Science Fiction Essays (Examples)

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Scifi Chadbourn 2008 Believes That

Words: 1118 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83836690

The massive mollusks still do seem fantastical. Several of the irrational elements of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea seemed more outrageous in the 19th century they do now. However, the novel continues to encapsulate the fantasy and science fiction genres because of its willingness to expand the boundary of what is real. Interestingly, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea did not stretch those boundaries much further than hard science has.

On the other hand, novels such as the ones in the Twilight series are more squarely fantastical. Barring any major scientific discoveries, vampires and shape-shifters simply do not exist. Such elements of the absolutely impossible serve various literary functions. For instance, in New Moon Stephanie Meyer uses vampires and shape-shifters to develop the central character, a human being. As in Frankenstein, the impossible becomes the best means to explore human motivations, dreams, desires, and weaknesses.

Moreover, the fantasy elements are not…… [Read More]

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Sci Fi Art Analysis & Examples

Words: 1557 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55702756

Sci-Fi Art Analysis

The class text makes two passing references to Star Trek. ith that in mind, the author of this report will focus on the show Star Trek: The Next Generation. Although rather dated, much of the material and imagery used in the show is very good even by today's standards. The show ran from 1987 to 1994, seven seasons in total. The show was a brilliant piece of art both in terms of the subject matter they covered as well as the manner in which it was presented in terms of color, presentation, concepts and ideas. The show is rated a very high 8.7 on the International Movie Database (IMDb) website (IMDb). This brief report shall cover some aspects of the show, what made the show so good and the adeptness in which they blended the script, the imagery and the characters into a cohesive storyline. hile Star…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Claremont. "The Politics of Star Trek." Claremont.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

IMDb. "Star Trek: The Next Generation (TV Series 1987-1994)." IMDb. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

IMDb. "The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)." IMDb. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.

Schneider, Bernd. "Ex Astris Scientia - Space Art in Star Trek: The Next Generation." Ex-astris-scientia.org. N.p., 2016. Web. 15 Feb. 2016.
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Sci-Fi Corporation A Mirror Image

Words: 703 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42654859

For example, towards the end of Falling Free Van Atta finds an old memo in his e-mail with orders to kill the Quaddies: "Item: Post-fetal experimental tissue cultures. Quantity: 1,000. Disposition: cremation by IGS standard biolab rules" (p. 293). Van Atta notices that the order came from "General Accounting and Inventory Control" and was signed by "some unknown middle manager in the GA& IC back on Earth." Van Atta says, "I don't think this twit even knows what Quaddies are." Similarly, non-sensical orders come down all the time in the military, which is organized along corporate lines, from people who know nothing about local situations.

In a large corporation it is difficult to affix moral responsibility on individuals. When scandals erupt (Enron, for example), the CEO will claim he didn't know anything about what was going on. Employees lower in the hierarchy need their incomes, and they may be reluctant…… [Read More]

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Legend' Is a Sci-Fi Thriller About a

Words: 2114 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7450807

Legend' is a sci-fi thriller about a New York scientist who is abandoned in Manhattan in the year 2012. This one hour 40 minutes movie stars Will Smith and Alice Braga with Francis Lawrence as its director the movie is rated at PG-13 for violence. The movie offers a stunning view of how the city as the world knows it today, might look in 2012 if in the event it were abandoned in 2009.

Going back in trivia, this is the third adaption of the ichard Matheson's 1954 novel, originally in the film it was vampires instead of zombies. Such movies are always inspired by our fears and hence hold special interest, especially if it's a scientist abandoned in New York struggling to survive a virus that turns humans into flesh-eating mechanical looking zombies.

If we go through its adaptations, the first time the novel was turned into a movie…… [Read More]

References

Ebert, Roger. Rev. Of I am Legend, Dir. Francis Lawrence Chicago Sun-Times. (14 Dec 2007. Web. 21 Mar. 2011)

Jack Matthews. Rev. Of I am Legend, Dir. Francis Lawrence. New York Daily News. (14 Dec 2007. Web. 21 Mar. 2011)

David Hughes. "Legend of the Fall: Will Ridley Scott's I Am Legend Rise From The Dead." The Greatest Sci-Fi Movies Never Made. Chicago Review Press. 2002.

