Revolutionary War Essays (Examples)

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Revolutionary America Describe Shay's Rebellion

Words: 2441 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19771269

The ritish came to impose serious taxes as a result of the French Indian war. These in turn were unacceptable to a people which considered itself not to be responsible for the causes of the war. The confrontation had been in fact another matter of European dispute that had to be solved outside the continent in the colonies.

Third, there is a disagreement in the way in which the war was perceived at the local level. The American colonies viewed this struggle as a need for independence from a regime that continued to impose an undemocratic control over its institutions and the lives of the people. On the other hand, the ritish saw it as a rebellion that must be immediately squashed. In its view, it was a war for the maintenance of a certain order, while the Americans viewed it as one of disruption of this order. While the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Brainard, R. (2005) "Shays' Rebellion." 18th century history. 11 June 2008. http://www.history1700s.com/articles/article1120.shtml

British Battles. (N.d.) the War of the Revolution 1775 to 1783. Accessed 11 June 2008  http://www.britishbattles.com/american-revolution.htm 

Calliope. (2008) "Shays' Rebellion." A Historical Synopsis. 11 June 2008.  http://www.calliope.org/shays/shays2.html 

Jenkins, P. (1997) a history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.
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Wars of the Barbary Pirates

Words: 1598 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67602952



The book is constructed on two main theses, the first revolving around the relevance of the Barbary wars in the freeing of the American population and in its formation as stable and confident people. The second thesis focuses on the Tripolitan war played in the formation of the modern American Navy. However the general history courses place little emphasis on the wars against the Barbary States, the naval forces commemorate them and recognize the role they played in the formation of the modern U.S. Marine. A third specification which could be made relative to the book is that, however not implicit, it also presents the historical conflict between the American and Islamic forces, relating as such to a contemporaneous matter, which is not as new as one could think.

"Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the Shores of Tripoli, the Birth of the U.S. Navy and Marines" is written in…… [Read More]

References:

Gregory Fremont-Barnes, "Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the Shores of Tripoli, the Birth of the U.S. Navy and Marines," Osprey Pub Co, November 2006

Wars of the Barbary Pirates: To the Shores of Tripoli, the Birth of the U.S. Navy and Marines, Random House, http://www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9781846030307, last accessed on October 1, 2008
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Revolutionary America the Difference Between

Words: 1997 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31394759

" It is course legitimate editorial decision-making to spend less time on one aspect than another writer might invest on that issue; but this points out the way in which Berkin makes her history more like journalism, bringing in as many quotes from a diverse set of speakers whenever she can. It was interesting to know that Jefferson was dead set against the proceedings going private.

Middlekauff (630) writes that by putting their Virginia Plan out first, the Virginians "had framed the terms of the discussion." And for the next two weeks the delegates supporting the Virginia Plan "had forced the pace of deliberations, and, for the most part, controlled the Convention." The momentum was on the side of the Virginians and their supporters; the Virginia Plan called for an executive branch, a judiciary, and a "supreme" legislature - and that the representation in the legislature should be allocated according…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berkin, Carol. (2002). A Brilliant Solution: Inventing the American Constitution. New York:

Harcourt, Inc.

Middlekauff, Robert. (1982). The Glorious Cause. New York: Oxford University Press.
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War the Concept of War Encompasses Various

Words: 899 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54952311

War

The concept of war encompasses various different types of conflict. Wars between sovereign nations involve nation states. Regional and world wars involve multiple sovereign nations. Revolutionary wars of independence involve the populations of nations rebelling against or rejecting the continued control national authorities. ivil wars occur when rival regions or political factions within one nation seek formal separation or complete control. Proxy wars are a means by which nations prosecute their competing interests against one another through smaller conflicts involving other nations as a means of avoiding direct military conflict.

Wars between Nation States

Wars between sovereign nations have occurred throughout recorded history, dating back to Biblical times. Generally, sovereign nations go to war when they each have claims to the same land, or natural resources, or rights of passage that each seeks to own or control exclusively. Throughout the Middle Ages and into the early modern age, the…… [Read More]

Civil wars occur when different political factions within one nation cannot reach an agreement or reconcile major differences. In some cases, the purpose of a civil war is similar to revolutionary wars because they are the result of one faction's desire or intention to break free from a larger unified nation and to create a new sovereign nation. The American War between the States or Civil War is an example of such a war because the southern states sought to secede from the American nation and to create their own nation where slavery could continue legally as a way of life. The northern states opposed the institution of slavery and had gradually placed more and more pressure on the southern states to give up the practice. In other instances, civil wars occur when one faction seeks to take exclusive power over the nation instead of sharing power or regional control with competing political factions. The Spanish Civil War immediately preceding the Second World War is one such example.

Proxy Wars

Sometimes, nation states prosecute wars against one another through wars between smaller nations. Generally, this occurs when much larger nations want to avoid the devastating consequences of a direct war between them. They may have long-standing conflicts with one another or competing aims and interests about foreign territories and regions. They may seek to achieve their objectives through the use of force but instead of direct military conflict, they act against one another by supporting wars and revolutions in smaller nations in those regions. Throughout the second half of the 20th century, the world's two principal superpowers, the United States and the Soviet Union conducted many overt and covert proxy wars in Eastern Europe, Latin America, and in both the Middle East and the Far East. Some of the more notable examples of those proxy efforts in modern times included the Soviet Union's attempt to militarize Cuba and install nuclear missiles aimed at the U.S. supposedly to guarantee Cuba's independence in 1961; the decade-long Vietnam War in which the Soviet Union supported and finances the North Vietnamese while the U.S. supported and financed the South Vietnamese; and the Arab-Israeli wars in which the Soviet Union supported Syria and Egypt while the U.S. supported Israel.
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War of Tripoli as a

Words: 3129 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78635994

Lear and Comodore Barron, the commander of the American fleet in the Mediterranean agreed in 1805 that Ahmad was no longer useful to the American cause. As a result, Lear met with Muhammad D'Ghies, Tripoli's Minister for foreign affairs, and eventually reached an agreement. War prisoners would be mutually exchanged, and America had to pay a sum of $60, 000 to Tripoli. However, this sum was considerably smaller than what the Pasha had asked for in 1804. Legendary Commodore Charles Morris wrote, "On the 3rd of June, a peace was concluded with Tripoli by Colonel Lear, who had been authorized by the President to negotiate."

One of the most important consequences of the war was its power to produce some of the earliest American war heroes. In the absence of news correspondents, and the far-reaching means the press has today, the accounts of the war were given by the people…… [Read More]

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War for Independence and Colonial

Words: 2278 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52871009

Because the country was essentially thirteen colonies fighting separately, the British had to deal with battles throughout the country, with people who were fighting for their homes and towns. The American forces knew their surroundings better, and they were motivated to fight well to protect their loved ones and neighbors.

The Declaration of Independence, written in July 1776, indicates how resolved most of the population was to independence from Great Britain. Thomas Jefferson, author of the document, wrote that the British government had become "destructive," and people believed they must assert their independence and be free of the country, or their lives would never be free from oppression. He wrote, "That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the ight of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in…… [Read More]

References

Editors. "Revolutionary War Causes." Son of the South. 2009. 20 Feb. 2009.  http://www.sonofthesouth.net/revolutionary-war/cause-revolutionary-war.htm .

Gerlach, Larry R., James a. Dolph, and Michael L. Nicholls, eds. Legacies of the American Revolution. Logan, UT: Utah State University Press, 1978.

Sweeney, Jerry K., ed. A Handbook of American Military History: From the Revolutionary War to the Present. 2nd ed. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, 2006

Ward, Harry M. The War for Independence and the Transformation of American Society. London: UCL Press, 1999.
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War Broke Out in 1756

Words: 7157 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43993603



The Seven Years War saw Britain established as the greatest colonial power, with control over India and North America seemingly secured, while Prussia emerged as the greatest power on the Continent, and the dominant force inside Germany, reducing still further the power of the Holy Roman Empire and Habsburg Austria. Frederick II of Prussia (the Great) emerges as the most remarkable leader of the war. Prussia was the smallest of the main combatants, and yet Frederick survived year after year of campaigning, and despite coming near to defeat he emerged triumphant (Richard).

Histories of the American Revolution tend to start in 1763, the end of the Seven-Year's War, a worldwide struggle for empire that pitted France against England in North America, Europe, and Asia. Fred Anderson, who teaches history at the University of Colorado, takes the story back a decade and explains the significance of the conflict in American history.…… [Read More]

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War American Revolution

Words: 827 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60893062

American evolutionary War

The objective of this study is to write on the causes and major outcomes of the American evolutionary War.

Until the finalization of the Seven Years' War, there were only very few British North America colonists that had objections to their situation in the British Empire and British American Colonists had realized a great many benefits reported from the system of the British imperialists and furthermore paid little in the way of costs for those reported benefits. In fact, the British did not bother the American colonies until the earlier part of the 1760s. However, the 'Seven Years' War" brought about changes with Britain realizing victory over France and their allies at a great cost.

