Satire Essays (Examples)

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How Teenage Girls Want to Be Just Like All of the Others

Words: 669 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56235094

Satire on Teenage Girls

They look so good, all in a row. Their jeans, lower than a plumber's pants, shimmer in the light because of all the glitter flung on their thighs. Tan lines from all of them are visible, so low are their extra low jeans. The sparkles on their pants match their eye shadow, which comes in a variety of colors: purple, silver, and the ever popular pink! The girls can choose whichever shade they prefer, to assert their individual personalities. As long as the shiny lip gloss matches, of course.

Their rear ends shake to the music blaring from the radio. They giggle in unison as they dance, arms flailing and bearing temporary tattoos. Two out of the four girls have belly button rings. The others have belly button rings and a tongue piercing. A melange of boy bands and Brittany blasts through the girls' bedroom. Whose…… [Read More]

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Biographical Report on Author Artist

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48769417

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745)

Satire and Irony in Dublin

LIFE OF JONATHAN SWIFT

Jonathan Swift is widely regarded as the greatest writer of satire in English literature. Yet it is crucial for understanding Swift's satire to know that he was not really English. Swift was born in Dublin in 1667, to a family that originally had emigrated from England -- for this reason, he is generally described as "Anglo-Irish." Swift did his university studies in Dublin at Trinity College, graduating in 1686. From here he became the personal secretary to a politician and writer, Sir William Temple, and moved to England. Political machinations, however, hampered Swift's advancement in a political career -- instead he would end up taking a position in the Protestant Church of Ireland, ultimately rising to the position of Dean at Saint Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin.

Swift's career encompassed both literature and politics. As a wit and satirist,…… [Read More]

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Swift's Use of Humor in

Words: 4828 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49981259

Now he is to be punished fo his good deed: "...the said Quinbus Flestin, in open beach of the said law, unde colou of extinguishing the fie kindled in the apatment of his Majesty's most dea impeial consot, did maliciously, taitoously, and devilishly, by dischage of his uine, put out the said fie..." Aticle II stated "That, the said Quinbus Flestin having bought the impeial fleet of Blefuscu into the oyal pot and being aftewads commanded by his Impeial Majesty to seize all the othe ships...and educe that empie to a povince, to be govened by a vice-oy fom hence; and to destoy and put to death not only all the Big-Endian exiles, but likewise all the people of that empie, who would not immediately fosake the Big-Endian heesy: he... like a false taito against his most auspicious seene, Impeial Majesty, did petition to be excused...: In Aticle III he…… [Read More]

references to women throughout and nearly always they are negative. He refers to the misery of marriage, to women's vanity, selfishness, and greed. He mentions their idle, incessant chatter. The only woman in the book he likes is Glumdalclitch who is really a young girl about nine or ten years old. Swift makes fun of women but not at great length. This is understandable since it is a man's world he's criticizing.

In the fourth part of the book, Swift makes his most devastating criticisms of human beings. They are cast as lower animals in a place where horses are noble, moral, and rational. The uncivilized humans are called "Yahoos," an expression that endures today. Yahoos today are generally country people without city manners who speak in vernacular and wear overalls. The Yahoos in Gulliver's Travels are gross, violent, and stupid. By looking them, Swift points out that human beings are the only animals capable of deception. Other animals have no vices and are incapable of crime. Only human beings desire power and riches. Only human beings go to war with each other -- and over whether flesh be bread, or bread be flesh; whether the juice of a certain berry be blood or wine: whether whistling be a vice or a virtue; whether it be better to kiss a post, or throw it into the fire; what is the best color for a coat, whether black, white, red, or grey; and whether it should be long or short, narrow or wide, dirty or clean; with many mores" (p. 214).

Of war, he states a number of foolish causes, "Sometimes one prince quarrelleth with another for fear the other should quarrel with him (reminds one of George Bush and Saddam Hussein). Sometimes our neighbors want the things which we have, or have the things which we want, and we both fight until they take ours, or give us theirs" (p. 214). This leads to two pages of irony on war and the uncivilized use of weapons: "a soldier is held the most honourable of all others; because a soldier is a Yahoo hired to kill in cold blood as many of his own species, who have never offended him, as possibly he can" (p. 215).

Swift is especially hard on lawyers, judges, laws of precedence, and the trial system, which deals only with irrelevant facts. Legal language and jargon perverts and postpones justice.

He states his low opinion of lawyers succinctly: "...that in all points out of their own trade they were usually the most ignorant and stupid generation among us, the most despicable in common conversation, avowed enemies to all knowledge and learning..." On the use of money, he points out "That the rich man enjoyed the fruit of the poor man's labor...that the bulk of our people was forced to live miserably, by labouring every day for small wages, to make a few live plentifully."
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Loss Read P 305 Leaving

Words: 7913 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75963209

" The differences in these two lines seem to be only a matter of syntax but in actuality, it also differs in the meaning. The King James Bible version makes it seem like the Lord is making the individual do something, as if by force or obligation, while the Puritan version states that the Lord causes the individual to do something, as if out of their own will. This alone relays the message that faith itself is driving the action, not a perceived obligation.

Another distinction between the two translations can be found with the lines "Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: / and I will dwell in the house of the Lord forever" (King James Bible) and "Goodness and mercy surely shall / all my days follow me. / and in the Lord's house I shall / dwell so long as days…… [Read More]

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Vanity Vanity -- All Is

Words: 1265 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93441427

Instead, it uses mock heroic allusions and meter in the style of Pope's translation of Homeric epic to make the mores and morals of the aristocracy seem absurd. In detailing the efforts of Belinda preparing herself for a party, Pope makes her sound like she is preparing to do battle, with her attendants, little, godlike beings that are pale shadows of great Zeus and Athena:

"Do thou, Crispissa, tend her fav'rite Lock;

Ariel himself shall be the Guard of Shock.

hen Belinda plays a card game with the Baron who will eventually deprive her of her hair, the trivial game is portrayed like a conquest of Troy:

The Knave of Diamonds now tries his wily Arts,

And wins (oh shameful Chance!) the Queen of Hearts.

