effect is a dangerous one, causing officers to become cynics to the point where they are incapable of seeing the good in people. A healthy skepticism is essential and healthy to doing the job, but cynicism, defined as the corruption of skepticism, leads to burnout (Goldfarb, 2008, "Scrooge").…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Goldfarb, Daniel. (2008). "10 Reasons Cops are Different." The PBA Psychologist. Retrieved 22 Feb 2008 at http://www.heavybadge.com/10reason.htm

Goldfarb, Daniel. (2008). "Critical Incident Stress Reactions." The PBA Psychologist. Retrieved 22 Feb 2008 at http://www.heavybadge.com/cisd.htm

Goldfarb, Daniel. (2008). "The Home Front." The PBA Psychologist. Retrieved 22 Feb 2008 a http://www.heavybadge.com/wframe.htm

Goldfarb, Daniel. (1995). "In Search of the Silly Thought." The PBA Psychologist. Retrieved 22 Feb 2008 at http://www.heavybadge.com/silly.htm
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future of policing law enforcement

Words: 632 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86974812

Policing needs to change, especially has it has failed to live up to its potential in improving quality of life for all citizens. The ideal police force is indeed one that prevents crime, keeps order, respects the rights and dignity of citizens, is friendly and courteous, respects the laws, and does not abuse its power through corruption. Policing needs to be increasingly situated as integral to all other community organizations and institutions. Collaborative and strategic partnerships will help law enforcement achieve the goals it shares in common with other social and political organizations. Reforming community relations, improving trust and accountability, and working together with stakeholders are some of the keynotes of twenty-first century policing models.
According to the IACP (2018) policing will change in the upcoming years by focusing on both internal and external issues. This means that in addition to the externalities of community relationships and strategic partnerships, police…… [Read More]

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History of Community Policing in America

Words: 1276 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41471056

Community Policing

The History and Concept of Community Policing in the U.S.

Community Policing Origins

Community Policing Philosophy

Community Projects

Office of Community Oriented Policing Services

Community policing is as much a philosophy as it is a practice. At the heart of the concept lies a deep level of collaboration between the community and the police. However, to form such a relationship many intermediary goals must first be achieved. Most likely, one of the primary values that must be established is a sense of trust between both the community and the police force. If the community perceives the police force as corrupt or ineffective then will generally remain apathetic to the goals of community policing. At the same time, if the police force is not fully engaged with the public then are not likely to benefit from the communities assistance. Therefore, to establish effective community policing efforts a balance between…… [Read More]

Works Cited

AA County Police. (2007, July 7). POLICE DISCRETION & ALTERNATIVES TO ARREST. Retrieved September 2, 2011, from Police Rules and Regulations:  http://www.aacounty.org/Police/RulesRegs/Sections01-06/0105.2DiscretionAlternArrest.pdf 

Bureau of Justice Assistance. (1994, August). Understanding Community Policing. Retrieved September 2, 2011, from U.S. Department of Justice:  https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles/commp.pdf 

COPS. (2011). Community Policing Defined. Retrieved September 2, 2011, from Community Oriented Policing Services:  http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?item=36 

Sherman, L. (1990). POLICING FOR CRIME PREVENTION. American Journal of Police, 43-74.
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Poilice Community Strained Relationships

Words: 599 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 42075733

Police Community elations

Does it eally Exist?

The policing organizations throughout the United States have been the subject of vast amounts of negative publicity in recent years. Although these relationships have always perceived as tense, especially by minority groups, in recent years many instances of police brutality have been digitally recorded and shared throughout many forms of media, including social media. The advancement of technology has allowed for most people to be able to create their own videos on demand, typically with the use of smart phones, which has created a situation in which many questionable acts by police officers have been documented. Because of this relatively recent development, it is unclear if there is actually a rise in occurrences of issues such as police brutality, or if there are just more examples of such instances that are being documented and shared.

ecently, the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Community…… [Read More]

References

Gest, T. (2015, October 2). DOJ Slams St. Louis County Cops on Community Relations. Retrieved from The Crime Report:  http://www.thecrimereport.org/news/inside-criminal-justice/2015-10-cops-on-st-louis-county 

Weitzer, R., Tuch, S., & Skogan, W. (2008). Police -- Community Relations in a Majority-Black City. Journal of Research in Crime & Deliquency.
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Employee Motivations for Police Officers

Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 91003333



If the economic/machine and affective/affiliation models are combined then the result would resemble the growth-open system theory of motivation (Cordner, 2013). The term 'open' in this model is meant to imply employees are influenced by their environment, including the environmental factors existing outside the workplace. The term 'growth' indicates that individuals will transition through several levels of need fulfillment depending on whether more basic needs have been met. This 'needs' hierarchy is based on the work of the psychologist Maslow, who proposed the first needs that must be fulfilled are the most basic, such as food, clothing, and shelter. If these needs are being met then an individual will next seek to protect themselves from threats to their physical and psychological health. The subsequent levels, according to Maslow, would be social needs, feeling valued and personal fulfillment, in that order. Since most police officers earn enough to meet their basic…… [Read More]

References

Cordner, G.W. (2013). Police Administration (8th ed.). New York: Anderson Publishing.
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Police Function the Functions of Policing at

Words: 1068 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95497490

Police Function

The Functions of Policing at the Local, State and Federal Levels

The functions of police work are highly complex and filled with myriad unpredictable challenges. Officers must place their safety and their lives at risk every day in the interests of maintaining order, protecting the pubic and apprehending law-breakers. The result is an occupation that is filled with stressors, pressures and dangers. One way that the structure of modern police-work helps officers to contend with these conditions is through the division of jurisdictions. American law enforcement is a sector comprised of many interdependent and overlapping agencies. And correspondent to the broader structure of American governance, this overlapping is somewhat hierarchical in nature, with jurisdictions generally determined by the unit of civil incorporation with which a precinct or department is affiliated. Therefore, at the local, state and federal level, responsibilities are generally divided among these different types of policing…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Gaines, L.K. & Kappeler, V.E. (2011). Policing in America. Elsevier.

Kappeler, V.E. & Gaines, L.K. (2009). Community Policing: A Contemporary Perspective. Elsevier.

Wright, A. (2002). Policing: An Introduction to Concepts and Practices. Taylor & Francis U.S..
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Community Safety and Crime Reduction An Evaluation

Words: 4216 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35797603

Community Safety and Crime eduction: An Evaluation of the ole of New Technology

ecent technological advances have effectively changed the way we conduct business, secure our borders, fight our wars, diagnose diseases, etc. Indeed, thanks to advances in technology, the world as we know it today looks very different from the world of yesteryears. The fact that technology continues to have a significant impact on almost every facet of our lives is undeniable. One of the areas in which recent advances in technology remains most visible is security. Today, unlike two or three decades ago, there are a wide range of hi-tech security devices that have been specifically developed to help in fighting crime. From CCTV cameras to alarm systems to GPS tracking and even software designed to examine online chat records, the fight against crime has surely gone high-tech. It is however important to note that the utilization of…… [Read More]

References

Alarid, L.F. And Carmen, R.V.D., 2010. Community-Based Corrections. 8th ed. Belmont, CA: Cengage Learning.