The War

The Seven-Year's War also known as the French and Indian War brought many changes. According to reports "A staggering war debt influenced many British policies over the next decade. Attempts…… [Read More]

References

The American Revolution (2014) Library of Congress. Retrieved from:  http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/timeline/amrev/ 

The American Revolution (2014) Library of Congress. Retrieved from:
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Revolutionary Generation

Words: 2378 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39794130

Founding Brothers

When studying the history of the formation of the United States, one usually thinks in terms of separate events and individuals. However, the American republic was established, instead, by a series of important decisions and the joint efforts of some of the most prominent men of all time. In a matter of ten years, these critical interactions among the eight leading figures of John Adams, Aaron Burr, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison and George Washington formed a nation that to this day remains one of the most successful "experiments" of democratic governments. As Joseph J. Ellis, the author of Founding Brothers: the Revolutionary Generation states:

What in retrospect has the look of a foreordained unfolding of God's will was in reality an improvisational affair ... If hindsight enhances our appreciation for the solidity and stability of the republican legacy, it also blinds us to the…… [Read More]

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Revolutionary French Peasants Thinking

Words: 2251 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73111961

French Revolution

The final crisis of the French Monarchy occurred in 1789, with the official beginning of the French Revolution. Although this was the year in which the first official battle of this martial encounter was fought, it is vital to realize that the monarchy had been floundering for some time prior. There were numerous factors that contributed to the disfavor the monarchy found itself in at the end of the 18th century. Some of the more eminent of these political, financial, and environmental causes helped to weaken the French Monarchy's hold over its subjects, as judged by the standards of the present 1. Concurrently, there were military woes that accompanied these factors and which contributed to the mounting unpopularity of this government. However, an analysis of these factors reveals that the most prominent cause of the French Revolution pertained to the zeitgeist of the time in with Enlightenment ideals…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Acemoglu, Daaron, Cantoni, Davide, Johnson, Simon, Robinson, James. "The Consequences of Radical Reform: The French Revolution." NBER Working Paper Series. Retrieved 4/3/2016. http://scholar.harvard.edu/files/jrobinson/files/jr_consequeces_frenchrev.pdf

Davies, Norman. The History of Europe. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.

Doyle, William. The Oxford History of the French Revolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press,1990.

Langer, William. The Encyclopedia of World History. New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1972.
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Post Revolutionary America Constitution

Words: 1996 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44332577

Revolutionary Era

y the late 1780's many Americans had grown dissatisfied with the Confederation. It was unable to deal effectively with economic problems and weak in the face of Shay's Rebellion. A decade earlier, Americans had deliberately avoided creating a strong national government. Now they reconsidered. In 1787, the nation produced a new constitution and a new, much more powerful government with three independent branches. The government the Constitution produced has survived far more than two centuries as one of the most stable and most successful in the world.

The Articles of Confederation and the Constitution resembled each other in some cases and differed from each other greatly in other aspects. The Articles of Confederation were a foundation for the Constitution, and sometimes even called the Pre-Constitution. The Confederation, which existed from 1781 until 1789, was not a big success. It lacked power to deal with interstate issues, to enforce…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Morgan, Edmund S. The Meaning of Independence. New York W.W. Norton & Company. 1978.

Brown. Richard D Major problems in the Era of the American Revolution., 1760-1791.Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co. 2000

Raphael, Ray. A Peoples History of the American Revolution: How Common People Shaped the Fight for Independence. New York: Perennial. 2002.
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What Were the Main Causes and Consequences of the War 1812

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17913849

War of 1812

A mere thirty years after the end of the Revolutionary War -- which saw the American colonies separate from and defeat the British empire -- the fledgling United States found itself once again face-to-face with the world's greatest military power in a struggle to secure for the new nation, a mark of international status. The War of 1812 began with a "secret vote on June 4th, in which House members endorsed going to war 79-49…and a Senate vote on June 17 favoring war 19 to 13" (Langguth, A.J. 2006). How though had the U.S. arrived at this precarious position and what would the confrontation invariably mean for American interests going forward?

Causes of War

America's "second war of independence" (Langguth, A.J. 2006) had three primary causes: the impressment of American sailors, the British trade and embargo and blockade of U.S. ports, and the "incitement of Native American's…… [Read More]

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Wars of Principles the Falklands and Malvinas

Words: 896 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76082748

Wars of Principle in the Falklands and Malvinas

Although the age of imperialism has slowly, but inexorably, been consigned to history books, with the great ritish, Spanish and Portuguese empires that once dominated the globe now largely defunct after the revolutionary spirit swept through colonies from America to Argentina, vestiges of this age-old system still remain to this day. Despite withdrawing from the vast majority of its former colonies after successful campaigns for independence were waged, the United Kingdom has strived to maintain a semblance of its former power by maintaining control over small areas of land within the nations it previously ruled over. Hong Kong in China, Gibraltar in the Iberian Peninsula, and a half dozen Caribbean islands from ermuda to Turks and Caicos, the custom of leaving behind ritish territories in the wake of widespread independence movements was instituted to ensure that the United Kingdom's dogged pursuit of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Coll, Alberto R., and Anthony C. Arend, eds. The Falklands war: lessons for strategy, diplomacy, and international law. Allen & Unwin, 1985.

Freedman, Lawrence, and Virginia Gamba-Stonehouse. Signals of war: the Falklands conflict of

1982. Faber & Faber, 1990.

Gustafson, Lowell S. The sovereignty dispute over the Falkland (Malvinas) Islands. Oxford University Press, 1988.
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Revolutionary History Describe Details of

Words: 1393 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84332756

Eventually, these deficiencies would lead to the adoption of the U.S. Constitution. But during the years that they 13 states struggled to achieve their independence, the Articles of Confederation accomplished what they had been intended to. Adopted by Congress on November 15, 1777, the Articles became operational on March 1, 1781 when the last of the 13 states signed the document (The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union, 2009).

During the debates that took place regarding the adoption of the Constitution, the opponents argued that the Constitution would open the way to tyranny by the central government. With the memory of the British violations of their civil rights before and during the evolution, they insisted that a bill of rights be used that would spell out the protections of the individual citizens. During the state conventions that were held to ratify the Constitution, several states asked for these amendments (Bill…… [Read More]

References

Bill of Rights. (n.d). Retrieved June 13, 2009, from The Charters of Freedom Web site:

 http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/bill_of_rights.html 

The Articles of Confederation. (2003). Retrieved June 13, 2009, from Ben's Guide to U.S.

Government Web site:  http://bensguide.gpo.gov/9-12/documents/articles/index.html
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War of Independence There Are

Words: 2516 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7292692

...[p. 41] Reasons may be given, why an Act ought to be repeal'd, and yet obedience must be yielded to it till that repeal takes place.

The intent of most colonists, was to create change through the proper channels, as has been described by the Philadelphia congress, as having occurred over the ten years bridging the two previous declarations.

A consummate expert on the War of Independence, writing in the early twentieth century, Van Tyne, stresses that the development of the ideal of democratic representation, was seeded in the ideals of Puritan politics which were spurned by the exposure of ministers to the ideas of John Locke and John Milton, who demonstratively effected the ideas of the American colonists as well as many others all over the colonial world. The idea of a fierce fight against tyranny and unchecked despotism was an essential standard of the day and at some…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bancroft, Hubert H.. American war for Independence: Early Causes. 2002-2003.    http://www.publicbookshelf.com/public_html/The_Great_Republic_By_the_Master_Historians_Vol_II/americanw_bb.html   .

Leach, Douglas Edward. Roots of Conflict: British Armed Forces and Colonial Americans, 1677-1763. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1986.

Miller, John C. Origins of the American Revolution. Boston: Little, Brown, 1943.

Morison, S.E., ed. Sources and Documents Illustrating the American Revolution, 1764-1788, and the Formation of the Federal Constitution. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1923.
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Revolutionary Women for Liberty and Freedom

Words: 588 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42670462

Revolutionary Women for Liberty and Freedom

Although they lived in an era defined by the pursuit of personal freedom, as their male counterparts courageously waged a successful revolution against the tyranny of the British monarchy, there were several patriotic women who made their presence felt during the tumultuous time of America's birth. From the poignant letters written by Abagail Adams to her husband John, the diplomat and statesman who worked tirelessly as a Founding Father to help form the foundation of a new union, to the steady hand of companionship provided by Martha Washington to her husband George as he led an undermanned and outgunned army against the most powerful armed forces in the world, women exerted their influence largely from behind the scenes. With the concept of liberty emerging as an ideal worth fighting for, as thousands of Americans bravely laid down their lives to secure liberty for their…… [Read More]

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American War for Independence Wars Are Fought

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19743910

American ar for Independence

ars are fought for many reasons, but freedom from oppression is by far the noblest. The Colonial States of America were British ruled until the year 1776, when the Declaration of Independence called for a complete withdrawal of the King's forces from the American colonies. (Decl. Of Indep. Entire.) The American ar for Independence was a revolutionary war by every definition of the word; the ruling British Empire was cast off permanently, the separation and equality of the various states was guaranteed, and sufficient support for the Constitution and the Bill of Rights completed the newly created United States of America.

