Rastafarian Religion Essays (Examples)

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Rastafarian Dread Politic There Are

Words: 342 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47531111

It is from this cultural paradigm that emerged the concept of "dread." This term was used as synonymous to "God-fearer," to describe the adherents to Rastafarianism. According to Rastafarian mysticism, JAH (God) was immediately present within each dread.

In European existentialism, the concept appears to be diametrically opposite to that within African philosophy. According to teven Kreis (2006), for example, existential dread is the result of the perceived absence of God or indeed any spirituality or deeper meaning in life. Whereas the Rastafarian dread immerses the soul within the consciousness of God, the existentialist searches for meaning in the very lack and absence of God. Like Rastafarianism, however, the existentialist concept provides meaning within itself: human life is meaningful because it is meaningless: meaning is found within physical and perceived existence.

ources

Arrayed Roots Media (2002). Rastafarian Cultural Page. http://www.geocities.com/arrayedroots/ARCul.html

Kreis, teven (2006). Lecture 12: The Existentialist Frame of Mind.…… [Read More]

Sources

Arrayed Roots Media (2002). Rastafarian Cultural Page. http://www.geocities.com/arrayedroots/ARSCul.html

Kreis, Steven (2006). Lecture 12: The Existentialist Frame of Mind. The History Guide

http://www.historyguide.org/europe/lecture12.html
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Rastafarian Movement

Words: 1611 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43811896

Rastarfarian Movement

The Rastafarian Movement started as a religion in the 1930s in amaica and the spread of the Reggae music in the 1070s transformed it into a political manifest as well as a social movement among those who were underprivileged young people who found in the Rastafari not just a way of life, but also a mean the express themselves in the a world that was governed by the rules set up by a society they felt neglected them.

Sheila Kitzinger write in 1966 an article on the Rastafarians based on her own research results, after personally interviewing some Rastafarians from amaica. She considered them a "social problem for amaica" (Kitzinger, 1966). According to Kitzinger, the "members of the movement worship the emperor Haille Selassie of Ethiopia, and insist that, as their African ancestors were brought unwillingly to amaica as slaves, it is now time to be "repatriated" to…… [Read More]

Johnson-Hill, J.A. 1995. I-Sight: The World of Rastafari: An Interpretive Sociological Account of Rastafarian Ethics. Evanston Kitzinger, S. 1996. The Rastafarian Brethren of Jamaica. Comparative Studies in Society and History. Vol. 9. No. 1. (Oct, 1966). Pp. 33-39

Savishinsky, N.J. 1994. Rastafari in the Promised Land: The Spread of the Jamaican Socioreligious Movement Among the Youth of the West Africa. African Studies Review, Vol. 37, No. 3. (Dec. 1994) pp. 19-50

Simpson, G.E. 1985. Religion and Justice: Some Reflections on the Rastafari Movement. Phylon (1960-), Vol. 46, No. 4 (4th Qtr., 1985), pp. 286-291
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Rastafarians Most Laypersons Are Familiar

Words: 962 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50372594

It deals with the recent problems created by colonialism and slavery, as a result of hite domination in the 20th and now the 21st century. Rastafarianism is located in the 'here and now' in terms of its millennial ideology. Ethiopia and the idea of Ethiopianism underline the messianic "cult" of the Rastafarians who view Haile Selassie, former Emperor of Ethiopia, as a kind of Black Messiah. (Barrett 2) In this worldview, Ethiopia functions as a kind of Israel, as it was one of the few African nations not to be subject to extended periods of colonial control. The Rastafarian cult's ideology is thus a kind of idealized return to origins, but not of the far past, like many native, older Caribbean religions, but the recent past history of the island. It also attempts to connect all Black persons in one common quest to escape the colonial past, rather than focuses…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barrett, Leonard. E. (Sr.) The Rastafarians. Boston: Beacon Press, 20th Anniversary edition, 1997.
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Rastafarianism

Words: 2833 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64571330

..the astas have now penetrated the middle class. At present, the overwhelming majority of members are African, but there are also Chinese, East Indians, Afro-Chinese, Afro-Jews, mulattoes, and a few whites. astafarians are predominantly ex-Christians. "(Barrett, 1997, p. 2-3)

One of the early innovators and leaders of the movement,

Leonard Howell, stated a number of principles that have been the hallmark of astafarianism and still apply to a large extent today. These include the following:

1)hatred for the White race; (2) the complete superiority of the Black race; (3) revenge on Whites for their wickedness; (4) the negation, persecution, and humiliation of the government and legal bodies of Jamaica; (5) preparation to go back to Africa; and (6) acknowledging Emperor Haile Selassie as the Supreme Being and only ruler of Black people. (Barrett, 1997, p. 85)

Another essential aspect which is of cardinal importance in astafarianism is the concept of…… [Read More]

RASTAFARI: ACCORDING TO THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN

RELIGIONS. Retrieved 4 November, 2006, at http://www.inithebabeandsuckling.com/EAR.html

Rastafarianism. Retrieved 5 November 2006, at http://religiousmovements.lib.virginia.edu/nrms/rast.htm. Royackers, M. (1999). Jamaica Genesis: Religion and the Politics of Moral Orders. Theological Studies, 60(2), 387. Retrieved November 7, 2006, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001267576Vertovec, S. (2001). Transnationalism and Identity. Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, 27(4), 573+. Retrieved November 7, 2006, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000908861Wardle, H. (2003). Anthropology and History. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 9(4), 794+. Retrieved November 7, 2006, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002070480
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Incongruous to Try to Compare the Artists

Words: 3952 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54796680

incongruous to try to compare the artists illiam Shakespeare and Bob Marley. These two men, separated by centuries and embodying two very different forms of art, both make up part of the history of popular culture. One man is considered the premiere playwright in the history of the English language, a man whose name is synonymous with high culture. The other man is known for his success in a musical genre and a culture that uses a different meaning for the word high. hat could these men possible have in common one might ask? Examining the history and writings of both Renaissance writer illiam Shakespeare and reggae musician Bob Marley it becomes evident that they both use emotional appeals and heavy symbolism to prove points about the human condition and to promote understanding between people from different stations of life, all of which are used to persuade others that the…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Backus, Truman J. 1897. "William Shakespeare." The Outlines of Literature: English and American. Sheldon: NY. 90-102.

Laroque, Francois. The Age of Shakespeare. Harry N. Abrams: London.

Marly, Bob, 1973. "Get Up, Stand Up." Burnin'. Tuff Gong.

Marley, Bob, 1973. "I Shot the Sheriff." Burnin'. Tuff Gong.
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Managing Religious Diversity in the

Words: 4595 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28736846

(Krukowski, 2001) Civil religion and workplace mysticism each change the institutional locus of religious expression from the church, synagogue, or mosque to another public organization- the state or the company. The existence of these different organizations hoists the main question of individuality and perhaps challenging faithfulness.

Both civil religion and workplace theology do not show the likely clashes and problems often met by employees who are also religious practitioners. Jews, Christians, or Muslims who are workforce of a company may well have grounds to question the customs of their company on religio-moral basis. Workplace theology in a funded organization does not distinguish these possible clashes. Institutionally conveying workplace theology is obviously not identical with permitting individual employees to convey their beliefs and customs at work. This grave outlook of workplace theology should not be realized, as a censure of persons who want to live out their definite religious or spiritual…… [Read More]

References

Alpert, Richard T. "Religious Diversity in the workplace." Retrieved at http://users.crocker.com/~amedpub/rc21d/Religion%20in%20the%20Workplace11.htm. Accessed on 4 February, 2005

Denise Smith

"Workplace Religious Freedom: What is an Employer's Duty to Accommodate? A Review of Recent Cases" Workplace Religious Freedom / 49. Retrieved at http://homepages.ius.edu/LCHRISTI/Journal%20of%20emply/religious%20accommodation.pdf. Accessed on 4 February, 2005

Deveney, William D. (September-October, 2004) "Religious Harassment Claims: Case Studies in Good Faith." No. 05-05. Retrieved at http://www.etsw.com/NewsletterLB/2004_09-10.pdf. Accessed on 4 February, 2005
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Rastafari Rastafarianism and Reggae

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96370277

46). Nowadays, Rastafarianism is a strong Jamaican tradition.

Reggae Music

Also tied to the experience of social oppression was the growing popularity for the emerging Reggae music. Reggae music came directly out of the religious fervor of the Rastafarians and their desire to remove themselves from the constraints of traditional society through forms of protest. Jamaica had long been experiencing tumultuous political tensions, which proved the perfect breeding grounds for Rastafarianism and the musical traditions which came with it. Early in the 1950s, a new musical sound named Ska came out of Jamaican indigenous music, American jazz, and rhythm and blues. According to research, "On the surface, ska was happy content -- even cheery -- music. But if one listened closely between the polrhythmic pulses of the music, ska was as deceptive as the government's attempt to paint the country with a color-blind palette of national unity," (King et al.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dolin, Kasey Qynn. "Words, Sounds, and Power in Jamaican Rastafari." Middle Atlantic Council of Latin American Studies. 2001.