Lewis Beale. "A variation on vampire lore that won't die." The New York Times. 2007.
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Parable of the Sower and feminist'scifi

Words: 2010 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35255677

Octavia Butler's novel Parable of the Sower depicts an America that has crumbled into complete chaos and disarray. ithin the dystopia of 2024, Lauren Olamina reflects on her family background and her past in order to help create a more ideal future for humanity. The key to the future is liberation, both personal and political. Therefore, the message of Parable of the Sower is revolutionary. Lauren does not just need to be a true leader; she needs to change what it means to be human. Butler reportedly said about the potential for female heroines to create a utopian society out of the ashes of the patriarchal dystopia: "I don't believe that imperfect humans can form a perfect society," (Zaki 239). Butler does not expect Lauren and the Earthseed community to become a Utopia because no matter how revolutionary and idealistic she might be, Lauren remains constrained by her past and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Barr, Marleen. Lost in Space. UNC Press, 1993.

Butler, Octavia. Parable of the Sower. New York: Warner, 2000.

Miller, Gavin. "Octavia Butler's Parable of the Sower." In Hoagland and Sarwal (Eds.) Science Fiction, Imperialism, and the Third World. McFarland, 2010, pp. 202-213.

Salvaggio, Ruth. "Octavia Butler and the Black Science Fiction Heroine." Black American Literature Forum, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1984, pp. 78-81.
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Cocoon Howard 1985 Is a 1985 Sci-fi Fantasy

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29206506

Cocoon (Howard, 1985) is a 1985 Sci-Fi/Fantasy genre film directed by Ron Howard, who previously directed such films as Splash and Night Shift. Benefitting from the kindly type of aliens previously seen in E.T.: The Extraterrestrial and Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Cocoon used the advanced technologies of benevolent aliens to explore aging and the pros/cons of reversing that process. Aided by a veteran cast and superior editing/special effects, Cocoon became a hit film.

General Theme/Overview, Style, Plot and Character Development

The general theme is the exploration of aging and the pros/cons of reversing the process, using the style of Sci-Fi/Fantasy. The plot involves the extraordinary results of humans interacting with kindly, advanced aliens, and the dilemmas caused by those results. Thousands of years ago, aliens from Antarea lived on the island of Atlantis on Earth. The island sank and 20 Antareans stayed behind so other Antareans would have…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Howard, R. (Director). (1985). Cocoon [Motion Picture].
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Fiction Novels

Words: 629 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43943586

Scifi

Emiko and the New People present some of the most poignant imagery in Paolo Bacigalupi's novel The Windup Girl. The titular character also emerges as a clear but ironic hero, providing a striking science fiction framework with which to view social and political realities. Emiko is an ironic hero because she is not human; she is a windup girl. She shares much in common with other quasi-human characters or species that people the canon of science fiction. Yet she is no android. Her modifications do imbue Emiko with android-like features. Because the New People are genetically engineered, they have sufficient human characteristics to make people like Emiko endowed with full emotional, sexual and spiritual energy. Most importantly, the New People are outsiders, outcastes, and Others.

Although the windup girl herself is the most striking feature, lending herself to the book's title, The Windup Girl certainly possesses all the features…… [Read More]

References

Bacigalupi, Paolo. The Windup Girl. Night Shade, 2009.
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Fiction Modern Fiction Qs Modern

Words: 683 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14564272



4)

Both the Lovely Bones and Belle Prater's Boy could be very effective in teaching a Social Sciences course on the loss of a family member, and the effect that this has both on the family and the larger community. The sense of identity for the adolescent characters in these books is an essential element and conflict in the story. Family, especially at this age and developmental stage, is essential to the concept of the self. These books both explore the ways in which identity can be disrupted by familial dysfunction, and suggest real ways in which to overcome such disruptions -- as well as the effects of failing to do so.