The drafting of the Declaration of Independence created a precedent for freedom that the United States had been waiting for decades, and it addressed directly the oppressions beset upon the American colonies by King George III. The Articles of Confederation were a result of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Articles of Conf. 2.

Articles of Conf. 3.

Decl. Of Indep. Entire.

Knight, F. (2000). Retrieved from http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ahr/105.1/ah000103.html
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African Americans in the War for Independence

Words: 838 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41406011

Black Soldier During the American ar for Independence

Many Americans today are aware of the military service of blacks during the First and Second orld ars, and some are even aware of the major contributions of these troops to the Union's victory in the Civil ar. Far fewer modern Americans, though, are aware of the contribution of black soldiers during America's ar for Independence. In fact, by war's end in 1783, fully five thousand black soldiers would serve in the military for a country that otherwise held them and their compatriots in slavery and contempt. This paper reviews the literature to determine the role of the black soldier during the American ar for Independence, followed by a summary of the research and important findings concerning their role in the conclusion.

Review and Discussion

Although they were at a clear disadvantage economically, politically and socially, many black men recognized the need…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"African-American Patriots of the Revolutionary War." The New Crisis (January/February 1999) 106(1): 24-31.

Ferling, John. "Myths of the American Revolution." Smithsonian (January 2010), 10(3): 37-41.

Loewen, James W. Lies My Teacher Told Me. New York: The New Press, 1995.
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Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier in His

Words: 720 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35604822

Narrative of a evolutionary Soldier

In his memoir A Narrative of a evolutionary Soldier, Joseph Plumb Martin recounts his experiences fighting in the evolutionary War as a private, providing a view of the war not usually seen in histories dealing with the more famous major political and military leaders of the day. In particular, Martin's perspective on colonial and British officers and soldiers, the day-to-day experience of the war, and his reasons for staying throughout the campaign offer the reader a useful insight into the realities of the American evolution from the perspective of an average soldier.

Although Martin serves under a variety of admirable officers during his time fighting for the colonial army, at one point in the narrative he encounters a particularly heartless officer which serves to demonstrate some of the class differences likely not seen in other accounts of the war. As Martin and some of his…… [Read More]

References

Martin, J. (2010). A narrative of a revolutionary soldier. New York: Signet Classic.
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Government Changes Post-Revolution War vs Post-Civil War

Words: 1520 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39980527

Government Changes post-Revolution ar vs. post-Civil ar

Close examination of the reasons for and the results of the Revolutionary ar and the Civil ar forces me to disagree with McPherson's position that more radical change in government occurred due to the Civil ar than the Revolutionary ar. In order to understand how this is true, one must look at several issues, such as the causes of each of the wars, the purposes and intentions, and the ultimate results.

The Revolutionary ar was based on the struggle to become independent from Great Britain and this struggle began due to a series of taxes forced upon the citizens. So "taxation without representation" was the initial call to arms however, it grew to include other freedoms as well.

The Civil ar was utterly a different process of situation. hile claims by the South of freedom it was always an economic issue tightly woven…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abraham Lincoln, Cooper Union Address, New York City Presidential Campaign

Confederate States of America-Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union, December 1860, South Carolina

Lincoln, Abraham. "First Inaugural Address." Washington D.C. Mar. 1861. Address.

Ordinance of 1787
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Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier in Martin's

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28613045

Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier

In Martin's (2001) narrative, he addresses many aspects of soldiering in the Revolutionary War. There were many deserters during that time, but Martin chose to stay. That makes him somewhat unusual, but he had a different outlook about American officers, ritish regulars, soldier morale, and the physical discomforts that came with soldiering. He talks of how he could have easily killed enedict Arnold, but did not realize at the time the significance that would have come along with that act (Martin, 2001). He was fiercely loyal to his cause, even though many of the American officers under whom he fought were not well-liked. According to Martin (2001), the largest risk that the American officers were taking in battle was from being killed by their own men. The conditions were bad and many of the men were mistreated by the officers, but most of the men…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Martin, Joseph Plumb. A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier. New York: Signet Classics, 2001.
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African-American Roles in the War for Independence

Words: 1519 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37756108

African-American Roles in the ar for Independence and the Civil ar

America was founded on the principle of freedom. ith this in mind, it comes as little surprise that both the ar for Independence and the Civil ar have the similarity that they both involved the struggle for freedom. Both wars sought to overcome oppression and both wars encompassed a vision of basic human rights connected with a sense of justice. The other similarity these two wars shared was the heroic efforts of African-Americans in their participation in the fight for freedom. This paper will seek to compare and contrast their involvement in these to similar, but different wars.

To understand African-American involvement in the Revolutionary ar, one must first paint a picture of what colonial life was like. Colonists faced the labor-intensive task of trying to carve out a life on a new continent. These were harsh conditions unlike…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arnesen, E. "Fighting for Freedom." Footsteps 5(4) Sept./Oct. 2003: p. 12-15. MasterFILE Premier. EBSCOHost. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. May 25, 2004 http://www.epnet.com.

Buffalo Soldier Feats No Longer Ignored." FDCH Regulatory Intelligence Database. 5 Feb. 2002. Business Source Premier. EBSCOHost. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. May 25, 2004 http://www.epnet.com.

History of African-Americans in the Civil War. No date. National Park Service Civil War Soldiers and Sailors System. May 25, 2004 http://www.it'd.nps.gov/cwss/history/aa_history.htm.

Revolutionary War." Blacfax 9(39) Summer 2001: p. 6-7. Academic Search Premier. EBSCOHost. University of Phoenix, Phoenix, AZ. May 25, 2004 http://www.epnet.com.
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Civil War in Alabama

Words: 1056 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16858221

Civil War in Alabama

The American civil war was a political turmoil that took place during the later years of the 18th Century, particularly between 1775 to 1783, where 13 British colonies joined together to liberate themselves from the British Empire and unite to from the United States of America (American evolutionary War, 2011). It all began with the rejection of the Parliament of the Great Britain as governing body from overseas without their representation and consequently rejecting and sending away all the royal officials and representatives. In turn they formed Provincial Congress in 1774 which made up the self-governing state. This prompted the British to send troops to America to reinstate the direct rule and in return, the Second Continental Congress was formed in 1775 to wade off the British troops and also to defend their decision towards self-governance. This was what was and still is famously know as…… [Read More]

References

American Revolutionary War, (2011). American Revolutionary War. Retrieved May 24, 2011

from  http://www.americanrevolutionarywar.net/ 

Civil War Trust, (2011). James Longstreet: Lieutenant General. Retrieved May 25, 2011 from  http://www.civilwar.org/education/history/biographies/james-longstreet.html 

The Alabama Civil War Round Table, (2011). A Discussion on the American Civil War.
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How Did Nursing Change Social Roles of Northern Women During the Civil War

Words: 7299 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96446723

Nursing & omen's Roles Pre-and-Post Civil ar

The student focusing on 19th century history in the United States in most cases studies the Civil ar and the causes that led to the war. But there are a number of very important aspects to 19th century American history that relate to women's roles, including nursing and volunteering to help the war wounded and others in need of care. This paper delves into the role nurses played in the Civil ar (both Caucasian and Black nurses), the way in which the Civil ar changed the woman's work roles, the role women (both Black and Caucasian) played before, during, and after the war, and the terrible injustices thrust on women of color in a number of instances throughout the 19th century.

The oman's role in America prior to the Civil ar

"A woman's work is never done," is an old maxim but it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brockett, Linus Pierpont, and Vaughan, Mary C. (1867). Woman's Work in the Civil War: A

Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience. Chicago, IL: Zeigler, McCurdy & Co.

Child, Lydia. (1837). The Family Nurse [or] Companion of the American Frugal Housewife.

Bedford, MA: Applewood Books (originally published by Charles Hendee in Boston).
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American History War of 1812

Words: 335 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48973688



There was another group of Americans who felt that all of America, including British Canada, should have been conquered during the Revolutionary War and then ceded to the Americans, so they felt the War of 1812, which began with Americans attempting to conquer Canada, should not have had to take place at all.

Finally, New England residents openly opposed the war, and did not support anything connected with it. They would not offer funds for the war, and they would not allow their militia to fight in the war. They were angry about the economy, but they were also angry because they felt they had been mislead by the government, and the war was really being fought to gain territory in Canada, which they did not agree with. Ultimately, the war ended in 1814, but much of American did not support or condone the…… [Read More]

In addition, before the war, British naval power was the superior naval power in the world, and the French, after a defeat at British hands, stopped trading with Britain, and asked most other European countries to stop, as well. Thus, the majority of Great Britain's trade was with the United States before the war, and there were few other avenues open to the U.S., with European ports blockaded. So, when the British blockaded American ports, there was nowhere else to trade, and trade fell even more than it had before the war.

