Psychological Factors Essays (Examples)

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Psychological Sequelae of Childhood Sexual

Words: 6079 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85748070

It is also interesting to note that the correlation between depression and childhood sexual abuse was found to be higher among females in many studies.

However, the issue of the relationship between depression and sexual abuse may not be as clear-cut as the above studies suggest. Recent research has begun to question this correlation and has produced findings that suggest that there are many other parameters and variables that should be considered. This is especially the case with regard to the view that childhood sexual abuse necessarily leads to depression in adulthood. As one report claims, "...there is accumulating evidence to contradict these claims" (Roosa,

Reinholtz, (Angelini, 1999). However the majority of studies indicate that there is a strong possibility that children who are sexually abused experience symptoms of depression that can extend into adulthood.

PTSD

3.1. What is PTSD?

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is a disorder that has shown…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abused Children Face Depression Risk as Adults. Retrieved March 3, 2009 at http://www.healthyplace.com/abuse/abuse-and-depression/abused-children-face-depression-risk-as-adults/menu-id-52/

Association between Childhood Sexual Abuse History and Adverse

Psychosocial Outcomes in controlled studies. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at  http://www.leadershipcouncil.org/1/res/csa.html 

Barker J. Adult Sequelae of Child Sexual Abuse. Retrieved March 6, 2009, at http://www.medicineau.net.au/clinical/psychiatry/SexualAbuse.html
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Psychological Trait Theory

Words: 2333 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91327853

Psychological Trait Theory in Criminology:

The field of criminology can basically be described as the scientific study of criminals and criminal behavior since professionals in this field try to develop theories that explain the reason for the occurrence of crimes and test the theories through observation of criminal behavior. The criminological theories in turn help in shaping the response of the society to crime in relation to preventing criminal behavior and reacting to such behaviors after they occur. Generally, the field of criminology has evolved in three different phases since the inception of this discipline in the 18th Century. While crime and criminals have existed for as long as societies have existed, the systematic study of these incidents began in the late 1700s. Prior to this period, crime and criminal behavior were mainly equated to sin i.e. The infringement of a sacred obligation.

Evolution of the Discipline of Criminology:

As…… [Read More]

References:

Lynch, J.P. (n.d.). Criminology. Retrieved from University of Colorado Boulder website:

 http://autocww2.colorado.edu/~toldy3/E64ContentFiles/LawAndCourts/Criminology.html 

See, E. (2004). Criminological Theories: Introduction, Evaluation, and Applications. Retrieved November 24, 2012, from http://roxbury.net/images/pdfs/ct4ssg.pdf

"Trait Theories." (2011). Chapter 5. Retrieved November 24, 2012, from http://ebooks.narotama.ac.id/files/Criminology%20(11th%20Edition)/CHAPTER%205%20Trait%20Theories.pdf
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Psychological Effects the Iraqi War

Words: 1880 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90420779



This point also emphasizes a cardinal aspect in the recent literature. There has been an increasing research focus on a more discursive and holistic approach which should be adopted in dealing with PTSD and related areas of psychological concern. At present the research into the field is an ongoing process which must be continually updated. The literature also leaves little doubt that PTSD and other related psychological problems as result of the Iraq war can no longer be ignored.

orks Cited

Casualties of war. April 21, 2007. http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/casualties-of-war/2005/10/26/1130302840559.html?page=3

Hare M. 2007. Army psychologist using new ways to treat

Stress. April 20, 2007. http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NES0201/704220321/-1/COLUMNS

Finer J. 2006. Frontline Care for 'At Risk' Soldiers: Army Effort Treats

Psychological Trauma at Source. April 20, 2007. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/07/AR2006060702390_pf.html

Friedman M.J. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: An Overview. Retrieved April 20, 2007, at http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/clients/sub.cfm?source=mhealth/factsheets/overview

Foa, E., & Meadows, E. (1997). Psychosocial Treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Critical…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Casualties of war. April 21, 2007.  http://www.theage.com.au/news/world/casualties-of-war/2005/10/26/1130302840559.html?page=3 

Hare M. 2007. Army psychologist using new ways to treat

Stress. April 20, 2007. http://www.democratandchronicle.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070422/NEWS0201/704220321/-1/COLUMNS

Finer J. 2006. Frontline Care for 'At Risk' Soldiers: Army Effort Treats
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Psychological Concepts and Principles Shape and Determine

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24154687

psychological concepts and principles shape and determine our behavior. They influence how we interact with other people and how we perform in social situations. Psychological factors also play an important part in the workplace.

An actor practices maintenance rehearsal in order to memorize lines. Maintenance rehearsal is great for rote repetition of material that can be quickly forgotten. An actor probably won't need to remember their lines for longer than the specific film or stage production requires. But an actor might be prone to narcissism. Narcissism is a personality disorder characterized by an inflated sense of self-importance. Many actors, especially celebrities, can probably be quite self-absorbed. In fact, the narcissistic need for attention, success, and power goes hand-in-hand with the glamour of the profession.

A musician may also be narcissistic, but the work itself may demand other psychological principles. For example, timbre, or the unique quality of a given sound,…… [Read More]

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Psychological and Socio-Cultural Theories of Risk

Words: 4457 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67940104

Psychological and Socio-Cultural Theories of isk

Definition of isk

The term "risk" is often defined differently depending on the particular paradigm. For example, risk is economics is typically defined in terms of differences in possible monetary outcomes and individuals/corporations involved in risk -- seeking behavior are typically seeking higher monetary payoffs (Markowitz 1952). When clinical psychologists, sociologists, law enforcement officials, and lay individuals identify "risky behaviors" they are referring to a broader meaning of the term "risk." In this context behaviors and involve risk are typically defined as behaviors that can be of potential harm to the person performing them or to other people (Steinberg 2008). In this sense the term "risk" is typically viewed in terms of possible negative outcomes as opposed to some other positive outcome such as the potential monetary gain.

This particular paper will assume that the definition of risky behavior includes some type of a…… [Read More]

References

Aristotle .1998. Aristotle: The Nicomachean ethics. In Ackrill J. et al. eds. Oxford World' s

Classics. York: Oxford, pp. 229-301.

Beck, U. 1992. Risk society: Towards a new modernity. New Delhi: Sage.

Boholm, A. 1996. Risk perception and social anthropology: Critique of cultural Theory. Ethnos 61, pp. 64-84.
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Psychological Influence of Diabetes the National Diabetes

Words: 1779 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66212281

Psychological Influence of Diabetes

Diabetes

The National Diabetes Educational Program is under the sponsorship of the Disease control and prevention and the National institutes of health. The purpose of this joint interaction is to reduce the effects of diabetes and delay the onset of diabetes. The target audience for this program is children, Adults, families, caregivers, healthcare professionals, promoters and peers.

Diabetes as a health related issue has diverse effects on the psychological aspects of people infected. Diabetes as a disease falls into two categories: Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 Diabetes mellitus also known as juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes is as a result of destruction of insulin producing cells of the pancreas. The lack of insulin results to an increased urine or blood glucose (Penckofer et. al., 2007). If left untreated the disease may turn out being fatal. The illness may, however, be treated by administration…… [Read More]

References

Penckofer, S., Ferrans, C.E., Velsor-Friedrich, B., & Savoy, S. (2007). The psychological impact of living with diabetes women's day-to-day experiences. The Diabetes

Educator, 33(4), 680-690.

Sepa, A., Frodi, A., Vaarala, O., & Ludvigsson, J. (2005). Diabetes-related autoimmunity in infancy Psychological stress . Diabetes care, 28(2), 290-295.

Funnell, M.M., Brown, T.L., Childs, B.P., Haas, L.B., Hosey, G.M., Jensen, B., ... & Weiss, M.A. (2009). Self-management education and National standards for diabetes. Diabetes care, 32 (1), 87-94.
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Psychological Barriers to Effective Decision-Making

Words: 1226 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64399352



The recency effect: most manager at times have an overreliance on the most readily available information to make decisions, it commonly occurs when carrying out annual performance evaluations of employees where recent performance of the employees plays a major role than accomplishments that have taken place in the earlier periods of review, this has an adverse effect has it may lead to the deviation of the set desired goals. (John k.bochardt 2010)

Anchoring bias: in most cases the price tags on products often if not always affect the purchasing negations between consumers and retailers, and most of the time consumer's end up paying higher prices for the product than necessary. This notion that sometimes leads us to allow initial reference point to distort our estimates is what professor oberto refers to anchoring bias.

From a marketing point-of-view anchoring bias can come about when negotiating the renewal of a contract with…… [Read More]

References

John k.borchardt (2010): overcoming barriers to effective deciosion making. An examination of cognitive bses that cause us to make poor decisions

Retrieved from:http://www.ncmahq.org/files/Articles/CM0610%20-%2054-61.pdf

Andrew T. Chadwick and Matthew D. Segall: Overcoming psychological barriers to good discovery

Decisions:
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Psychological Analysis Barrack Obama Analysis

Words: 603 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64402288

However, his sense of self-respect is rendered incomplete because of his father. The struggle he experienced demonstrated this and though it did not define his whole being as he is now, it was the primary component in his life that made it a challenge to meet his need for esteem.

2. As the current president of the United States, Obama can be said as a successful person. However, it cannot be said that he is fulfilled and has achieved self-actualization. The absence of a father figure in Obama's life remains a struggle in his life that could determine his successful realization for self-actualization.

3. Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs demonstrates how individual needs are categorized by levels and are comprised of different factors that may or may not apply to the individual. Using the Hierarchy of Needs alone, the theory cannot explain fully Obama's psyche, personality and behavior. Maslow's theory…… [Read More]

References

Barak Obama. (2012). Biography. Retrieved: http://www.biography.com/people/barack-obama-12782369

MacFarquhar, Larissa. (2007). The conciliator. The New Yorker. Retrieved: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2007/05/07/070507fa_fact_macfarquhar#ixzz1pbLlZHPI
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Psychological Capital and Learners K-12

Words: 4962 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33447575

Physical and mental disorders are often comorbid, reflecting an entire system that is out of balance. A healthy state, both physically and mentally reflects a state of equilibrium and stability that every organism wishes to achieve (Wallace, 2008).When one portion of the system is out of balance, the entire system can be out of balance. The degree to which the system is out of balance determines the degree of the disturbance.

A child that has greater resilience skills can recover from a greater disturbance than a child with little resiliency. Everyone has heard stories of the rich and famous who rose up from situations of poverty and despair to become something great. This is exactly what this research is about. Eriksson's psychosocial model sets up the situation that the person must overcome. Wallace's theory on resiliency provides an understanding of what the child needs to overcome these circumstances to become…… [Read More]

References

Anthony, E., Alter, C. & Jenson, J. (2009). Development of a Risk and Resilience-Based Out-of-

School Time Program for Children and Youths. Social Work. 54 (1): 45+. Retrieved from Questia Database.

Brendtro, L. & Larson, S. (2004). The Resilience Code: Finding Greatness in Youth. Reclaiming Children and Youth. 12 (4): 194 +. Retrieved from Questia Database.

Brown, W. (2006). The Value of Role Models in Inspiring Resilience. Reclaiming Children and Youth. 14 (4): 199+. Retrieved from Questia Database.
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Psychological the Most Creative Person

Words: 3872 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20626197



Portfolio: Patients who express suicidal ideation should always be taken seriously. I have read that the greatest risk factor for suicide in previous attempts. Sometimes suicide can be considered a cry for help, and everyone who expresses some time of suicidal ideation deserves evaluation.

Question 14.2

The form of psychotherapy I find the most appealing is the cognitive behavioral approach. It appeals to me since the focus if reparative and based on a desire to change one's behaviors which contribute to the problem which prompted therapy in the first place. Patients who engage in cognitive behavioral therapy require a certain degree of insight into how their behaviors contribute to their own emotions or feelings. The interaction of mind and body can be especially telling; many psychological disorders have physical manifestations and conversely, many chronic medical problems can also manifest emotional symptoms. Cognitive behavioral therapy allows the individual to recognize patterns…… [Read More]

Reference:

Moscicki EK. Identification of suicide risk factors using epidemiologic studies. Psychiatr Clin North Am 1997; 20:499-517.

Bushman BJ, Peterson WC, Bonacci EA, Vasquez EA, Miller N. (2005) Chewing on it Can Chew You Up: Effects of Rumination on Triggered Displaced Aggression. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Copyright 2005 by the American Psychological Association. Vol. 88, No. 6, 969-983

Caprara, G.V., Barbaranelli, C., & Comrey, a.L. (1992). A personological approach to the study of aggression. Personality and Individual Differences,
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Psychological Element in Drug Use and Dependence

Words: 605 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98018774

Psychological Element in Drug Use and Dependence

Placebo, the Latin term for "I will please," refers to the psychological positive response that a patient exhibits to a non-specific treatment. It is a purely psychological element, which arises out of the patient's trust in the physician, or the belief in the positive medicinal effects of the drug. Researcher Henry eecher's famous study in 1955 showed that more than 30% of patients respond positively to a placebo. Since then, numerous studies that were focused on the effects of placebo have reported mixed results. The brain imaging study conducted by Leuchter, in 2002, revealed distinct patterns of cerebral blood flow as a response to placebo among depressed subjects. Similarly Evans (2004) reported that placebo effect was quite marked in medical conditions that involved acute phase response. (inflammtion, acute sensitivity, etc.). [Wikipedia] Since placebo trials report significant positive response (at least in one third…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Wikipedia, " Placebo effect," Accessed on 14th Oct 2005, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placebo_effect

2) University of Colorado, "Psychoactive Drugs and Addiction,"

Accessed on 14th Oct 2005, psych.colorado.edu/~campeaus/2012/StudyguideExam4.PDF

3) University of Waterloo, "Biological and Psychological Models of Drug Use," Accessed on 14th Oct 2005,
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Psychological Perspective Scenario Anyone Can Experience Stress

Words: 1974 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14131132

Psychological Perspective Scenario

Anyone can experience stress in his or her life, but how the person responds to that stress is affected by the person's personality and upbringing, as well as other factors (Fernald, 2008). For someone like Lester, the issues he is facing are serious and immediate, but they also appear to have been (and will continue to be) ongoing. That is highly significant, because there is no "quick fix" for Lester. Despite that, he will be able to move forward if he addresses the issues he has and learns how to face them more clearly and in a way that is healthier for him. Psychological distress can have physical causes, but the reverse can also be true in that physical issues can be manifestations of what is taking place psychologically (Hockenbury & Hockenbury, 2010; Overskeid, 2007).

In Lester's life, he faces several causes of stress. The main one…… [Read More]

References

Fernald, L.D. (2008). Psychology: Six perspectives. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Hockenbury, DH & Hockenbury, S.E. (2010). Psychology. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

O'Neil, H.F.; cited in Coon, D. & Mitterer, J.O. (2008). Introduction to psychology: Gateways to mind and behavior. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning.

Overskeid, G. (2007). Looking for Skinner and finding Freud. American Psychologist 62(6), 590 -- 595.
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Psychological Testing in the Workplace

Words: 715 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44609974

Often, psychological testing is used to determine a candidate's approach to conflict resolution, identify the candidate's stress factors and coping mechanisms, or to possibly identify potential management skills and preferences. These and other insights are very important to potential employers, especially when it pertains to the higher-level professions and when the company has a large amount of money and a large commitment on the line.

The article concludes that psychological testing in the workplace is a good thing and that it serves a very necessary function. The disconnect between the employers' understanding of these tests and the employees' understanding is emphasized in the article as it tries to debunk the common negative myths surrounding the practice. The author's perspective is unique in that she works in the testing and test administration industry herself and is likely used to having to answer questions regarding psychological testing in the workplace on a…… [Read More]

Article Analyzed:

Botero, Ingrid Murro. (1996). "Psychological Testing Need Not Be Feared." Phoenix Business Journal, July 19, 1996.

Available online at: http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/1996/07/22/smallb3.html
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Psychological Research on Animals Is

Words: 694 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85577964

The purpose is to determine whether the "face-processing system of humans" and in this case, the tamarin, share characteristics.

By finding out if humans' face-processing systems and the face-processing systems of the tamarin are similar, the researchers will be more readily be able to allow "early and quick processing of socially salient stimuli" (Neiworth, et al., 2003). Do humans and primate share sensitivity toward "conspecific faces" (i.e., faces of the same species), and do they share an ability to "generalize changes in the face that do not suggest a new identity" (Neiworth). The researchers presented the subjects (a human and taramin) with "a human face, chimpanzee face, taramin face, or an object as a sample." The faces were either in an upright position, or inverted in the next phase of the research.

Conclusion: The above-mentioned research is an example of a totally ethical, well-managed psychological experiment. The results showed that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Psychological Association. (2010). Animal Research Advances Animal and Human

Welfare: Research Animals in Psychology. Retrieved March 27, 2011, from  http://www.apa.org/research/responsible/research-animals.pdf .

Neiworth, Julie J., Hassett, Janice M., and Sylvester, Cara J. (2003). Face processing in humans

and new world monkeys: the influence of experiential and ecological factors. Animal Cognition. Retrieved March 27, 2011, from http://www.acad.carleton.edu/curricular/PSYC/monkeys/face.html.
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Psychological Affects Sexual Abuse Has

Words: 1547 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23779142



In conclusion, both juvenile sex offenders and victims of sexual abuse need to undergo treatment and counselling. The importance of treating victims of sex abuse is to ensure that the "cycle of abuse" ceases and that they can recover from their ordeal and lead normal lives. The treatment of juvenile sex offenders is to ensure their rehabilitation, depending on the problem and also separate them from the rest of society.

eferences

California Dept. Of Justic, (n.d). Megan's Law - Facts about Sex Offenders -- California

Department of Justice. etrieved April 13, 2010, from http://www.meganslaw.ca.gov/facts.htm

Harrison, L. (2009). The Ambiguity of Juvenile Sexual Offenders. Internet Journal of Criminology, 7, 1-29. etrieved April 14, 2010, from http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Harrison_Juvenile_Sexual_Offenders_J

uly_09.pdf

Herrmann B, Navratil F. (2004). Sexual Abuse in Pre-pubertal Children and Adolescents.

Sultan C (Editor) Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology: Evidence-Based Clinical

Practice. Pakistan: Endocr Dev, Basel, Karger

Hunter, J.A. (2000). Understanding Juvenile Sex Offenders:…… [Read More]

References

California Dept. Of Justic, (n.d). Megan's Law - Facts about Sex Offenders -- California

Department of Justice. Retrieved April 13, 2010, from  http://www.meganslaw.ca.gov/facts.htm 

Harrison, L. (2009). The Ambiguity of Juvenile Sexual Offenders. Internet Journal of Criminology, 7, 1-29. Retrieved April 14, 2010, from http://www.internetjournalofcriminology.com/Harrison_Juvenile_Sexual_Offenders_J

uly_09.pdf
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Psychological Trauma of Colonization the

Words: 1642 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87537705

You drove him to kill himself; and now he will be buried like a dog...

