Psychological Disorders Essays (Examples)

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Psychological Disorder ADHD ADHD Is

Words: 1806 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61198795

My final recommendation was that the parents and Adam's teachers should work as a team to help Adam manage his condition. In other words, the parents should communicate with the teachers to determine if the interventions have been effective. I would then talk to the parents themselves every two months to make further recommendations as necessary.

CONCLUSION

While drug interventions for ADHD, especially in children, have been increasingly controversial because of their possible side-effects, their main advantage is the speed and efficacy with which they work. Those who have benefited reported that the effects were almost immediately visible, on the same day the drug was used.

On the other hand, drug therapies for any mental disorder have been imperfect and frequently plagued by side-effects and non-compliance. Continuous research is therefore necessary to improve not only drug therapies and identify potential harmful effects in the long-term, but also to find possible…… [Read More]

References

ADHD Information Library (2008). ADHD Treatment Options: many Good Choices. Newideas.Net. Retrieved from: http://newideas.net/adhd/treatment

Martin, B. (2011). Treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD). PsychCentral. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2007/treatment-for-attention-deficit-disorder-adhd/

Personal Health Lifestyles, Inc. (2001). Attention Deficit Disorder: Facts, Prevention and Treatment Strategies. Retrieved from:  http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/adisease/add-adhd/add-adhd.html#A1
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Psychological Disorder Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Words: 1022 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78093761

This is also a symptom of ptsd, as people constantly try to find an answer for the horrors having happened. (Douillard)

In order to come up with effective treatment to combat the disorder, one first needs to understand it properly and to see what triggers it, its symptoms, and how individuals can be assisted in their attempt to fight the traumas in their past. It seems that the main part of the brain affected by ptsd is the ones influencing the states of nervousness and hopelessness. Its symptoms are basically the main thing in ptsd that prevent psychotherapists is efficiently doing their jobs.

Individuals feel either unable to understand what the therapist is trying to say, or they are simply reluctant to accept the therapy that is being provided to them. In some cases, the feelings experienced by people are very intense, and not even themselves can describe what they…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Beall, Lisa S. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A Bibliographic Essay, CHOICE, 1997, 34(6), 917-930.

2. Douillard. Andy Do the Wounds Ever Heal-PTSD and Holocaust Survivors. Retrieved June 6, 2010, from the UCSD Department of History Web site:  http://www.history.ucsb.edu/faculty/marcuse/classes/33d/projects/survivors/SurvivorPTSD_Andy05z.htm 

3. Falsetti, Sherry a. And Resnick, Heidi S. "Treatment of Ptsd Using Cognitive and Cognitive Behavioral Therapies," Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy 14.3 (2000).

4. Meyers. David G. Psychology, Eighth Edition in Modules. (Worth Publishers, 2006)
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Psychological Disorder

Words: 576 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92100674

Generalized Anxiety Disorder in Film

Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as defined by the American Psychiatric Association (AMA), involves excessive worry and anxiety for a six-month period or longer (AMA 429). GAD is not typically associated with the more intense expressions of anxiety, such as panic attacks or panic disorder (Shelton S2), yet the degree of worry and anxiety experienced is easily recognized as disproportionate for the reality of the situation (AMA 473-475). A diagnosis depends in part on eliminating contributions from an underlying medical condition or the effects of a substance such as drugs or excessive caffeine, and the focus of the anxiety is not limited to a single concern, such as experiencing a panic attack or becoming deathly ill. The anxiety experienced therefore involves wide swaths of the patient's life.

Patients often report experiencing muscle tension, trembling, twitching, feeling shaky, muscle aches, soreness, sudden fatigue, irritability, and difficulty concentrating…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision. New York: American Psychiatric Association, 2000. Print.

Analyze this. Dir. Harold Ramis. Perf. Robert De Niro, Billy Crystal, and Lisa Kudrow. Warner Brothers, 1999. Film.

Shelton, Charles I. Diagnosis and Management of Anxiety Disorders. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association 104.3 (2004): S2-S5. Web.
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Realm of Psychological Disorder Through the Use

Words: 2202 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14333578

realm of psychological disorder through the use of a character assessment. The character in question is fictional and the data used to evaluate the psychological profile derives from a movie. Melvin Udall, the main character in the movie "As Good as It Gets" serves as the character used in this assessment. Ultimately, I find and explore specific links to Melvin's condition in the movie to that of one suffering from Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD).

In order to discuss the relationships previously mentioned, I needed to perform several steps in order to logically conclude that Melvin represents someone suffering from OCD symptoms. In order to accomplish this task, I first watched the film and examined many of the traits that Melvin demonstrated. Next, I used a set of ten questions which provided a baseline assessment formula. These questions are each answered separately within the body of this essay. This character assessment…… [Read More]

References

Atkins, L. (2009). A radical treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder patients. The Guardian, 14 Dec 2009. Retrieved from http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/dec/15/obsessive-complusive-disorder- gamma-knife

Brooks, J.L. (1998) As Good As It Gets. Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt, Greg Kinnear. Tristar Pictures.

Bouchard, C. Rheaume, J. Landouceru, R. (1998). Responsibility and perfectionism in OCD. Behavior Research Therapy 37 (1999). 239-248. Retrieved from http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/Homepage/Class/Psy394Q/Research%20Design%20Clas s/Assigned%20Readings/Experimental%20Psychopathology/Bouchard99.pdf

Eddy, M.F., & Walbroehl, G.S. (1998, April 1). Recognition and treatment of obsessive- compulsive disorder. American Family Physician, p. 1623-1632.  http://www.aafp.org/afp/1998/0401/p1623.html
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Symptom and Treatment of Psychological Disorder

Words: 965 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34146978

Treatment of Psychological Disorder

The bipolar disorder is a mental disorder and alternatively known as manic depression elevates the mood and cause depression to the affected individuals. The symptom of bipolar depression is the elevated mood, and it is the significant symptom of the affected person. During mania process, the affected individuals behaves irritably, display abnormally energetic and happy. The affected individuals often make poorly decision with little or no regard to the consequences. During the depression period, the affected individuals may have a negative outlook on life, and having poor eye contact with others. The risk of suicide is another symptom of bipolar disorder where between 30% and 40% of the victims attempt to inflict self -harm. Other mental issues include substance use disorder, and anxiety disorders. While it is difficult to establish the cause, however, the genetic and environmental factors have been responsible for the cause of bipolar…… [Read More]

Reference. Causes of Bipolar Disorder. Retrieved June 5, 2017 from http://www.webmd.com/bipolar-disorder/guide/bipolar-disorder-causes#1

Jenkins, M. M., Youngstrom, E. A., Youngstrom, J. K., Feeny, N. C., & Findling, R. L. (2012). Generalizability of Evidence-Based Assessment Recommendations for Pediatric Bipolar Disorder. Psychological Assessment, 24(2), 269 -- 281. http://doi.org/10.1037/a0025775

Kerner, B.(2014).Genetics of bipolar disorder. Appl Clin Genet. 7: 33 -- 42.
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DP 2 AB the Psychological Disorder That I

Words: 686 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26996907

DP#2 AB

The psychological disorder that I have selected to explain from a variety of causal perspectives is bulimia. Bulimia is a condition in which people engage in the act of binge eating, and eat a lot more than is necessary or even healthy for an allotted period of time. Granted, there are certain physiological aspects of this sort of maladaptive behavior, in which individuals can train their bodies to trigger a specific reaction to help them purge themselves of the food. Most often purging involves either vomiting or exiting one's stool. egardless, there are a number of different causal factors that can contribute to this sort of abnormal behavior (Laureate Education, 2007) -- some more so than others.