At this, the Blood the Virgin's Cheek forsook,

A livid Paleness spreads o'er all her Look;

Unlike Johnson's satire, instead of directly telling the reader…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Alexander Pope." Books and Writers. April 29, 2009. http://www.kirjasto.sci.fi/apope.htm

Johnson, Samuel. The Vanity of Human Wishes. Full e-text available April 29, 2009 at http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~rbear/johnson.html

"Juvenalian satire." Encyclopedia Britannica. 2009. Encyclopedia Britannica Online. 29 Apr.

2009 .
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Desiderius Erasmus Selection From the Praise of Folly

Words: 1022 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70376186

Praise of Folly

Desiderius Erasmus' story "The Praise of Folly" is a pointed satirical work that serves many purposes that the art of literature uniquely presents. The purpose of this essay is to examine the written work to explore several themes. This argument will describe and explain the author's use of criticism and satire by highlighting certain passages of the text that best demonstrate these tools. This essay will also compare Erasmus' use of satire with its use by today's social critics. Finally this essay will remark about this work as it is presented in its parent text book.

The Praise of Folly is divided into three different parts or sections that help seperate the author's criticisms. The story is narrated by Folly herself as she presents herself in front of a crowd of wearing an outlandish costume. Folly proclaims her many admirable traits and begins to rant on her…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Erasmus, Desiderius. "The Praise of Folly." Readings in the Western Humanities. Roy T. Matthews and F. DeWitt Platt. 7 thMcGraw Hill, 2010. Print.

Matthews, Roy, DeWitt Platt, et al. The Western Humanities. 7th edition. McGraw Hill, 2011. Print.
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Will Epicqwest com Book

Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79160044

Satire: Grimes, Tom.

Medicated Memoir. New York: Ludlow Press, 2003.

The book A Medicated Memoir is indeed a book, not as its title is deceptively designed to suggest, a domain name upon the World Wide Web. However, the deceitful nature of the book's title is emblematic of the text's satirical style, penned by its author Tom Grimes. The web, some of its most ardent zealots might suggest, seems infinite in its nature as once the human will was in its epic quest for real truth. However, rather than ultimately being expanded by bandwidth, human beings instead find themselves only, ultimately, limited by its illusions of breadth and depth. The novel satirizes the false nature of the modern search for information and truth through medicine and technology, given a particular stress upon the falsity of education and drugs in the modern world.

The novel's hero Will is a college student on…… [Read More]

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Horace Juvenal Pope Dryden Swift

Words: 4162 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65134062

" For example, of the materialism and penchant for "conspicuous consumption" among Romans of the time, Juvenal observes:

in Rome we must toe the line of fashion, spending beyond our means, and often non-borrowed credit.

It's a universal failing: here we all live in pretentious poverty. To cut a long story short, there's a price-tag on everything in Rome. hat does it cost to greet Cossus, or extract one tight-lipped nod from Veiento the honors-broker? (180-5).

Criticizing the inflated costs of everything in Rome, Juvenal also states:

inflation swells the rent of your miserable flat, inflation hits the keep of your hungry slaves, your own humble dinner. (166-7)

Moreover, within the declining Roman society described by Juvenal's Third Satire, wealth is so revered for its own sake that, when, for instance, a rich man's house burns to the ground, his house and all his belongings will soon be replaced by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Damrosch. David et al., Eds. The Longman Anthology World Literature. Vol.

A. New York: Pearson, 2004. 1309; 1353.

Dryden, John. "Discourse concerning the Original and Progress of Satire (Abridged)."

Dryden's "Discourse on Satire" (Abridged). Ed. Jack Lynch.
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Education - Teaching Methods Teaching

Words: 3549 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56868805

Yet, that is arguably why the characters act as they do (Mcilliams 197). Mcilliams further notes that human incompetence is comedy (197). Since the characters are not real people but Twain's creations, students should feel free to laugh at the ignorance and misfortunes of Huck and Jim in the same way that they are free to laugh when someone deliberately falls down in an attempt at comedy.

Comedy may not be immediately obvious in Twain's portrayal of Pap Finn. Yet he is one of Twain's strongest examples of satire and irony. Carter argues that Pap Finn establishes himself as an example of all that is wrong with the Southern social system; in becoming that example, readers can look to him to see what needs to change in order for people to become better and society to improve (137). In younger classrooms, this may at first be difficult to grasp. However,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bollinger, Laurel. "Say It, Jim: The Morality of Connection in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." College Literature 29.1 (2002): 32-52.

Carter, Everett. "Huckleberry Fun." Making Mark Twain Work in the Classroom. Ed. James S. Leonard. Durham, NC: Duke Univeersity Press, 1999, 131-139.

Edgar, Christopher, and Ron Padgett. Classics in the Classroom: Using Great Literature to Teach Writing. New York: Teachers & Writers Collaborative, 1999.

Ferris, William R. "Trying to Tame Huck Finn." Humanities 21.1 (2000): 4-.
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17th and 18th Century Humanities

Words: 2619 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53697307

Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift are two of the greatest satirists in literature because they capture elements of truth that force us to look at ourselves as a society. hile both authors reflect on political and economic conditions of the eighteenth century, their work is timeless because their topics ultimately return to humanity. Their achievements lie in the fact that they depict man in circumstances that are both thought provoking and amusing. Pope's "The Rape of the Lock" and "The Dunciad," along with Swift's "A Modest Proposal" and Gulliver's Travels demonstrate how satire takes its best form when its target is human nature.