5)

One of the primary ways that Ruth White achieves a sense of verisimilitude in Belle Prater's Boy is through the use of dialect. There are many mundane events that take place that also lend the story a…… [Read More]

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Science and Religious Beliefs of

Words: 1437 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 838405



Another Victorian poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins, was more forthright in his beliefs. Biblical typology was a signature to his poetry, and his poems often included biblical phrasings and in the case of "The Barnfloor and Winepress," even a passage from a scripture as an epigraph. Hopkins addresses the sinning Christians and even unbelievers, and reveals to them the various gifts that Christ has rewarded them with, as a result of the ultimate sacrifice. 'And on a thousand alters laid, Christ our sacrifice is made'. He offers hope through belief, and cites historical examples in his writings reminding the reader that God is their only hope in adversity (giving the example of the people of Samaria who were besieged by the Syrians). In his poems, he also opines that God must bruise and test the human being, in order to create good, as he deals with this issue in "The loss…… [Read More]

References

Glenn Everett, 2006, "Browning's Religious Views," the Victorian Web

George P. Landow, 2004, "Paradigm, Point-of-View, and Narrative Distance in Verbal and Visual Arts," Victorian Web

John Matterson, 2002, "Constructing ethics and the ethics of construction: John Ruskin and the humanity of the builder," CrossCurrents
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Science and Morality After the

Words: 1361 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57790064



That is not to say that theory and application cannot be separated into ethical categories. They can be, but those categorizations are always going to be somewhat skewed by the researcher, because no human being is capable of perfect neutrality. To assume that one can research for the sake of purse science really does involve imaging that scientists are not human beings with their own personal motivations. Moreover, this is not an issue that developed in the post-atomic world. Even before the use of the atomic bomb, scientists were motivated by personal motivations that kept them from being completely neutral. Therefore, it might be better to consider the ethics of scientific discovery from a viewpoint that includes the inherent morality of a discovery. For example, chemotherapy could be used as a weapon with very disastrous results, because its side-effects are devastating and can even be fatal. However, chemotherapies are developed…… [Read More]

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Technology and Society -- Science

Words: 1660 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1853386

Allen is saying that all of the wonders of technology can never replace tow people connecting and trusting each other. I completely agree with these concepts and given Mr. Allen's wit and comedic sense, am thankful it was made. Finally any film made during a specific period of time can't help but reflect the values of society at the time. The open discussions about sexuality and sex make light of society's open and free attitudes about these areas of the human experience in 1973.

Why Sleeper is a Classic

Sleeper will always be a classic because it combines Mr. Allen's slapstick and vaudevillian comedic approaches while integrating his favorite music, which is jazz and ragtime. In addition the triumph of the human spirit and human emotions, as chaotic and mercurial as they can be, will always be superior to technology. The use of technology as a means to coerce and…… [Read More]

References

George O'Har. "Technology and Its Discontents " Technology and Culture 45.2 (2004): 479-485.
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Life Science Current Event Report Current Events

Words: 1263 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69136107

Life Science Current Event eport

Current Events on Cloning and Evolution

Topic and Date: The Ethics of Egg Manipulation (Evolution), August 27, 2009

Nature

The article "The Ethics of Egg Manipulation" published in Nature investigates the research challenges in reducing diseases that can be identified prior to egg fertilization. Scientists have questioned if it is necessary for humans to give birth to offspring that are at high risk for genetic diseases. Their hypothesis is: If we remove the bad parts of the DNA from one egg and replace it with good DNA from another egg and use the new egg for in vitro fertilization, can we reduce the number of babies born with disease (Anonymous, 2009)?

Current experiments have been performed on monkeys. The experiments have been successful and scientists believe the research is ready to move to humans, but many laws are in place to deter this type of…… [Read More]

References

Anonymous. (2009, August 27). The ethics of egg manipulation. Nature, 460(7259), 1057. Retrieved from ProQuest Database.

Anonymous. (2008, November 13). Clones of the dead. Nature, 456(7219), 144. Retrieved from ProQuest Database.
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Philosophy of Science

Words: 2868 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48559114

Scientific Explanation

Must every scientific explanation contain a law of nature? For those who support the Deductive-Nomological Account, the answer is yes. Discuss critically the arguments for and against this view, and present your own analysis of which is stronger.