As defined within Abnormal Psychology written by Butcher et al., the causal pattern of any sort of abnormal behavior is etiology (Butcher et al., p., 2012). Oftentimes, the etiology for bulimia…… [Read More]

References

Butcher, J.N., Mineka, S., & Hooley, J.M. (2012). Psychology (Laureate Education, custom 14th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Laureate Education, Inc. (Executive Producer). (2007). Diagnosis and assessment. Baltimore, MD: Author. "Introduction" with Dr. John Marszalek
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Etiology and Treatment of a Psychological Disorder

Words: 2917 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83230922

Individual Programmatic Assessment

TEATMENTS OPTIONS FO IEGULA SLEEP-WAKE SYNDOME

Irregular Sleep-Wake Syndrome is a form of a psychological disorder also called Irregular Sleep-Wake hythm. People with Irregular Sleep-Wake Syndrome have non-aligned sleep times. These people have sleeping patterns that do not adhere to the "normal" times of sleeping at night. The sleeping patterns are disorganized to a magnitude that one cannot tell the presence of a clear sleep or wake pattern. Such people have a tendency to sleep off on some naps over a 24-hour period. The sleep patterns have been split into pieces. They behave like infants who sleep for a few hours, wake up for some other few hours, and also sleep off for some few hours, with the cycle repeating with no clear sequence. During the day, the number of sleep times may be high since they like napping a lot. During the night, they seem to…… [Read More]

References

American, P. A. (2015). Sleep-Wake Disorders: DSM-5 Selections. New York: American Psychiatric Pub

Flamez, B., & Sheperis, C. (2015). Diagnosing and Treating Children and Adolescents: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals. New York: John Wiley & Sons

Fontaine, K. L. & LeFontaine (2014). Complementary and Alternative Therapies for Nursing Practice. New York: Pearson

Kerkhof, G. A., & Dongen, H. P. A. (2011). Human Sleep and Cognition: Part II. Amsterdam: Elsevier.
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Psychological Sequelae of Childhood Sexual

Words: 6079 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85748070

It is also interesting to note that the correlation between depression and childhood sexual abuse was found to be higher among females in many studies.

However, the issue of the relationship between depression and sexual abuse may not be as clear-cut as the above studies suggest. Recent research has begun to question this correlation and has produced findings that suggest that there are many other parameters and variables that should be considered. This is especially the case with regard to the view that childhood sexual abuse necessarily leads to depression in adulthood. As one report claims, "...there is accumulating evidence to contradict these claims" (Roosa,

Reinholtz, (Angelini, 1999). However the majority of studies indicate that there is a strong possibility that children who are sexually abused experience symptoms of depression that can extend into adulthood.

PTSD

3.1. What is PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a disorder that has shown…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abused Children Face Depression Risk as Adults. Retrieved March 3, 2009 at http://www.healthyplace.com/abuse/abuse-and-depression/abused-children-face-depression-risk-as-adults/menu-id-52/

Association between Childhood Sexual Abuse History and Adverse

Psychosocial Outcomes in controlled studies. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at  http://www.leadershipcouncil.org/1/res/csa.html 

Barker J. Adult Sequelae of Child Sexual Abuse. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at http://www.medicineau.net.au/clinical/psychiatry/SexualAbuse.html
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Disordered Eating in College Students

Words: 5808 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39021106

Relationships provide the key experience that connects children's personal and social worlds. It is within the dynamic interplay between these two worlds that minds form and personalities grow, behavior evolves and social competence begins." (1999) Howe relates that it is being acknowledged increasingly that "...psychologically, the individual cannot be understood independently of his or her social and cultural context. The infant dos not enter the world as a priori discrete psychological being. Rather, the self and personality form as the developing mind engages with the world in which it finds itself." (Howe, 1999) Therefore, Howe relates that there is: "...no 'hard boundary' between the mental condition of individuals and the social environments in which they find themselves. The interaction between individuals and their experiences creates personalities. This is the domain of the psychosocial." (Howe, 1999) the work of Howe additionally states that attachment behavior "...brings infants into close proximity to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ainsworth, M.D.S. (1989). Attachments beyond infancy. American Psychologist, 44, 709-716.

Allen, Jon G. (2001) a Model for Brief Assessment of Attachment and Its Application to Women in Inpatient Treatment for Trauma Related Psychiatric Disorders Journal of Personality Assessment 2001 Vol. 76. Abstract Online available at http://www.leaonline.com/doi/abs/10.1207/S15327752JPA7603_05?cookieSet=1&journalCode=jpa

Armsden, G.C., & Greenberg, M.T. (1987). The inventory of parent and peer attachment: Individual differences and their relationship to psychological well-being in adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 16, 427-454.

Barrocas, Andrea L. (2006) Adolescent Attachment to Parents and Peers. The Emory Center for Myth and Ritual in American Life. Working Paper No. 50 Online available at http://www.marial.emory.edu/pdfs/barrocas%20thesisfinal.doc
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Psychological Health Unlike Physical Health Psychological Health

Words: 1004 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29925827

Psychological Health

Unlike physical health, psychological health cannot be measured by a machine or screened for via a blood test. However, psychological health is absolutely critical to the well-being of patients and cannot be disregarded by a responsible health practitioner. Mental health is composed of emotional health (compassion for others and an understanding that the self is not the center of the universe and a balanced perspective on the world); mental health (resiliency to adversity); and spiritual health (a sense of higher purpose in life) (Hales 2008: 25). However, while mental health is something which may be said to be striven for on a universal level, the manifestations of these components of psychological health are expressed in culturally-specific ways, something which a healthcare practitioner must be mindful of when assessing psychological health in a responsible fashion (Hales 2008: 26).

Positive psychology stresses that it is essential not simply to study…… [Read More]

Reference

Hales, D. (2008). An invitation to health: Brief edition. 5th ed. Wadsworth.
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Psychological Trait Theory

Words: 2333 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91327853

Psychological Trait Theory in Criminology:

The field of criminology can basically be described as the scientific study of criminals and criminal behavior since professionals in this field try to develop theories that explain the reason for the occurrence of crimes and test the theories through observation of criminal behavior. The criminological theories in turn help in shaping the response of the society to crime in relation to preventing criminal behavior and reacting to such behaviors after they occur. Generally, the field of criminology has evolved in three different phases since the inception of this discipline in the 18th Century. While crime and criminals have existed for as long as societies have existed, the systematic study of these incidents began in the late 1700s. Prior to this period, crime and criminal behavior were mainly equated to sin i.e. The infringement of a sacred obligation.

Evolution of the Discipline of Criminology:

As…… [Read More]

References:

Lynch, J.P. (n.d.). Criminology. Retrieved from University of Colorado Boulder website:

 http://autocww2.colorado.edu/~toldy3/E64ContentFiles/LawAndCourts/Criminology.html 

See, E. (2004). Criminological Theories: Introduction, Evaluation, and Applications. Retrieved November 24, 2012, from http://roxbury.net/images/pdfs/ct4ssg.pdf

"Trait Theories." (2011). Chapter 5. Retrieved November 24, 2012, from http://ebooks.narotama.ac.id/files/Criminology%20(11th%20Edition)/CHAPTER%205%20Trait%20Theories.pdf
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Psychological Effects the Iraqi War

Words: 1880 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90420779



This point also emphasizes a cardinal aspect in the recent literature. There has been an increasing research focus on a more discursive and holistic approach which should be adopted in dealing with PTSD and related areas of psychological concern. At present the research into the field is an ongoing process which must be continually updated. The literature also leaves little doubt that PTSD and other related psychological problems as result of the Iraq war can no longer be ignored.

orks Cited

Casualties of war. April 21, 2007. http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/casualties-of-war/2005/10/26/1130302840559.html?page=3

Hare M. 2007. Army psychologist using new ways to treat

Stress. April 20, 2007. http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NES0201/704220321/-1/COLUMNS

Finer J. 2006. Frontline Care for 'At Risk' Soldiers: Army Effort Treats

Psychological Trauma at Source. April 20, 2007. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/07/AR2006060702390_pf.html

Friedman M.J. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Overview. Retrieved April 20, 2007, at http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/clients/sub.cfm?source=mhealth/factsheets/overview

Foa, E., & Meadows, E. (1997). Psychosocial Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Critical…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Casualties of war. April 21, 2007.  http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/casualties-of-war/2005/10/26/1130302840559.html?page=3 

Hare M. 2007. Army psychologist using new ways to treat

Stress. April 20, 2007. http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NEWS0201/704220321/-1/COLUMNS

Finer J. 2006. Frontline Care for 'At Risk' Soldiers: Army Effort Treats
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Psychological the Most Creative Person

Words: 3872 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20626197



Portfolio: Patients who express suicidal ideation should always be taken seriously. I have read that the greatest risk factor for suicide in previous attempts. Sometimes suicide can be considered a cry for help, and everyone who expresses some time of suicidal ideation deserves evaluation.