" This statement shows that the once great leader is nothing in the eyes of the white colonists. This has a trickle-down affect on those around him. When Okonkwo gave in to the struggle, those around him lost their final hope of every overcoming the colonialists.

Through an examination of two African historical novels, one can see many similarities in the psychology of change between colonialism and change management in corporate take-overs. Change begins slowly and there are always some that will readily accept the new regime and others that will put up a resistance. The reasons for resistance to change are similar to corporate change.

One can find examples of the same psychological reactions in both novels. The resistance becomes more violent as it loses ground and the total change and loss of familiar…… [Read More]

References

Achebe, C. Things Fall Apart. New York, NY: Anchor Books.

Ngugi, wa Thiong'o. Petals of Blood. New York, NY: Penguin Books.

Sdiffgy-krenke, I. Coping Styles: Does intervention change anything? Eurpoean Journal of Developmental Psychology. 1 (4): 367-382.

Winn, G.A Change in employee attitude IS possible! Change Management, Retrieved April 11,
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Psychological Research and Patient-Practitioner Interaction the Work

Words: 830 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24737591

Psychological Research and Patient-Practitioner Interaction

The work of Like and Zyzanski (2002) reports that patient-practitioner transactions in the ambulatory setting have gained in importance in the research as there is "empirical support for our anecdotal, common-sense notions that clinical encounter experiences are a major determinant of outcomes such as the patient's satisfaction with the encounter. The study is reported to examine the issue of patient-physician encounter and asks the questions of: 1) Is there a relationship between fulfillment of patient requests for services and patient satisfaction with the clinical encounter? And (2) What degree of satisfaction is explained by the qualities of the encounter as compared to the characteristics of the patient, physician, and system of health care? (Like and Zyzanski, 2002) A study of 144 adult patients and their physicians was conducted and it is reported "at least 19% of the variance in patient satisfaction could be attributed to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Feinberg, J. (1988) The effect of patient -- Practitioner interaction on compliance: A review of the literature and application in rheumatoid arthritis. Patient Education and Counseling. Vol. 11 Issue 3, June 1998.

Hellstrom, O., Lindqvist, P. And Mattsson, B. (1996) A Phenomenological Analysis of Doctor-Patient Interaction: A Case Study. Patient Education and Counseling. Vol. 33, Issue 1. 20 Nov 1998.

Heritage, J. And Maynard, DW (2006) Problems and Prospects in the Study of Physician-Patient Interaction: 30 Years of Research Annual Review of Sociology Vol. 32: 351-37.

Kaplan, SH, Greenfield, S, and Ware, JE (1989) Assessing the Effects of Physician-Patient Interaction on the Outcomes of Chronic Disease. Medical Care. Mar 1989; Vol.27, No.3.
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Psychological Learning Theories There Are

Words: 1412 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98009598

Thus instrumental condition would rely on the notion that a person generates a response rather than an environmental stimulus. I have found that both people and stimulus may elicit certain behaviors both in and outside of the classroom.

Instrumental conditioning is modeled after animal experiments which showed that the individual's environment can reinforce response controls, thus the best responses occur when reinforcement of a particular behavior is given. This I have learned to be the case in the classroom most assuredly, where students are more likely to exhibit positive behaviors more frequently when they are reinforced immediately for demonstrating positive behaviors. Generally the patterns that emerge from such conditioning are self-directed, meaning that I have found that most students engage in behaviors and continue to engage in behaviors which they find result in a positive response regardless of the environment they are placed in.

With regard to controlling adverse behavior,…… [Read More]

References

Chang, Min-Yu S. (1998). "Learning Theory and Advertising." CIA Advertising. 23,

October 2004, Available: http://www.ciadvertising.org/studies/student/98_spring/theory/learning.html

Klein, S.B. (2002). "Principles and Applications of Appetitive Conditioning." Mississippi

State University. McGraw Hill. Education. 22, October, 2004, Available:
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Psychological Way of Looking at

Words: 977 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38464983

Certain people might blame this on the high number of immigrants coming into the country and working for less money or stealing in order to sustain themselves.

Racism is harmful for both the oppressor, and the oppressed. Racism can be both physical and nonphysical. hen people are physically harassed because of a racism-based reason, it results in victims with physical wounds. On the other hand, when people are suffering nonphysical wounds, it means that their lives are being affected through the fact that they are frequently discriminated. Discrimination poses threats like unemployment and poorer education.

People tend to feel that they should be more privileged than others that recently entered their country. Also, people tend to believe that the fact that those of the same color with them are majority makes them better than those that have a different skin color and form a minority.

Evolution has only proved that…… [Read More]

Works cited:

1. Charles Quist-Adade, "What Is 'Race' and What Is 'Racism'?," New African, No. 450, April 2006

2. George M. Fredrickson, "Racism: A Short History," Princeton University Press, 2002.

3. Graham Richards, "Race, Racism, and Psychology: Towards a Reflexive History," Routledge, 1997.

4. Jean Lau Chin, "The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination: Racisim in America," Greenwood Publishing Group, 2004.
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Psychological Theories of Crime Similarities

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36139053

For instance a child performs poorly in examination and the parent decides to withdraw his promise to take the child to the zoo during the holiday.

Positive punishment; it is a process by which stimulus is immediately added after a specific behavior so that future frequency of the behavior is decreased. A good example is of a pick pocket is taken to prison and subjected to learning of a given artwork so that when he comes out of prison he can make his own money through the artwork learned.

Negative punishment; it is a process by which stimulus is removed immediately after a given behavior so that future frequency of that behavior is decreased. Example is when a student performs poorly in class and the parent decides to cut down the student pocket money, the pocket money acts as the stimulant that has been removed hence a negative punishment.

The…… [Read More]

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Psychological Disorder ADHD ADHD Is

Words: 1806 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61198795

My final recommendation was that the parents and Adam's teachers should work as a team to help Adam manage his condition. In other words, the parents should communicate with the teachers to determine if the interventions have been effective. I would then talk to the parents themselves every two months to make further recommendations as necessary.

CONCLUSION

While drug interventions for ADHD, especially in children, have been increasingly controversial because of their possible side-effects, their main advantage is the speed and efficacy with which they work. Those who have benefited reported that the effects were almost immediately visible, on the same day the drug was used.

On the other hand, drug therapies for any mental disorder have been imperfect and frequently plagued by side-effects and non-compliance. Continuous research is therefore necessary to improve not only drug therapies and identify potential harmful effects in the long-term, but also to find possible…… [Read More]

References

ADHD Information Library (2008). ADHD Treatment Options: many Good Choices. Newideas.Net. Retrieved from: http://newideas.net/adhd/treatment

Martin, B. (2011). Treatment for Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD). PsychCentral. Retrieved from: http://psychcentral.com/lib/2007/treatment-for-attention-deficit-disorder-adhd/

Personal Health Lifestyles, Inc. (2001). Attention Deficit Disorder: Facts, Prevention and Treatment Strategies. Retrieved from:  http://www.healingwithnutrition.com/adisease/add-adhd/add-adhd.html#A1
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Psychological Precursors for Impulsive Shopping

Words: 2330 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6962965

Psychological Parameters of Impulse Buying

Personality -- Impulse Buying

Defining the Psychological Parameters of Impulse Buying

Impulse buying (IB) represents unplanned, impulsive purchases that make little economic sense. The occasional, inexpensive impulsive purchase may do little harm and may even be healthy, but a pattern of chronic IB can lead to financial ruin. For this reason, understanding the psychological precursors for IB will be important for the creation of effective interventions. Towards this goal, the psychological states that predict IB behaviors were examined. In addition to the cognitive and affective domains included in the Impulse Buying Tendency Scale (IBTS), this study includes for the first time an analysis of the relationship between IB and the two most relevant time perspective domains of future-oriented and present-hedonistic-oriented from the Zimbardo Time Perspective Instrument (ZTPI). In addition, six questions were incorporated into the questionnaire to assess a consumer's perspective on IB consequences that…… [Read More]

References

Lin, Y.H. & Chen, C.F. (2013). Passengers' shopping motivations and commercial activities at airports -- The moderating effects of time pressure and impulse buying tendency. Tourism Management, 36, 426-34.

Silvera, DH, Lavack, A.M., & Kropp, F. (2008). Impulse buying: The role of affect, social influence, and subjective well-being. Journal of Consumer Marketing, 25(1), 23-33.

Verplanken, B. & Herabadi, A. (2001). Individual differences in impulse buying tendency: Feeling and no thinking. European Journal of Personality, 15, S71-83.

Zimbardo, P.G. & Boyd, J.N. (1999). Putting time in perspective: A valid, reliable individual-differences metric. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77(6), 1271-88.
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Psychological Perspectives the Relationship to

Words: 1341 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42218794

In this way, they have become familiar with each other's behavioral traits and the reasons behind these traits.

Psychodynamic aspects (Cherry, 2010) did play a role since the beginning of the relationship, but became significant only while Eric and Amanda were learning about each other on a cognitive level. Eric's fundamental insecurity regarding Amanda's relationships with other men stem not only from his first disappointment, but also from the fact that his mother abandoned him as a baby. aised by his father and stepmother, who did provide him with plenty of love and security, Eric always experienced a sense of loss and abandonment from the female gender. This broken mother-child relationship, reinforced by his disappointment at 19, has informed his relationships in later life.