Date of Submittal

Must every scientific explanation contain a law of nature? For those who support the Deductive-Nomological Account, the answer is yes. Discuss critically the arguments for and against this view, and present your own analysis of which is stronger.

Deductive-Nomological Account

Arguments for and against the statement

Must every scientific explanation contain a law of nature? For those who support the Deductive-Nomological Account, the answer is yes. Discuss critically the arguments for and against this view, and present your own analysis of which is stronger.

Introduction

"Explanation" is sometimes used in what might be called its "pedagogical" or "clarificatory" sense, as opposed to the sense of explanation that…… [Read More]

References

C.G. Hempel and Paul Oppenheim. (1948) Studies in the logic of explanation. Philosophy of Science, 15:135-175,.

CG. Hempel.( 1965) Aspects of Scientific Explanation and Other Essays in the Philosophy of Science. Free Press, New York,.

CG. Hempel. (1963). Explanation and prediction by covering laws. In Bernard Baumrin, editor, Philosophy of Science: The Delaware Seminar, pages 107-133, New York,. John Wiley and Sons.

D. Hume.(1980). Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. Hackett, Indianopolis,. Contains the Posthumous Essays. Edited by Richard H. Popkin.
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Computers in Space Science

Words: 1740 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47234107

computers in space science. Specifically, it will look at the roles computers have in current space technology and how they have effected the lives of everyone in the world. Without computer technology, space science would be confined to the ground, and man's imagination. efore large-scale computing was developed, the technologies necessary to design, build, and maintain a space program simply did not exist. Computers have made it possible to explore the moon, stars, and beyond.

Computers in Space Science

Computers play an integral role in the science of space, and without them most of modern space exploration would not be possible. As the NASA report, "Computers at NASA" states, "Since the 1950's, the computer has been the main tool that has enabled scientists and engineers to visualize the next frontier and then make it a reality" (NASA). NASA employs literally thousands of computers throughout the world to monitor, design, and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Author not Available. "Computers at NASA." NASA. 1994. 29 Oct. 2003.  http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/news/factsheets/computers.pdf 

Barber, Jennifer Lauren. "Close Encounters on Your Desktop." Bright Magazine. 2001. 29 Oct. 2003. http://journalism.medill.northwestern.edu/journalism/magazine/bright/brightlite/peer4.html.

Dubinski, John. "Cosmology." Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics. 26 June 1997. 29 Oct. 2003. http://www.cita.utoronto.ca/webpages/CITA/annrep96/node20.html

Editors. "Hubble's Computers and Automation." HubbleSite. 2003. 29 Oct. 2003. http://hubble.stsci.edu/sci.d.tech/nuts_.and._bolts/spacecraft_systems/#comp
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Sustainability Science

Words: 2660 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63958595

Food security is a critical issue for any food & beverage company. It is self-evident that food is the business for such a company, so any macro-level issue regarding food is inherently important, but there are specific considerations that drive the relevance of food security.

First, food security reflects on the long-run sustainability of the business. It may sound silly to say it, but food companies need food in order to survive. They need to grow it, process it, package it and sell it. So at the supply chain level, threats to food security need to be taken seriously. The world today is just now starting to legitimately look like a zero sum game with respect to many resources, food being one. If the world needs to produce much more food than what has been produced in the past, but as much as a quarter of agriculture land is already…… [Read More]

References

AP (2011). UN: Farmers must produce 70% more food by 2050 to feed population. The Guardian. Retrieved December 11, 2014 from http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2011/nov/28/un-farmers-produce-food-population

Satran, J. (2013). Water scarcity must be addressed urgently to avoid food shortages, Nestle CEO Paul Bulcke says. Huffington Post Retrieved December 11, 2014 from http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/02/26/water-scarcity-nestle-ceo-paul-bulcke_n_2768390.html

Wheeler, T. & von Braun, J. (2013). Climate change impacts on global food security. Science. Vol. 341 (6145) 508-513.
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Competing Views of Science