There was another group of Americans who felt that all of America, including British Canada, should have been conquered during the Revolutionary War and then ceded to the Americans, so they felt the War of 1812, which began with Americans attempting to conquer Canada, should not have had to take place at all.

Finally, New England residents openly opposed the war, and did not support anything connected with it. They would not offer funds for the war, and they would not allow their militia to fight in the war. They were angry about the economy, but they were also angry because they felt they had been mislead by the government, and the war was really being fought to gain territory in Canada, which they did not agree with. Ultimately, the war ended in 1814, but much of American did not support or condone the war.
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Brief History Review of World War Two

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7513176

History of World War II: American Involvement and Social Effects of the War on America

Many people think that the United States' involvement in World War II did not actually begin until Japan infamously attacked the American navy base at Pearl Harbor, on December 7, 1941. However, in truth, even before the Pearl Harbor attack by the Japanese, the American President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt (FDR) and other U.S. military, industrial, and economic leaders had taken initial steps to mobilize the nation into a wartime economy. In terms of both mobilization at home and social effects of the war, the onset of World War II contributed greatly to changes, many of them permanent, in American society and the American way of life.

In the build-up to the war, American factories were offered economic rewards by the government for adopting wartime production modes and practices. Consequently, United States industry focused increasingly on…… [Read More]

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Military Technology Wins Wars Technology

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12452791

S. system of communication was responsible for far too many problems, including the presidential conception of the value of the leader, Nhu Ding Diem. Key factors in this war were the misuse of technology in the south and intelligent use of simple technology by the north. The Battle of Diem Bin Phu was a classic miscalculation when the French thought that artillery could not be brought against them through the jungle. The North Vietnamese did just that, manually hauling big guns on jungle trails and over mountains, then followed with ammunition on bicycles. In addition they hid the guns in tunnels and set off charges in the jungle to confuse the French as to the sources of shelling.

After the French left, the U.S. set up Nhu Ding Diem as president of South Vietnam. Between him and his brother, they alienated more than half the population in short order with…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=109396003

Best, Antony, Jussi M. Hanhim ki, Joseph a. Maiolo, and Kirsten E. Schulze. International History of the Twentieth Century. London: Routledge, 2004. Questia. 8 Oct. 2006 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=109396005.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106977474

Bull, Stephen. Encyclopedia of Military Technology and Innovation. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2004. Questia. 8 Oct. 2006 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=106977476.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=9805116
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Splendid Little War John Hay -- A

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60790427

Splendid Little War

John Hay -- "A Splendid War"

Secretary of State John Hay once wrote to Theodore oosevelt that the Spanish-American War had been "a splendid little war" (Fried, 1998). It was an opinion shared by many Americans at the time. The three-month war -- declared in April 1898 and over by August -- had few American casualties and helped open up many foreign territories for the United States.

The war began with the Cuban evolution. Spanish rule in Cuba was fiercely opposed by Cuban rebels who were routinely dehumanized, degraded and mistreated in the country throughout the late 19th Century (Lovett, 1997). Spanish general Valeriano Weyler instituted many concentration camps to contain insurgents and suppress the threat of rebel uprisings. The camps were scenes of indecency and deplorable living conditions where death, starvation and malaria and typhoid epidemics were rampant. The suffering of Cubans was deemed a social…… [Read More]

Reference

Fried, R.M. (1998). Spain Examines the 'Splendid Little War.'. Chronicle of Higher Education, 45(7), B9.

Haskell, B. (1998). The 'splendid little war'. Soldiers, 53(7), 20.

Lovett, C.C. (1997). A Splendid Little Centennial: Remembering the Spanish-American War. Teaching History: A Journal of Methods, 22(1), 37-39.

Smith, J. (1995). The 'Splendid Little War' of 1898: A reappraisal. History, 80(258), 22.
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Consequences That WW2 Had on United States

Words: 685 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57204232

consequences that WW2 had on United States society.

The Banks

World War 2 had enormous consequences on many parts of American life. One of these was on the economy, and included in the economy was the result that the War had on the banks.

Admittedly, it wasn't just the War that impacted the banks; Franklin Delaney oosevelt's New Deal had an inextricable impact too in enhancing the security of the banking system. Initially, involvement of commercial banks in securities underwriting under-cut bank stability. oosevelt, therefore, implemented the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933 which separated between commercial and investment banking. oosevelt also introduced egulation Q, which forbade banks from paying interest on checking accounts and established a limit on interest rates paid to time deposits.

The post-World war booming era helped these new policies along. Some of oosevelt's reforms persisted into he 21st century; other have instigated discussion and have been changed…… [Read More]

References

Americaslibrary.gov. Depression & WWII.

http://www.americaslibrary.gov/cgi-bin/page.cgi/jb/wwii

Dull, Jonathan R. (1987). A Diplomatic History of the American Revolution. Yale University Press.

EH. Net U.S. Banking History http:/ / the.net/encyclopedia/article/grossman.banking.history.us.civil.war.wwii
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Mary Silliman's War

Words: 854 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62432383

Mary illiman's War

Women in the 18th Century:

Mary illiman's War

Women's roles have changed throughout history both very slowly and very rapidly. The reason for the former is due to the fact that women had, for a very long time, stayed in the same role of household fixture; yet, as is stated in the latter part of the previous sentence, once change began happening it spread both very rapidly and very inclusively. As a result, in Western societies today woman have all the rights and privileges that men have. However, this was not the case in the 18th century, and especially in pre-Civil War America. In the film Mary illiman's war, the viewer is shown a glimpse of what life was like in this period, and how a woman fought both to reconcile with prescribed gender roles, and to break them while accommodating behavior considered appropriate. In order to…… [Read More]

Source:

McMahon, Sarah F. "Mary Silliman's War: A Convincing Social Portrait." American Historical Association. Web. 09 Oct. 2011. .

Please note that the film, and the two attachments provided by the customer on class notes were also utilized.
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Civil War Strategies the General

Words: 325 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68014448

The belief was that eventually the North would have to give up, as long as the South could maintain a unified defense (McPherson). The Confederate Army was not well organized in the beginning, however, and the widespread and largely independent militias defending the Confederate borders were stretched too thin in places, allowing the Union Army to break through (McPherson). Technological advancements had large effects on the strategies of both the Union and Confederate armies as well.

The railroad was one of the most important advancements of the time; it was used to ship troops and supplies, and the destruction of railroad lines was common practice by both armies.

eferences

McPherson, James. Battle Cry of Freedom. Accessed 10 May 2009. http://www.civilwarhome.com/confederatestrategy.htm

Smith, Page. Trial By Fire, A People's History of the Civil War and econstruction. Accessed 10 May 2009. http://www.civilwarhome.com/unionstrategy.htm… [Read More]

References

McPherson, James. Battle Cry of Freedom. Accessed 10 May 2009.  http://www.civilwarhome.com/confederatestrategy.htm 

Smith, Page. Trial By Fire, A People's History of the Civil War and Reconstruction. Accessed 10 May 2009.  http://www.civilwarhome.com/unionstrategy.htm
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How Revolutionary Was the American Revolution

Words: 3820 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79397572

revolutionary the American evolution was in reality. This is one issue that has been debated on by many experts in the past and in the present too. The contents of this paper serve to justify this though-provoking issue.

American evolution-how revolutionary was it?

When we try to comprehend why the American evolution was fought, we come to know that the residents of the American colonies did so to retain their hard-earned economic, political and social order when the British had stated to neglect them. However, before we began to understand what The American evolution was all about, it is necessary for us to look at conditions of the colonies preceding the war. The economy of Colonial America were divided into three separate parts: New England, where the economy was commerce; the South, where cash crops were the major source of earning; and the middle colonies, a combination of both. [Account…… [Read More]

References

Bailyn, Bernard. The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (Harvard University Press, 1967).

Kurtz and Hutson (eds), Essays on the American Revolution (University of North Carolina Press, 1973).

Account of a Declaration 1, available at:  http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/account/ , accessed on: February 11, 2004

American Journey, available at:
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Causes and Outcomes of War

Words: 1976 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54142514

Furthermore, while it established Canada as an independent
nation, it also established America. As a war over its previous colonizer,
America can be said to have won a second war of independence. This is
further reflected in considering President Madison's war message to
Congress. Madison appeals to the "honor" of his country, as if Britain has
violated it and it is America's responsibility to retain it (Madison,
1812). Although the war was fought primarily for economic reasons, the
"honor" Madison is referring to was regained during the war as Great
Britain was unable to dominate the United States. In fact, the United
States did more than a good job of fighting the British. Thus, it appears
that the war was fought somewhat over honor, and the United States
maintained their honor in the war. This means that the United States
established itself, and its pride, in the war, and this…… [Read More]

References

Feldmeth, Greg D. (31 March 1998). U.S. History Resources. Retrieved 3
March 2007 from
  http://home.earthlink.net/~gfeldmeth/USHistory.html  .