The satirist is quite lucky in that he has many varieties of subjects when it comes to human nature M.H. Abrams observes that in most instances the satirist considers "prevalent evils and generally observable human types, not with particular individuals" (Abrams 2211). This is certainly true with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abrams, M.H. "Alexander Pope." The Norton Anthology of English Literature W.W. Norton and Company. pp. 2209-14.

Pope, Alexander. "The Rape of the Lock." The Norton Anthology of English Literature W.W. Norton and Company. pp. 2233-52.

The Dunciad." The Norton Anthology of English Literature W.W. Norton and Company. pp. 2291-6.

Ross, John. Gulliver's Travels. Introduction. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston. 1948.
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Lesson 3 Journal Entry

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59929217



Do you disagree with any of Pope's opinions or pronouncements in the Heroic Couplets or "An Essay on Man"?

Pope is critical of individuals who "cry, if man's unhappy, God's unjust," suggesting that the unhappiest people are people who blame God, rather than themselves for all of their troubles, or who curse God because their lives are imperfect. The need to accept life's imperfections while still working to enact positive changes within the limitations of humanity is a positive message still relevant for people today.

Based on what you have read of "The Rape of the Lock," what do you think the poem's theme or central message is? What or who are the objects of his satire? Does the epic, "The Rape of the Lock" apply in any way to society today? Identify two passages that could serve as satiric commentaries on people's behavior today. Your answer should discuss both…… [Read More]

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Metaphysical Poetry Journal Exercise 3 1A

Words: 3452 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67044569

The Lord will lead one to safety always. One can simply believe in something higher to get the meaning of this; it doesn't have to be Jesus. Psalm 127, contrarily is confusing because it states that unless the Lord builds the house, it is built in vain. This seems to be more literal, but I do get the idea. Unless the people building the house are doing it with the love of the Lord in their hearts, or building it for him, then what is the point?

Didactic poetry can be quite comforting as seen in Psalm 23 or it can be much too literal and seen as both confusing and condescending. Psalm 127 isn't very instructive spiritually speaking, unlike Psalm 23.

Updated Proverb: A broken toe can hurt, but a broken heart can kill.

Metaphors: Obscure or Illuminate? Didactic literature with its use of metaphors can sometimes obscure the…… [Read More]

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Humor Studies Comparative Review on

Words: 1105 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2468717

Each author subsisted to two (2) different kinds of perspectives, which make up the second and third critical elements of the comparative analysis component of this paper.

Berger analyzed humor based on social and political perspectives. Usage of these perspectives was most useful in discussing the two typologies of humor he thoroughly discussed in the book: satire and folly. Satire as a type of humor drew upon important concept that makes up its core: "militant irony" (158-9). Folly, meanwhile, was best characterized through the concepts "absurd" and "reality in a looking glass" (176).

Satire gives humor a political aspect to it, as illustrated in the term "military irony," which Berger defined as "a term derived from war, it is an attitude of attack that is part of a campaign against someone or something." Interestingly, the author qualified that satire need not have the 'brutality' that comes with military irony; however,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berger, P. (1997). Redeeming Laughter: the Comic Dimension of Human Experience. Walter de Gruyter.

Critchley, S. (2002). On Humour. Routledge.
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Comedic Writing How Does One Describe the

Words: 1754 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73604233

Comedic Writing

How does one describe the nature of comedy? Comedy is both simple and complicated. How comedy works is simple, but what is funny is complicated. Comedy describes the nature of the universe in universal terms. Every culture has a sense of humor. Every culture across the global and across time values humor. There are figures in literature and culture such as "the fool," and "the jester." These kinds of figures in literature and history and culture are valuable. The voice of comedy is often one that is able to cross social boundaries/construction, class, institutions, etc. The Shakespearean fool gets to speak the truth when often many other characters cannot. As Shakespeare wrote in "Hamlet," "Much truth is said in jest." Comedy as a psychological expression or function is also very interesting. The ways people use comedy say a lot about who they are and what they think. Comedic…… [Read More]

References:

Swift, Jonathan. "A Modest Proposal." 1729

Wilde, Oscar. "The Importance of Being Earnest." 1895.

Wodehouse, P.G. "Jeeves & the Unbidden Guest." 1915.
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Beowulf as a Hero Lesson

Words: 8817 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81934961

Your answer should be at least five sentences long.

The Legend of Arthur

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 9 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7A: Honor and Loyalty

1. Consider how Arthur's actions and personality agree with or challenge your definition of honor. Write a few sentences comparing your definition (from Journal 1.6A) with Arthur's actions and personality.

2. Write a brief paragraph explaining the importance or unimportance of loyalty in being honorable.

Lesson 1 Journal Entry # 10 of 16

Journal Exercise 1.7B: Combining Sentences

Complete the Practice Activity on page 202 of your text. After completing this activity, read over your Essay Assessment or another journal activity you've completed.

* Identify three passages that could be improved by combining two or more sentences with coordinating or subordinating conjunctions. Below the practice activity in your journal, write the original passages and the revised sentences you've created.

* Be sure to…… [Read More]

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Tom Sawyer

Words: 897 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34471605

Tom Sawyer. There are four references used for this paper.

Mark Twain is one of America's most well-known and respected writers. It is interesting to define satire and how Twain uses it in the Sunday school scene in the book 'Tom Sawyer'.

Defining Satire

In order to understand how Mark Twain uses satire in his stories, it is important to understand exactly what satire is. Satire is a "literary manner which blends a critical attitude with humor and wit to the end that human institutions or humanity may be improved. Satire is the literary art of diminishing or derogating a subject by making it ridiculous and evoking towards it attitudes of amusement, contempt, scorn, and indignation. The true satirist is conscious of the frailty of institutions of man's devising and attempts through laughter, not so much to tear them down, but to ridicule their folly and shortcomings to inspire a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

(Mark Twain. (Accessed 03 December, 2004).


Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Chapter 4. New York and London: Harper and Brothers. (1903). Pp. 44-58. (Originally published in 1876).

(Unknown. "Book review for Tom Sawyer." The New York Times. January 13, 1877. (Accessed 03 December, 2004). ).
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Star Wars and Politics Draws

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18837028

Laura ush describes her life as the First Lady and goes all the way in making fun of the President's habits, way of doing things and personal life. The satire comes from the two different faces of ush we see here. On one hand, we have the most powerful person on Earth, the President of the only superpower left, and, on the other hand, we have George ush's wife belonging to the "desperate housewives" category.

As we can see, all three articles are keen to satirize different aspects in George W. ush's activity, both as president of the U.S. And as a simple husband. As a president of the U.S., the authors pick two controversial issues in the administration's mandate: its actions in the exterior, including military interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan, and its stand on gay marriages.

The use of violence in the case of Iraq may suggest that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. http://politicalhumor.about.com/?once=true&

Star Wars and Politics. On the Internet at http://politicalhumor.about.com/?once=true&

Bush and Prince Abdullah's Love Affair. On the Internet at http://politicalhumor.about.com/?once=true&

Laura Bush, Desperate Housewife. On the Internet at http://politicalhumor.about.com/?once=true&
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Pope and Swift Satirists of Their Day

Words: 1452 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27113522

Pope and Swift: Satirists of Their Day

In Swift's Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift and Pope's An Epistle to Arbuthnot, the authors seem to vindicate their use of satire, while satirizing others. Alexander Pope, in his preface to An Epistle to Arbuthnot, identifies the motivation of the poem as a response to attacks on his "Person, Morals, and Family" and to give "truer information" of himself (Pope 1733). Pope warns readers that many would recognize allusions to them in it, "but I have, for the most part spar'd their Names, and they may escape being laugh'd at" (Pope 1733). In 1731, shortly before Pope wrote his Epistle, Pope's friend Jonathan Swift completed Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift and published it almost a decade later in 1739. After his friend Esther Johnson died, the theme of death "became a frequent feature in Swift's life" (Wikipedia, 2012). Swift…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Deutsch, Helen. (1993). The "truest copies" and the "mean original:" pope, deformity, and the poetics of self-exposure. Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 27, No. 1. 1-26.

Fischer, J. Irwin. (1970) How to Die: Verses on the Death of Dr. Swift. The Review of English Studies, New Series, Vol. 21, No. 84. 422-441.

Jonathan Swift. (2012, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:34, May 10, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Jonathan_Swift&oldid=490658106

Pope, Alexander. (1733). An Epistle to Arbuthnot. Ed. Jack Lynch. Retrieved May 10, 2012, from Jack Lynch's website:  http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~jlynch/Texts/arbuthnot.html
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Twain Incorporates Humor by Using

Words: 565 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32730455

They are the same age but Buck's family is wealthy and, for all intents and purposes, he should be refined but he is not.

Twain uses satire with the Grangerfords by making fun of Emmeline, who keeps a notebook full of notations like car wrecks, other kinds of bad luck, and suffering because she would later use those records to compose poetry.

The Grangeford's are also used for Twain to point out the hypocrisy of people. They are "church goers" and one of Mr. Grangerford's sermons is about brotherly love yet his family is feuding with another family for a reason no one can remember.

Examples of imagery in Chapter 19 include the days and nights swimming by, sliding along slowly. e read about the bullfrogs "a-cluttering" (323) and the cool breeze "fanning" (323) their faces. The intent on this scene is to bring the woods alive for the reader.…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Clemens, Samuel. "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." The Heath Anthology of American

Literature. Lauter, Paul, ed. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1990. Print.
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Crying of Lot 49 Thomas

Words: 573 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78126222

The first comes with the name of the main character, Oedipa, a play on the famous Oedipus. Part of Oedipus's destiny is related to his capacity to solve several mysteries, which is also what Oedipa has to do. Some of the names the author uses are simple plays on the sound of the respective name. Such is the case with Pierce Inverarity, but also Genghis Cohen. Many of the names are a simple instrument of satire, such as Dr. Hilarius.

The novel ends in a similar postmodern knowledge tension. As Oedipa becomes more and more lonely, there are different clues pointing out that the entire plot may in fact have been a joke played on her by Pierce Inverarity. As she attends the auction, she is hopeful that by learning who the bidder is, she will find the main key in understanding what Tristero is. The hope that is build…… [Read More]

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Earl of Rochester Aphra Behn Masks

Words: 4609 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80132401

Earl of Rochester / Aphra Behn

Masks and Masculinities:

Gender and Performance in the Earl of Rochester's "Imperfect Enjoyment"

and Aphra Behn's "The Disappointment"

Literature of the English Restoration offers the example of a number of writers who wrote for a courtly audience: literary production, particularly in learned imitation of classical models, was part of the court culture of King Charles II. The fact of a shared model explains the remarkable similarities between "The Imperfect Enjoyment" by the Earl of Rochester and "The Disappointment" by Aphra Behn -- remarkable only because readers are surprised to read one poem about male sexual impotence from the late seventeenth century, let alone two examples of this genre by well-known courtly writers. In fact, Richard Quaintance presents ten more examples by lesser-known poets as he defines the literary sub-genre of the neo-Classical "imperfect enjoyment poem," written in imitation of Roman poems on the same…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Butler, Judith. Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity. New York: Routledge, 1990. Print.

Empson, Sir William. "Rochester." Argufying: Essays on Literature and Culture. Ed. John Haffenden. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 1988. 270-7. Print.

Farley-Hills, David. Rochester: The Critical Heritage. London: Taylor and Francis, 2005. Print.