Barak, G., 2007. Battleground: Criminal Justice. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), 2012. Latest Crime Stats: Annual Crime in the U.S. Report Released. [online] Available at: <  http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2012/october/annual-crime-in-the-u.s.-report-released/annual-crime-in-the-u.s.-report-released  > [Accessed 8 January 2013].

Grolle, S., 2009. CCTV to Prevent Crime? To What Extent Does CCTV Prevent Crime and How Does it Effect the Life in Our Cities. Munich: GRIN Verlag.
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Policing Services and Programs Even as Policing

Words: 1602 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89219509

Policing Services and Programs:

Even as policing services and programs are being restructured across the globe, understanding this change in customary terms is rather difficult. In these new policing services and programs, the difference between public and private domains of policing is also problematic. However, understanding the ongoing changes is dependent on distinguishing between the authorization of policing and the way these services are provided. This is because of the fact that those who authorize policing services and programs may differ from those who provide these services (Bayley & Shearing, 2001). The restructuring of policing incorporates the weaknesses of the public police and is due to increases in crime, social structure, ideas and culture, character of government and the nature of economic systems. Due to the ongoing restructuring of policing, the role of the public police is significantly changing adopting a governmental rather than individual agenda. Furthermore, policing services and…… [Read More]

References:

Bayley, DH & Shearing, C.D. (2001, July). The New Structure of Policing: Description,

Conceptualization and Research Agenda. Retrieved from National Institute of Justice -- U.S. Department of Justice website:  http://www.ncjrs.gov/txtfiles1/nij/187083.txt 

Cohen, B. & Leinen, S.H. (2009). Research On Criminal Justice Organizations: The Sentencing

Process. Retrieved May 4, 2011, from  http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/reports/2009/R2018.pdf
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Policing in America As Compared to the

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74544890

Policing in America:

As compared to the 1920's, policing in the United States has had to change over the years in order to cope with the numerous changes in the society.

Most of these changes have occurred during the 20th Century because of the rapid technological advancements and globalization. During this period, telephones, car ownership, and use of personal computers have become commonplace in the society. While these are positive changes, they have also contributed to significant changes that are sometimes negative in relation to law enforcement.

With the innovations of computers and telecommunication technologies in America, the police force and other criminal justice practitioners has really improved in terms of opportunity and challenges. These technologies have empowered the police force in the sense that they can now collect, store, study, and share records with stakeholders within and outside administration. The innovations of these technologies have created opportunities in the…… [Read More]

Reference:

Reichert, K. (2001, December). Use of Information Technology by Law Enforcement. Retrieved from University of Pennsylvania website:  http://www.sas.upenn.edu/jerrylee/programs/fjc/paper_dec01.pdf
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Community Response to Race and Criminal Justice

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 4962339

Community esponse to ace and Criminal Justice

Community esponse

The Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ), in Decatur, GA was chosen for this assignment. The department is responsible for serving the state's youth offenders up until the age of twenty-one. The organization's mission as stated on their web page is: "Our Mission is to protect and serve the citizens of Georgia by holding young offenders accountable for their actions through the delivery of services and sanctions in appropriate settings and by supporting youth in their communities to become productive and law-abiding citizens" (http://www.djj.state.ga.us/AboutUs/AboutUsOverview.shtml). Cathy Dravis, the Juvenile Program Manager was interviewed. Below is a summary.

When asked how they view the issue of the disproportionate amount of African-American males arrested for drug distribution vs. Caucasian and Hispanic males, the response was that the person's environment that they grew up in plays a large role in shaping their adult lives. Many…… [Read More]

References

DJJ - About Us. (n.d.). DJJ Internet Home. Retrieved May 16, 2012, from  http://www.djj.state.ga.us/AboutUs/AboutUsOverview.shtml 

Grunwald, H., Lockwood, B., Harris, P., & Mennis, J. (2010). Influences of neighborhood context, individual history and parenting behavior on recidivism among juvenile offenders. Journal of Youth & Adolescence, 39(9), 1067-1079. doi:10.1007/s10964-010-9518-5

Ryberg, J. (2011). Racial profiling and criminal justice. Journal Of Ethics, 15(1/2), 79-88. doi:10.1007/s10892-010-9098-3

Western, B. (2010).Decriminalizing poverty. Nation, 291(26), 12-14.
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Policing Is an Essential Issue

Words: 1592 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34544021

Not only doe s this approach include the participation of the community it also incorporates organizational change. Both community involvement and organizational change is necessary if policing efforts are going to be effective. This approach also emphasizes the importance of trust between the police and the community. The community oriented approach to policing is the most effective in the solving and reducing of crime within a community.

Conclusion

For the purposes of this discussion: Two police officers are arguing about the policies of community-oriented and problem-oriented policing as opposed to zero-tolerance policing. The research analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of these two approaches to policing. Both approaches seek to understand crime. However, both approaches had disadvantages related to the boundaries of community residents and the time required to solve crime using a problem oriented approach. The investigation also explained the ideologies that support these policy perspectives. The research will also…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Community Policing Defined."  http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?item=36 

G Cordner, EP Biebel. Problem-Oriented Policing in Practice. Criminology & Public Policy, Volume 4, Issue 2 (p 155-180)

Lum, C. 2009 Community Policing or Zero Tolerance. British Journal of Criminology.  http://bjc.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/azp039v1 

Maguire, M. 2004. 'The Crime Reduction Programme in England and Wales: Reflections on the Vision and the Reality', Criminal Justice 4(3): 213 -- 37.
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Community Watch Impact on Colleges

Words: 996 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 77027758

(COPS, 2005)

IV. A Multidisciplinary Approach

The work entitled: "Campus Threat Assessment Training: A Multidisciplinary Approach" states that it t has been recommended by the Florida Gubernatorial Task Force for University Campus Safety as follows: "That each college and university develop a multidisciplinary crisis management team, integrating and ensuring communication between the university law enforcement or campus security agency, student affairs, residential housing, counseling center, health center, legal counsel, and any other appropriate campus entities to review individuals and incidents which indicate "at-risk" behavior. The team should facilitate the sharing of information, timely and effective intervention, and a coordinated response when required." (Community Policing Dispatch, 2009) Colleges and universities in the United States are "recognizing the particular applicability of community policing in the campus environment. The community policing model helps to create the framework for a productive relationship between the officers and those whom they serve." (Wilson and Grammich, 2009)…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Campus Threat Assessment Training: A Multidisciplinary Approach (2009) Community Policing Dispatch. Vol. 2 Issue 4 April 2009. Online available at:  http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/html/dispatch/April_2009/campus_threat.htm 