Harney, Major W. (1989). The Causes of the War of 1812. Retrieved 4 March
2007 from
http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/1989/HWW.htm.
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Truth About War and Peace

Words: 1882 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75422020

Life's Subjections: Changes To The ays Of Life Found In Tolstoy's ar And Peace

ar and Peace is a truly epic novel in that details a number of important themes as well as major events in the lives of its characters. In this respect it actually uncovers some of the most major events that are bound to take place throughout a person's life -- birth, death, marriage, divorce, war and peace. hat makes this particular novel so compelling is the fact that it largely depicts these life altering events through the fates of a couple of aristocratic Russian families during the time in which the usurper Napoleon Bonaparte is wreaking havoc on the European continent in the early part of the 19th century. As such, there is a certain romantic quality to this tale and to the life-altering events it depicts of people who in some cases are noble personages…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Close, Adam. "Sancho Panza: Wise Fool." The Modern Language Review. 68(2), 344-357. Print. 1973.

Knowles, Alexander. Count Leo Nikolaevich Tolstoy, The Critical Heritage. New York: Routledge and Kegan Paul Books. Print. 1997.

Southgate, Beverly. "Tolstoy and Ethical History: Another look at War and Peace." Rethinking History. 13(2), 235-250. 2009. Print.

Tolstoy, Leo. War and Peace. www.archive.org. Web. 1805.
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Freedom and Liberty in the Revolutionary Era

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12687506

Founding Fathers

Freedom and Liberty to the Founding Fathers

The founding fathers of the United States of America were a product of the Enlightenment. The "Enlightenment" was the 18th century's attempt to break out of the self-imposed restrictions of society and create something better. (osner 2000, 251-253) Beginning with the writings of John Locke in the mid-1600's, a new idea had begun to take root: that man could, through his reason, create better social structures. In other words, man had the ability to create a more perfect form of government, one more in line with the rights of the people. This idea, by its very nature, is an attempt to transfer authority over society from a select few, to the masses of people. The idea of taking power away from Kings, and other rulers, and creating governmental system that would be created and responsible to the people is what the…… [Read More]

References

Locke, John, and Peter Laslett (ed.). Two Treatises of Government. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1988. Print

Rosner, Lisa, and Theibault, John. 2000. A Short History of Europe, 1600-1815. New York: M.E. Sharpe

"Africans in America Narrative: Part 2, The Revolutionary War." PBS.org. Retrieved from  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part2/2narr4.html
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Civil War Both Sides Fought

Words: 1313 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11954670

A stronger Navy allowed the North to enforce the blockade more effectively than the Confederacy could overcome it. The second significant part of the Anaconda Plan was similar in scope and strategic significance: to take control of the Mississippi. When the Union Army eventually did gain control of the mighty Mississippi, the South was effectively split in two. The Anaconda Plan was fulfilled. Not only did the Union have the means by which to enforce their strategies: the Confederacy also lacked as clear a military plan.

While the blockade was nearly automatic and put into place toward the beginning of the war, control over the Mississippi was harder-fought. It meant encroachment deep into Southern territory, where most of the war was fought. Not until 1863 and the Union victory at the Battle of Vicksburg did the Union manage to infiltrate the iver and successfully set up its second major and…… [Read More]

References

Debating Who Actually Won the Civil War." Dummies.com. Retrieved Nov 19, 2006 at http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/id-1229.html

Feldmeth, Greg D. "Secession and Civil War." U.S. History Resources. 31 March 1998. Retrieved Nov 19, 2006 at   http://home.earthlink.net/~gfeldmeth/USHistory.html  

The History Place. "The U.S. Civil War 1861-1865." Retrieved Nov 19, 2006 at   http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/  

Why did the North Win the Civil War?" Retrieved Nov 19, 2006 at   http://www.socialstudieshelp.com/Lesson_35_Notes.htm
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Ethics and the War on

Words: 3193 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47292008

Finally, torture is the best means to try to get this information from the suspect (McCoy, 2006). Taken as a whole, these circumstances are so unlikely to occur that, even if the ticking bomb scenario would justify the use of torture, it has not ever occurred and, therefore, cannot be used to justify torture.

In fact, what many people who advocate in favor of torture fail to acknowledge is that while torture may be guaranteed to elicit information from even the most reticent of subjects, there is no reason to believe that torture will elicit truthful information. The theory behind torture is that, with the application of sufficient pain and fear, people will talk, and that does appear to be true in the vast majority of cases. However, it is more important to wonder what they will say than whether they will talk. In the non-terrorist scenario, "About 25% of…… [Read More]

References

Armbruster, B. (2011, October 3). Obama's successful counterterror strategy. Retrieved March 21, 2012 from Think Progress website: http://thinkprogress.org/progress-report/obamas -successful-counterterror-strategy/

Bufacchi, V., & Arrigo, J.M. (2006). Torture, terrorism, and the state: A refutation of the Ticking-Bomb argument. Journal of Applied Philosophy, 23(3), 355-373.

Gathii, J. (2004). Torture, extra-territoriality, terrorism, and international law. Albany Law

Review, 67, 101-138. Retrieved March 19, 2012 from:
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Military War

Words: 1837 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74569156

growth and development of the United States military from its origination to its present status in the 21st century. It will specifically examine the fostering of both the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force. Moreover, these two branches -- which will serve as case studies for the overall development tendencies of the military in general -- will get deconstructed in the context of the martial encounters that were most seminal for them: The evolutionary War and the War of 1812, and World War I and World War II, respectively.

this paper will delineate the history of the U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force to indicate how military sophistication has paralleled the developments in technology and applications knowledge of America itself.

B.U.S. Naval History

The American evolutionary War

The War of 1812 and the establishment of the U.S. Naval Academy

C.U.S. Air Force History

1947 Third branch of the…… [Read More]

References

Deeben, J.P. (2012). Stoking the fires: The impressments of Seaman Charles Davis by the U.S. Navy. Prologue Magazine. Retrieved from  http://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2012/summer/1812-impressment.html  This is an excellent source which helps to contextualize the sentiment that contributed to the War of 1812, It not only covers the events of that time period at a macro level, but also includes a number of salient personal details as well. This source emphasizes the importance of the Navy in this war.

Dzurec, D. (2013). Prisoners of war and American self-image during the American Revolution. War in History. 20(4), 430-451. This source provides an explanation for much of the anti-British sentiment during the Revolutionary War. It principle does so by discussing the experience of those captured by the British in this encounter.

National Archives. (2010). Teaching with documents." www.archives.gov. Retrieved from http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/369th-infantry / This source provisions a decent overview of World War I. It does so largely through a consideration of the involvement of African-American troops. These troops were necessary to implement in combat situations for the simple fact that the U.S. did not have enough men without their addition. It illustrates some of the wider social implications of this war and its effect both within and outside of the military.

United States Naval Academy (2015). A brief history of USNA. www.usna.edu Retrieved from http://www.usna.edu/USNAHistory / This source provides a fairly detailed history of the development of the United States Naval Academy. As such, it provides an overview of the history of the navy as well. By emphasizing the level of development that the academy underwent since its inception, this source indicates the sort of improvement that characterizes the military in general through the years.
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Civil War in American History

Words: 1676 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25337214

Therefore, the South felt she could count on the aid of France and Great Britain at some time during the war. This of course, did not happen, and so, the South did not have the luxury of external support that the United States had enjoyed during the evolutionary War (Donald, 1996, p. 15-16).

The South also had over 3 million slaves they could conscript into the Army, but these slaves could also stay behind and work, while the whites fought the war, and this gave the South a distinct advantage over the North. While she did not have more manpower, their operations were smaller, and they could move more effectively. They were also on the defensive, which gave additional impetus to their cause, and their coastline was short and sheltered, which held off blockading of supplies they needed (Donald, 1996, p.16). In addition, they were more attuned to the war…… [Read More]

References

Donald, DH Why the north won the Civil War.

McPherson, J.M. (2001). Ordeal by fire: The Civil War and reconstruction. New York: McGraw-Hill.
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Revolutionary People at War The

Words: 994 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28622315



Royster does an effective job of explaining how the revolutionaries managed to hold on and keep fighting against the larger British forces. In the hellish nightmare of war, "Liquor in moderation was thought to relieve fatigue," Royster explains (144). This was not a decision that the generals made -- allowing soldiers to drink alcohol during battles -- but rather it was fully endorsed by Congress. Those that haven't read Royster's book might not know that Congress "rewarded victory with rum" -- although perhaps elected officials didn't realize that liquor had its bad side; many soldiers "got drunk every day and men sold their clothing and equipment to buy liquor, which "aggravated mutiny as well as valor" (144).