Amanda in turn did not have traumatic childhood experiences. Her parents are still together and provided her with plenty of love and security during her formative…… [Read More]

References

Appraiser Central (2010). 5 Major Perspectives. Retrieved from http://www.appraisercentral.com/research/5%20Major%20Perspectives.htm

Cherry, Kendra. (2010). Perspectives in Modern Psychology. Retrieved from http://psychology.about.com/od/psychology101/a/perspectives.htm

Matheson, Kelly (2009, Jul. 27). The Psychology Behind Romantic Relationship. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/guestab8f5a1/the-psychology-behind-romantic-relationships
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Psychological Testing

Words: 1536 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64787182

Psychological Testing

Psychological tests are commonly used to establish individual capabilities and characteristics. Such inference is derived as a result of collecting, integrating and interpreting information about a person (Marnat, 2009). It constitutes measuring variables through the use of procedures and devices crafted to demonstrate a person's behavior (Cohen & Swerdlik, 2009). Assessment of personality is, ideally, the measuring and evaluating of psychological aspects such as one's values, states, world view, personal identity, acculturation, behavior styles, sense of humor and the related characteristics of an individual (Cohen & Swerdlik, 2009). Personality tests are designed to determine the character of a human being or their disposition. The initial personality tests were designed to examine and predict disorders of clinical nature. The tests are still useful today and are applied to determine cases in need of counseling. The latest personality tests are used to measure normal characteristics (Miller, Mclntire, & Lovler, 2011).…… [Read More]

References

Cattell, H. E., & Mead, A. D. (2008). The sixteen-personality factor questionnaire (16PF). The SAGE handbook of personality theory and assessment, 2, 135-178.

Cohen, R. & Swerdlik, M. (2009). Psychological testing and assessment (7th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw-Hill.

Friedman, M. (1996). Type A Behavior: Its Diagnosis and Treatment. New York: Plenum Press (Kluwer Academic Press)

Groth-Marnat, G. (2009). Handbook of psychological assessment. John Wiley & Sons.
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Psychological Counseling Interview Counselor Tom

Words: 4270 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81626687

Okay?

Client: Thank you Christina, I look forward to seeing you next week.

Zal (1990, p. 136) states that it can indeed be a very fragile and emotionally battered individual that comes to your office for evaluation. An adequate treatment plan for panic disorder must therefore comprise many specific aspects. The first of course is to make the diagnosis and share it confidently and directly with the patient. As the first person to encounter the patient with some understanding of his or her symptoms, you are in a unique position to do an enormous therapeutic service by giving them a clear, precise definition of their illness and once and for all showing them that their symptoms have meaning. Let them know that it is only since 1980 that panic disorder has a name and that it is only during this decade that even psychiatry is beginning to understand this malady.…… [Read More]

References www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339937

Austrian, S.G. (2000). Mental Disorders, Medications, and Clinical Social Work. New York: Columbia University Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100339938 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908719

Barber, J.P. & Crits-Christoph, P. (Eds.). (1995). Dynamic Therapies for Psychiatric Disorders: Axis I. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85908721 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620

Beck, A.T., Emery, G., & Greenberg, R.L. (1985). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias A Cognitive Perspective. New York: Basic Books. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=6960620 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037

Craske, M.G. (1999). Anxiety Disorders: Psychological Approaches to Theory and Treatment. Boulder, CO: Westview Press. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8992037 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=85933111
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Psychological Attitudes Toward Risk Is

Words: 626 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57486549

It is essential that such risks be managed in an appropriate and targeted way.

One way in which to mitigate the risk of problematic interpersonal relationships within the workplace is by means of both formal and informal gatherings. Informal gatherings are beneficial in terms of helping employees to become familiar with each other in a context other than work. Work parties and lunches can for example be used in this way. This kind of informal gathering is perhaps best instituted when there is not a large amount of tension between workers.

For greater tension levels, more formal measures can be taken. Seminars presented by human relations experts can for example help to teach employees the importance of functioning within a diverse environment. Such seminars should be presented in such a way as to not threaten employees or their attitudes, but rather to gradually change their attitudes. Seminars can for example…… [Read More]

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Psychological View of Investment &

Words: 1828 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44339313

" (Grabel, 2004) Good institutions serve as the basis for economic growth due to right market-based and market-guided incentives being created which include those stated in this study and specifically: (1) rule of law; (2) competitive markets; (3) low taxation (4) noninflationary monetary policies; and (5) free trade. (2002) Good institutions serve to "Foster other cultural patterns of conduct, hard work, savings and industriousness, honesty and trustworthiness, creativity, and self-responsibility. These are the bases of the wealth of nations." (Easterly, 2002; as cited in: Ebeling, 2002) These tools are helpful in avoiding and mitigating economic risks in development.

ibliography

Easterly, W (2002) the Elusive Quest for Growth: An Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (Cambridge, MIT Press) Chapter 2

Krueger, a.O (1998) Why Trade Liberalization Is good for Growth, Economic Journal 108

Demetriades, P. And Hussein, K.A (1996) Does Financial Development Cause Economic Growth? Time-Series Evidence From 16 Countries,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Easterly, W (2002) the Elusive Quest for Growth: An Economists Adventures and Misadventures in the Tropics (Cambridge, MIT Press) Chapter 2

Krueger, a.O (1998) Why Trade Liberalization Is good for Growth, Economic Journal 108

Demetriades, P. And Hussein, K.A (1996) Does Financial Development Cause Economic Growth? Time-Series Evidence From 16 Countries, Journal of Development Economics 51, pp387-411.

Grabel, I. (2003) International Private Capital Flows and Developing Countries, in H-J. Chang (ed.) Rethinking Development Economics, London: Anthem Press.
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Human Factors Engineering There Is

Words: 3285 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62873818

The work environment, for example, could be conducive to this type of stress, as can the relationship with other employees and with supervisors.

This type of fatigue is vastly different from the mental or physical fatigue of direct work overburden, and is also more subtle than these types of fatigue. It should therefore be carefully monitored in terms of its nature and how it interacts with other types of fatigue, particularly when the workforce is diminished.

Because of the complexity of psychological loading factors, Dr. Bill should be careful to monitor, revise, and update company policy in terms of issues such as communication among employees as well as among employees and their supervisors. Communication can play a significant part in how employees perceive their work, as well as how they experience the burden of their work in a psychological sense.

Mental loading, on the other hand, is probably the most…… [Read More]

References

Advameg, Inc. (2012). Sprains and Strains. Retrieved from:  http://www.faqs.org/sports-science/Sp-Tw/Sprains-and-Strains.html#b 

City Office (2012). Retrieved from: http://www.yourcityoffice.com/articles/48/office-space_lighting.html

How Does Human Metabolism Work? (2012). Retrieved from:  http://campus.bethlehem.edu/eclinic/eclinic_0013e.pdf 

Overgaard, D., Gyntelberg, F. And Heitmann, B.L. (2004). Psychological workload and body weight: is there an association? A review of the literature. Occupational Medicine, no. 54. Retrieved from:  http://occmed.oxfordjournals.org/content/54/1/35.long
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Health and Socio-Cultual Factors Health and Socio-Cultural

Words: 1535 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43787095

Health and Socio-Cultual Factors

Health and Socio-Cultural Factors

Health and Socio cultural Factors

Health and Socio-Cultural Factors

Health and Socio-Cultural Factors

The value of health being wealth is as old as the history of mankind. People of all times have their philosophies related to healthcare and they developed the precautions and treatment according to their specified theories. As the changes take place in every aspect of life, the theories of healthcare and causes of diseases were also developed and the new concepts were promoted to replace the old concepts and practices.

This paper casts light upon causes of disease and illness with regard to classical and modern concepts. The paper explains the differences between the two concepts and elaborates how the new concepts are better than the classical ones.

Classical Concepts about Health

The classical statement about health was 'Illness is simply a matter of bad luck, bad judgment, or…… [Read More]

References

International Vegetarian Union. (2011). Retrieved from  http://www.ivu.org/history/northam20a/einstein.html 

Natural News. (2008). Retrieved from  http://www.naturalnews.com/023237_minerals_health_soil.html 

World Health Organisation. (2012). Retrieved from http://www.who.int/suggestions/faq/en/index.html
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Human Factors of Night Vision Goggles

Words: 3255 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81095109

Night Vision Goggles: Fatigue and Decline Cognitive Levels

Night Vision Goggles: Fatigue and Decline of Cognitive Levels

In modern combat missions, the desire to operate at night is paramount because of the heightened enemy prowess against aggressors. As a result, technology has fostered the possibility of developing systems that would minimize the challenges associated with darkness. A common example of this technology is the Night Vision Goggles (NVG). However, because of physical and physiological challenges associated with NVG technology, pilots have often been dissatisfied with their careers. This situation has often forced many of them to leave their current workplaces in search for the ones that address cognitive and psychological problems associated with the use of the gadget. This research proposal will prove that NVG causes fatigue and lowers the quality of cognitive judgments required in piloting. While identifying the problems associated with NVG technology in piloting, this study will…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, R.E. (2012). Awareness and Detection of Traffic and Obstacles Using Synthetic and Enhanced Vision Systems. NASA Center for AeroSpace Information, 1-69

Brickner, M.S. (1980). Helicopter Flights with Night-Vision Goggles- Human Factors Aspects. Ames Research Center; 1-40

Chen Y, Wickramasinghe V and Zimcik D. (2007). Adaptive mount approaches for helicopter seat vibration control. In: Proceedings of ICAST 17 (4) 211-241

Craig, G, et al. (2006). Night Vision Goggle External Lighting Effects. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 50: 86-90 DOI: 10.1177/154193120605000119
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Link Between Dietary Quality and Psychological Well Being

Words: 3791 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14389994

Diet on a Univesity Student's Psychological Well-being

This aticle povides a eseach poposal fo a study to be conducted on the impact of a diet on the psychological well-being of a univesity student. The pape poposes conducting an expeiment on univesity students using Mediteanean diet as the basis of exploing the impact of diet on psychological well-being. The eseache demonstates that thee is evidence in existing liteatue egading the impact of diet on psychological well-being, especially Mediteanean diet. The poposed independent vaiable fo the study is Mediteanean diet while the dependent vaiables include physical and mental health, isk of depession, and cognitive decline. The eseache poposed conducting a coss-sectional study on students fom the univesity's nusing depatment using a self-administeed questionnaie. The data analyses will entail the use of SPSS statistical softwae and Chi-squae tests. The final section of the pape discusses potential impotance of findings if the hypotheses ae…… [Read More]

references and have addictive properties.