Hughes, Derek. "Aphra Behn and the Restoration Theatre." The Cambridge Companion to Aphra Behn. Ed. Derek Hughes and Janet Todd. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. 29- 45. Print.
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Humor and Violence in U S

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27845192

..There is reason for concern, therefore, when aggressive acts are presented in a humorous context in the media" (622).

Although it is intended to refer to society and its misdemeanor, satire cannot be considered to be offensive, since there is a small probability that it will produce any resentment in people. A good example of the American society giving birth to something that is funny and enjoyable, despite its satirical character, is Charlie Chaplin. In times when movies were something new to the American public, the English actor succeeded in making it addicted to him and to his movies. His merit is also largely owed to the scriptwriters and to the movie directors that invested hard work in making the respective movies. Even with his obvious success among the American public, there still are a number of critics believing that the characters played by Charlie Chaplin had been too vulgar…… [Read More]

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CT Yankee Connecticut Yankee in

Words: 488 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45939296



Oddly enough, Twain's simple, homespun character seems to believe what people say about his genius, eventually, as people treat him with awe. He uses his power to create industry and to mimic the life he knew in America. He says he: "was pretty well satisfied with what I had already accomplished. In various quiet nooks and corners I had the beginnings of all sorts of industries under way -- nuclei of future vast factories, the iron and steel missionaries of my future civilization" (Chapter 10). Twain satirizes both the medieval peoples' ignorance, but also the Yankee inability to conceive of a better or different world than American industrial, mechanized life.

The lessons of the satire are twofold -- first of all, the dangers of ignorance and the refusal to progress in knowledge and understanding, exemplified by the superstitions of Camelot. but, as so many of the traditions and beliefs of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Twain, Mark. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. Complete E-Text available at Literature.org. 1 May 2007. http://www.literature.org/authors/twain-mark/connecticut
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Kurt Vonnegut The Forward March

Words: 1930 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72881365

This is a fascinating commentary about how modernization and mechanization can impact individuals to taking on the attributes of the technology that they work with. This is definitely thought-provoking in this day and age, making one wonder how one is impacted by the speed and immediacy of the Internet and other forms of technology on this generation.

However, this is one of Vonnegut's more hopeful stories. "Though Vonnegut has a reputation as a black humorist, this is an unusual love story between the most timid of men and a lonely receptionist" (Smith, 274). hile one can interpret this story in a cynical fashion, one can also appreciate it for the positive attributes it has to offer. "Yet, as in other Vonnegut works, art can be redeeming and transformative. Harry, when he is playing a character in a play, becomes larger than life. Helene, speaking with the narrator and Doris Sawyer…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Farrell, Susan Elizabeth. Critical Companion to Kurt Vonnegut. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2009.

Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. New York: DC Heath, 1950.

Smith, Patrick a. Thematic Guide to Popular Short Stories. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2002.

Strom, Hannah. "What Could "Tomorrow" Really Be?" 1 September 2011. Vonnegutclass. Blog. 11 July 2013.
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Arrowsmith - Sinclair Lewis What

Words: 1088 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23445377

In the novel, Lewis seems to be satirizing the Rockefeller Institute - by using the fictional name of the McGurk Institute. "At night all halls are haunted. Even in the smirkingly new McGurk building there had been a bookkeeper who committed suicide" (Lewis, p. 320). In this passage he pans the institute by bringing it down to the level of "all halls" (any building anywhere) and then adds that the building is "smirkingly new" (suggesting a stuffy, cryptic, sneering building reflecting the phony people inside).

Moreover, Lewis is satirizing the commercialization of American medicine. And he satirizes scientists themselves. "It is strange that excellent bacteriologists and chemists should scramble eggs to waterily, should make such bitter coffee and be so casual about dirty spoons," Lewis writes on page 323.

His protagonist, Martin, is - for a time - something of a hero for his noble morality and idealism. hile Martin…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Lewis, Sinclair. Arrowsmith. New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1945.
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American Politics Through Film and Fiction

Words: 1715 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19441583

Roger and Me: Automobile Industry

Like All the President's Men, this work is a departure from fiction in film and in novels. Rather than portraying fictional characters in a contrived plot, "Roger and Me" takes us into the lives of actual men and women dealing with the all-too-real problems of the decline of the United States as a world industrial power.

The focus is on the automobile industry, in particular, on one of the early centers of that industry, Flint, Michigan. Major automakers like General Motors have for years been cutting back on production and employment. Now, many of the older plants that have been running at reduced capacity are being closed for good and their workers let go permanently.

Because Flint was heavily dependent on auto making, the effects on the local economy are disastrous. Flint seems to be in the process of turning into a postindustrial ghost town,…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Moore, Michael (Dir.). Roger and Me. Warner Bros, 1989.
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Coleridge & 18 Thcent Tradition Samuel

Words: 1523 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25263539

His belief that literature is a magical blend of thought and emotion is at the very heart of his greatest works, in which the unreal is often made to seem real.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge effectively freed British (and other) poetry from its 18th century Neo-classical constraints, allowing the poetic (and receptive) imagination to roam free.

orks Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Kublai Khan. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 157-158.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 80-105.

Moore, Christopher. "Introduction." Samuel Taylor Coleridge. New York:

Grammercy, 1996. 10.

Nokes, David. Raillery and Rage: A Study of Eighteenth Century Satire. New York: St. Martin's, 1987. 99.

Pope, Alexander, The Rape of the Lock. Representative Poetry Online. Retrieved September 22, 2005, from: http://66.102.7.104/search?q=cache:0gO7fceq2_

AJ:eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem1644.html+text+of+Pope%27s+The+Rape+of+the+Lock&hl=en&lr=&strip=1.html>.

Romanticism." ikipedia. 3 Apr. 2005. Retrieved September 22, 2005, at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romanticism.

Samuel Taylor…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Coleridge, Samuel Taylor. Kublai Khan. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 157-158.