Two themes beyond what have already been expressed are important to Royster's book. One is religion, which he uses as a subtle and not-so-subtle theme off and on; a total of 52 pages…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Royster, Charles. A Revolutionary People at War: The Continental Army and American

Character, 1775-1783. 1979.
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Revolutionary Thinkers

Words: 377 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9042233

revolutionary thinkers held widely disparate viewpoints regarding war. Charles Darwin's viewpoint was based on the assumption that war was a manifestation of humans' "struggle for existence." In his book The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex (1882) Darwin explained that natural selection was behind the development of certain human social qualities, namely sympathy, courage, and fidelity. Thus in a fight between two primitive human tribes, the tribe that had the most sympathetic, courageous, and secure warriors was most likely to succeed. ar was thus seen as being essential towards the diffusion of such noble qualities throughout the world.

Karl Marx's view towards war was that it was an essential aspect of the Communist revolution. In the Communist Manifesto (1848) he laid out the steps that would lead towards this revolution. The first step was that an inevitable "class struggle" would occur between workers and capitalists. This would…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Darwin, Charles. The descent of man and selection in relation to sex. 1882. Retrieved April 16, 2005 from British Library Online at: http://pages.britishlibrary.net/charles.darwin2/texts.html

Grassie, William. "The fateful question in Freud's Civilization and its discontents." 2000. Retrieved April 16, 2005 from Temple University's Intellectual Heritage Website at:

http://isc.temple.edu/ih/IH52/Revolutions/Freud/FreudSet.htm

Zelnick, Stephen. "An introduction to the Communist Manifesto." N.d. Retrieved April 16, 2005 from Temple University's Intellectual Heritage Website at:
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War for Cuban Conquest in 1883 Frederick

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5908363

War for uban onquest

In 1883, Frederick Jackson Turner gave a speech to the World's olumbian Exposition, introducing what is now known as the "Turner thesis" of American history. This thesis says "continental expansion...was the driving, dynamic factor of American progress. Without [it] America's political and social institutions would stagnate. If one adhered to this way of thinking, America must expand or die." (Musicant) It was an odd moment to being saying such things, and a prophetic one, for America has, perhaps unbeknownst to him, just run out of frontier to conquer. Further expansion had to be overseas. Of course, "overseas" was already conquered, had its own government, and its own citizens. Thus a war of conquest rose on the horizon for America. The perfect opportunity to conquer arose during what was politely called the Spanish-American war, in which America stepped in to help out a struggling band of revolutionaries…… [Read More]

Cuba became increasingly caught up in trade with the United States, "Sugar estates and mining interests passed from Spanish and Cuban to U.S. hand... Cuban sugar producers were more and more at the mercy of the U.S. refiners" (Hernandez) This economic unity no doubt helped provoke America's eventual conquest. In the meantime, revolutionary spirit continued undimmed by the end of the Ten Years' War, building its foundation of support and respect among the people. "It was a multiracial and multiclass movement...Its leaders were no longer members of the creole elite, but men of modest social origin." (Hernandez) This was a true revolution of the people now, and its prospects for success seemed to grow daily under the leadership of Jose Mart', a middle class poet, journalist, philosopher, and dreamer. In 1895, following a Spain-induced loss of trade with America, and further evidence of Spanish despotism, the revolution began.

The revolution seemed successful at first; then Spain sent the best of its worst men.

General Valeriano Weyler, with his reinforcements, began a war of deprivation, forcing peasants into concentration camps where lack of food, sanitation, and water killed thousands upon thousands of them. The revolution continued in the hills and
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War Politics Conflicts and Society

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36353147

This makes sense, and has happened in other wars, such as the Civil War. Here, it seems like it was more prevalent because of the nature of the war, and the close proximity of the trenches. The men understood they were more than killing machines, and reached out to the men close to them. The author states, "In various place they fraternized, even playing soccer, singing, and talking together" (Kolko 134). This indicates the men recognized each other as human beings first - trapped in a war not of their making. It also shows that the men were larger than what they were fighting, and larger than the countries that created the war. They could see the humanity of the "enemy," and understand they were simply men caught up in an impossible situation. This is interesting, since the text notes that so many of the soldiers were peasants, who many…… [Read More]

References

Kolko, Gabriel. Century of War: Politics, Conflicts, and Society Since 1914. New York: The New Press, 1999.
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Revolutionary Comparison The English America

Words: 700 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14770744

Unlike the English Revolution, the American Revolution was also bloody, not relatively peaceful, and created a new government, rather than sustained and substantially reformed an old one. But it was more desired and waged 'by the people,' rather than by the ruling classes, unlike the British. In this sense, the American Revolution was seen as a greater victory for the Enlightenment. Just as the Bloodless Revolution did make the English system more balanced in terms of monarchial authority and allowed the predominantly Protestant will of the English people to be respected, the American Revolution even more radically upheld notions of national self-definition, individual rights, and the right for a people to exercise self- determination over their futures. The philosopher John Locke believed that a sovereign abdicated his or her right of rule when he or she acted in a tyrannical fashion and deprived citizens of fundamental rights to life, liberty,…… [Read More]

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War in Nicaragua

Words: 1006 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4975939

Nicaragua

The Civil War in Nicaragua was one of the defining events from the 1980s, and it also happened to be a defining event in my personal life and that of my family. The argument in question was over the nature of the revolution in Nicaragua, and the political motivations of the Sandinistas. My assertion is that the situation in my home country is not as black-and-white as it has been presented in the American media, and to a lesser degree, the Canadian media. I believe that the situation that gave rise to this argument is rooted in a lack of accurate media coverage. Because I am from a Nicaraguan background, but also have one American parent, I can present a unique perspective that illuminates both sides of the argument to show that neither the Sandinistas nor the Americans had the best interests of Nicaragua at heart.

During this argument,…… [Read More]

References

Chomsky, Noam. "1970-1987: The contra war in Nicaragua." Retrieved online:  https://libcom.org/history/1970-1987-the-contra-war-in-nicaragua 

Klerlein, Ellie. "Environmental Effects of Nicaraguan Armed Conflicts." Nov. 2006. Retrieved online:  http://www1.american.edu/ted/ice/nicaragua.htm 

Smith, John. [Conversation]. 2014.
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Social Impact of Cold War & Terrorism

Words: 1772 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30854973

Social Impact of Cold War & Terrorism

The Cold War is often associated with the idea of making great and physical divides between the good and the bad of the world. It was a symbolic representation that extended for about 30 years on the expectation that the greatest powers of the world could, under the right circumstances, impose a sort of benign order on the planet by isolating the evil empires and showcasing how the non-evil ones could administer their own ideas of peace, justice and liberty .

In reality, what was happening was much different. The Cold War was about engagement, not separation (Tirman, 2006). No matter that the Berlin Wall was its most powerful symbols of division, the world as a whole was learning that military might was not all that it was made out to be (U.S. History, n.d.). Together and separately, the biggest countries across the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Diamond, L. (n.d.). Winning the new cold war on terrorism. Hoover Institute. Stanford University. Retrievable from http://www.stanford.edu/~ldiamond/papers/coldWarOnTerrorism.pdf.

Levine, D. And Levine, R. (2006). Deterrence in the Cold War and the War on Terror. National Science Foundation Grant publication. Retrievable from   http://www.dklevine.com/papers/inimical.pdf  .

Tirman, J. (2006). The War on Terror and the Cold War: They're not the same. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The Audit of Conventional Wisdom. Retrievable from   http://web.mit.edu/cis/acw.html  .

US History (n.d). Berlin Wall. Viewable at   http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1867.html  .
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Both of These Center on the Authors Experiences During the Spanish Civil War

Words: 3073 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31817238

Spanish Civil War

The famous Spanish Civil War fought from the year 1936 to 1939. This war was fought between two groups; the Republicans and the Nationalists. The Republicans were the supporters of the established Spanish republic; meanwhile the latter were a group of rebels who were led by General Francisco Franco. Franco emerged victorious in this war and ruled Spain for the next 36 years as a dictator.

After a group of generals (led by Jose Sanjurjo) of the Spanish Republican Armed Forces declared opposition against the government of the Second Spanish Republic, the war ensued. At that time the President of Spain was Manuel Azana. This group of rebels had gained support from a couple of conservative groups that included the Spanish Confederation of the Autonomous Right, Fascist Falange and Carlists (Payne, 1973).

Military units formed in urgos, Pamplona, Corodova, Morocco, Cadiz and Seville supported this group of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Beevor, Antony. The Battle for Spain: The Spanish Civil War 1936 -- 1939. London: Weidenfield and Nicolson. 2006

Buckley, Ramon. "Revolution in Ronda: The facts in Hemingway's For Whom the Bell Tolls." The Hemingway Review. 1997

Hemingway Ernest. "For Whom the Bell Tolls." New York: Charles Scribner's Sons. 1940

Meyers, Jeffrey. Hemingway: A Biography. London: Macmillan. 1985
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Civil War Most of Us

Words: 4049 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55865581

In some ways, the Civil War was the analogue of the Terror for Americans: It was the bloodthirsty incestuous violence that allowed the nation to move onward to a full embrace of democracy, joining itself to Europe as the world began to tip toward democratic ideas and ideals.