Highly-processed snack and takeaway food products, rich in tasty fat and sugar, have now displaced much of the fruit, vegetables and other nutritious, unprocessed foods in our diets.

Largely as a result of these changes, there has been a staggering increase in the proportion of overweight and obese people across many countries. Common non-infectious illnesses, many driven by poor diets, are now the leading cause of death worldwide.

And we're now realizing that unhealthy diets may also be contributing to poor mental health.

Appendix C
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Biological and Psychological Determinism Theories

Words: 581 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74814678

Environmental determinism relies on the importance of the physical environment around the individual in relation to that individual's behavior. Applying the ideas of environmental determinism to serial murder means that one would believe the physical environment of a murderer would be the most influential factor which determines them to kill. However; this more generalized theory does not fully account for why a murderer would commit mass or multiple murders. ather, like many other generalized theories attempting to explain seemingly senseless violence, it just poses a theory for why individuals would be driven to kill in the first place.

The trauma-control model, formulated by Hickey, gives a more in depth look at why individuals would turn from murderers to serial murderers. According to this model, individuals can harbor intense feelings of depression and rejection. As these feelings are amplified throughout life, that individual's tendency to engage in abnormal behaviors would increase.…… [Read More]

References

Egger, Steven. Serial Murder: An Illusive Phenomenon. Praeger Publishers. 1990.

Purcell, Catherine E., Arrigo, Bruce a. The Psychology of Lust Murder: Paraphernalia,

Sexual Killing, and Serial Homicide. 1st ed. Academic Press. 2006.
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Criminality Psychological Theories of Criminal

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53904242

Biological models of criminal behavior typically look at such variables as heredity and genetic contributions to criminality (which are significant in many cases), the contribution of neurotransmitters to behavior, and abnormal or different brain structures and their association with behaviors. Biological models offer treatments such as chemical castration for sex offenders where psychological principles of rehabilitation are not especially effective (aine, 2002). Sociological theories of criminal behavior are more concerned with how the structure of society and culture historically contribute to criminal behavior. This theory takes the point-of-view that criminality is a social construction (Holmes & Holmes, 2008). Understanding the societal and culture contributions to behavior can also be useful. It would be a mistake to deny that biological and sociological contributions are also useful in explaining and dealing with criminal behavior in society.

In order to consider the full extent of any phenomenon it is best to approach it…… [Read More]

References

Andrews, D.A. & Hoge, R.D. (1999). The psychology of criminal conduct and principles of effective prevention and rehabilitation. Forum on Corrections Research. Special Edition. 12 -- 14. Retrieved on April 1, 2013 from http://www.csc-scc.gc.ca/text/pblct/forum/special/espe_b-eng.shtml

Holmes, R.M., & Holmes, S.T. (2008). Profiling violent crimes: An investigative tool (4th

ed). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Mischel, W. (1968). Personality and assessment. New York: Wiley.
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Represented by the Psychological Mechanisms

Words: 675 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40877060



Method: I will use both the descriptive and the interpretive method. I will use psychological studies discussing the arguments mentioned above, as well as practical case studies. I will use the interview as an instrument in order to perform a small scale research among the people I know to see if the conclusions of other studies in the field are similar to mine. I will try to keep an impartial point-of-view and at the same time provide some relevant personal opinions.

Limitations: he limitations of the research reside in the impossibility to conduct a large scale applied research.

Delimitations: he research will try to reach relevant conclusions regarding the motivation that pushes people to exercise (or not).

References

Allen, J.B. Sport and exercise psychology, Perception of coaches social environment: supporting or thwarting women coaches pshychological needs-Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2008, 30(Suppl.), S146-S215, http://hk.humankinetics.com/eJournalMedia/pdfs/15776.pdf

Exercise psychology tip no 5:How…… [Read More]

The journal of sport and exercise psychology, Human Kinetics Journals,  http://journals.humankinetics.com/JSEP 

Turner, A. An investigation into the relationship between physical activity and happiness in adults,  http://chesterrep.openrepository.com/cdr/bitstream/10034/78653/1/introductory%20materials.pdf ,

Why do people exercise? Americanheart.org, http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3003225
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Life Course Crime Factors Determining

Words: 1853 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79243872

The argument here is highly theoretical, ultimately defining crime as unskilled and essentially unrestrained activity -- supporting their later conclusions in a Genera Theory of Crime (Gottfredson & Hirschil 1986). Even here, however, some points of continuity with other research can be found.

The authors ultimately maintain that criminal behavior arises out of a failure to meet the standards of normal behavior in society, and that the image of the "career criminal" is a misleading research concept as all who exhibit consistent criminal patterns are essentially incapable of maintaining the intellectual and conscious through-line of a "career" (Gottfredson & Hirschil 1986). Though other findings suggest that rehabilitation is more possible than these conclusions indicate, even a minor adjustment in Gottfredson & Hirschil's (1986) theory makes it compatible with these other findings: if learning can continue in adulthood, than the persistent "incapabilities" of career-oriented behavior can eventually be taught these capabilities.…… [Read More]

References

Gottfredson, M. & Hirschil, T. (1986). The true value of lambda would appear to be zero. Criminology 24(2), pp. 213-234.

Gottfredson, M. & Hirschil, T. (1990). A General Theory of Crime. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.

Laub, J.; Nagin, D. & Sampson, R. (1992). Trajectories of change in criminal offending. American Sociological Review 63, pp. 225-238.

Sampson, R. & Laub, J. (1990). Crime and Deviance over the Life Course: The Salience of Adult Social Bonds. American Sociological Review 55(5), pp. 609-627
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Psychological Disengagement

Words: 1426 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44849136

ace and Academic Disengagement

Psychological Disengagement

Psychological disengagement represents a coping mechanism that preserves a person's sense of self-worth in the face of negative feedback. For example, a student may discount a bad grade on an exam by framing it as an aberration, thereby preserving a 'good student' self-identity. Employing this coping mechanism has specific advantages, such as allowing the student to be persistent about achieving academic success despite receiving negative feedback (Nussbaum and Steele, 2007). On the other hand, psychological disengagement could facilitate a student framing academic success as irrelevant to their personal goals and future. Such students tend to perform poorly in school and suffer from increased dropout rates (reviewed by Stephan, Caudroit, Boiche, and Sarrazin, 2011). In contrast, students who are academically successful tend not to disengage, despite receiving a negative evaluation, and self-perceptions of their academic competency suffers accordingly. Understanding the mechanisms that encourages psychological disengagement…… [Read More]

References

Major, Brenda, Spencer, Steven, Schmader, Toni, and Wolfe, Connie. (1998). Coping with negative stereotypes about intellectual performance: The role of psychological disengagement. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 24, 34-50.

Nussbaum, A. David and Steele, Claude M. (2007). Situational disengagement and persistence in the face of adversity. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43, 127-134.

Schmader, Toni, Major, Brenda, and Gramzow, Richard, H. (2001). Coping with ethnic stereotypes in the academic domain: Perceived injustice and psychological disengagement. Journal of Social Issues, 57, 93-111.

Stephan, Yannick, Caudroit, Johan, Boiche, Julie, and Sarrazin, Philippe. (2011). Predictors of situational disengagement in the academic setting: The contribution of grades, perceived competence, and academic motivation. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 81, 441-455.
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Psychological Testing and Its Uses in Practical

Words: 521 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3013789

psychological testing and its uses in practical situations. This essay will examine the intelligence test, as means to help illuminate how these assessments can be used for in a given situation. Specifically, this essay will examine how these intelligence tests can be used in the workplace for human resources purpose such as hiring and promotion.

Psychological Testing

The role of psychological testing is to provide a tool to further evaluate the mental frame work of an individual. While there are several types of these assessments such as screening, personality and achievement, this essay will examine how intelligence testing can be utilized in the workplace. Intelligence testing attempts to measure the ability of a person's ability to understand the world around them in their environment. These tests use questions that measures the intellectual potential of the person being evaluated and does not reflect a total or comprehensive model of one's totally…… [Read More]

References

Flynn, J.R. (1987). Massive IQ gains in 14 nations: What IQ tests really measure. Psychological bulletin, 101(2), 171.