Campus Watch Program (nd) College of Lake County, Illinois. Online available at:  http://www.clcillinois.edu/depts/sec/CampusWatchBrochure.pdf 

Godfrey, Steven (nd) Assessing the Success of Community-Policing (Neighborhood Watch Program) Online available at:  http://docs.google.com/gview?a=v&q=cache%3AUvBqWMSAHI0J%3Awww.emich.edu%2Fcerns%2Fdownloads%2Fpapers%2FPoliceStaff%2FCommunity%2520Policing%2FAssessing%2520the%2520Success%2520of%2520Community%2520Policing.pdf+colleges+and+universities%3A+community+watch+volunteers&hl=en&gl=us&pli=1 

Gummere, Sara Lippincott (2003) Making a Better Place: Planning, Implementing & Managing a Student Volunteer Program. University of Oregon June 2003. Online available at:  http://aad.uoregon.edu/icas/project_thesis_pdf/gummere_s.pdf
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Police Recruitment and Hiring Has

Words: 1415 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 38794168

(Frederickson, 2000, p. 3) Police forces became the fodder for systematic research on the need for and development of improved minority representation in public service as well as a frequently attached public entity with regard to minority status in the community. (Frederickson, 2000, p. 3) As early as the 1960s and 70s police forces all over the nation began to be scrutinized for limiting their hiring pool to white males and began to make changes to support the reduction of this reality. (Broadnax, 2000, p. xx)

The development of police forces within the guidelines of public scrutiny as one of the most significant and public hiring authorities in the public sector has created a hiring protocol that though variant to some degree is similar in most agencies and is reflective of public demand for diversity in representation. Many would likely call the last frontier of this more egalitarian hiring process…… [Read More]

References

Broadnax, W.D. (Ed.). (2000). Diversity and Affirmative Action in Public Service. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Frederickson, H.G. (2000). Part One Representative Bureaucracy and Equal Employment Opportunity. In Diversity and Affirmative Action in Public Service, Broadnax, W.D. (Ed.) (pp. 1-4). Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Hahn, H., & Jeffries, J.L. (2003). Urban America and Its Police: From the Postcolonial Era through the Turbulent 1960s. Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado.

Kogut, C.A., & Short, L.E. (2007). Affirmative Action in Federal Employment: Good Intentions Run Amuck?. Public Personnel Management, 36(3), 197.
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Police Describe the Impact of Sir Robert

Words: 650 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 28937475

Police

Describe the impact of Sir obert Peel on American policing

Sir obert Peel was not an American police officer, or an American politician. He served twice as the Prime Minister of Britain as a Tory, passing a series of significant laws. Part of Peel's concern was in the field of criminal justice and law enforcement. He helped pass major prison reform legislation and also established the first significant metropolitan police force in the United Kingdom. In transforming British police organizations and law enforcement, Peel helped to lay the foundation for the modern American police force and its underlying philosophy.

Peel developed a law enforcement philosophy that was based on involving community residents in the process of crime prevention. The modern concept of community policing is in part based on Sir Peel's original "nine principles," which were outlined in the 19th century. The first of Peel's nine principles is that…… [Read More]

References

Larrabee, A.K. (2007). Law enforcement: Sir Robert Peel's concept of community policing in today's society. Yahoo! Nov 8, 2007. Retrieved online:  http://voices.yahoo.com/law-enforcement-sir-robert-peels-concept-community-638595.html 

New Westminster Police Service (n.d.). Sir Robert Peel's Nine Principles. Retrieved onine:  http://www.newwestpolice.org/peel.html 

Sabath, D.O. (n.d.). The evolution of American policing. Retrieved online:  http://www.aphf.org/hist.html
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Policing Roles What Is the Role of

Words: 372 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14372003

Policing oles

What is the role of police in society? What would happen if the role of the police were lessened as it applies to the theory and practice of community policing?

Generally, the most important roles that police play in civilized society are that of criminal deterrence (Schmalleger, 2009). More specifically, the public awareness of the presence and authority of law enforcement deters most members of the population from criminal conduct that they might otherwise consider if there were no negative consequences. In community policing, police serve a much wider role than criminal deterrence, prevention, and response (Schmalleger, 2009). Modern police also play important roles in ensuring public order and public safety, as well as in addressing contemporary counterterrorism (Schmalleger, 2009). They maximize opportunities to work with proactive members of the community to establish and maintain positive and mutually beneficial relationships (Ellison, 2006). If the role of police were…… [Read More]

References

Ellison, J. "Community Policing: Implementation Issues." Federal Bureau of Investigation Law Enforcement Bulletin. Vol. 75, No. 4 (Apr/06).

Schmalleger, F. (2009). Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st

Century. Hoboken, NJ: Prentice Hall.
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Police Terrorism Ethics and Corruption the Traditional

Words: 1441 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63849911

Police, Terrorism, Ethics, And Corruption

The traditional mission of police forces in the United States is fighting criminality and upholding the law in the defined geographical area or boundary they belong to. This translates to the local police forces of towns, municipalities and cities engaging in policing activities in these respective areas. Outside of these boundaries, the state police forces have responsibilities and on the national level, the Federal ureau of Investigation (FI) has jurisdiction. Prior to the onset of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the American homeland, the mission and boundaries of the aforementioned police forces are clear and distinct. Immediately thereafter, there has been a tremendous paradigm shift in the mission of police forces in the United States because the growing threats of terrorism and terrorist activities have entered into the very heart of the nation. Even several years after the 9/11 attacks, terrorists have taken…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Caldero, M.A. & Crank, J.P. (2011). Police ethics: The corruption of noble cause. Burlington, MA: Anderson Publishing.

Terwilliger, G.J., Cooperstein, S.G., Blumenthal, D., & Parker, R. (2005, February 15). The war on terrorism: Law enforcement or national security? Retrieved April 27, 2011 from  http://www.fed-soc.org/publications/detail/the-war-on-terrorism-law-enforcement-or-national-security
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Police Recruiting

Words: 1018 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82018761

Police ecruiting

Just like every other institution in the country, American policing system went through a long period of evolution to finally achieve the shape that it has today. And similar to other laws and institutions in America, even police recruitment methods were heavily borrowed from Britain. In the 19th century or at least for most part of it, American police was shaped after the British policing laws (O'Keefe, 2004). However the one important difference lied in the separation of national and local police bodies. Since in most western countries, police was under the direct control of the national government, it was easier to manage them from one central location and their development was also almost simultaneous. However that was not the case in the United States where every county and state had its own local police department, which is why development of sporadic and departments were created at different…… [Read More]

References

1) Miller, Wilbur R. (1999) Cops and Bobbies: Police Authority in New York and London, 1830-1870. Columbus: Ohio State University Press.