Question 14.2

The form of psychotherapy I find the most appealing is the cognitive behavioral approach. It appeals to me since the focus if reparative and based on a desire to change one's behaviors which contribute to the problem which prompted therapy in the first place. Patients who engage in cognitive behavioral therapy require a certain degree of insight into how their behaviors contribute to their own emotions or feelings. The interaction of mind and body can be especially telling; many psychological disorders have physical manifestations and conversely, many chronic medical problems can also manifest emotional symptoms. Cognitive behavioral therapy allows the individual to recognize patterns…… [Read More]

Reference:

Moscicki EK. Identification of suicide risk factors using epidemiologic studies. Psychiatr Clin North Am 1997; 20:499-517.

Bushman BJ, Peterson WC, Bonacci EA, Vasquez EA, Miller N. (2005) Chewing on it Can Chew You Up: Effects of Rumination on Triggered Displaced Aggression. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Copyright 2005 by the American Psychological Association. Vol. 88, No. 6, 969-983

Caprara, G.V., Barbaranelli, C., & Comrey, a.L. (1992). A personological approach to the study of aggression. Personality and Individual Differences,
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Psychological Theory

Words: 2096 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11794677

Alcoholism and Upbringing

Psychological theory

James' father is responsible for James' involvement in crime and burglary. Origin of the problem. Alcoholic parents are the reason for the moral decay of juveniles

Another reason for James' feelings of inadequacy

Effect of alcoholism in the upbringing of a child

The effect of taking James out of his mother's home as a juvenile

eaction formation

An examination of James' denial of his responsibility over his problem

Personality theory

Sociological theory

Personality and sociological theory

An explanation of James' behaviors, and his father using the two frameworks

Thorburn (2005) suggests that a misapprehension that numerous alcoholics seem to have is that their behavior does not affect other people. They deny ever hurting other people but themselves. A great deal of research and huge anecdotal proof suggest otherwise. The behavior of alcoholics can affect those around them, including family members, friends, coworkers and employers. Children…… [Read More]

References

Plant, M.A., Peck, D.F., Samuel, E., & Stuart, R. (2000). Alcohol, drugs, and school-leavers.

London: Tavistock Publications.

Thorburn, D. (2005). Alcoholism myths and realities: Removing the stigma of society's most destructive disease. Northridge, Calif: Galt Pub.

Floyd, M.R., & Seale, J.P. (2002). Substance abuse: A patient-centered approach. Abingdon,
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Diversity in Psychological Testing

Words: 1346 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7716003

Psychological Testing: Establishing Diversity

Psychological testing is the backbone of how psychologists are able to gain a higher level of understanding regarding human beings and how/why they act as they do. Good psychological exams can help tremendously in the task of problem-solving and in getting a better snapshot of a person's psychological or mental health issues while identifying strengths and weaknesses. Furthermore, a precise psychological exam helps to exam an individual's precise point in time in a mode which examines their present-functioning in terms of test data. There are a range of psychological tests which are available, many of which are the results of decades and decades of research and procedures. The four main types of psychological tests are as follows: clinical interviews, assessment of intellectual functioning, personality assessment, and then behavioral assessments.

However, since psychological tests emerged within the field, the issue of diversity in psychological testing was an…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2013). What Is the Rorschach Inkblot Test? Retrieved from About.com: http://psychology.about.com/od/rindex/g/rorschach-ink.htm

Reynolds, C., & Suzuki, L. (2003). Bias in Psychological Assessment. Retrieved from wileypub.com:  http://lp.wileypub.com/HandbookPsychology/SampleChapters/Volume10.pdf 

Wakefield, H., & Underwager, R. (n.d.). The application of images in child abuse investigations.

Retrieved from  http://www.tc.umn.edu/~under006/Library/Images.html
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Psychological Testing and Assessment There Is a

Words: 915 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42312241

Psychological Testing and Assessment

There is a distinct relationship between psychological testing and assessment in conjunction with the DSM-IV. First, testing provides a systematic means of assessments that provide insight into the potential mental complications of a patient. Further, psychological testing provides a means of flexible evaluation which can better conform to the changing needs of the public. By providing flexibility in its approach to assessment, psychological testing can better adapt to changing and varying conditions within the mental health profession. Much like the internet, new health issues arise yearly with profound implications for the general public. Psychological testing and assessment attempts to abate or diminish the influence of these changing dynamics on the health profession and the community at large.

What is case history data?

The American Heritage Medical Dictionary defines case history data as, "A detailed account of the facts affecting the development or condition of a person…… [Read More]

References

1) "Clinical Interview (psychology) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia." Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Web. 26 Jan. 2012. .

2) "Psychological Report Format." Untitled 1. Web. 26 Jan. 2012. .
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Psychological Capital and Learners K-12

Words: 4962 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33447575

Physical and mental disorders are often comorbid, reflecting an entire system that is out of balance. A healthy state, both physically and mentally reflects a state of equilibrium and stability that every organism wishes to achieve (Wallace, 2008).When one portion of the system is out of balance, the entire system can be out of balance. The degree to which the system is out of balance determines the degree of the disturbance.

A child that has greater resilience skills can recover from a greater disturbance than a child with little resiliency. Everyone has heard stories of the rich and famous who rose up from situations of poverty and despair to become something great. This is exactly what this research is about. Eriksson's psychosocial model sets up the situation that the person must overcome. Wallace's theory on resiliency provides an understanding of what the child needs to overcome these circumstances to become…… [Read More]

References

Anthony, E., Alter, C. & Jenson, J. (2009). Development of a Risk and Resilience-Based Out-of-

School Time Program for Children and Youths. Social Work. 54 (1): 45+. Retrieved from Questia Database.

Brendtro, L. & Larson, S. (2004). The Resilience Code: Finding Greatness in Youth. Reclaiming Children and Youth. 12 (4): 194 +. Retrieved from Questia Database.

Brown, W. (2006). The Value of Role Models in Inspiring Resilience. Reclaiming Children and Youth. 14 (4): 199+. Retrieved from Questia Database.
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Psychological Affects Sexual Abuse Has

Words: 1547 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23779142



In conclusion, both juvenile sex offenders and victims of sexual abuse need to undergo treatment and counselling. The importance of treating victims of sex abuse is to ensure that the "cycle of abuse" ceases and that they can recover from their ordeal and lead normal lives. The treatment of juvenile sex offenders is to ensure their rehabilitation, depending on the problem and also separate them from the rest of society.

eferences

California Dept. Of Justic, (n.d). Megan's Law - Facts about Sex Offenders -- California

Department of Justice. etrieved April 13, 2010, from http://www.meganslaw.ca.gov/facts.htm

Harrison, L. (2009). The Ambiguity of Juvenile Sexual Offenders. Internet Journal of Criminology, 7, 1-29. etrieved April 14, 2010, from http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Harrison_Juvenile_Sexual_Offenders_J

uly_09.pdf

Herrmann B, Navratil F. (2004). Sexual Abuse in Pre-pubertal Children and Adolescents.

Sultan C (Editor) Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology: Evidence-Based Clinical

Practice. Pakistan: Endocr Dev, Basel, Karger

Hunter, J.A. (2000). Understanding Juvenile Sex Offenders:…… [Read More]

References

California Dept. Of Justic, (n.d). Megan's Law - Facts about Sex Offenders -- California

Department of Justice. Retrieved April 13, 2010, from  http://www.meganslaw.ca.gov/facts.htm 

Harrison, L. (2009). The Ambiguity of Juvenile Sexual Offenders. Internet Journal of Criminology, 7, 1-29. Retrieved April 14, 2010, from http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Harrison_Juvenile_Sexual_Offenders_J

uly_09.pdf
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Psychological Assessment Is a Broad

Words: 885 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38550595

However, when using labels, counselors have to be careful to not pigeonhole or otherwise be biased. Labels are helpful in offering some clear-cut solutions for specific problems, but labels can and should change over time as the client progresses with therapy. Assessments should be always be used with the ultimate aim of improving a client's life.