Framingham, J. (2011). Types of Psychological Testing. Psych Central. Retrieved on September 26, 2014, from http://psychcentral.com/lib/types-of-psychological-testing/0005924

Richardson, K. (2002). What IQ tests test. Theory & Psychology, 12(3), 283-314. Retrieved from  http://www.swisswuff.ch/files/richardson2002whatiqteststest.pdf
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Psychological and Emotional Stress Experienced

Words: 1292 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50588820

As one study states, "Suicide rates for te elderly, tirty-five per 100,000 are iger tan any oter age group..." (Oriol W.) a study by Butler, Lewis and Sunderland (1991) also amplifies tis data and refers to te increase of depressive moods in te elderly wic can also lead to extreme states of stress. Tese factors are obviously compounded by te events and trauma in natural disasters and can lead to severe psycological problems in te elderly.

Anoter factor tat is often mentioned is transfer trauma. Tis occurs wen te elderly ave to be suddenly moved from teir normal environment or ome during disasters. Tis can cause extreme stress and disorientation in older people, wo ave become dependent and accustomed to teir surrounding and may fear losing teir support system.

In conclusion, all of te above factors empasize tat natural disasters can increase and exacerbate stress and anxiety in te elderly…… [Read More]

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=107540836

World Health Organisation. (1995) the world health report 1995: bridging the gaps. Geneva: WHO, 1995.

In the United States the percentage of people 65 or older increased from 4% in 1900 to about 13% in the late 1990s. In 1900, only about 3 million of the nation's people had reached 65. By 1998, the number of senior citizens had increased to about 34 million. Population experts estimate that more than 50 million Americans -- about 17% of the population -- will be 65 or older in 2020." (Old age)
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Psychological Testing Movement History and

Words: 2251 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1536882

The opposing side, which sports a more eclectic set of disciplinary backgrounds and prides itself on a more sophisticated and inclusive perspective, divides human abilities into broad classes -- logical, spatial, interpersonal, verbal, etc. -- and labels each class an "intelligence." The two sides then proceed to talk past each other. (Casse, 1998, p. 33)

The resulting controversy then falls back to the idea of socio-cultural differences, and race/gender/culture/environment. (Skidmore & Aagaard, 2004, p. 304) Casse claims that by differing on core definitions of intelligence scientists are not good at comparing anything but data or defining concepts,

Scientists make bad dictionary writers and worse philosophers. Their main skills are in constructing experiments and generating explanations for what they observe. Neither of these endeavors requires agreement on what the words involved "mean" in any deep or absolute sense, only on ways of converting the elements of the theory at issue into…… [Read More]

References

Casse, D. (1998, August). IQ since "The Bell Curve." Commentary, 106, 33.

Intelligence. (2004). In the Columbia Encyclopedia (6th ed.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Daly, W.C. (1997). Some Mentally Retarded Children Can Benefit from Placement with Peers. Education, 117(4), 553.

Figueroa, R.A. (1989). Psychological Testing of Linguistic-Minority Students: Knowledge Gaps and Regulations. Exceptional Children, 56(2), 145.
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Psychological Diagnosis Related Children Topic Generalized Anxiety

Words: 3739 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71398487

psychological diagnosis related children. TOPIC: GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER. Topics selected Diagnostic Statistical Manual Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR). The research paper discuss: a.

Anxiety disorders are presently responsible for interfering in people's lives and preventing them from being able to successfully integrate society. hen considering the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), matters are particularly intriguing as a result of the fact that many people have trouble identifying it and actually go through their lives thinking that their thinking is perfectly normal. In spite of the fact that there are no motives to provoke the exaggerated worry seen in people with GAD, they are unable to realize that they are overstressed. Millions of people from around the world are currently suffering from GAD, with the malady affecting virtually everything about their lives.

hile some individuals actually acknowledge the fact that their worries are unfounded, it is very difficult for them to put across rational…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Gliatto, M.F. "Generalized Anxiety Disorder." American Family Physician. October 1, 2000.

Kendall, Philip C. Pimentel, Sandra Moira Rynn, A. Angelosante, Aleta and Webb, Alicia "12 Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Phobic and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Clinician's Guide to Effective Psychosocial and Pharmacological Interventions, ed. Thomas H. Ollendick andJohn S. March (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004)

Murray, Megan "Treading Water: Self-reflections on Generalized Anxiety Disorder," Human Architecture 2.1 (2003)

Nutt, David; Bell, Caroline; Masterson, Christine and Short, Clare Mood and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Psychopharmacological Approach (London: Martin Dunitz, 2001)
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Psychological Research It Is Difficult

Words: 1904 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91807125



We have also talked about the "blue print" of a study, or the logical model of proof which guides the researcher throughout the entire study -- i.e. The research design. It is by which the investigator determines the relationships between variables being tested. We have discussed true experiments, its nature and validity issues as well as quasi-experimental designs. We also provided a discussion of the difference between these two designs.

What is worth nothing, I believe, is the importance of a good research design. A good research design theoretically leads to good data. Hence, during the conceptualization of research design, careful thought needs to be employed.

Lastly, our research considerations, on which kind of statistical tool to use, whether to use sample or population, and/or which research design to employ, should always be anchored in our research objectives, on the things that we aim to know through the study.

eferences…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association (2003). How To Be A Wise Consumer of Psychological

Research. Retrieved from http://www.psychologymatters.org/wiseconsumer.html on May 15, 2009.

Aron, A., Aron, E. & Coups, E.J. (2006). Statistics for Psychology, 4th Edition.

New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall.
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Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma &

Words: 1093 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60475847

Psychological Efficacy of Debriefing for Trauma & Stress

Author's Note with contact information and more details of collegiate affiliation, etc.

The paper will describe what debriefing is. The paper will discuss the nature and prevalence of trauma in American life and culture. The paper will go on to estimate what psychologists are doing to combat this epic rise in traumatic experience, which can lead to stress disorders affecting the daily lives of many. Thus, not only are people victims of trauma, but also, with improper or no treatment, these people can fall victim again to a trauma related disorder. The paper will talk about why and how psychologists are dealing with all these instances of trauma. The paper will summarize two scholarly articles that offer perspective on the issue of trauma and debriefing as treatment. After providing concise summaries of the articles, the paper will provide a comparative analysis of…… [Read More]

References

Raphael, B., Meldrum, L., & McFarlane, A.C. (June 10, 1995) Does debriefing after psychological trauma work?: Time for randomised controlled trials. British Medical Journal. 310(1). 1479 -- 1480.

Rose, S.C., Bisson, J., & Wessely, S. (2009) Psychological debriefing for preventing post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Cochrane Collaboration. The Cochrane Library, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 1(1). 1 -- 46.
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Psychological Experiment The Experiment in Question Studied

Words: 1635 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99981362

psychological experiment. The experiment in question studied the effect of maternal stress reduction, during pregnancy, on the health of their children, at one year of age. In this paper, I will apply my understanding of some fundamental principles of proper psychological research and the principles of critical thinking.

First, I will discuss the independent variable, and possible ways the researchers' treatment of this variable may have invalidated their claimed outcome. Further, I will discuss construct and internal validity. Finally, I will investigate possible extraneous variables that may invalidate the researchers' claimed outcome of the research study. I conclude that the researchers claimed outcome results from flawed research practices and design, and that their claimed outcome is therefore, highly questionable.

The experiment analysed in a research study about preparing for parenthood. The research study focuses on the effect of maternal meditation and stress reduction on the health of their children. The…… [Read More]

References

Christensen, L.B. 1991. Experimental Methodology, 5th Edition. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
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Psychological Impact of Poverty and the Solutions

Words: 2504 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29271101

psychological impact) of poverty and the solutions to the problem of poverty described in some of the stories covered in this course.

Poverty

There is much controversy about poverty, given that it was, is, and most probably will be one of the most terrible things that ever existed. People are known to perform exceptional acts as a result of their low social status, especially when they acknowledge the fact that their condition is desperate and that they have to care for their families. Individuals who experience financial breakdowns experience great difficulties in trying to behave normally, given that poverty affects people both physically and mentally. Some actually come to perform desperate acts with the purpose of getting even the smallest amount of resources. There are numerous cases in which people abandoned their lifelong ideals and decided that it was essential for them to do whatever they could in order to…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Dun, Mao "Spring Silkworms"

Shia, Rou, "Slave Mother"

Shuli, Zhao "Lucky"

Zuxiang Wu "Let there be peace"
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Psychological Theory

Words: 2096 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11794677

Alcoholism and Upbringing

Psychological theory

James' father is responsible for James' involvement in crime and burglary. Origin of the problem. Alcoholic parents are the reason for the moral decay of juveniles

Another reason for James' feelings of inadequacy

Effect of alcoholism in the upbringing of a child

The effect of taking James out of his mother's home as a juvenile

eaction formation

An examination of James' denial of his responsibility over his problem

Personality theory

Sociological theory

Personality and sociological theory

An explanation of James' behaviors, and his father using the two frameworks

Thorburn (2005) suggests that a misapprehension that numerous alcoholics seem to have is that their behavior does not affect other people. They deny ever hurting other people but themselves. A great deal of research and huge anecdotal proof suggest otherwise. The behavior of alcoholics can affect those around them, including family members, friends, coworkers and employers. Children…… [Read More]

References

Plant, M.A., Peck, D.F., Samuel, E., & Stuart, R. (2000). Alcohol, drugs, and school-leavers.