Words: 938 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45391173

Invisible Man by H.G. Wells

Character Analysis: Griffin and Kemp

The science fiction novel written by H.G. Wells called the Invisible Man is written about a talented scientist who is something of a rogue researcher. He represents a person who believes more so in the scientific methods than in humanity. These character traits are fully illustrated throughout the plot as Griffin undertakes many questionable activities. When Griffin was studying at the University of London he had a colleague named Dr. Kemp who has roughly an equal intelligence, yet some quite different character traits. Kemp also has a vast appreciation for science and the scientific method but these interests are utilized in efforts to help humanity progress and not necessarily for personal gain. This analysis will compare and contrast how the two individuals could have vastly different outlooks on life despite the fact that they both fully embrace and appreciate the…… [Read More]

References

Bowser, R. (2013). Visibility, Interiority, and Temporality in the Invisible Man. Studies in the Novel, 20-36.

Sirabian, R. (2001). The Conception of Science in Well's The Invisible Man. Papers on Language & Literature, 382-404.
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Fiction Harry Potter A Briefly Outline

Words: 751 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79935892

Fiction ~ Harry Potter

a) riefly outline where the person was born and raised and the nature of his childhood experience.

orn in Godric's Hollow, England to James and Lily Potter

Raised by Uncle Vernon and Aunt Petunia Dursley alongside cousin Dudley. Was treated badly during the first eleven years of his life, including being forced into slave labor and being the subject of constant neglect.

b) Explain the person's life before and after his "life altering event."

efore the life altering event, Harry was miserable. He was forced to live in a cupboard under the stairs, had no friends, and was not allowed any kind of warmth or happiness. After, he was invited into a world where he could be loved and appreciated for who he is. He goes from being minimized in importance to one of the most important people within his society.

c) riefly explain what the…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows. New York, NY: Arthur A. Levine, 2007.

Print.

Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. New York: Scholastic, 1999. Print.
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Fiction and Non-Fiction in 19th Century England Example of the Grotesque

Words: 1450 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91505486

All without distinction were branded as fanatics and phantasts; not only those, whose wild and exorbitant imaginations had actually engendered only extravagant and grotesque phantasms, and whose productions were, for the most part, poor copies and gross caricatures of genuine inspiration; but the truly inspired likewise, the originals themselves. And this for no other reason, but because they were the unlearned, men of humble and obscure occupations. (Coleridge iographia IX)

To a certain extent, Coleridge's polemical point here is consistent with his early radical politics, and his emergence from the lively intellectual community of London's "dissenting academies" at a time when religious non-conformists (like the Unitarian Coleridge) were not permitted to attend Oxford or Cambridge: he is correct that science and philosophy were more active among "humble and obscure" persons, like Joseph Priestley or Anna Letitia arbauld, who had emerged from the dissenting academies because barred (by religion or gender)…… [Read More]

By mid-century, however, these forces in the use of grotesque in prose were fully integrated as a matter of style. We can contrast two convenient examples from mid-century England, in Dickens's 1850 novel David Copperfield, compared with Carlyle's notorious essay originally published in 1849 under the title "Occasional Discourse on the Negro Question." Dickens is, of course, the great master of the grotesque in the Victorian novel. Most of Dickens' villains -- the villainous dwarf Quilp in The Old Curiosity Shop, the hunchback Flintwinch in Little Dorrit, the junkshop-proprietor Krook who perishes of spontaneous combustion in Bleak House -- have names and physical characteristics that signpost them as near-perfect examples of the grotesque. The notion that this grotesquerie is, in some way, related to the streak of social criticism in Dickens' fiction is somewhat attractive, because even the social problems in these novels are configured in ways that recall the grotesque, like the Circumlocution Office in Little Dorrit, Boffin's mammoth dust-heap in Our Mutual Friend, or the philanthropist and negligent mother Mrs. Jellaby in Bleak House who proves Dickens' polemical point about charity beginning at home by being rather grotesquely eaten by the cannibals of Borrioboola-Gha. We can see Dickens' grotesque in a less outlandish form, but still recognizable as grotesque, in the introduction of the villainous Uriah Heep in Chapter 15 of David Copperfield:

When the pony-chaise stopped at the door, and my eyes were intent upon the house, I saw a cadaverous face appear at a small window on the ground floor (in a little round tower that formed one side of the house), and quickly disappear. The low arched door then opened, and the face came out. It was quite as cadaverous as it had looked in the window, though in the grain of it there was that tinge of red which is sometimes to be observed in the skins of red-haired people. It belonged to a red-haired person -- a youth of fifteen, as I take it now, but looking much older -- whose hair was cropped as close as the closest stubble; who had hardly any eyebrows, and no eyelashes, and eyes of a red-brown, so unsheltered and unshaded, that I remember wondering how he went to sleep. He was high-shouldered and bony; dressed in decent black, with a white wisp of a neckcloth; buttoned up to the throat; and had a long, lank, skeleton hand, which particularly attracted my attention, as he stood at the pony's head, rubbing his chin with it, and looking up at us in the chaise. (Dickens, Chapter 15)

We may note the classic elements of
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Science Teacher I Wanted to Select a

Words: 834 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54399849

science teacher, I wanted to select a non-fiction reader on a topic of interest to me, and one with which I could share my love of science with students. I chose Remarkable Rocks by Ron Cole. I thought the students would enjoy seeing my rock collection, which I brought in as part of the lesson. The students had an opportunity to observe and sort rocks and use information they gleaned from the book to label them. I expected that the lesson would have strong appeal to the students because of the hands-on activities. They could easily identify the purpose for reading and I expected that they would be engaged from the beginning.

One student in the class, Justin, does not have any diagnosed disabilities, but he is considered a struggling reader. The at-risk benchmark for 6th grade students is 40 words per minute. Justin reads at this level and is…… [Read More]

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Otherness Quality of Gothic Fiction Otherness in

Words: 1932 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47857289

Otherness" Quality of Gothic Fiction

Otherness in Wapole and Lewis

The construct of otherness is represented in Gothic fiction in three primary ways: (1) An underlying emphasis on the supernatural is a strong platform to presenting a sense of the other to readers. (2) Moreover, women are portrayed in a manner that characterizes them as being very different from men. (3) The behavior of the characters and the situations in which they find themselves and put themselves is profoundly different from the quotidian experiences of the readers, thereby imparting a separation between fiction and real life that comfortably maintains the characters in some kind of otherland.

The "Otherness" of the Supernatural

With his 1764 writing of the novel The Castle of Otranto, Horace Wapole is said to have invented the Gothic novel genre -- a classification that relies heavily on representation of the supernatural. In the minds of contemporary readers,…… [Read More]

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Fic Historical Fiction and U S

Words: 2346 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62109659

This lesson would itself actually consist of several smaller lessons in order to incorporate all tasks and provide proper room for learning and absorption. This extended time period will also assist learners in making greater strides with the multimedia technology they have available, which as a dynamic setting and experiential means of expression and communication requires time to allow for repositioning and reanalysis (Gonzalez et al., 2000). By progressing in segments, leaners will come full circle form an examination of how alien history can be to how similar the technologies of the period in question are to certain technologies of today, despite the substantial and unquestionable differences. Lesson objectives include an improved understanding of communication technology and its importance in all times, societies, and civilizations; an ability to make connections between historic technologies and capabilities and those that exist today, the ability to work effectively in groups, the ability to…… [Read More]

References

Brophy, J., & VanSledright, B. (1997). Teaching and learning history in elementary schools. New York: Teacher's College Press.

Castek, J.M. (2008). How do 4th and 5th grade students acquire the new literacies of online reading comprehension? Exploring the contexts that facilitate learning. ProQuest.

Cunningham, P.M., Hall, D.P., & Cunningham, J.W. (2011). Comprehension During Guided, Shared, and Independent Reading, Grades K-6. Carson Dellosa Publishing Company.