The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. In The Portable Coleridge, I.A. Richards

Ed.). New York: Penguin, 1987. 80-105.
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Cried You Didn't Listen A Survivor's Expos

Words: 1296 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2994157

Cried, You Didn't Listen: A Survivor's Expos of the California's Youth Authority. The paper should be 4 pages in length and should include a brief synopsis of the book. When writing your reaction to this book.

Please concentrate on the topics and questions below:

The impact of abuse on juvenile development.

How the family system affects juvenile development.

How peer relationships and gangs influence juveniles.

Would Dwight's life have been different had he been placed with a relative instead of in juvenile hall?(no separation between child welfare and juvenile justice at this time)

How could the California Youth Authority improve its work with juveniles?

What was your overall reaction to Dwight's story?

Long ago in the dying years of the 17th century, the authors of a satire on human society, called The Roaring Girl, criticized the jail system noting that it was a place that bred criminals rather than reformed…… [Read More]

Interesting it is to note that Dwight's anger is mainly directed at these parents. It is interesting since his parents were, after all, largely helpless and external to the system. Nonetheless, parents are the primordial force of the child's development. Had Dwight's parents, or a caring relative, been there to protect Dwight none of this plausibly may have occurred. Would Dwight's life have been different had he been placed with a relative instead of in juvenile hall? This is difficult to answer. The fact is that the Dwight Edgar Abbott ends his book as voice behind these walls. This is where he is still today.

Source

DE Abott (2006)I Cried, You Didn't Listen: A Survivor's Expose of the California Youth Authority AK Press
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John Dryden Was One of the Most

Words: 998 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44226437

John Dryden was one of the most important literary figures in the 17th century because he excelled in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Dryden was a master of many literary techniques, most particularly the extended metaphor. His poem "Absalom and Achitophel" is a political satire which deals with the then-current political situation in England in a most sly and intelligent way. The piece is an historical allegory wherein the author uses historical events to explore the deeper meaning behind more recent events that have shaped is own society. The rebellion of Absalom against King David is used to parallel the various plots to take over the throne of England through the Exclusion Crisis, the Popish Plot, and the Monmouth Rebellion. Dryden uses the relative safety of the allegory to make a scathing remark about the politics of his country and to subtly recommend ways in which the country could be strengthened…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Dryden, J. (1889). "Absalom and Achitophel." Macmillan: Oxford, UK. 83-115.
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Humor in Literature American Literature Is Unique

Words: 2197 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38766983

Humor in Literature

American literature is unique in that the attitudes of the works tend to reflect the spirit of the nation and of her citizens. One of the trademarks of American literature is that authors display a tone that can be very serious, but that also can be interpreted as humorous. hereas texts from other cultures are usually more concerned with message and in presenting that message in a dry, even stoic manner, American literature is uniquely capable of mixing the honest and the humorous. Even in the most serious and earnest stories, the sensibility of American humor can be detected. Of course, there are different types of humor. Some stories are flat-out ridiculous and make the reader laugh. Other stories are more sarcastic in their approach to humor and the funny moments have to be analyzed to be better understood. Still other tales are anecdotal and function as…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Hawthorne, Nathaniel (1986). The Scarlet Letter. Bantam: New York, NY.

Irving, Washington (1917). "Rip Van Winkle." Rip Van Winkle and the Legend of Sleepy

Hollow. Harvard.

Poe, Edgar Allen (1844). http://www.amlit.com/twentyss/chap18.html
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Ben Jonson Intertextualities The Influence

Words: 22973 Length: 80 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70168505

" James a.S. McPeek

further blames Jonson for this corruption: "No one can read this dainty song to Celia without feeling that Jonson is indecorous in putting it in the mouth of such a thoroughgoing scoundrel as Volpone."

Shelburne

asserts that the usual view of Jonson's use of the Catullan poem is distorted by an insufficient understanding of Catullus' carmina, which comes from critics' willingness to adhere to a conventional -- yet incorrect and incomplete -- reading of the love poem. hen Jonson created his adaptation of carmina 5, there was only one other complete translation in English of a poem by Catullus. That translation is believed to have been Sir Philip Sidney's rendering of poem 70 in Certain Sonnets, however, it was not published until 1598.

This means that Jonson's knowledge of the poem must have come from the Latin text printed in C. Val. Catulli, Albii, Tibulli, Sex.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alghieri, Dante Inferno. 1982. Trans. Allen Mandelbaum. New York: Bantam Dell, 2004.

Print.

Allen, Graham. Intertextuality. Routledge; First Edition, 2000. Print.

Baker, Christopher. & Harp, Richard. "Jonson' Volpone and Dante." Comparative
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Media the Two Media News

Words: 1502 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7032494

Arguably, the raw data at ikiLeaks is far more powerful than anything that can be found in traditional media or satire news. The audience here must also acquire the tools necessary to properly digest the information, as an audience accustomed to uncritical digestion of mainstream media will be challenged by the raw information presented devoid of spin and context.

orks Cited:

Feldman, L. (2007). The news about comedy. Journalism. Vol 8 (4) 406-427.

Ludlow, P. (2010). ikiLeaks and hacktivist culture. The Nation. Retrieved November 27, 2011 from http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/7669895/771113000/name/ikileaks.pdf

McCue, D. (2009). hen news breaks, "the Daily Show" fixes it: Exposing social values through satire. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved November 27, 2011 from http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl%3furl_ver=Z39.88-2004%26res_dat=xri:pqdiss%26rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation%26rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:1456354

Postman, N. & Power, S. (2008) How to watch TV news. Penguin Books.

Reilly, I. (2011). Satirical fake news and the politics of the fifth estate. University of Guelph. Retrieved November 27, 2011 from http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl%3furl_ver=Z39.88-2004%26res_dat=xri:pqdiss%26rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation%26rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:NR71829… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Feldman, L. (2007). The news about comedy. Journalism. Vol 8 (4) 406-427.