Psychological assessments can help psychologists determine whether medical attention is necessary for the client. If so, the psychologist or counselor would need to recommend the client see a psychiatrist, who would then reassess the client using different parameters. For instance, a psychiatric assessment would include more information about the patient's medical history, medication history, and allergic reactions. Psychiatric tests might include specialized computer-aided tests like brain scans. When a psychiatrist administers medications to the client, he or she will also make assessments based on the patient's reaction to the drugs. Assessments can also draw…… [Read More]

References

Psychological Testing vs. Psychological Assessment." (2003). Online at < Psychological Testing vs. Psychological Assessment>.
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Disorder of the Hypothalamus

Words: 486 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34302407

Disorder of the Hypothalamus

There is a tremendous amount of importance associated with the hypothalamus, which extends throughout various physical, emotional, and mental aspects of life. The hypothalamus is a part of the brain that creates hormones that are critical to a number of processes of the body including temperature, sex drive, mood, and others. It is also directly related to certain glands that secrete hormones. Therefore, it is very important that it functions properly because it plays a role in a number of vital processes that most people take for granted. Those with this condition have a reduced sense of smell (Houneida et al., 2013, p. 144).

Several different disorders exist that pertain to the hypothalamus. One that is fairly rare is termed Kallman syndrome, and is a genetic disorder that is related to bodily processes that typically develop during puberty for those with a normal functioning hypothalamus. The…… [Read More]

References

Arkoncel, M., Arkoncel, F., Lantion-Ang, F. (2011). A case of Kallman syndrome. BMJ Case Rep. 13(2), 24-37.

Houneida., Z., Slim, I., Zina, N., Mallet, N., Tajouri, H., Kraiem, C. (2013). Kallman syndrome: MRI findings. Indian Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism. 17(2) 142-146.
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Psychological Assesment Psychological Assessment Psychological

Words: 745 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4045230

Additionally, within a school setting, parental consent must be obtained if a child is assessed. The results of testing a minor for learning disability can impact the child's education for many years and carries an additional weighty responsibility for the assessor: the child's parents must be made fully aware of what types of treatment are available for the child and the pros and cons of assessment.

In all settings, the tests must be validated, reliable, and accepted by the psychological community as appropriate for that setting. An obvious example of appropriateness is the need to use the correct version of the MMPI Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-A) when testing adolescents, and using tests 'normed' on a representative population. Some tests are normed on individuals who are already identified as pathological, while others upon the general population.

Cultural sensitivity is also an issue: on a very basic level, when testing a…… [Read More]

References

Richmond, Raymond Lloyd. (2009). Confidentiality. A guide to psychology and its practice.

Retrieved January 14, 2010 at  http://www.guidetopsychology.com/confid.htm
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Psychological Research and Patient-Practitioner Interaction the Work

Words: 830 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24737591

Psychological Research and Patient-Practitioner Interaction

The work of Like and Zyzanski (2002) reports that patient-practitioner transactions in the ambulatory setting have gained in importance in the research as there is "empirical support for our anecdotal, common-sense notions that clinical encounter experiences are a major determinant of outcomes such as the patient's satisfaction with the encounter. The study is reported to examine the issue of patient-physician encounter and asks the questions of: 1) Is there a relationship between fulfillment of patient requests for services and patient satisfaction with the clinical encounter? And (2) What degree of satisfaction is explained by the qualities of the encounter as compared to the characteristics of the patient, physician, and system of health care? (Like and Zyzanski, 2002) A study of 144 adult patients and their physicians was conducted and it is reported "at least 19% of the variance in patient satisfaction could be attributed to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Feinberg, J. (1988) The effect of patient -- Practitioner interaction on compliance: A review of the literature and application in rheumatoid arthritis. Patient Education and Counseling. Vol. 11 Issue 3, June 1998.

Hellstrom, O., Lindqvist, P. And Mattsson, B. (1996) A Phenomenological Analysis of Doctor-Patient Interaction: A Case Study. Patient Education and Counseling. Vol. 33, Issue 1. 20 Nov 1998.

Heritage, J. And Maynard, DW (2006) Problems and Prospects in the Study of Physician-Patient Interaction: 30 Years of Research Annual Review of Sociology Vol. 32: 351-37.

Kaplan, SH, Greenfield, S, and Ware, JE (1989) Assessing the Effects of Physician-Patient Interaction on the Outcomes of Chronic Disease. Medical Care. Mar 1989; Vol.27, No.3.
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Psychological Learning Theories There Are

Words: 1412 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98009598

Thus instrumental condition would rely on the notion that a person generates a response rather than an environmental stimulus. I have found that both people and stimulus may elicit certain behaviors both in and outside of the classroom.

Instrumental conditioning is modeled after animal experiments which showed that the individual's environment can reinforce response controls, thus the best responses occur when reinforcement of a particular behavior is given. This I have learned to be the case in the classroom most assuredly, where students are more likely to exhibit positive behaviors more frequently when they are reinforced immediately for demonstrating positive behaviors. Generally the patterns that emerge from such conditioning are self-directed, meaning that I have found that most students engage in behaviors and continue to engage in behaviors which they find result in a positive response regardless of the environment they are placed in.

With regard to controlling adverse behavior,…… [Read More]

References

Chang, Min-Yu S. (1998). "Learning Theory and Advertising." CIA Advertising. 23,

October 2004, Available: http://www.ciadvertising.org/studies/student/98_spring/theory/learning.html

Klein, S.B. (2002). "Principles and Applications of Appetitive Conditioning." Mississippi

State University. McGraw Hill. Education. 22, October, 2004, Available:
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Psychological Effect the Media Has

Words: 3154 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95044860

but, the interesting thing is that their peers, family, friends and young boys are basing their opinion of what these girls should look like from what they see in the media.

Main Cause of Poor ody Images in Young Girls

The media has been with us for years and it is here to stay. There are good aspects of this industry because it serves to keep us informed and aware of what is happening in the world around us. The media can also be viewed negatively because of some of the television programs that are out there today. Technology is so advanced that we can now watch our favorite television shows and read our favorite fashion magazines right from our cell phones. We can assume that as the years go by, technology will get more advanced and the role of the media will become even more prominent.

Such outlets as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ata, R.N., Ludden, AB. And Lally, M.M. (2007). The effects of gender and family, friend, and media influences on eating behaviors and body image during adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 36(8), 1024-1037.

Bell, B.T., Lawton R., and Dittmar, H. (2007). The impact of thin models in music videos on adolescent girls' body dissatisfaction. Body Image, 4(2), 137-145.

Dohnt, H.K. And Tiggemann, M. (2006). Body image concerns in young girls: The role of peers and media prior to adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 35(2), 141-151.

Worell, J., & Goodheart, C.D. (2006). Body Image. Handbook of Girls' and Women's Psychological Health (pp. 68-75). New York: Oxford University Press.
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Psychological Counseling Interview Counselor Tom

Words: 4270 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81626687

Okay?

Client: Thank you Christina, I look forward to seeing you next week.

Zal (1990, p. 136) states that it can indeed be a very fragile and emotionally battered individual that comes to your office for evaluation. An adequate treatment plan for panic disorder must therefore comprise many specific aspects. The first of course is to make the diagnosis and share it confidently and directly with the patient. As the first person to encounter the patient with some understanding of his or her symptoms, you are in a unique position to do an enormous therapeutic service by giving them a clear, precise definition of their illness and once and for all showing them that their symptoms have meaning. Let them know that it is only since 1980 that panic disorder has a name and that it is only during this decade that even psychiatry is beginning to understand this malady.…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339937

Austrian, S.G. (2000). Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339938 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908719

Barber, J.P. & Crits-Christoph, P. (Eds.). (1995). Dynamic Therapies for Psychiatric Disorders: Axis I. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908721 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620

Beck, A.T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, R.L. (1985). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias A Cognitive Perspective. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037

Craske, M.G. (1999). Anxiety Disorders: Psychological Approaches to Theory and Treatment. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85933111
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Psychological Testing

Words: 1536 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64787182

Psychological Testing

Psychological tests are commonly used to establish individual capabilities and characteristics. Such inference is derived as a result of collecting, integrating and interpreting information about a person (Marnat, 2009). It constitutes measuring variables through the use of procedures and devices crafted to demonstrate a person's behavior (Cohen & Swerdlik, 2009). Assessment of personality is, ideally, the measuring and evaluating of psychological aspects such as one's values, states, world view, personal identity, acculturation, behavior styles, sense of humor and the related characteristics of an individual (Cohen & Swerdlik, 2009). Personality tests are designed to determine the character of a human being or their disposition. The initial personality tests were designed to examine and predict disorders of clinical nature. The tests are still useful today and are applied to determine cases in need of counseling. The latest personality tests are used to measure normal characteristics (Miller, Mclntire, & Lovler, 2011).…… [Read More]

References

Cattell, H. E., & Mead, A. D. (2008). The sixteen-personality factor questionnaire (16PF). The SAGE handbook of personality theory and assessment, 2, 135-178.