Curby, T.W., Stuhlman, M., Grimm, K., Mashburn, A., Chomat-Mooney, L., Downer, J., ... & Pianta, R.C. (2011). Within-day variability in the quality of classroom interactions during third and fifth grade. The Elementary School Journal, 112(1), 16-37.
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Enemies of Science Haldane P 225

Words: 1081 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96827417

HALDANE

"Some Enemies of Science" J.B.S. Haldane

The vivisection debate: J.B.S. Haldane's "Some enemies of science"

The vivisection debate is an old one. As early as 1928, the scientist J.B.S. Haldane rigorously defended the practice of vivisection against its earliest detractors, arguing that even moderate government regulation of scientific behavior to protect animal rights was hypocritical, given the way that animals were treated in other spheres of human life. In contrast, David Suzuki's 1989 essay "The pain of animals" highlights the central paradox of animal experimentation. On one hand, animal experiments are only useful because of our biological similarities to animals. On the other hand, we assert our right to exploit animals based upon our inherent differences from them. The intelligence of animals such as the chimpanzee is analogous to a two-year-old child and yet through logical sleight of hand we justify using chimps in the laboratory by calling them…… [Read More]

References

Haldane, J.B.S. (2004). Some enemies of science. The Nelson Introduction to Literature (2nd

Ed). Valleau, Al & Jack Finnbogason. (Eds.). Toronto: Thomson Nelson.

Suzuki, David. (2004). The pain of animals. The Nelson Introduction to Literature (2nd

Ed). Valleau, Al & Jack Finnbogason. (Eds.). Toronto: Thomson Nelson.
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Truth in Fiction Live by the Harmless

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68056601

Truth in Fiction

"Live by the harmless untruths that make you brave and kind and healthy and happy."

-- Kurt Vonnegut

"Philosophy is a battle against the bewitchment of our intelligence by means of language."

Ludwig Wittgenstein

In an influential article on the concept of truth in scientific language, Polish logician and mathematician lfred Tarski advanced a detailed analysis of what constitutes a "true sentence" (Tarski, 1933). ccording to Tarski's semantic theory of truth, a proposition is true if and only if it states what is the case. For example, the statement, "The cat is on the mat," is true if and only if there is a real cat on an actual mat. Tarski's concern for precise criteria for determining the truth-value of sentences came out of a project to give rigorous definitions of truth in scientific discourse (Hodges, 2010).

t a more general level, logicians and philosophers have argued…… [Read More]

A non-truth need not be reduced to a simple falsehood, any more than an agnostic can be placed in the same camp as a militant atheist, simply because neither affirms the existence of a god. As attitudes toward religious belief may vary in subtle, non-binary ways, works of fiction need a more subtle set of terms to describe their possible non-true relationships to the actual world. Instead of being simply false or untrue, a work of fiction might be described as "parafactual" or "paralethia," to coin some imaginary words that combine the Greek prefix for alongside with a root word for truth.

A complex work of fiction may contain both true and untrue statements. In fact, the story may rely for its dramatic effect on the creative retelling of a counter-factual history that incorporates real historical persons and events. Take, for example, the alternative Cold War of the Watchmen series, where through the intervention of costumed superheroes, the United States wins the Vietnam War, the victorious President Richard Nixon is elected to his third term in office, and the nuclear standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union is intensified to disastrous ends (Moore & Gibbons, 1986). By incorporating fictional characters into historical events alongside historical figures, writer Alan Moore manages to slip into the story what his fans may take to be honest insights -- or uncomfortable truths -- concerning the workings of American political power. Moore may be wrong in his speculations of how things might have happened had a handful of amazing people changed the course of history in the 20th century. But he invites us to consider what might be true about ourselves with a compelling storyline that creatively mixes fact and fiction..