2) Wadman, Robert C. And William Thomas Allison (2004) To Protect And Serve: A History Of Police In America. Upper Saddle River. New Jersey

3) James O'Keefe. (2004) Protecting the Republic: The education and training of American police officers. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.
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Police Abuse Problems With Guilty Pleas

Words: 661 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11580751

Police Abuse/Problems with Guilty Pleas

Police Abuse

From time to time, the media highlights stories about police abuse that can best be described as disturbing. It is unfortunate that some police officers do turn against the same people they have sworn to keep safe. Indeed, most victims of police brutality are left feeling frightened, betrayed and helpless. Further, police abuse triggers a cycle of mistrust in which case the community gradually loses confidence in those they rely on for safety and protection. Though a majority of police officers in the community I come from are dedicated and act within the confines of the law; there are a few bad elements (based on previous incidences of police brutality) who soil the otherwise warm relations the community shares with the police.

It is important to note that only a fraction of the total incidences of police abuse are reported by the media.…… [Read More]

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Community Profile Research Community Diversity

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 9244680

'In New York City, the controls are better. Since Sept. 11, as police are looking for terrorists and those who mail anthrax, the controls have increased. So crime continues to go down. Everyone is much more alert.'" (NewsMax Wires)

Queens, NY has also become really diverse with people from different ethnic and racial backgrounds coming in and living there. There are large numbers of Hispanics, Asians and African-American in Queens. However there is a difference in the drop of crime rate in Queens and Brooklyn. "Year to date, overall crime is down 7.1% in Queens, 5.6% in Brooklyn" (Anonymous). However the overall general change is that in both communities, crime rates have plummeted and there is increased safety for the civilians. Normally in areas where there is a wide diversity of people living, there is an increased rate in crime and although there has been unemployment in the entire city…… [Read More]

References

1) U.S. Bureau of the Census, Population Estimates Program, Population Division, "Counties Ranked by Black Population in 1998" (Table CO-98-16), September 15, 1999.

2) Anonymous - The Tipping Point. [Online website] Available at  http://www.gladwell.com/1996/1996_06_03_a_tipping.htm [Accessed on: 15/09/2005]

3) Randy Bergmann - New York City: Few places can match Brooklyn's imprint on American culture. [Online website] Available at  http://www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/170-11122002-120.html [Accessed on: 15/09/2005]

4) NewsMax Wires - NYC Crime Rate Continues To Drop. [Online website] Available at  http://www.newsmax.com/archives/articles/2002/3/20/60653.shtml [Accessed on: 15/09/2005]
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Police on Jupiter Madame Council

Words: 318 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 73779958

In addition we have made, and continue to make, efforts to employ people of all backgrounds for Jupiter's police force so that people of all backgrounds see people from their cultures in law enforcement.

People, no matter where they are from, tend to fear the unknown (Carter, 1995), so we feel that a policy of community policing -- getting the officers into the various neighborhoods of Jupiter in positive ways -- is important. One of the things we have done to accomplish that is to put our officers in the vicinity of school crosswalks when children are traveling to and from school. This allows them to interact positively with children from an early age as well as allow the parents to see police officers in their most important role -- protecting all of Jupiter's inhabitants. I hope these comments will put any concerns to rest.

ibliography

Carter, Ronnie A. 1995.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Carter, Ronnie A. 1995. "Improving minority relations." The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, December.
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Police in America in the

Words: 871 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 6493473

Because of the type of individuals police officers in mid-to large cities often deal with, they can engender a mind-set of violence and abuse of power. Certainly, the military approach is efficient; the command style authoritarian so it can get quicker results. However, in going with more modern leadership approaches, the servant leadership, or service style might be more appropriate in many areas. This would stress community service; keeping areas safe, but referring as many problems as possible to social agencies, trying for education and partnership, and working to improve society through a more egalitarian approach in which police are integral to the community's entire philosophy.

Part 4 -- Design for an effective police department would entirely depend on the size and composition of the area affected. For instance, large urban area with a concentrated inner-city would require a different organization than a smaller community of 30,000 people. Hypothetically, if…… [Read More]

Sources:

Patrol Staffing and Development Study. (n.d.) International Association of Chiefs of Police. Retrieved from:  http://www.theiacp.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=AKL78d4MBw8%3  D&tabid=252

Hesser, L. (2010). Police Chief's Desk Reference. International Association of Chiefs of Police. Retrieved from:  http://www.olemiss.edu/ciss/Academics/Research/Police_Chiefs_  Desk_Reference/pdf/4%20org%20strategy%20guide.pdf

Church, J. (April 2007). Non-Sworn Positions in Law Enforcement. Officer.com. Retrieved from:  http://www.officer.com/article/10249940/non-sworn-positions-in-law-enforcement 

Earle, J. (June 2012). Police Say No Magic When Calculating Staffing Levels. Reporter Newspapers. Retrieved from: http://www.*****/2012/06/28/police-say-theres-no-magic-when-calculating-staffing-levels/
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Police Mentally Ill Policing and Mentally Ill

Words: 952 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57895589

Police Mentally Ill

Policing and Mentally Ill Individuals

There is a significantly higher proportion of mentally ill individuals in the criminal justice system than compared to the same proportion of the United States in the society in general. It is estimated that a mentally ill individual is about eight times more likely to enter into the criminal justice system than they are a mental hospital. These individuals, as the video and the interview illustrates, have special challenges that make them difficult to deal with. Often they hear voices and are paranoid schizophrenics that require a host of special medications to allow them the possibility of being stable. However, many of these individuals face specific challenges that make it difficult for them to access and maintain an effective treatment regimen. This paper will provide a brief overview of how this situation arose and what implications it has for modern police forces.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

CIT International. (N.d.). Mephis Model. Retrieved from CIT International:  http://www.citinternational.org/training-overview/163-memphis-model.html 

Conan, N. (2012, April 2). A Patient's Perspective: Police and the Mentally Ill. Retrieved from NPR:  http://www.npr.org/2012/04/02/149857042/a-patients-perspective-police-and-the-mentally-ill 

PBS. (2009, April 28). The Released. Retrieved from Frontline:  http://video.pbs.org/video/1114528522/ 

Torrey, E.E., Geller, J., Stanley, J., & Jaffe, D. (N.d.). The Shortage of Public Hospital Beds for Mentally Ill Persons. The Treatment Advocacy Center, 1-17.
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Police Management Management Irrespective of the Particular

Words: 2681 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30878429

Police Management

Management, irrespective of the particular industry, has a profound effect on organizational effectiveness. For one, management has the ability to drive results through proper motivation and incentives. A manager must also effective lead through his or her ability to inspire action on the part of subordinates. These broad requirements of management demands various skill sets. Many of these skill sets including leadership, time managements, the ability to inspire, financial acumen, and so forth are acquired over time. Through a broad array of experiences, management is better equipped to handle varying and often conflicting circumstances. The law enforcement arena is no different in this regard. Management, particular those in law enforcement must be cognizant of a litany of behaviors and activities. Policing management, has undergone extensive change due primarily to the changing societal demographics prevailing in the world today. Cultures are now becoming more profound in America. The Hispanic…… [Read More]

References:

1) Seabrooks, T.J. "Why Are so Many Felons Repeat Offenders?" Geek Politics. Web. 02 Apr. 2012. .