King, Stephen; Barry, T. Bays; & Foster, Renee. Reggae, Rastafari, and the Rhetoric of Social Control. University Press of Mississippi. 2002.

Knipe, Ed. Culture, Society, and Drugs: The Social Science Approach to Drug Use. Prospect Heights: Illinois. 1995.

Wardle, Huon. "Anthropology and History." Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute. 2002. 9(4):793-796.
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Right With Jamaica Is a

Words: 327 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30790718

The culture associated with the religion has become very popular all over the world, and has spread to many regions of the globe.

Religion has also influenced several artistic manifestations in Jamaica. Music is undoubtedly the most prominent example. Reggae is the most well-known style of music coming from Jamaica, but there are many other styles which were generated by Jamaican folk music which in turn, was a result of African influence which has always been present on the island. Dancehall is another popular style. Dance is also a very important local cultural product; celebrations and are oftentimes accompanied by dance and costumes.

However, one cannot talk about Jamaica without referring to sports. There are several popular sports on the island such as football, cricket and basketball, to name just a few. Nonetheless, Jamaicans excel at track and field; Jamaica's success started in 1948 when Jamaica's first track Gold Medalist,…… [Read More]

Without a shadow of a doubt, one of the most intriguing and interesting aspects of Jamaica is its spirituality. Jamaicans have adopted several forms of spirituality embodied in an impressive number of denominations, and all of them are reflected in the country's diverse and unique culture. However, apart from Christian religions, Rastafari is the "local" religion of the island. Rastafarians believe in the cultivation of the inner spirit, and the detachment from exterior appearance, or material goods. The Rastafari religion was born as an alternative to Christian and non-Christian white-oriented religions which were dominant on the island at the beginning of the twentieth century. It promotes the existence of the inner self, as well as meditation. The culture associated with the religion has become very popular all over the world, and has spread to many regions of the globe.

Religion has also influenced several artistic manifestations in Jamaica. Music is undoubtedly the most prominent example. Reggae is the most well-known style of music coming from Jamaica, but there are many other styles which were generated by Jamaican folk music which in turn, was a result of African influence which has always been present on the island. Dancehall is another popular style. Dance is also a very important local cultural product; celebrations and are oftentimes accompanied by dance and costumes.

However, one cannot talk about Jamaica without referring to sports. There are several popular sports on the island such as football, cricket and basketball, to name just a few. Nonetheless, Jamaicans excel at track and field; Jamaica's success started in 1948 when Jamaica's first track Gold Medalist, Dr. Authur Wint won the 400m in the Olympics, and has continued through to this day.
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Jamaican Music a Cultural Evolution

Words: 4850 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47790806

Jamaican Music

It is never just about the music.

No matter how great the musician, music is always the expression of an entire culture, of a moment in history, of a particular place in time. The genius of a particular musician, the synergy of a particular group - these are both essential to the success or failure of a particular group. But that success or failure is never intrinsic to a single song, to a single album. Music that succeeds - both in its own time and later - does so because it has the ability to express something important about that moment in time. eggae has been able to provide just such an expression of the beliefs of a particular people at a moment in history for the last two years - and it has been able to do so because of its ability to change with larger political…… [Read More]

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Why Marijuana Should Be Legalized

Words: 1819 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13260871

Marijuana

Why Marijuana Should Be Legalized in United States

Marijuana is a plant with extreme strong fragrance, and its dry leaves are an active ingredient of a number of hallucinogenic drugs. The liberty endorsing and preaching societies of the world are still in a fit to either legalize the usage of marijuana or not. The argument that forms the mainstream of the authorization of the usage and legal selling of marijuana in the United States has long been a subject of contention. Health hazards pertaining to the usage of marijuana are a common stance used to justify the illegalization of this drug in United States. The following paper tends to highlight the various aspects that will justify that marijuana should be legalized in the United States.

The most important reason that forms the mainstream of the stance that marijuana should be legalized in the United States is the rational choice…… [Read More]

References

Bowman, K. (2001, July). Attitudes toward Marijuana. The American Enterprise, 12, 62. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000083032

Conservative Forum. (2002, February 4). Human Events, 58, 16. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5035784226

Marandino, C. (1998, March). Fired Up. Vegetarian Times 18. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5036612328

Notes & Comments: September 2002. (2002, September). New Criterion, 21, 1+. Retrieved August 20, 2011, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000823678