White Supremacy

Stephen Kantrowitz's biography of Benjamin Tillman demonstrates how he can be seen as a symbol for an entire cohort of Southerners of his generation, people (mostly but not exclusively men) who could neither understand nor tolerate the new order that had formally instituted itself after Emancipation. They could not understand a world in which black men were suddenly their legal equals. Tillman, and others like him, lived in a world that told them that blacks had to be treated like equals even though many white Southerners did not see their black compatriots as even being fully human.

This set up…… [Read More]

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Great War World War One Ultimately Killed

Words: 981 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5878712

Great ar

orld ar One ultimately killed 35 million people -- this alone might have merited its being called "The Great ar," although to a large degree it was the astonishing way in which the deaths happened. On the first day of the Battle of the Somme alone, Britain suffered almost sixty thousand casualties. The ten-month stalemate of the Battle of Verdun resulted in seven hundred thousand (700,000) dead, with no discernible tactical advance made by either side (Tuchman 174). The immediate causes of orld ar One were complicated but fairly straightforward. Many of the long-standing political institutions of Europe were badly outmoded, in particular two of the oldest: the Austro-Hungarian Empire and the Ottoman Empire. Each of these institutions were the inheritors of previous large-scale imperial institutions (the Holy Roman Empire and the Byzantine Empire accordingly) which dated back nearly a thousand years -- and each was failing badly.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Karp, Walter. The Politics of War: The Story of Two Wars Which Altered Forever the Political Life of the American Republic. New York: Franklin Square Press, 2010. Print.

Tuchman, Barbara. The Guns of August. New York: Ballantine, 1962. Print.
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WWI and the Russian Revolution

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24086671

The makers of the peace settlement hoped to reduce the possibility of future conflict by taking away Germany's army and controlling its political system. This proved impossible, and only provoked more violence in the long run, as Germans grew more sympathetic to fascism as a result.

Third, why did the United States Senate reject the Treaty of Versailles? What objections did they have to the treaty, especially to the League of Nations? Why was the United States not ready for peace through collective security?

The United States at the time was still isolationist in its philosophy. It had come to participate in the war fairly late, and had little appreciation about how bloody and terrible it had been, through the system of trench warfare, for the major participating European powers. The U.S. still believed the Atlantic Ocean could protect itself from most major European conflicts, and it had felt less…… [Read More]

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World War Turning Point Europe Significant Change

Words: 2238 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90985032

World War Turning Point Europe, Significant Change Occurred Emergence Legitimate evolutionary egimes

Self-Determination in Cuba

There are few who would dispute the fact that following the conclusion of World War II and prior to its revolution (which began in 1953 and concluded on January 1 of 1959) Cuba was a prosperous region of the world that was certainly worth fighting for. The country's leader prior to the ascendancy of Fidel Castro, Fulgencio Batista, had cleverly manipulated the assistance of a number of external forces, primarily that of the United States, to assist the country in achieving a degree of economic gain and modernity the likes of which were comparable to, if not surpassing, those of other parts of the world.

Its economic prowess may be demonstrated from the following quotation. "Cuba in 1958, prior to the government of the Communist Fidel Castro, paid its employees an average of $3.00 per…… [Read More]

References

Epperson, R.A. (1985). The Unseen Hand. Arizona: Publius.

Guevara, C. (2005). Cuba: Historical Exception or Vanguard in the Colonial Struggle? Retrieved from http://www.marxists.org/archive/guevara/1961/04/09.htm

Kapur, T., Smith, A. (2002). "Housing Policy In Castro's Cuba." Retrieved from http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/education/oustanding_student_papers/kapur_smith_cuba_02.pdf

Jones, L. (1966). Home. New York: William Morrow and Co.
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Civil Wars it Is Estimated That Between

Words: 3550 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85083177

Civil ars

It is estimated that between 1900 and 1967, there were 526 civil wars called throughout the world (Civil pp). Today, there are literally dozens of wars going on around the globe, and dozens more that have ended during recent years, such as the civil wars in Guatemala and Tajikistan.

According to Christopher Cramer, most literature concerning civil wars has highlighted the role of political instability in the relationship between growth and inequality (Cramer pp). Although there are interlinkages between distribution, conflict and growth, these interlinkages are complex and cannot be read off or predicted from any convincing repeated empirical relationship between variables that are often loaded with too much and unclear meaning (Cramer pp). Cramer takes the title to his article, "Civil ar is Not a Stupid Thing: Exploring Growth, Distribution and Conflict Linkages" from a short story by Sicilian writer, Leonardo Sciascia, about a Sicilian dragooned into…… [Read More]

Work Cited

"Civil Wars Throughout the World."

http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/inter-aspects/world1.htm

Cramer, Christopher. "Civil War is Not a Stupid Thing: exploring growth, distribution and conflict linkages."

http://64.233.187.104/search?q=cache:N00ZR7tRHzsJ:mercury.soas.ac.uk/economics/workpap/adobe/wp73.pdf+countries+that+have+had+civil+wars& hl=en
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Civil War Was Inevitable The

Words: 1585 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28006722

Firstly secession could not be allowed as it would divide the country politically, morally and economically. This aspect tended to highlight the differences between North and South. The differences in terms of labor and ethics presented two almost diametrically opposed systems.

With two fundamentally different labor systems at their base, the economic and social changes across the nation's geographical regions - based on wage labor in the North and on slavery in the South - underlay distinct visions of society that had emerged by the mid-nineteenth century in the North and in the South.

American_Civil_War: Wikipedia)

Secondly, the war was inevitable due to one word - slavery. While there are many complex issues, such as independence and economics that can be debated, yet the importance of the slavery issue was a factor that was morally and ethically the main element that made the civil war inevitable and a factor that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

African-American Civil War History in the National Park System. September 20, 2005. http://www.it'd.nps.gov/cwss/history/aa_cw_parks.htm

American Civil war: Wikipedia. September 20, 2005. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War

Causes of the Civil War: A Balanced Answer. October 1, 2005. http://members.tripod.com/~greatamericanhistory/gr02013.htm

Higham, Robin, and Steven E. Woodworth, eds. The American Civil War: A Handbook of Literature and Research. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996.
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Revolution War What Led to the Revolution

Words: 1089 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6364838

Revolution War

What led to the Revolution War

This paper aims to discuss main ideas that led to the Revolution War as explained by Edmund S. Morgan in the third edition of his book "The Birth of the Republic' (993). This book was initially published in 956 and then republished another time in 977 and then in 993. It provided a tremendous overview of the major events of the history of America during the revolutionary period.

Morgan in the first part of the book examined the relationship between the 3 U.S. colonies and British Parliament. He emphasized primarily on the unjust taxation that was imposed on the colonies by the English and other violations of liberties committed by British Parliament. In fact, Sugar and Stamp Acts of 764-765 turned out to be a great shock to the colonists, that declared that in future additional taxes will be taken from the…… [Read More]

1. Explained by Daniel K. Richter, Before the Revolution: America's Ancient Pasts, Belknap Press of Harvard University Press; First Edition, 2011, 500- 510

2. Quoted in Edmund, S, and Morgan. The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89 (The Chicago History of American Civilization), University of Chicago Press; Third Edition, 1993, 27

3. Explained by Edmund, S, and Morgan. The Birth of the Republic, 1763-89 (The Chicago History of American Civilization), University of Chicago Press; Third Edition, 1993, 52.
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Alk War in Art When

Words: 1397 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82446150

The viewer is not directed to mourn the bodies that cover the ground, but rather celebrate alongside the victors, who charge forward carrying guns and swords. Instead, the piled corpses are merely a means to an end, a soft topping to the pile of rubble that is apparently necessary to secure Liberty and allow her to take charge.

The contrast in theme is particularly strong because the style of either artist does not immediately feel conducive to their apparent goal, but upon closer examination . While Delacroix is decidedly more "realistic" than Picasso, the realism of his corpses does not direct the viewer to sympathize with them, but merely adds some sense of gravity to central image of a glowing Liberty directing "the people" onward with a rifle and French flag. Thus, while one might imagine Delacroix's "realism" would instill some sort of thematic or ideological realism into the painting,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Athanassoglou-Kallmyer, Nina. "Cezanne and Delacroix's Posthumous Reputation." The Art

Bulletin 87, no. 1 (2005): 111-129,5.

Delacroix, Eugene. Wikimedia, Liberty Leading the People. Last modified 1830. Accessed

August 25, 2012. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Eugene_Delacroix
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Social Evolution to Rapid Revolutionary Change and

Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70700407

Social evolution to rapid revolutionary change and contemporary globalization dynamics: Emphasizing the an Analysis of Global Economics.

An article that recently appeared in The Korea Herald, "U.S. And Germany stress cooperation" details a visit to Germany by U.S. Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner, who met with his German counterpart to discuss the financial crisis that has enveloped Europe as of late. The context for this meeting was important, as the European Union's currency, the Euro, has consistently been devalued in the past few years and several countries that are part of this alliance (17 altogether) are contemplating various measures in which the currency and the economic solidarity of the EU could be saved.