2) Blake, R.; Mouton, J. (1964). The Managerial Grid: The Key to Leadership Excellence. Houston: Gulf Publishing Co...

3) Carlyle, Thomas (1841). On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and the Heroic History. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 1-4069-4419-X.

4) Fiedler, Fred E. (1967). A theory of leadership effectiveness. McGraw-Hill: Harper and Row Publishers Inc.
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Policing Comparison of Policing Tactics

Words: 1691 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71490106

At this time there is no uniform consensus about what agencies have authority in the Middle East. The Dubai police are working with agencies including the Department of Homeland Security to establish a more democratic policing system. Despite their best efforts however, there still exist many groups within the Middle East that adopt radical approaches to policing. Not every agency agrees on uniform democracy, and some still prefer an authoritarian approach to policing (Exum, 2006, p. 1). This can and often does lead to greater violence within the region, with in many cases people living within the regions of the Middle East still lacking freedom of expression and living in fear of violent punishment for any crimes committed.

As Exum (2006) noted in his overview of policing in the Middle East, a bus driver was at one point withdrawn from his vehicle and beaten as well as sodomized as a…… [Read More]

References

Exum, Andrew. (2006). "Hizballah at War: A Military Assessment." The Washington

Institute for Near/East Policy, Accessed 3, May 2007:  http://www.washingtoninstitute.org/templateC05.php?CID=2574 

Institute of Race Relations. (2007). "The politics of fear: Civil society and the security state." Institute of Race Relations, Accessed 3, May 2007:

http://www.irr.org.uk/2004/june/ak000011.html
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Policing Challenges to Policing in the 21st

Words: 888 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92231395

Policing Challenges

Challenges to policing in the 21st century

Policing has taken a different dimension from the traditional policing habits of maintaining law and order and combating the usual crimes to handling new forms of crime, which can be termed as white collar crimes. The society is faced with criminal activities which are as a result of the advanced level of technology use across the globe. The 21st century criminals are not the hardcore type law breakers but very intelligent individuals who are well informed and highly educated, they use very sophisticated systems to execute several crimes in different parts of the world as more people are embracing the use of technology in their day-to-day life (Interpol, 2012). This is an era where the criminals are technologically savvy and use this as a tool to commit crimes without the use of force or inflicting any bodily harm to the victims…… [Read More]

References

Patricia Linn, (1999). what are the five types of Crimes. Retrieved April 3, 2012 from http://www.ehow.com/list_7245606_five-types-crime_.html.

Interpol, (2012). Cyber Crimes. Retrieved April 3, 2012 fromhttp://www.interpol.int/Crime-areas/Cybercrime/Cybercrime.
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Policing in American Society Describe and Analyze

Words: 605 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55892892

Policing in American Society

Describe and analyze the relationship between the U.S. government and the policing organizations throughout the U.S. And the impact of this relationship on American society as a whole.

Police departments in the United States exist on the federal, state, and local levels of government. "There are 65 federal agencies and 27 offices of inspector general that employ full time personnel authorized to make arrests and carry firearms" (Types of police/law enforcement agencies, 2011, Discover Policing). Examples of such agencies include U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Federal Bureau of Prisons, the FBI, and U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, all of which have jurisdiction to enforce federal laws within these specifically-designated areas. On the state and local level, there are more than 17,000 state and local law enforcement agencies in the United States and these divisions "range in size from one officer to more than 30,000" (Types of…… [Read More]

References

Mueller, Robert S. (2002). Partnerships and communication with state, local and national law enforcement. FBI. Retrieved:

 http://www.fbi.gov/news/speeches/partnerships-and-communication-state-local-and-national-law-enforcement 

Types of police/law enforcement agencies. (2011). Discover Policing. Retrieved:

 http://discoverpolicing.org/whats_like/?fa=types_jobs
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Police Psychology Identify the Different Domains Police

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12354204

Police Psychology

Identify the different domains police psychologists work in, and discuss some of the roles psychologists might assume when working in different domains.

A police psychologist will work primarily in the assessment domain. In many instances, police officers must be properly screened and evaluated prior to duty. In other instances, officers will be evaluating during duty to proper access their ability to fully protect society. As such, psychologists have the primary function or determining the adequacy of a police officers skill set relative to predetermined metrics of success. Through periodic evaluation, the psychologist has the distinct role of assessing the skills and abilities of current and prospective police officers.

Psychologists also operate within the intervention domain. This domain is particularly important due to the nature of police officer work. Law enforcement officers are unique to many professions, as their job requires exposure to very contentious issues. Particularly troubling, is…… [Read More]

Reference:

1) Kitaeff. JackHandbook of Police Psychology, 2011. Bookshelf. Web. 07 November 2013

2) Walker, Samuel (2005). The New World of Police Accountability. Sage. p. 5. ISBN 0-534-58158-7.
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Police History the American System of Criminal

Words: 741 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1217712

Police History

The American system of criminal justice and investigations stem from English common law and practice, which advised colonial governments and gave rise to subsequent systems in the United States. In fact, the standing police force that most Americans take for granted did not always exist. Early Americans, like the English before them, were averse to the concept of a government-sponsored standing police force that could at any time be authorized to strip citizens of their rights and liberties. The current method of law enforcement, from apprehension to pre-trial investigations, also owes its roots to the English.