Cohen, R. & Swerdlik, M. (2009). Psychological testing and assessment (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Friedman, M. (1996). Type A Behavior: Its Diagnosis and Treatment. New York: Plenum Press (Kluwer Academic Press)

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. John Wiley & Sons.
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Psychological Social and Economic Issues

Words: 366 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91033668

It is clear that compliance with taking medication needs to be increased within this population but this is a difficult thing to do. Putting them in a 'home' or an in-patient residential treatment facility is a short-term fix but will not help them when their treatment is over and they still have no home to live in and no money with which to purchase their medications. Compliance can be best increased in two ways: 1) make medications for these people extremely affordable and 2) combine the medication and/or treatment that they receive with other services that can help these individuals find jobs, inexpensive but decent housing, and social networks that can help them to reach out to others that have struggled or that are still struggling. Support is very important to those that have a mental illness and this support might be one of the best things that these individuals…… [Read More]

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Neurotransmission OCD and the Psychotropic

Words: 2322 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76916718



Discussion

Though a great deal more is known about neurotransmission today than was known at the beginning of the research associated with the initial biological discoveries of neurotransmitters and the neurotransmission process there is still a great deal to be discovered. Neurotransmission disorganization and impairment is clearly identified as a pervasive aspect of many psychological disorders. This is particularly true of the anxiety disorders and OCD. There is no doubt that increased understanding of the various mechanisms of OCD and normal neurotransmission will add to a greater research understanding of the biological causalities and modalities of OCD.

Though the most simplistic and earliest neurotransmission disturbance theories have been largely discounted the research has created ample evidence of disturbances in neurotransmission function (in more complex terms) as the root cause of several psychological disorders including various forms of anxiety disorders the subgroup which OCD falls into.

…this research has revealed the…… [Read More]

References

Goodman, W.K., Rudorfer, M.V., & Maser, J.D. (Eds.). (2000). Obsessive-compulsive disorder contemporary issues in treatment. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Hollander, E. Allen, A. Steiner, M. Wheadon, D.E. Oakes, R. Burnham, D.B. (September 2003) Acute and long-term treatment and prevention of relapse of obsessive-compulsive disorder with paroxetine. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 64(9) 1113-1121.

Howland, R.H. (2005). Chapter 6 Biological bases of psychopathology. In Psychopathology: Foundations for a Contemporary Understanding, Maddux, J.E. & Winstead, B.A. (Eds.) (pp. 109-119). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Liebowitz, M.R. Turner, S.M. Piacentini, J. Beidel, D.C. Clarvit, S.R. Davies, S.O. Graae, F. Jaffer, M. Lin, S. Sallee, F.R. Schmidt, A.B. Simpson, H.B. (December 2002) Fluoxetine in Children and Adolescents With OCD: A Placebo-Controlled Trial Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry 41(12) 1431-1438.
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Obesity Versus Eating Disorder

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33681009

Eating Disorders

According to Himmel (2009), "We could save a lot of pain, suffering and money by incorporating obesity into the range of illnesses now classified as eating disorders, and focusing on prevention" Obesity related issues are frequently classified separately from eating disorders, but there is more overlap than many people believe. When a person diagnosed with anorexia or bulimia, the traditionally recognized eating disorders, enter treatment with a professional counselor or psychologist, a Twelve Step program called Overeaters Anonymous is sometimes recommended. The Twelve Step program Overeaters Anonymous was not started to help people with anorexia and bulimia, and yet it has come to serve these populations as well, suggesting that what Himmel (2009) says is correct. Eating disorders encompass a range of disordered eating behaviors. Individual differences ensure that there are no two people who practice an eating disorder for the same reasons. By the same token, obesity…… [Read More]

References

Day, J., Ternouth, A. & Collier, D.A. (2009). Eating disorders and obesity: Two sides of the same coin? Epidemiological Psychiatry 18(2): 96-100.

Himmel, S. (2009). You must be hungry. Psychology Today. 18 Sept, 2009. Retrieved online: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/you-must-be-hungry/200909/is-obesity-eating-disorder
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DSM IV Disorders DSM IV-TR - Anxiety

Words: 1010 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84488286

DSM IV Disorders

DSM IV-T - Anxiety, Somatoform, and Dissociative Disorders

American Psychological Association has compiled and published DSM IV-T, which is a diagnostic manual of mental disorders. This manual not only categorizes mental enormities but also provide guidance and assistance to medical practitioners about the suitable and appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the included mental illnesses. Moreover, specific codes have been assigned to each disorder in DSM IV-T with a purpose of providing an effective method for medical documentation. Additionally, this manual serves as a valuable resource for teaching the technicalities of psychopathology. DSM IV-T extensively discusses wide range of mental disorders such as anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders.

The person who experiences frequent fear and panic about different things is believed to be suffering from anxiety. Acute state of anxiety is conducive to various other mental disorders such as obsessive-compulsion disorder, panic disorder, phobia, and so forth. Furthermore,…… [Read More]

References

Weiten, W, Dunn, D & Hammer, E.Y. (2010). Psychology Applied to Modern Life: Adjustments in the 21st Century. Tenth Edition. USA: Cengage Learning.
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism Addiction

Words: 4543 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57309421

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism/Addiction

Narrative

Alcoholism and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Overview

PTSD and Co morbidity of Alcoholism: The ole of Trauma

Childhood Abuse and Gender Differences in PTSD

Association Between Alcoholism and Emotion

Genetic and Environmental Influences

Models of Assessment/Conclusions

Abstract TC "Abstract" f C l "1"

This study will examine the relationship between post traumatic stress disorder and alcoholism/addiction. The author proposes a quantitative correlation analysis of the relationship between PTSD and alcoholism be conducted to identify the influence of trauma on subsequent alcohol abuse in patients varying in age from 13-70.

A survey of the literature available on PTSD and alcohol/substance abuse on patients is conducted leading to a conclusion that a direct relationship does exist between Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Alcoholism/Addiction. This conclusion coincides with a large body of evidence and prior studies which link the prevalence of traumatic disorders with alcohol and substance…… [Read More]

References" f C l "1":

Brady, S.; Rierdan, J. Penk, W; Losardo, M; Meschede, T. (2003). "Post traumatic stress disorder in adults with serious mental illness and substance abuse." Journal of Trauma and Dissociation, 4(4): 77-90

Brown, P.J. (2001). "Outcome in female patients with both substance use and post-traumatic stress disorders." Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 18(3):127-135

Bulijan, D.; Vreek, D.; Cekic, A.A.; Karlovic, D.; Zoricic, Z; Golik-Gruber, V. (2002).

'Posttraumatic stress disorder, alcohol dependence and somatic disorders in displaced persons." Alcoholism: Journal on Alcoholism and Related Addictions, 38(1-2)35-40
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Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder PMDD Virtually

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61999228

They also state that PMS is also normal for reproductive women.

Some critics go even farther, and blame the woman for the symptoms she is experiencing (Sellers, 2003). They suggest that the emotional and behavioral difficulties called PMDD are nothing more than basic conditioning, that the woman is rewarded for negative behavior. Sick days and other accommodations, they argue, allow the woman to skip school or work with a phony excuse, and allow them to avoid situations they find generate anxiety in them, such as difficult social interactions (Sellers, 2003).

However, the fact that the women show significant improvement during the luteal phase when taking effective medication argues against the critics' claims. In particular, the same SSRI's that work relatively rapidly in PMDD can take up to twelve weeks to help with non-PMDD depression (Steiner, 2000).

Critics also argue that "PMS provides an excuse for what would otherwise be unacceptable…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bhatia, Shashi K. 2002. "Diagnosis and treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder." American Family Physician, Oct.

Bosarge, Penelope M. 2003. "Understanding and treating PMS/PMDD." Nursing, November.

Sellers, Melissa 2003. "Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder' and 'Premenstrual Syndrome' myths." Skeptical Inquirer, May.