The crux of this article, which directly correlates to Hans-Werner Sinn's opinion editorial, "Why Berlin is Balking on Bailout" actually has less to do with the meeting between the two financial heads of the U.S. And Germany and…… [Read More]

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Cold War and Its Aftermath

Words: 3171 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70876456

That intervention considered, it is fair to say that on the one hand, the fact that the U.S. came out as the winner of the Cold War was obvious, and on the other hand that a certain change had occurred in terms of the rule of the international law.

The following years saw an increase in the intrastate violence, taking into account the Somalia crisis, the situations in South Africa, the genocide in Rwanda, or the war in the former Yugoslavia. All these elements of the international political scene were signs of the power vacuum that was created as a result of the fall of the higher authority in the communist world, the U.S.S.R. More precisely, although the cases in Africa were in fact reminiscences of post colonial revolts, the situations worsened as there was no authority to report to in terms of international situations. However, a certain modification did…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Buzan, Barry et al. European security order recast: scenarios for the post-cold war era. London; Pinter, 1990.

Calvocoressi, Peter. World politics since 1945. New York: Longman, 1987.

Graebner, Norman a. "Cold War Origins and the Continuing Debate." The Journal of Conflict Resolution, Vol. 13, No. 1., 1969, pp. 123-132.

Guzzini, Stefano. Realism in international relations and international political economy: the continuing story of a death foretold. London: Routledge, 1998.
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Beatles the Revolutionary Commonness of

Words: 748 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95145163



To the point, even beyond everything else which Norman portrays in the text, the theme that seems to emerge with the greatest relevance is this idea of the various members of the group as well as of such important figures in the group's extended family as manager Brian Epstein as plagued by personal uncertainty and tragic grief. So is this best captured in the details concerning John Lennon at the time of his mother's untimely passing by an automobile accident. Norman relates of Lennon that "he had never been short of girlfriends, though few were willing to put up for long with the treatment that was John Lennon's idea of romance. His drinking, sarcasm, his unpunctuality at trysts, his callous humor, and most of all, his erratic temper drove each of them to chuck him, not infrequently with the devastating rejoinder that is the specialty of Liverpool girls. 'Don't take…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Norman, P. (2005). Shout! The Beatles in Their Generation. Simon and Schuster.
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World War II Also Marked

Words: 2272 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99236996

The demonstration in Tiananmen Square showed that there were alrge semgnets of the population that wanted change, but Deng's response was to crush the movement with violence and to assert the supremacy ofm centalzied rule once more..

These actions show some of the difficulties of independence and of developing a new political structure when many adhere to older political structures and ideas. One response is to try to wipe out the old with violence, but regimes tend to become reactionary about their own ideas as well and to crush any opposition, real of perceived.

9. Arab unity has not materialized for a number of historical reasons related to the different ways in which the countries of the region have developed so that the leaders of some of the states are wary of other leaders, because of differences in economic structures in the various countries, and because of different reactions to…… [Read More]

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Social Evolution to Rapid Revolutionary Change and

Words: 990 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94465231

Social evolution to rapid revolutionary change and contemporary globalization dynamics: Emphasizing the contributions of economic, and political process to societal change

Should the U.S. trade with ussia?

The Cold War ended long ago but trade restrictions still exist between the U.S. And the former communist superpower of ussia. In an effort to liberalize trade, the U.S. has been easing some of these restrictions. ecently, the Senate Finance Committee passed a trade bill that could double U.S. exports to ussia at a time when the U.S. economy is particularly strapped and in need of rectifying the trade imbalance that exists between itself and the rest of the world overall. Declining U.S. exports have been linked to sluggish job growth. U.S. exports to ussia currently hover around $9 billion dollars, a figure which some analysts estimate could double if the trade bill passes ("U.S. okays trade with ussia," The Korea Herald, 2012).…… [Read More]

Reference

Pukhov, Rusan. "Why Russia supports Syria." The New York Times. 7 Jul 2012.

[27 Jul 2012] http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/07/opinion/why-russia-supports-syria.html?_r=2&%20scp=1&sq=russia%20syria&st=Search

"U.S. okays trade with Russia." The Korea Herald. 19 July 2012. [19 July 2012]

http://view.koreaherald.com/kh/view.php?ud=20120719000668&cpv=0
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Rosa Luxemburg's View of World War I

Words: 917 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39558264

osa Luxemburg's view of World War I, as demonstrated in her political tract "The Workers and the War," was relatively simple. She vehemently protested against the war on political grounds, arguing that it actually represented a dissolution of the socialist principles which had largely animated Europe and large portions of Germany at the time. This fact is readily underscored by the notion that the author was imprisoned for the majority of World War I due to her protesting this war as violating many of the crucial tenets of socialism. The author's primary thesis is that large international conflicts such as World War I were fundamentally contrary to the ideologies of socialism, which strove to unite and empower the working class. Luxemburg widely believed that World War I and the very conception of nationalism itself merely led to the disempowerment of socialists, and regulated the working class to its substandard living…… [Read More]

References

Luxemburg, R. (1916). "The war and the workers." www.h-net.org. Retrieved from http://www.h-net.org/Y?\?X[???^ ??Z\?\??ZX? ?^ ?[
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Tank Warfare in World War II Tank

Words: 5332 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39543476

Tank arfare in orld ar II

Tank warfare was a catalyst for success starting in orld ar II. The war catapulted the importance of the tank and its abilities. orld ar II saw tanks as the primary means for overtaking enemy forces (Piekalkiewicz). They were essential in fending off invaders, maintaining strongholds, and even going on the offensive (Piekalkiewics). Tanks were somewhat of a new dimension, but they quickly perpetuated to become probably the most important dimension in the European theatre.

orld ar I saw the first major tank warfare take place. orld ar I was based on the assumption that victory was achieved through tank warfare. Soldiers would entrench themselves, and periodically charge all at once in an effort to invade the opposing trench. Once that trench was invaded, another one would be targeted. It was an everlasting cycle that led to millions of deaths and very little advance…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Wright, Patrick. Tank: Progress of the War Machine. London: Faber. 2001

Vannoy, Allyn. Against the Panzers. Jefferson: McFarland. 1996.

Senger, Elterlin. German Tanks of WWII. New York. Galahad. 1969.

Dinardo, R.L. Germany's Panzer Arm. Westport: Greenwood. 1999.
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Effect of WWI on Literature

Words: 1616 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8625859

WWI and Literature

World War I was certainly one of the most productive periods in literature with millions of poets and authors emerging on the scene and each one contributing tremendously to the growth and progress of literature. It is quite strange that while WWI was a deeply disturbing and a largely horrifying experience for most countries, it inspired writers and poets around the globe and this resulted in significant growth of world literature.

In England alone, more than 2000 poets emerged during this period as Harvey (1993) elaborates: "From the very first week, the 1914-18 war inspired enormous quantities of poetry and fiction. The claim that three million war poems were written in Germany in the first six months of hostilities is difficult to substantiate, but Catherine W. eilly has counted 2,225 English poets of the First World War, of whom 1,808 were civilians. For example, William Watson (then…… [Read More]

References

A.D. Harvey, First World War literature. Magazine Title: History Today. Volume: 43. Publication Date: November 1993.

Fussell, Paul. The Great War and Modern Memory. New York: Oxford UP, 1975.

Hemingway, Ernest. Complete Poems. Lincoln: U. Of Nebraska, 1983.

Granville Hicks, The Great Tradition: An Interpretation of American Literature since the Civil War. Publisher: Biblo and Tannen. Place of Publication: New York. Publication Year: 1967.
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Effect of WWI on Jews and Germans

Words: 3140 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25856239

Germans and Jews After I

Germans and Jews After orld ar I

In orld ar I, more than 12,000 Jews lost their lives fighting for Germany (Flannery, 43). They were a large part of the culture there, and had intermingled as much as they were able to. However, despite the way they were involved in so much of what was taking place in the country, they were also never really accepted. After I, Germany's official position on Jews changed. Much of that took place because the German leaders did not want to take any blame for the problems that had caused them to lose out in the war. Because they wanted to make sure the people saw them in a good light, and they did not want to admit past mistakes, they looked for scapegoats. One of the main groups for that scapegoating was the Jewish people. Even though many…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anti-Semitism in History: World War 1. United States Holocaust Museum. United States Holocaust Memorial Council, 2014. Print. http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007166

While Anti-Semitism is nothing new in society, this article spells out clearly what was taking place in Germany after WWI and how that shaped the beliefs of the Germany people when it came to their feelings about Jews in their country.

Elon, Amos. The Pity of It All: A History of Jews in Germany, 1743 -- 1933. New York, 2002. Print.

The Jewish people in Germany never really had much of a chance to be a part of the country, at least not on a proper level. They were marginalized from the very beginning, and that only got worse after WWI, finally culminating in the atrocities of WWII.