The first professional, paid American police forces started in the early seventeenth centuries: first in Boston in 1631 and about fifteen years later in New Amsterdam. Known initially as watchmen and later as constables, the officers did not enjoy the same level of responsibility or the same role in society as modern…… [Read More]

References

Engel, R.S. (2011)Police: History - Early Policing In England, The Beginning Of "modern" Policing In England, Early Policing In Colonial America." Retrieved online:  http://law.jrank.org/pages/1647/Police-History.html 

"Early Police in the United States." Encyclopedia Brittanica. Retrieved online:  http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/467289/police/36619/Early-police-in-the-United-States 

"History of Law Enforcement," (n.d.). Infosheet retrieved online:  http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:q1n8bE8PqeYJ:teachers2.wcs.edu/high/rhs/maryc1/Criminal%2520Justice%2520I/History%2520of%2520Law%2520Enforcement%2520Info%2520Sheet.doc+law+enforcement+history+united+states&hl=en&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESjKuxGm5bbh8GjrtJ5yn4AHn2bIiIWlGBAWSGHopoH9f51uVsygxxkwB5I83si1CkPS_E4Ry83mW7oZ6hQqbjOlD6NYV1qH3lXjh3-T_vu58Mk4_-H6k2V9qchHrfRrO_hH5Nn2&sig=AHIEtbQPG0dtcbkFj_Q-1gi8wj6BmauLrg 

Kelly, M. (n.d.). A brief history of the Pinkertons. About.com. Retrieved online:  http://americanhistory.about.com/od/19thcentur1/a/allan_pinkerton.htm
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Police Psychology

Words: 2519 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52776718

Police Psychology

Scenario:

You are a police psychologist for a major metropolitan area. You are also a member of its hostage negotiation team. You have been called to a crisis incident at 3:15 P.M. On a Friday. It is in a residential area about three blocks from a middle school and a public library. The information you have at this time is that the subject is a 42-year-old male who is holed up in his house with his wife, son, and a family friend. He has murdered his next-door neighbor and is threatening to kill those in the house if his demands are not met. One of his demands is for immunity from the murder charge if he surrenders without harming any of the people in the house. His other demands are a case of beer and some fast food. He wants his demands met or "something will happen."u

Introduction…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alaxander, D., & Klein, S. (2010). Hostage-taking: motives, resolution, coping and effects. Advances in Psychiatric Treatment, 176-183.

Cooper, H. (1981). Hostage-takers. Retrieved from National Criminal Justice Reference Service:  https://www.ncjrs.gov/App/publications/abstract.aspx?ID=75936 

Goldaber, I. (1979). Typology of Hostage-Takers. Police Chief, 21-23. Retrieved from Hughes, J. (2009). A Pilot Study of Naturally Occuring High-Probability Request Sequences in Hostage Negotiations. Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis, 491-496.

McMains, M., & Mullins, W. (2010). Crisis Negotiation (4th ed.). New Providence: Lexis/Nexis/Anderson.
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Community Investment Lack of Investment

Words: 1368 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19740100

Money can help bring about the truly necessary elements, however, and without proper funding the ability to give a good public education to eth hundreds or thousands of students most serve becomes a true practical impossibility. There are numerous elements of providing an education that require an investment of financial resources, and like most things in this world you get what you pay for when it comes to education. A higher price tag doesn't guarantee a successful and high-quality education, but a low price tag all but guarantees a poor one.

One of the ways in which underfunding makes it almost impossible for a good education to be delivered is in the selection of educators. If the overall employment arena can be viewed as a market system, and it is very common and very reasonable to view it in just this manner, then job seekers will tend to seek out…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Denney, John. Colorado Education Underfunded by 'Unconscionable' Billions, Judge Rules. Huffington Post. (2011). Accessed 4 May 2012.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/12/12/colorado-education-underf_n_1143753.html 

DiCarlo, Matthew; Johnson, Nate, and Cochran, Pat. Survey and Analysis of Teacher Salary Trends 2007. Washington, DC: American Federation of Teachers, 2007.
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Community Corrections Are an Integral Component of

Words: 822 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27659867

Community corrections are an integral component of any law enforcement correctional program. Community corrections staff, develop, and administer contracts for community-based correctional programs and serve as the Bureau of Prisons (BOP)'s local liaison with the federal courts, the U.S. Marshals Service, state and local corrections, and a variety of community groups. Through the community corrections program, the BOP has developed agreements with state and local governments to house juveniles and prisoners of non-violent crimes (Federal Bureau of Prisons, 2011).

The BOP contracts with residential reentry centers to provide assistance to inmates who have been found to be non-violent offenders. The community centers also include those inmates nearing release at the end of their determined term of incarceration. esidential reentry centers are always under supervision; in addition, they provide employment counseling, job placement, financial management assistance, and other programs and services. C's help inmates gradually re-enter the community and facilitate supervising…… [Read More]

References

Akhila, K. (2010) Foreign Prison Conditions Improvement Act of 2010. http://akhilak.com/blog/2010/10/17/foreign-prison-conditions-improvement-act-of-2010 / Last accessed January 11, 2013.

Federal Bureau of Prisons (2011) Community Corrections.  http://www.bop.gov/locations/cc/index.jsp  Last accessed January 11, 2013.

Public Safety Performance Project (2007) What Works in Community Corrections. www.pewpublicsafety.org Last accessed January 11, 2013.
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Community-Based Corrections Description A Court-Ordered Sanction That

Words: 687 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53238448

Community-Based Corrections

Description: A court-ordered sanction that puts the offender back into the community but under the supervision of a probation officer. Probation can be assigned to follow jail time (provided good behavior while incarcerated), and it may include having the offender pay a fine, do restitution, and perform community service activities as well (www.pwcgov.org)

Advantages: a) Instead of serving time in prison or a county jail the offender gets an opportunity to return to the community albeit under stringent requirements; b) it is basically like a second chance for the offender, and if he or she takes advantage of the opportunity and follows the rules, it can be a blessing for the offender and a savings of money for the correctional system

Disadvantages: a) This is not technically a "disadvantage" but if the terms of the probation are not met (for example, if the person on probation fails to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Findlaw. (2010). Restitution. Retrieved February 18, 2013, from  http://criminal.findlaw.com .

Prince William County, Virginia. (2010). What is Probation? Retrieved February 18, 2013, from  http://www.pwcgov.org .

U.S. Department of Education. (2011). Community-Based Correctional Education. Retrieved February 18, 2013, from  http://www.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ovae/pi/cclo/index.html .

U.S. Department of Justice. (2011). Electronic Monitoring Reduces Recidivism. Retrieved February 18, 2013, from  http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov .
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Community Policing Future Changes in

Words: 1508 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 5421121

Frequent town meetings where residents can air concerns to representatives of the force likewise fosters a sense of community empowerment.

Finally, it goes without saying that officers must, to establish trust, always seem ethical and not act as if they are above the law. Not abusing police privileges, not accepting things 'on the house' such as free food, upholding the law when engaging in searches, stops, and seizures, and including ethics training as a part of the education of new officers are all positive steps in this direction. Having a strong and impartial internal affairs department within the force and minimizing events that can generate bad publicity and erode community trust and damage relations with community leaders is likewise essential.

orks Cited

School Safety." (2008). COPS: U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved 22 Jun 2008 at http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?Item=106

Newman, Grahame. (2008). "Check and Card Fraud." COPS: U.S. Department of Justice.