Sherman, Carl. 2001. "Sertraline, Venlafaxine Offer PMDD Patients Relief.(premenstrual dysphoric disorder). Clinical Psychiatry News, October.
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy CBT Techniques for Combat Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder PTSD

Words: 5327 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85865281

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Combat Veterans With Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Although not limited to veterans, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may be the single most significant mental health risk to veterans, particularly to those veterans that have seen combat. PTSD is an anxiety disorder, which occurs after a person has seen or experienced a traumatic event including, but not limited to: assault, domestic abuse, prison stay, rape, terrorism, war, or natural disaster (Vorvick et al., 2011). In fact, PTSD is unique among psychiatric diagnosis in that it "requires a specific type of event to occur from which the person affected does not recover" (esick et al., 2008). Veterans are at high risk of PTSD because they experience war, but they also experience many of the other traumatic events that can trigger PTSD in the course of the war. PTSD can have serious lifelong effects for veterans. It can impair…… [Read More]

References

Byers, M.G., Allison, K.M., Wendel, C.S., & Lee, J.K. (2010). Pra-zosin vs. quetiapine for nighttime posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms in veterans: An assessment of long-term comparative effectiveness and safety. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 30, 225-229.

Chard, K., Schumm, J., Owens, G., & Cottingham, S. (2010). A comparison of OEF and OIF

veterans and Vietnam veterans receiving cognitive processing therapy. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 23(1), 25-32.

Hassija, C.M., & Gray, M.J. (2010). Are cognitive techniques and interventions necessary? A
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Physical and Mental Disorders for

Words: 1325 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61490952

Usually, diagnosis is symptom driven, then combined with testing, forms an opinion, sometimes verified by lab tests, of a specific diagnosis. For instance, someone may have symptoms of nausea, pain, depression, anxiety, and their skin has a yellowish hue. The physician runs blood tests and finds that the liver is malfunctioning and there is likely a diagnosis of hepatitis. In this case, there are both physical and mental symptoms, but it is the physical nature that is diagnosed first. For mental diagnosis, symptoms are also important, but are based more on the functioning of the individual in social systems, or by observing the patient's behavior (How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? 2012). Thus, both use symptoms as a guide, but mental diagnosis is more empirical and uses observation, while physical diagnosis uses quantitative measurements.

Etiology- Etiology is the study of basic causation. We now know that there are a number of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

American Psychiatric Association Practice Guidelines. (2006). PsychiatryOnline. Retrieved from: http://psychiatryonline.org/guidelines.aspx

How are Mental Illnesses Diagnosed? (2012). WebMD. Retrieved from:  http://www.webmd.com/anxiety-panic/guide/mental-health-making-diagnosis 

Curtis, a.J. et.al. (2000), Introduction to Health Psychology, New York: Routledge.

Dombeck, M. (2003). Blurring the Boundary Between Mental and Physical. Seven Counties Services, Inc. Retrieved from: http://www.sevencounties.org / poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=1855&cn=74
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Questions OCD and PTSD

Words: 702 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48316131

ABC/123 Version X

Week Five eview Worksheet

PSY/203 Version

Week Five eview Worksheet

Choose two categories of psychological disorders and outline the main symptoms associated with the disorders.

The old classification system for psychological disorders only had two kinds, neurosis and psychosis with people suffering from neurosis experiencing anxiety and people with psychosis suffering from hallucinations. Now psychological disorders are categorized even further. The two selected are from the category of anxiety disorders. The first is PTSD or post-traumatic stress disorder. The second is OCD or obsessive-compulsive disorder. There are other classifications, the somatoform disorders and dissociative disorders. The three main symptoms of PTSD revolve around re-experiencing the traumatic scenario. The afflicted person will experience nightmares, upsetting memories, flashbacks, including feels of distress (Barlow, 2001). The person will also experience intense physical reactions like nausea, sweating, and pounding heart. They will also try to avoid any remind of the trauma.…… [Read More]

References

Antony, M. & Barlow, D. (2002). Handbook of assessment and treatment planning for psychological disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

Barlow, D. (2001). Clinical handbook of psychological disorders. New York: Guilford Press.

Copyright © XXXX by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.

Copyright © 2015 by University of Phoenix. All rights reserved.
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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and

Words: 920 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32678472

The EMD technique is used in conjunction with psychotherapy and it has proven very effective for statistically significant numbers of patients in controlled studies (Breslau, Lucia, & Alvarado, 2006; Gerrig & Zimbardo, 2008).

Ethical Issues in Treating PTSD in eturning Combat Veterans with MDMA

A much more ethically controversial approach involves the use of low doses of MDMA in conjunction with traditional psychotherapy. That is because MDMA is an illicit drug with a very well-deserved reputation for being notoriously popular with recreational users and addiction. While their may be beneficial therapeutic uses of MDMA in certain patients, the population of U.S. armed services veterans suffering from PTSD are also, demographically and psychologically, at the greatest risk of drug addiction and to mental instability that could be worsened by non-therapeutic use of consciousness-altering substances, particularly in connection with unauthorized and unmonitored or controlled use.

It is not necessarily never appropriate to…… [Read More]

References

Breslau, N., Lucia, V., and Alvarado, G. "Intelligence and Other Predisposing Factors in Exposure to Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Follow-up Study at Age 17 Years."Arch Gen Psychiatry, Vol. 63; (2006):1238-1245.

Frain, M.P., Bishop, M., and Bethel, M. "A Roadmap for Rehabilitation Counseling to Serve Military Veterans with Disabilities." Journal of Rehabilitation, Vol 76,

No. 1; (2010): 13-21.

Gerrig, R, and Zimbardo, P. (2008). Psychology and Life. New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Internet Addictive Disorder or Iad Is Defined

Words: 635 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57422039

Internet Addictive Disorder or IAD is defined in this paper as a "maladaptive behavior surrounding the use of the Internet," and it was established earlier that this kind of disorder is not yet formally recognized, most especially among the scientific community. IAD is significant and poses a crucial problem for every individual who gets acquainted with Internet use, and even though IAD may be difficult to define and determine accurately, the problems it poses to an individual and the society around him/her can be considered serious and critical.

This paper also discussed some behavioral patterns in which one can observed an individual or even one's self if they are afflicted with this kind of disorder. Primarily, IAD is considered to be type of an obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD). Another theory says that IAD is only a "phasic" behavior, which can be rationally explained because of the overwhelming effect of Information Technology,…… [Read More]

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The Exploration of Autism Spectrum Disorders 1

Words: 2167 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87769281

Autism Spectrum Disorders

esearch shows that in today's society, the awareness of Autism has went from something that people were ashamed of, all the way to the forefront of education. It is also noted that research is increasing due to the rising amount of people and children that are suffering from Autism Spectrum disorders. However, this disorder is gaining attention all over the world. With that said, this paper will challenge and explore the mystery of this condition, and expectations for the future, concerning this disorder in an ever developing and expanding society.

What is Autism?

Autism came on the scene in 1943. At first, the condition is was believed to be some kind of a mental retardation condition. Some even categorized this condition as someone that is insane. However, Leo Kanner recognized that these children did not fall into the category of emotionally disturbed children. Instead, he recorded patterns…… [Read More]

References

Andrea L Roberts, K. L.-E. (2016). Maternal exposure to intimate partner abuse before birth is associated with autism spectrum disorder in offspring. Autism, 26-36.

Attwood, T. (2003). Attwood, T. (2003). Why does Chris do that?: Some suggestions regarding the cause and management of the unusual behavior of children and adults with autism and Asperger syndrome. Shawnee Mission, KS: Autism Asperger Publishing Company. Arlington, TX: Future Horizons, Inc.

Debbaudt, D. (2012). Debbaudt, D. (2002). Autism, advocates, and law enforcement professionals: Recognizing and reducing risk situations for people with autism spectrum disorders. . Philadelphia, PA: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Frymiare, M. A. (2012). Does the Autistic Brain Lack Core. Journal of Developmental and Learning, 9, 3-16.
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Gwas OCD and Genes

Words: 3400 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35243323

Personal Details of Student

Family Name: ooney

Given Name (s) Bridget

Student Number (SID): 312165250

Email (University email only) broo2460@uni.sydney.edu.au

GWAS OCD

Assignment number (if applicable): #1

Becker

Genetics of Brian and Mind Disorders

Academic Honesty -- all forms of plagiarism and unauthorized collusion are regarded as academic dishonesty by the university, resulting in penalties including failure of the unit of study and possible disciplinary action. A module of academic honesty and plagiarism is at http://elearning.library.usyd.edu.au/learn/plagiarism/index.php .