London: Tavistock Publications.

Thorburn, D. (2005). Alcoholism myths and realities: Removing the stigma of society's most destructive disease. Northridge, Calif: Galt Pub.

Floyd, M.R., & Seale, J.P. (2002). Substance abuse: A patient-centered approach. Abingdon,
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Factors Effecting Childhood Obesity and Interventions

Words: 2001 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37658469

Childhood Obesity and Interventions

There is a strong relationship between childhood obesity and exposure to environmental factors -- most notably socio-economic status. There are exposures that trigger both positive and negative outcomes, and these have to be discussed along with the possible interventions that can be undertaken. Low socio-economic status (E) has been associated with a large number of problematic outcomes where health is concerned, including obesity and related issues in childhood (Kallem, et al., 2013). Despite this correlation, though, there are plenty of children with low E who grow up slim and apparently health, so it is clear that environment is not the only factor (Kallem, et al., 2013). The objective of the study by Kallem, et al. (2013) was to examine the "shift-and-persist" strategy and how (or if) it was what was protecting low E children from obesity in some cases. This strategy involves how a person deals…… [Read More]

Studies have found that racial and ethnic disparities can be just as significant as SES, diet, and exercise issues -- largely because SES and related concerns are often tied to specific racial and ethnic groups more than others (Carroll-Scott, et al., 2013). Preschool age children who are in minority racial and ethnic categories have a statistically higher prevalence of obesity when all other variables have been controlled for by researchers (Carroll-Scott, et al., 2013). That is a serious indication that there is more at play in the overall environment, and that study of all factors that could contribute to obesity is needed. That would include analyzing a larger area of environmental factors, because there are many causes for the tripling of obese children and adolescents throughout the last three decades (Dixon, et al., 2012). That much of a change in that short of a time period is a significant problem for society, and can raise the rates of health care for everyone.

If the obesity epidemic in children is not dealt with now, society can expect to see increases in the rates of many chronic diseases, and these diseases will be particularly obvious in populations that already have a disparity in their health (Dixon, et al., 2012). In the study conducted by Dixon, et al. (2012), the associations between SES and social characteristics of the residential environment were considered. Then, these were looked at as compared to diet, physical activity, and BMI (Dixon, et al., 2012). The participants consisted of students in the fifth and sixth grade at a school in New Haven, Connecticut (Dixon, et al., 2012). That was done to narrow down a population in order to determine the environmental factors associated with it (Dixon, et al., 2012). Multilevel modeling was used in order to collect information on the area and the students (Dixon, et al., 2012).

It was discovered that students living within a close walking distance of fast food outlets had higher BMI numbers than those who lived farther away (Dixon, et al., 2012). Additionally, high fast food outlet densities were linked to higher BMIs and more unhealthy eating (Dixon, et al., 2012). When students had close access to gyms, parks, and playgrounds, though, they were more likely to get exercise, helping to offset some of the unhealthy eating patterns (Dixon, et al., 2012). More affluent neighborhoods were also linked to healthier eating behaviors and better exercise regimens, where students who were on the low end of the SES scale ate poorly and got little exercise (Dixon, et al., 2012). One of the ways to help lessen the problems with childhood obesity could be to provide more parks, playgrounds, and other areas where students could get good exercise, and to lower the number of fast food establishments in residential areas.
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Psychological Study of Personality Psychoanalytic

Words: 1813 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60715447



andura's social cognitive theory is similar with Skinner's behaviorist theory, in so far as the role of the external environment on the individual is concerned. However, andura's theory differs from Skinner's in that the former extended the relationship between the individual and external environment to include, at the same time, the influence that the individual's behavior has on his/her external environment. andura's theory illustrates a seemingly 'reciprocal' relationship between the individual and the external environment: the latter affects the former in exchange for a positive outcome, while the former affects the latter as part of his/her continuous cycle of personality development (424).

From the discussion of these three perspectives of the psychology of human personality, significant differences that highlight the importance of each tradition emerge.

The humanistic tradition looks into the internal traits of the individual, positing that these internal traits are what ultimately shape the personality of a person.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Buber, M. And C. Rogers. (1997). The Martin Buber-Carl Rogers Dialogue: A New Transcript with Commentary. Albany: University of New York Press.

Freedheim, D. And I. Weiner. (2003). Handbook of Psychology, Volume 1: History of Psychology. NY: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Santrock, J. (2001). Psychology. NY: McGraw-Hill.
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Psychological Stress Can Result From

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79766285

For that reason, employers routinely provide stress-management programs for their employees (Archer, 2005; Probst, 2005; ichardson & othstein, 2008) and some hospitals have begun implementing stress-relieving programs and services because patient stress has been demonstrated empirically to inhibit recovery and suppress the immune system (Archer, 2005).

Strategies for educing Stress

There are many different strategies for reducing stress, depending on the type of stress involved and the source of its origin (Probst, 2010). In general, some kinds of stress can be reduced by making changes that address their source; meanwhile, other kinds of stress cannot necessarily be reduced at their source but their negative effects on the individual can be reduced through the use of coping strategies (Probst, 2005; ichardson & othstein, 2008). For example, certain kinds of self-induced stress (such as fear of failure, social anxiety, and performance anxiety) can be addressed by cognitive psychological therapy. Other kinds of…… [Read More]

References

Archer, R. (2005). "Hospitals design stress-reduction treatment to speed recovery."

Westchester County Business Journal. Westfair Communications, Inc. Retrieved

November 30, 2010 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-132120351.html

Jancin, B. (2005). "Bright light therapy also looks promising for primary insomnia."
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Psychological Tests and Measurements

Words: 2465 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65728271

Psychological Assessment

Confidentiality Disclaimer

eason for eferral

Identifying information

Developmental History

Medical and Psychiatric History

Short Family and Social History

Short History of School Behavior

Tests Administered

Standardized Instruments

Information Assessment Techniques

Mental Status Examination and Behavioral Observations

esults Form Testing

The following results were obtained with respect to the different domain of functioning of Sebastian based on information from multiple sources.

Cognitive-Intellectual-Executive Functioning

Social-Emotional Functioning

Diagnostic Impression

Confidentiality Disclaimer:

There is a chance that the subject of the report or those who are closely associated with the subject of the report could get psychologically and/or emotionally hurt as the report contains sensitive information about the subject. This report is meant only for people trained enough to read such reports and should not be given to the subject named in the report. In order to ensure that the name of the person who is also the subject of the report…… [Read More]

References

Goldfinger, K. And Pomerantz, A. (2010). Psychological assessment and report writing. Los Angeles: SAGE.

Groth-Marnat, G. (2003). Handbook of psychological assessment. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons.

No authorship indicated, (2003). Psychological Assessment: Editors. Psychological Assessment, 15(1), pp.1-1.

8 | Page
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Psychological Basis of Mental Illness Is Certainly

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60673893

psychological basis of mental illness is certainly only half of the story. Though mental illness is genetic, the actual symptoms and condition being presented is based on a careful marriage between biological and environmental factors. In particular, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), is a mental illness in which "people have unwanted and repeated thoughts, feelings, ideas, sensations or obsession, or behaviors that make them feel driven to do something (compulsions)" (National Institute of Mental Health, 2011). This mental illness, like many others is multi-faceted, in that there is a physiological process associated with it, a set of symptoms that manifest, certain diagnostic criterion and then a set of treatment options.

Foremost, the physiological process of mental illness is mainly concerned with the brain and certain regions of it. The physiological process is a process that evaluates the neural mechanisms of perception and behavior. esearch examining the brain has found that "a selective…… [Read More]

Riccardi, Christina J, Timpano, Kiara R, & Schmidt, Norman B (2010). A Case Study Perspective on the Importance of motivation in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Clinical Case Studies, Volume 9, (Issue 4), pages 273-284.

Rosenberg, David R. & Keshavan, Matcheri S. (1998). Toward a Neurodevelopment Model of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Biological Psychiatry: Official Journal of the Society of Biological Psychiatry, Volume 43 (Issue 9), Pages 623-640.

Swinson, Richard P (2001). Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Theory, Research, and Treatment. New York: The Guilford Press.
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Psychological Theories It Uses 3 Sources and

Words: 942 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36035897

psychological theories. It uses 3 sources and is in MLA format.

Psychologists have researched personality disorders and have formulated different theories presenting their own reasoning established via comprehensive research over a lifetime. I have attempted to draw similarities and contrasts between the psychoanalytical theory of Sigmund Freud and social cognition theory of Carl ogers. They are both known figures in the field of psychoanalysis. Both the theories are logical and applicable in varied circumstances.

Personality disorders stem from the fact that personal satisfaction is not achieved due to the societal norms that humans have entrapped themselves in. Dissatisfaction creates conflicts and thus anxieties occur which cause personality disorders.

Discussion

Sigmund Freud was a one of the most eminent psychologists of all times. Freud is termed as the father of psychoanalysis. His theory of psychoanalysis entails the conscious and the unconscious. The conscious is what we are aware of like one's…… [Read More]

References

1.Boeree, George, 2002. Abraham Maslow. Theories of Personality. Accessed 4th Dec 2003:

http://allpsych.com/personalitysynopsis/maslow.html, 2. Boeree, George, 2002. Sigmund Freud. Theories of Personality. Accessed 4th Dec 2003: http://www.ship.edu/%7Ecgboeree/freud.html, accessed 4th Dec 2003.