Ludlow, P. (2010). WikiLeaks and hacktivist culture. The Nation. Retrieved November 27, 2011 from http://xa.yimg.com/kq/groups/7669895/771113000/name/Wikileaks.pdf

McCue, D. (2009). When news breaks, "the Daily Show" fixes it: Exposing social values through satire. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved November 27, 2011 from http://gateway.proquest.com/openurl%3furl_ver=Z39.88-2004%26res_dat=xri:pqdiss%26rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:dissertation%26rft_dat=xri:pqdiss:1456354

Postman, N. & Power, S. (2008) How to watch TV news. Penguin Books.
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Simpsons When the Oxford English

Words: 1114 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82383519

Everyone takes a stab, and is better for it in the end. The impact of the Simpsons on popular culture is therefore due to the diversity of opinions and issues explored on the show.

The Simpsons makes fun of diversity frequently, capitalizing on the comedy of stereotyping through the heterogeneous cast of characters. Strong characterizations provide one of the clearest mechanisms by which the show impacts popular culture. In short, everyone can relate to the Simpsons, even if on a superficial level. Even babies have their mirror in little Maggie, the only character who can shoot Mr. Burns and get away with it both morally and legally.

Finally, the sometimes-distasteful marketing campaigns that capitalize on the Simpsons characters have entrenched the show in popular culture. Butterfingers is one example of how Matt Groening has gradually sold his soul to the same capitalism he satires on the Simpsons. He cannot be…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, P. (n.d.). The Simpsons and democracy: Policial apathy, popular culture, and lifelong learning as satire. Retrieved online: http://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q=cache:UrraSdD42RwJ:www.education.leeds.ac.uk/research/uploads/36.pdf+simpsons+popular+culture&hl=en&pid=bl&srcid=ADGEESgQ6y_8cvr-QJw3MlZuBgokG2-Y3bGjD5rgDeKHv9WADs-WtZpWy-OI_nL_uhMrXMkPrr8WbewmGv7O5AlG5Kv_pAZ1AtfZ8peBr6Kx4o0DzUdjaaO02B5LmTIN4Pcmg7C1gJ1C&sig=AHIEtbT5132yUXRyZ8O036of9MXHKcQbcA

Couchman, D. (n.d.). The Simpsons. Facing the Challenge. Retrieved online: http://www.facingthechallenge.org/simpsons.php

Libaw, O. (2001). Doh! Oxford Dictionary Takes Homer Simpson. ABC News. Retrieved online: http://abcnews.go.com/U.S./story?id=93098&page=1
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Snatch Film Analysis Employing a

Words: 2056 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63214071



Cinematography

As with any film, what is captured by the eye of the camera in this film is done with skill, expertise, and a high level of perfection in direction. The locations are captured by the camera in a way that supports and adds to the film's satire. For instance, in the gypsy camp, where Turkish and Tommy have gone to purchase a caravan to serve as an office for Turkish to work out for the fight he has to fix, the pair must walk around what appears to be large pile of excrement - and it doesn't appear to be animal in nature. Gross, yes, but it works with the conveyance of the stereotypical image that the director is attempting to convey.

Much the same holds true when Brick Top is giving Turkish and Tommy a tour of the pig pens. It is a harsh looking environment that successfully…… [Read More]

Reference List

Ritchie, G. (dir), 2000, Snatch, Columbia Pictures and SKA Films, UK.
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Setting in Jonathon Swift's a

Words: 858 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24650787

(2179)

Here we have another example of how Swift uses his setting as a perfect weapon for his argument. Not all people are respected and soome are treated badly. These statements are morbid but they are true and that is why this essay succeeds.

Swift's satire has a greter impact because he opens his argument up for debate. Any argument is allowable as long as it is "equally innocent, cheap, easy, and effectual" (2180). Furthermore, he writes to anyone that believes they have a better solution to the problems to:

ask the parents of these mortals, whether they would not at this day think it a great happiness to have been sold for food at a year old, in the manner I prescribe, and thereby have avoided such a perpetual scene of misfortunes, as they have since gone through, by the oppression of landlords, the impossibility of paying rent without…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Swift, Jonathan. "Modest Proposal." The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Vol. II. Abrams, H. H, etal, eds. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1986.
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Swift's Modesty

Words: 979 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83282985

Jonathan Swift's "A Modest Proposal" is quite an unusual work of literature, and one which certainly has a surprise ending. The only allusions to the wild solution that the author will offer to the very real problem plaguing the streets of Ireland -- that of the unfortunate beggar children and their mothers of Irish distinction -- is the fact that it is quite obvious that this essay is a satire. All satires create humor around human folly; that which is made laughable time and again throughout this narrative is the lack of concern on the part of the English for the plight of the Irish. It is due to this lack of concern that Swift quite facetiously, and more than a little bit sarcastically, advocates eating the misfortunate children, which is the surprise ending of this essay -- as well as the fact that the author, after advocating this stance,…… [Read More]

References

Swift, J. (1729). "A modest proposal." www.victorianweb.org. Retrieved from http://www.victorianweb.org/previctorian/swift/modest.html
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Wife of Prioress

Words: 929 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27890295

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales

There are a bevy of similarities that exist between the tales of the wife of bath and the prioress in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. The similarities largely pertain to the circumstances in which these individuals tell their tales. They are both women, and each are telling a tale to other pilgrims in which there presumably is both entertainment as well as ecclesiastical value in the subjects. However, a close analysis of these two particular stories reveals that despite the similarities between them, the differences between them are more pronounced. Although both tales emphasize various elements of satire, characterization, and tone, it is clear that the principle distinction between them is that the wife of bath's tale is ultimately secular while the tale of the prioress is ecclesiastical in nature.