Declaration:

I / We have read and understood the University of Sydney Student Plagiarism: Coursework Policy and Procedure (which can be found at sydney.edu.au/senate/policies/Plagiarism.pdf).

I / We understand that failure to comply with the Student plagiarism: coursework Policy and Procedure can lead to the University commencing proceedings against me / us for potential student misconduct under Chapter 8 of the University of Sydney By-Law 1999 (as amended).

3. This work is substantially my…… [Read More]

References

Ahmari, S. E., Spellman, T., Douglass, N. L., Kheirbek, M. A., Simpson, H. B., Deisseroth, K., ... & Hen, R. (2013). Repeated cortico-striatal stimulation generates persistent OCD-like behavior. Science, 340(6137), 1234-1239.

Arnold, P., Sicard, T., Burroughs, E. et al. (2006). Glutamate Transporter Gene SLC1A1 Associated With Obsessive-compulsive Disorder. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 63(7), p.769.

Baxter, A., Scott, K., Vos, T. and Whiteford, H. (2012). Global prevalence of anxiety disorders: a systematic review and meta-regression. Psychological Medicine, 43(05), pp.897-910.

Barrett, P., Healy-Farrell, L. & March, J. S. (2004). Cognitive behavioral family treatment of childhood obsessive-compulsive disorder: a controlled trial. J. Am. Acad. Child Adolesc. Psychiatry . 43, 46-62.
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An effective'strategy in dealing with people with mental disorders

Words: 655 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22365821

Grand Canyon University (GCU) presents an inclusive doctorate course adaptable to every doctorate program. DNA represents a metaphor that denotes distinctive artifacts personalized by GCU’s doctorate course for simplifying pupils’ academic journey. The course is grounded in curricular and content development, research guidance, competences and acquaintance, and a detailed dissertation procedure (Gcumedia.com, 2017). The aim is: creation of an effectual, engaging, and stimulating academic experience for doctorate level pupils.

The campus provides corporate leadership and educational courses concentrating on cultivating accountability and knowledge with regard to the development and inspiration of superior- performance entities. The institution also offers other doctoral courses like philosophy in nursing practice, general phycology, and business administration. This course is grounded in the DNA system utilized for instilling economic, leadership and business capabilities among directors and educators. It is based on in- depth scientific, practical and abstract research. Learners imbibe skills that facilitate the application of…… [Read More]

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Childhood Developmental Disorders and Their Treatment

Words: 1165 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78204851

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and the Difficulties Associated ith the Assessment and Treatment of Psychological Childhood Disorders

By any measure, childhood is a challenging period in human development where young people are forced to actively participate in the educational process while developing human relationship skills that they will need for the rest of their lives. Against this backdrop, it is not surprising that many young people experience behavioral difficulties that detract from their ability to attain their full academic and social potential including one of the most commonly diagnosed conditions, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. To gain some new insights into this condition, this paper reviews the relevant literature concerning attention deficit hyperactivity disorder followed by a discussion concerning the difficulties that are associated with assessing and treating psychological childhood disorders. Finally, a summary of the research and important findings concerning these issues are presented in the conclusion.

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Facts about ADHD." (2016). Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Web.

Mash, Eric J. and Barkley, Russell A. (1999, May 1). "Treatment of Childhood Disorders, Second Edition." Behavioral Disorders 24(3): 258-261. Print.

McCabe, Paul C. (2009, Annual). "The Use of Antidepressant Medications in Early Childhood: Prevalence, Efficacy, and Risk." Journal of Early Childhood and Infant Psychology 5: 13-15. Print.

McLoone, Jordana and Hudson, Jennifer L. (2006, May). "Treating Anxiety Disorders in a School Setting." Education & Treatment of Children 29(2): 219-223. Print.
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GAD and Anxiety Disorders

Words: 3244 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84131793

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Background/Definition/Epidemiology

Humans have a natural response to survival, stress and fear. Such responses enable an individual to pursue pertinent objectives and respond accordingly to the presence of danger. The 'flight or fight' response in a healthy individual is provoked via a real challenge or threat and is utilized as a means of acting appropriately to the situation. However, when an anxiety disorder manifests in someone, then an inappropriate/excessive state of arousal develops. People then feel symptoms of fear, apprehension, or uncertainty. These feelings or reactions may surface even when no real threat exists.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), is a common anxiety disorder that affects roughly 5% of the United States general population. "GAD is commonly associated with psychiatric and medical comorbidities and is often chronic. GAD is associated with extensive psychiatric and medical utilization and, if left untreated, can cause impairment as severe as major depressive disorder…… [Read More]

References

Asmundson, G. J., Fetzner, M. G., DeBoer, L. B., Powers, M. B., Otto, M. W., & Smits, J. A. (2013). LET'S GET PHYSICAL: A CONTEMPORARY REVIEW OF THE ANXIOLYTIC EFFECTS OF EXERCISE FOR ANXIETY AND ITS DISORDERS. Depression and Anxiety, 30(4), 362-373. doi:10.1002/da.22043

Butnoriene, J., Bunevicius, A., Saudargiene, A., Nemeroff, C. B., Norkus, A., Ciceniene, V., & Bunevicius, R. (2015). Metabolic syndrome, major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, and ten-year all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in middle aged and elderly patients. International Journal of Cardiology, 190, 360-366. doi:10.1016/j.ijcard.2015.04.122

Chokroverty, S. (2013). Sleep Disorders Medicine: Basic Science, Technical Considerations, and Clinical Aspects. Elsevier Science.

Dodhia, S., Hosanagar, A., Fitzgerald, D. A., Labuschagne, I., Wood, A. G., Nathan, P. J., & Phan, K. L. (2014). Modulation of Resting-State Amygdala-Frontal Functional Connectivity by Oxytocin in Generalized Social Anxiety Disorder. Neuropsychopharmacology, 39(9), 2061-2069. doi:10.1038/npp.2014.53
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Nerve Disorders

Words: 574 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13850638

Fibromyalgia has emerged as one of the more controversial and prominent disorders of the recent years and decades. It is controversial because many have dismissed it as a perception or form of hypochondria while others have strongly asserted that this is dangerous talk and the disorder is absolutely real. This paper will discuss what the disorder is, who is at risk for it, what the symptoms are and what treatments are available. While the diagnosis and treatment of fibromyalgia is still somewhat in its nascent stages, there are indeed options that exist and a good many people have come forward as having the disorder.

Fibromyalgia is a disorder that manifests in a large amount of pain and something known as allodynia. The latter of those terms refers to a condition whereby pressure and touch becomes much more sensitive than it would be for a regular person as it becomes painful…… [Read More]

Reference

Mayo Clinic. (2014, August 19). Fibromyalgia. Definition. Retrieved August 19, 2014,

from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/fibromyalgia/basics / definition/con-20019243
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Psychology - Fatherless Children Psychological

Words: 885 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83955821



However, as male children transition into late childhood and adolescence, they tend to withdraw from their mothers and confide much more in their fathers. In fatherless households, the male child often withdraws from the mother in much the same way, but without the option of shifting emotional connection to the father. As a result, fatherless male adolescents exhibit substantially higher rates of delinquency, alcoholism, illegal activity, and perform worse academically (Gerrig & Zimbardo, 226).

The Importance of Fatherhood for Female Children:

In female children, absentee fathers predispose them either to negative expectations or to unrealistic idealized expectations in their dating relationships with men that ultimately increase the likelihood of disappointment and by virtue of multiple mechanisms that undermine those relationships (annon & Southern, 22-3). Typically, females raised without their fathers select emotionally unavailable partners who will allow them to reenact the male abandonment they experienced as children. Alternately, they may…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bannon, Jill a. And Southern, Mara L. "Father-absent women: Self-concept and modes of relating to men" Sex Roles, February, 1980. Branden, Nathaniel. The Psychology of Romantic Love. New York: Bantam (1999).

Gerrig, Richard J. And Phillip G. Zimbardo. Psychology and Life. 17th Edition. New York: Allyn & Bacon (2005).