3. Monte, Christopher, Beneath The Mask.

Dr. Boeree, George, 2002, http://www.ship.edu/%7Ecgboeree/freud.html, accessed 4th Dec 2003.
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Psychological Research of the 21st Century Human Memory

Words: 7275 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3668581

Human Memory

Psychology

This literature review upon human memory will cover a fairly wide spectrum of ideas regarding the subject. While there will be a number of connections among the divisions or categories of this literature review, there will certainly be several distinctions or differences among them. The psychological research a part of the review will span, roughly, the duration of the 21st century thus far, with a few sources of research having taken place in 1999, just before the turn of the century. The review will approach the selected body of psychological research on human memory by dividing the research loosely into the following sections: memory distortion, repressed memories, body memory, and the changes in perspective on memory with respect to appropriate psychological/psychotherapeutic treatment.

The section of the review that focuses upon memory distortion will identify that memory distortion does, in fact, occur. The research presented in that section…… [Read More]

References:

Conway, M.A. & Pleydell-Pearce, C.W. (2000). The Construction of Autobiographical Memories in the Self-Memory System. Psychological Review, 107(2), 261 -- 288.

Health Services Commissioner. (2005). Inquiry into the Practice of Recovered Memory Therapy. Health Services Commissioner of Australia, Victoria, AU. Print.

Johnson, M.K. (2001). Psychology of False Memories. International Encyclopedia of Social & Behavioral Sciences, 5254 -- 5259.

Leijssen, M. (2006). Validation of the Body in Psychotherapy. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 46(2), 126 -- 146.
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Psychological Testing of African Americans in the Army

Words: 3356 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90981843

American writers from both the antebellum South and the North commented on the great differences between the white people in the two regions (Ibid; Samuda).

Note though, the table data below regarding the percentage of males who completed high school by race, 1940-1980, which will provide data for further discussion regarding utilization of testing to stratify recruits:

Table 1 -- Males 18-21 Who Completed High School By Percentile

ace

1940

1950

1960

1970

1970

White

40

49

56

68

78

Black

11

18

33

49

60

(Source: Binkin, p.94)

How is it that tests designed to measure information that was given in school could be administered to populations who did not even attend school? And, when one takes population and demographic statistics into account, this historical bias deepens. At the outbreak of World War I, for instance, African-Americans were about 11% of the general population, and the Selective Service draft…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Benjamin, L. (2009). "The Birth of American Intelligence Testing." Monitor on Psychology. 40(1): Cited inL

http://www.apa.org/monitor/2009/01/assessment.html

Binkin, M., et.al. (1982). Blacks in the Military. Brookings Institution Press.

Black, E. (2004). War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create
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Factors Influencing Human Mate Selection

Words: 4285 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81713534

Evolutionay Undestanding of Physical Attaction and Mate Selection

Item Page

Financial stability

Physical attactiveness

Fequency Statistics

Oveall Analysis of Pefeences Effect

Factos Influencing Mate Choices

Financial stability

Physical attactiveness

Evolutionay Undestanding of Physical Attaction and Mate Selection

What factos would usually dive a peson to pefe one peson as a mate, to anothe? Ae thee any obsevable diffeences between the mate selection stategies employed by men, and those employed by women? A numbe of theoies have been put fowad to povide answes to these questions. Buss and Banes (1986), while making specific efeence to the Evolutionay Theoy, posit that the qualities women look fo in a potential mate diffe consideably fom those that men look fo. These diffeences, they suggest, manly accue fom the biological systemic diffeences between men and women, as well as the common belief that women age faste than men.

Women's fetility has been obseved to decease…… [Read More]

references influence your mate choices. Your cooperation is well appreciated. Thank you.

1. What is your gender? (Please circle one) (GENDER)

a. Male = 1

b. Female = 2

c. Transgender = 3
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Psychological Treatment for Gender Dysphoria

Words: 3198 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11557244

Clinical Psychology and Gender Dysphoria

Advancement of Clinical Psychology with Gender Dysphoria

Clinical psychology is recognized as a psychology branch that deals with the assessment and treatment of abnormal behavior, mental illness, and psychiatric problems (Brennan, 2003). Clinical psychology integrates the science of psychology with treatment of complicated human problems, which makes it a challenging and rewarding field. American psychologist Lightner Witmer introduced the term in 1907. Witmer defined clinical psychology as a field that studies individuals by experimentation or observation, with the intent of promoting change. A clinical psychologist will try to reduce any psychological distress suffered by a patient and enhance their psychological well-being. Previously clinical psychology focused on the psychological assessment of the patients, and there was little or no attention been paid to treatment. This scenario changed after World War II in the 1940s because there was increased demand for trained clinicians. A clinical psychologist will…… [Read More]

References

Brennan, J.F. (2003). History and systems of psychology. Upper Saddle River, N.J: Prentice Hall.

Colomb, J., & Brembs, B. (2010). The biology of psychology:'Simple'conditioning? Communicative & integrative biology, 3(2), 142.

Eliason, M.J., Dibble, S.L., & Robertson, P.A. (2011). Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) physicians' experiences in the workplace. Journal of homosexuality, 58(10), 1355-1371.

Leahey, T.H., Greer, S., Lefrancois, G.R., Reiner, T.W., Spencer, J.L., Wickramasekera, I.E., & Willmarth, E.K. (2014). History of Psychology. San Diego, CA: Bridgepoint Education.
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Psychological State of Consumer Behavior Perception

Words: 2541 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52209982

MANAGING CONSUME BEHAVIOS & UNDESTANDING CONSUME PECEPTIONS

Consumer Behavior

Understanding consumer behavior is a pursuit that answers why, when, how, and where people buy or do not buy products. Consumer behavior is an area that combines topics such as economics, media studies, sociology, and psychology. Predicting and understanding consumer behavior is a challenge for experts and novices alike. Perception can be a biological process by which a person's brain interprets and organizes stimuli so as to gain awareness and understanding of one's environment. Perception can also be psychological and social phenomena. The paper surveys literature that proves the correlations and implications between consumer perception and consumer behavior.

Managing Consumer Behaviors & Understanding Consumer Perceptions

Perception is a large determinant or factor apart of behavior. Therefore, gaining understanding of consumer perceptions can illuminate the reasons behind certain types of consumer behaviors. With accurate data reflecting the connection between consumer behaviors and…… [Read More]

References:

Christandl, F., & Garlin, T. (2011) The Accuracy of Consumers' Perception of Future Inflation Prices. Journal of Psychology, 219(4), 209 -- 216.

Schneider, B. (1973) The Perception of Organizational Climate: The Customer's View. Journal of Applied Psychology, 57(3), 248 -- 256.

Schneider, B., & Bowen, D.E. (1985) Employee and Customer Perceptions of Service in Banks: Replication and Extension. Journal of Applied Psychology, 70(3), 423 -- 433.

Schneider, B., Hanges, P.J., Goldstein, H.W., & Braverman, E.P. (1994) Do Customer Service Perceptions Generalize? The Case of Student and Chair Ratings of Faculty Effectiveness. Journal of Applied Psychology, 79(5), 685 -- 690.
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Psychological and Physiological Effects of Exercise on the Mind and the Body

Words: 1900 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97000787

Exercise has been described as the best medicine for depression. It can help a person get through rough times. Physical exercise is very important for a person's mental and physical health. Exercise helps in pumping more blood through the veins. This results in the increase in size of the arteries and it prevents fats from clogging the arteries. It also prevents blood clots. A person who exercises regularly is protected from a variety of diseases and it helps in curbing cholesterol. Exercise benefits a human body as it lowers blood pressure and conditions the lungs. Exercise has its various advantages. It successfully counters stress, depression and anxiety. It has been named as the best fighting force for all these problems. Exercise is also instrumental in improving a person's nervous, cardiovascular and immune system. It also increases our metabolism, digestion and stimulation. (University of Michigan Health System) (http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/primry/fit02.htm)

Sometimes people feel…… [Read More]

Bibliography

http://www.med.umich.edu/1libr/primry/fit02.htm

Marissa Beck, Relieving Stress Through Exercise, The Tufts Daily, 2003

Richard Harvey, The Physician and Sports Medicine - September 1995

Harvard Health Publications Special Health Report, Depression Report, 2002
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Psychological Support for Police Operations

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33846034

Police Ops

For police officers, undercover work provides a priceless opportunity to help the force achieve its goals and to infiltrate large criminal organizations. However, undercover work can be tremendously stressful. The stress of undercover work often reaches a boiling point, leading the officer to have mental health issues and even suicide attempts. In New York, Detective Margaret Sasso served as an undercover officer successfully, but a failed suicide attempt using doctor-prescribed muscle relaxants served as a wake-up call.

In an interview, Detective Sasso claimed that she needed a "rest," which is itself a symptom of the stress experienced as an undercover officer. Undercover officers are new to the force, largely because of the need to ensure their not being recognized. However, their relative inexperience, coupled with the nature of their socially isolating work, causes a large number of undercover officers to experience stress. Dozens request transfers, according to research…… [Read More]

References

Baker, A. & Goldstein, J. (2012). Police working under cover, and under strain. International New York Times. May 6, 2012. Retrieved online: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/07/nyregion/undercover-officers-under-strain-with-no-clear-way-off-the-beat.html?pagewanted=all

Joh, E.E. (2009). Breaking the law in order to enforce it. 62 Stan. L. Rev. 155 (2009-2010).