An analysis of the characterization in both of these stories readily proves this thesis. One point of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Canterbury Tales. www.archive.org. 1904. Web. http://www.archive.org/stream/canterburytaleso00chauuoft/canterburytaleso00chauuoft_djvu.txt
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Australian Law on Torts and

Words: 5206 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57106443

This provision is based on the rationale that general damages do not represent financial loss to the injured person. A number of changes have also been made to the law in respect to assessment of damages for past and future economic loss.

4. The maximum amount of damages for economic loss due to loss of earnings or the deprivation or impairment of earning capacity is fixed at a rate of three times the average weekly earnings in New South Wales for the most recent quarter occurring before the date of the award.

5. Future economic loss predictions, for the purpose of making an award, must be based on assumptions that accord with the claimant's most likely future circumstances but for the injury. If the court makes an award for future economic loss, it must adjust the amount determined by reference to the percentage possibility that, but for the injury, certain…… [Read More]

References

Amponsah, P.N. 2004. Libel Law, Political Criticism, and Defamation of Public Figures: The

United States, Europe, and Australia. New York: LFB Scholarly Publishing.

Bailey, R.J. 1976. "Trespass negligence and Venning v Chin." The Adelaide Law Review, vol. 5,

no. 4, pp. 402-427.
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Symbol in Frost Welty Symbol of Journey

Words: 2868 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60831847

Symbol in Frost, Welty

Symbol of Journey in Frost and Welty

Welty's Journey is Transcendental/Social

Frost's Journey is Satirical/Inspirational

Style

Both Frost and Welty Use Satire in a Gentle Way

Welty's Style Moves From Satire Towards Compassion

Frost's Style Moves From Satire Towards Self-Awareness

Thematic Structure

Welty eflects all of life in her Thematic Structure

Frost eflects a simple event, losing one's way

Form and Content

Frost's poetry

Allows for many interpretations

The content can be read in varying ways

Welty's short story

Allows a more intimate connection with characters

The story can be read as allegory, social commentary, or realism

Conclusion

Welty and Frost use the same symbol to reflect different facets of life

B. They initiate a journey for the reader, but the reader's destination is of his own choosing

An Analysis of the Symbol of the Journey in Welty's "Worn Path" and Frost's

"oad Not Taken"

Introduction…… [Read More]

Reference List

Baym, N. (1998). Eudora Welty. The Norton Anthology of American Literature, 5th ed.

NY: W.W. Norton & Company.

Frost, R. (1920). The Road Not Taken, Journey into Literature. [ed. By Clugston]. San

Diego, California: Bridgepoint Education, Inc.
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Bergson and Kubrick How I

Words: 3234 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88954084

And Sellers plays the repressed social engineer Strangelove, the timid Merkin Muffley, and the persevering Mandrake -- all with mechanical precision. Kubrick's unflinching camera acts as a character, too, slyly observing the exposition of humanity in all its grimly humorous glory.

This film belongs to a culture that has rejected the status quo -- the quaint picturesque comedies of the 1940s and 1950s; it belongs to a culture that is bordering on nihilism, anarchy, revolution -- anything that will help it to get away from the culture that has brought us the faceless, nameless idiots running the ar Room in Dr. Strangelove. The film offers no solutions -- it only asks us to present ourselves to world with fresh eyes, a pure soul able and willing to laugh at its human foibles and failings, and begin to meditate upon a new direction, a new solution perhaps to the problem of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aristotle. Poetics. Sacred-texts. 13 May 2013. Web. < http://www.sacred-

texts.com/cla/ari/poe/poe06.htm>

Bergson, Henri. Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic. NY: MacMillan,

1914. Print.
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Presentation of Reason in the Work of Dryden and Swift

Words: 1005 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72488738

Reason in the faith and satire of Dryden and Swift

The neoclassical age in which both John Dryden and Jonathan Swift penned their most noteworthy prose is often also called 'The Age of Reason.' However, although this valorization of reason and rationality may be a fair characterization of much of the Age of human Enlightenment, Dryden and Swift do not deploy nor valorize reason in the same fashion. For Dryden, reason is the key to humanity's connection with the divine and political freedom. In Swift's social and religious satires, however, human confidence in its rationality is just as absurd as overconfidence in human religious political and social institutions to create just and fair societies.

Dryden's religious poem "Religio Laici" begins with a definition of reason as the most perfect mode of the ultimate human understanding of the divine. Dryden writes, "as the borrow'd beams of moon and stars./To lonely, weary,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dryden, John. Absalom and Achitophel" Accessed on April 25, 2004 at http://eir.library.utoronto.ca/rpo/display/poem736.html

Dryden, John. "Religio Laci." Accessed on April 25, 2004 at Plagarist.com

Swift, Jonathan. "The Battle of the Books." From A Tale of a Tub. Originally published 1704.

Swift, Jonathan. A Tale of a Tub. Originally published 1704.
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Huck Finn the Issue of

Words: 2647 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23145823

Rather than allowing the scene to solidify a stereotype, the author of this book proposes that readers should, assuming they are understand the true voice of the novel Huck Finn, allow the scene to alter the stereotype of Jim as a servant to the Caucasian man. Readers should, according to the author, instead see that Jim, as a free man, acts no differently not because he is bound to the Caucasian man, but because he is a noble character. This argument would greatly enhance the point of a paper whose main theme was that Hick Finn was more about freedom and dignity than about race relations.

Davis, Thadious, M., Leonard, James, S., and Tenney, Thomas, a. "Introduction: The Controversy over Huckleberry Finn." Satire or Evasion?: Black Perspectives on Huckleberry Finn. Durham, N.C: Duke University Press, 1992: 1-13.

This chapter discusses many important arguments both for and against the novel the…… [Read More]