Retrieved 22…… [Read More]

Works Cited

School Safety." (2008). COPS: U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved 22 Jun 2008 at  http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/default.asp?Item=106 

Newman, Grahame. (2008). "Check and Card Fraud." COPS: U.S. Department of Justice.

Retrieved 22 Jun 2008 at  http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/files/RIC/Publications/e07042442.pdf 

Police integrity." (2008). COPS: U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved 22 Jun
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Policing for the Past Several

Words: 726 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 428030

This model provided for a hierarchical chain of command based on rank but there are many experts who argue that such system is out-dated. New systems where command is much less centralized and individual police are allowed autonomy in their specific neighborhoods and areas. This is an attempt to integrate the police more heavily into their neighborhood and to develop the idea that police work is a community challenge and not the work of the police alone. The long-range goal of this type of policing is to have the public view policing as a service and the public as customers. Eventually this will result in the effectiveness being measured by public satisfaction and not by harsh statistics such as the number of crimes occurring and the number of arrests being made.

Whatever changes are eventually implemented in regard to policing in America such changes will not be easy. Police agencies,…… [Read More]

References

Butterfield, R. (2005). The New Public Management and Managerial Roles: the case of the Police Sergeant. British Journal of Management, 329-341.

Federal Bureau of Investigation. (2011). Investigations & Operations Support. Retrieved from the FBI.

Gau, J.M. (2010). Procedural Justice and Order Maintenance Policing: A Study of Inner-City Young Men's Perceptions of Police Legitimacy. Justice Quarterly, 255-279.

Grabosky, P.N. (2007). Private Sponsorship of Public Policing. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal, 5-16.
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Policing - Implementing Changes the

Words: 846 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 16762141

Regardless of the fact that no serious criminal activity transpired in most cases, it detracted from the quality of life of some residents of buildings immediately adjacent to such congregations (Conlon, 2004).

In other situations, such as peaceful gatherings of small groups of students outside bars every weekend night, residents of buildings overlooking the bars were subjected to loud conversations, cigarette smoke, music from vehicles until well after typical closing times of 4:00AM every weekend night, at a minimum. Giuliani's zero-tolerance approach to "unlawful assembly" of the type previously and ordinarily ignored as a technical violation not worth enforcing prohibited these gatherings for the benefit of residents who wished not to be disturbed all night long three or four nights a week in many "trendy" neighborhoods. Furthermore, the broken windows analogy also applied to those situations, by virtue of the frequency with which altercations and brawls break out in conjunction…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Conlon, E. (2004) Blue Blood. Riverhead, NY: Bantam

Nolan, J., Conti, N, McDevitt, J. Situational Policing. Federal Bureau of Investigation Law Enforcement Bulletin. Vol. 74 No. 11 (Nov/05).

Schmalleger, F. (2001) Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century. New Jersey: Prentice Hall
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Community Outreach and Counterterrorism With Efforts Towards

Words: 2487 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 65378735

Community outreach and counterterrorism with efforts towards exploitable weaknesses.

Community Outreach and Terrorism

International and domestic terrorism have reached levels previously believed to be impossible. hether fueled by profits they get from trafficking drugs or whether they are fueled by religious ideologies, a series of communities express particular interest in wanting to get actively involved in performing activities characteristic to terrorist organizations. Many governments have the tendency to focus on fighting them directly and fail to understand the significance of addressing factors that influence these people to take up arms against the system. Focusing on underlying concepts encouraging individuals to become terrorists is likely to destabilize terrorist institutions and to make it increasingly difficult for them to recruit people.

Background

The intelligence community in the contemporary society plays an important role in detecting terrorist threats and in making it less likely for individuals to engage in terrorist acts. Even with…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Coolsaet, R. (2011). "Jihadi Terrorism and the Radicalisation Challenge: European and American Experiences." Ashgate Publishing.

Johnson, J.A. Ledlow, G.R., & Cwiek, M. (2005)."Community Preparedness and Response to Terrorism: Communication and the media." Greenwood Publishing Group.

Nikbay, O. & Hancerli, S. (2007). "Understanding and Responding to the Terrorism Phenomenon: A Multi-Dimensional Perspective." IOS Press.

Spalek, B. (2012). "Counter-Terrorism: Community-Based Approaches to Preventing Terror Crime." Palgrave Macmillan.
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Police Components

Words: 682 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 96007617

Police Components

Organized management is an essential component in any workforce environment and leads to an organizations success. Police managers are an important part of the department, they provide guidance, planning and help control personnel resources. In order for an individual to provide proper management honesty and integrity are an important aspect in running a department.

A police manager is there to provide guidance to other officers who look for that sense of knowledge and this must be done in an ethical way. Ethical mentoring is an important part of this field, essentially putting others before oneself in time of need. A police manager can help guide his or her employees to a goal they desire and help them accomplish an important step in their career. On the other hand if a police manager is not willing to provide the proper guidance, this can be detrimental to the department. Essentially…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Police Management Services - support for Police Departments. (n.d.). Police Policies

and Procedure Development, Police Policy Manuals - Police Management Services. Retrieved December 11, 2011, from  http://www.policemanagement.com  / aboutus.html

The Role of Integrity, Honesty and Values in the Organization. (n.d.). Cornelius & Associates.

Retrieved December 11, 2011, from http://www.corneliusassoc.com/CA/new/impact/
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Police Law Enforcement Agencies or the Police

Words: 780 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19893591

Police

Law enforcement agencies, or the police force, operate on several jurisdictional platforms within the United States. In general, their primary mandate is to help maintain societal order and the rule of law by assisting subjects with legal compliance, protecting property, helping to keep citizens and property safe and secure, and for assistance in extraordinary events. The police force is part of the social order of society and mediates public events, pre-empts anti-social behaviors, helps mitigate potential dangers at large events, works with other agencies in general search and rescue, crowd control, regulations, education and awareness campaigns, and to support the rule of law (Cole, 2004). Under the rubric of law enforcement, there are three major categories of police: Federal, Local and State.

Local law enforcement provides routine and micro-policing to the communities within their jurisdiction. This may include traffic enforcement, criminal investigations, local laboratory or forensic investigation, certain types…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

The Difference Between Federal and State Law. (2010). Retrieved from The Leadership Conference - Civilrights.org:  http://www.civilrights.org/judiciary/courts/difference-federal-local-courts.html 

Cole, G. a. (2004). The American System of Criminal Justice. New York: Wadsworth.

Dempsey and Forst. (2009). An Introduction to Policing. Florence, KY: Delmar Cenage Learning.