Kasl, Charlotte Davis. Women, Sex, and Addiction. New York: Harper & Row (1998).

Wen, Ming. "Single-Parent Family Structure, Child Development, and Child's Well- being" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005.
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Measuring Various Psychological Instruments

Words: 2340 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18298595

Deconstructing the Utility of the orschach as a Measure of Personality and Psychopathology

This paper explores the enduring relvance of the orschach and finds that this instrument deserves such appositeness. It examines its strengths and weaknesses, and provides a review of literature that elucidates its value. This instrument is useful in numerous fields.

The orschach Inkblot Test is one of the most time honored and widespread assessment instruments within the field of psychology. It has endured in numerous forms ever since its inception in the early part of the 20th century (Meyer and Eblin, 2012, p. 107). During its tenure, it has experienced substantial amounts of criticism as well as various deployments in a number of diverse vertical industries and applications (Wood et al., 2003, p. 30). However, it is worth noting that this instrument has been revised and reformed on a number of occasions to continue delivering value to…… [Read More]

References

Franklin, K. W., & Cornell, D. G. (1997). Rorschach Interpretation With High-Ability Adolescent Females: Psychopathology or Creative Thinking?. Journal Of Personality Assessment, 68(1), 184.

Meehan, K. B., PhD., Ueng-McHale, J., Reynoso, J. S., PhD., Harris, Benjamin H, PhD., M.Ed, Wolfson, V. M., M.A., Gomes, H., PhD., & Tuber, S. B., PhD. (2008). Self-regulation and internal resources in school-aged children with ADHD symptomatology: An investigation using the rorschach inkblot method. Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 72(4), 259-82. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/200473131?accountid=25340

Meyer, G. J., & Eblin, J. J. (2012). An overview of the Rorschach Performance Assessment System (R-PAS). Psychological Injury & Law, 5, 107-121.

Wood, J. M., Nezworski, M. T., Lilienfeld, S. O., & Garb, H. N. (2003, Jul). The rorschach inkblot test, fortune tellers, and cold reading. The Skeptical Inquirer, 27, 29-33,61. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/219286741?accountid=25340
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Psychological Diagnosis Related Children Topic Generalized Anxiety

Words: 3739 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71398487

psychological diagnosis related children. TOPIC: GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER. Topics selected Diagnostic Statistical Manual Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). The research paper discuss: a.

Anxiety disorders are presently responsible for interfering in people's lives and preventing them from being able to successfully integrate society. hen considering the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), matters are particularly intriguing as a result of the fact that many people have trouble identifying it and actually go through their lives thinking that their thinking is perfectly normal. In spite of the fact that there are no motives to provoke the exaggerated worry seen in people with GAD, they are unable to realize that they are overstressed. Millions of people from around the world are currently suffering from GAD, with the malady affecting virtually everything about their lives.

hile some individuals actually acknowledge the fact that their worries are unfounded, it is very difficult for them to put across rational…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Gliatto, M.F. "Generalized Anxiety Disorder." American Family Physician. October 1, 2000.

Kendall, Philip C. Pimentel, Sandra Moira Rynn, A. Angelosante, Aleta and Webb, Alicia "12 Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinician's Guide to Effective Psychosocial and Pharmacological Interventions, ed. Thomas H. Ollendick andJohn S. March (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004)

Murray, Megan "Treading Water: Self-reflections on Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Human Architecture 2.1 (2003)

Nutt, David; Bell, Caroline; Masterson, Christine and Short, Clare Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Psychopharmacological Approach (London: Martin Dunitz, 2001)
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Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma &

Words: 1093 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60475847

Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma & Stress

Author's Note with contact information and more details of collegiate affiliation, etc.

The paper will describe what debriefing is. The paper will discuss the nature and prevalence of trauma in American life and culture. The paper will go on to estimate what psychologists are doing to combat this epic rise in traumatic experience, which can lead to stress disorders affecting the daily lives of many. Thus, not only are people victims of trauma, but also, with improper or no treatment, these people can fall victim again to a trauma related disorder. The paper will talk about why and how psychologists are dealing with all these instances of trauma. The paper will summarize two scholarly articles that offer perspective on the issue of trauma and debriefing as treatment. After providing concise summaries of the articles, the paper will provide a comparative analysis of…… [Read More]

References

Raphael, B., Meldrum, L., & McFarlane, A.C. (June 10, 1995) Does debriefing after psychological trauma work?: Time for randomised controlled trials. British Medical Journal. 310(1). 1479 -- 1480.

Rose, S.C., Bisson, J., & Wessely, S. (2009) Psychological debriefing for preventing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Cochrane Collaboration. The Cochrane Library, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1(1). 1 -- 46.
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Psychological Basis of Mental Illness Is Certainly

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60673893

psychological basis of mental illness is certainly only half of the story. Though mental illness is genetic, the actual symptoms and condition being presented is based on a careful marriage between biological and environmental factors. In particular, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is a mental illness in which "people have unwanted and repeated thoughts, feelings, ideas, sensations or obsession, or behaviors that make them feel driven to do something (compulsions)" (National Institute of Mental Health, 2011). This mental illness, like many others is multi-faceted, in that there is a physiological process associated with it, a set of symptoms that manifest, certain diagnostic criterion and then a set of treatment options.

Foremost, the physiological process of mental illness is mainly concerned with the brain and certain regions of it. The physiological process is a process that evaluates the neural mechanisms of perception and behavior. esearch examining the brain has found that "a selective…… [Read More]

Riccardi, Christina J, Timpano, Kiara R, & Schmidt, Norman B (2010). A Case Study Perspective on the Importance of motivation in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Clinical Case Studies, Volume 9, (Issue 4), pages 273-284.

Rosenberg, David R. & Keshavan, Matcheri S. (1998). Toward a Neurodevelopment Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Biological Psychiatry: Official Journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 43 (Issue 9), Pages 623-640.

Swinson, Richard P (2001). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory, Research, and Treatment. New York: The Guilford Press.
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Disorder Down's Syndrome and the Certain Ways

Words: 3241 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75320661

disorder Down's syndrome and the certain ways these individuals are treated in the society. Certain characteristics like their learning ability and their ability to live in the society is emphasized in the paper. Laws and regulations for children with these disorders are also hinted upon. Lastly, the inclusion of these children in the integrated teaching program is discussed.

Down syndrome is a disorder that has been named after John Langdon Down, who was a British physician and he explained this syndrome in the year 1886. Earlier in the 19th century, this condition was clinically described by Jean Etienne Dominique Esquirol in the year 1838 and then by Edouard Seguin in 1844. Dr., Jerome Lejeune identified this syndrome as a chromosome 21 trisomy. This disorder can be diagnosed after as well as before birth through prenatal screening procedures. If such pregnancies are identified, they are often terminated.

According to the CDC…… [Read More]

References

Buckley, S. (1995). Teaching children with Down syndrome to read and write. Down syndrome: Living and learning in the community (pp. 158-169). New York: Wiley-Liss.

Cheung, Y.B., Law, C.K., Chan, B., Liu, K.Y., YIP, P.S. (2006): Suicidal ideation and suicidal attempts in a population-based study of Chinese people: risk attributable to hopelessness, depression, and social factors. J. Affect. Disord.

Cicchetti, D., & Beeghly, M. (Eds.). (1990). Children with Down syndrome: A developmental perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Crawford, P.A. (1995). Early literacy: Emerging perspectives. Journal of Research in Childhood Education, 10(1), 71-86.
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Psychological Concepts and Principles Shape and Determine

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24154687

psychological concepts and principles shape and determine our behavior. They influence how we interact with other people and how we perform in social situations. Psychological factors also play an important part in the workplace.

An actor practices maintenance rehearsal in order to memorize lines. Maintenance rehearsal is great for rote repetition of material that can be quickly forgotten. An actor probably won't need to remember their lines for longer than the specific film or stage production requires. But an actor might be prone to narcissism. Narcissism is a personality disorder characterized by an inflated sense of self-importance. Many actors, especially celebrities, can probably be quite self-absorbed. In fact, the narcissistic need for attention, success, and power goes hand-in-hand with the glamour of the profession.

A musician may also be narcissistic, but the work itself may demand other psychological principles. For example, timbre, or the unique quality of a given sound,…… [Read More]