Hedgpeth, D. (2008, September 17). Congress Says DHX Oversaw $15 Billion in Failed Contracts. Retrieved from The Washington Post.com:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/16/AR2008091603200.html
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Police vs Public

Words: 3513 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28298945

Police Interviews

The author of this report has been asked to conduct two interviews of police officers with six basic questions being the crux of both interviews. To protect the anonymity of the officers as well as a way to get the most honest and complete answers, the identity of the officers as well as the departments they have or do work for will not be identified in any way, shape or form. The answers garnered were insightful, honest and illuminating. The perspective they offer is perhaps not nearly as known as it should be given the reporting going on as it relates to the incidents in Ferguson and other places where cops have been shot or allegedly unarmed and/or innocent people on the street have endured the same. While there are two sides to each story, both the police and the people have the right to have their voice…… [Read More]

References

Cooper, H. (2009, July 22). Obama Criticizes Arrest Of a Harvard Professor. The New

York Times. Retrieved September 30, 2014, from  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/23/us/politics/23gates.html?_r=0 

Reyes, D. (1994, November 2). Only One Drunk Driver in 500 Is Caught: Enforcement:

Even with tough Highway Patrol policy, probability of arrest in California is small.
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Police Applicants What Types Questions Police Applicants

Words: 638 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29634806

Police Applicants: What types questions police applicants interview phase determine possessed racist bigoted ideologies? 2. eligious Beliefs: 1. Should police officers pro-life forced provide security pro-choice demonstrators clashes religious beliefs? 2.

Police applicants: What types of questions would you ask police applicants during the interview phase to determine if they possessed racist or bigoted ideologies?

When interviewing a police applicant, it is possible to ask direct questions regarding his or her legal beliefs, such as "do you believe that all persons are entitled to equal treatment under the law" and "do you believe that the U.S. Constitution applies to all citizens, regardless of their race, creed, or color?" More personal questions are also valid such as: "do you believe that people of similar backgrounds should 'stick together' or not" and "do you believe that certain types of people are more likely to commit crimes and why?"

While such direct questions…… [Read More]

References

Williams, J. (2013). Public safety for all? Huffington Post. Retrieved:

 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/news/racial-profiling
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Community Power Distribution

Words: 1538 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55565895

Community Power and Social Distribution: A Debate Over Social Stratification and Elitism from Hunter Onwards

Floyd Hunter was a sociologist whom identified himself as part of the early stages of a movement to enact greater systems of localized, community social justice. Such movements were to later grip the American nation during the 1960's. However, as early as the 1950's, Hunter sought to quantitatively and qualitatively measure who had 'political power' in the community of Regional City in the American South over the course of the early 1950's. Hunter stated in his text Community Power Structure that in Atlanta, ostensibly a regional power base of the time, he had 'found' an elite whom formed the core of the local political power nexus, an elite that was not institutional in nature, but personal. In other words, through Hunter's social excavation over the course of his doctorial dissertation, Hunter discovered a hidden elitist…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bachrach, Peter and Morton Baratz, (December 1962). "Two Faces of Power." American Political Science Review. Volume 56. December 1962. Pp.947-952.

Hunter, Floyd. Community Power Structure. (1953). Chapter 4: The Structure of Power in Regional City.

Polsby, Nelson. (1980). Community Power and Political Theory. Second Edition. Chapter 5: Power and Social Stratification: Theory or Ideology?

Stone, Clarence N. (1980). "Systemic Power in Community Decision Making: A Restatement of Stratification Theory." American Political Science Review 74: 976-90
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Policing in the Future One

Words: 679 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 93963499

One of the major things that management can do is increase traffic control. From the Department of Motor Vehicles, which screens people before issuing identification, to officers in routine traffic stops and roadblocks that look for suspected terrorist activity, management can change policies in a manner aimed at increasing detection. (Riebling, p.8). The more routine contact that the police have with members of society; the more likely they are to uncover possible terrorist activity.

Finally, the community at large faces new challenges in the wake of 9-11. Americans have a tremendous amount of civil rights, which generally exceed those that have received constitutional protection. Prior to 9-11, the majority of community members who avoided criminal activity would be able to avoid interactions with the police. However, now that law enforcement has had to broaden its emphasis and take a closer look at the community, the average citizen can anticipate greater…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Connors, Timothy and Georgia Pellegrini, Ed. Hard Won Lessons: Policing Terrorism in the United States. New York City: Manhattan Institute, 2006.

Riebling, Mark, Ed. Hard Won Lessons: The New Paradigm- Merging Law Enforcement and Counterterrorism Strategies. New York City: Manhattan Institute, 2006.
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Community Policing Is Not a

Words: 308 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67854755

Later, the two male officers should be taken aside and reminded of the gender-inclusive nature of the police force, the department policy on sexual harassment, and warned that such language, even in jest, is not acceptable while they are on the job, and in uniform.

Scenario 3: Officer Smith

Although Officer Smith may be a productive officer, his attitude and demeanor is a detriment to the productivity of others and to the cohesion of the police force. Although the other officers may like him, by belittling another officer, and not showing respect for department policy, Smith is making policing more difficult in the long run. Mediation through a third party, ideally provided by the department for such purposes, is needed between Smith and those persons he has a personality conflict, before the conflict…… [Read More]

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Police Culture and Individual Characteristics

Words: 457 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Discussion Chapter Paper #: 16159089



However, in certain instances, the element of fear in a policeman cannot justify the use of lethal force. This restraint, according to the Federal Bureau of investigation, is highly advocated for since deadly force is unlawful and can be mostly be used against a law enforcement officer. Areas of shoot out in schools and traffic and in states or cities, where the populous if high highly exempt the use of deadly force. In these situations, there is usually a dynamic interaction of the police, suspects or confirmed criminals and the public. This is the deadly mix concept that provides rational insights on the restraint of lethal force by the police. By so doing, the police adhere to the law enforcement training offered to them, which invokes their perception towards the use-of-force situations in handling offenders. Whether, during the on-duty or off-duty performances, the restrain upon the use of lethal force…… [Read More]

Reference

Pinizzotto, a.J., Davis, E.F., Bohrer, S. B and Infanti, B.J. (2012). Restraint in the Use of Deadly Force. [Online] Retrieved from URL
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Police and Criminals Law Enforcement

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82721276

Furthermore, in this game of "cat and mouse," the law enforcement officers being the cat, they have to think and act in the way that criminals do in order to catch them- officers need to anticipate criminal actions. By doing this, officers need to be "at one" with criminals thus making criminals and officers to employ very similar ways of thinking. Thinking and operating in the same manner and anticipating one another's moves allows criminals and law enforcement officers to utilize the same skill set and mentality in order to stay one step ahead of the other.

Despite these similarities, it is important to delineate the differences between police and criminals, which includes, the police being moral and ethical, using their propensity for violence to ensure the safety of the community they are protecting and ultimately using their status in society for good. Being moral and ethical are two traits…… [Read More]