While a logical proposition may be a lie as well as an untruth, a work of fiction cannot qualify as a lie. To lie is "to make an untrue statement with the intent to deceive" (Merriam-Webster, 2011). When people unwittingly make untrue statements that they wrongly believe to be true, they are simply mistaken, not lying. They are not lying where the intent to deceive or mislead is absent. Fiction writers, unlike liars, often include disclaimers, stating that their work
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William Gibson's Neuromancer on Technology and Humans

Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84742467

Science fiction frequently portrays a dystopian reality to demonstrate the faults and failings in human nature or in human societies. Technology becomes an extension of human nature, enabling people to abuse or exploit. In William Gibson's novel Neuromancer, the author offers a bleak portrayal of the ways human beings use technology. Humans interface with technology in a way that obliterates their ability to relate to one another or experience emotions like compassion and empathy. The protagonist Henry Case is an exception, which is why the audience can relate to the ways he tries to subvert the system. A matrix supersedes human collective consciousness, and artificially intelligent systems can even stave off death. In the world of the Neuromancer, individual human beings can even upload their own personal memories and experiences to preserve them. In Neuromancer, Gibson’s shows that because human beings create technology, all outgrowths of technology are essentially outgrowths…… [Read More]

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Nature of Science Even in

Words: 595 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97594194

Smith notes that it may be impossible to unequivocally prove something with one hundred percent accuracy; rather, scientists seek probability.

The term theory is often misconstrued: Smith states that "theories always explain facts." Moreover, there is no clear demarcation between a theory and a hypothesis. Theories are basically broad hypotheses. Laws, on the other hand, are more restrictive and are often derived from theories. The practice of science entails experimentation as well as presentation to the scientific community. When the research is presented to other scientists, it is usually done so through peer-reviewed journals. Often other scientists will critique and critically evaluate the scientific experiment and attempt to replicate it. When the experiment has been replicated the hypothesis may become part of the canon of established science and from there, common knowledge.

Because science can only deal with what is observable and measurable, it can not apply to philosophy, aesthetics,…… [Read More]

Reference

Smith, David. "The Nature of Science."
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Harry Potter Fan Fiction Reaction

Words: 793 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61302120



But perhaps the most dramatic deviation between the fan fiction and the actual Potter books is the seriousness and lack of humor in the fan fiction. The Harry Potter novels were notable for their magic candy, broomsticks, spells and other forms of levity that lightened some of the serious issues pertaining to death, curses, prophesy, and an emerging adult awareness of the characters. Rowling often used a very ironic tone in the dialogue and in her authorial voice. This Potter fan fiction has a modernist, almost Hemingway-like style as it quickly moves from year to year in somber, spare sentences, talking about Harry's grief regarding his circumstances and the death which magic has caused. Harry is clearly finding himself as a person, and the focus of the fan fiction is more internal than external.

It is difficult to imagine Rowling's books having had such a hold upon the imagination of…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Suitesamba. "Scars." Archiveofourown.org. 2007. [15 Apr 2013]

 http://archiveofourown.org/works/751306 .
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Darwinism and the Standard Social Science Model

Words: 2086 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79369793

Darwinism and the Standard Social Science Model

If the Standard Social Science Model is mistaken, then we are less altruistic than would otherwise be the case'.

Put another way, the same statement could read, "If culture is not the underlying cause of human behavior, then human beings are more selfish than they would be if culture were the underlying cause of human behavior." An evaluation of this statement rests not only on an assessment of the truth of each part, but also on the relationship between the two parts of the claim. Is having A (a false presumption put forth by the SSSM) the condition for having B (self-centered human beings)? Let us investigate the premise as well as the argument.

The Standard Social Science Model claims that "only genetically determined human behavior is 'natural' or biological" (Zimmer, 1.) This means that when an infant pulls away from fire, or…… [Read More]

Resources

Young, J. Valid Argument Forms. As retrieved June 11, 2004 from http://www.uncfsu.edu/jyoung/chapter_4_notes.htm

Dawkins, Richard. Interview as retrieved June 11, 2004 at  http://www.pbs.org/faithandreason/transcript/dawk-body.html 

Social Science Model as retrieved June 11, 2004 at http://www.facub.stjohns.edu/~beasleyt/socialsciencemodel.pdf

Zimmer, J.Raymond. Evolutionary Psychology Challenges the Current Social Sciences. As retrieved June 11, 2004 at http://www.asa3.org/ASA/topics/Evolution-PSCF9-98Zimmer.html
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Political Science Black Representation

Words: 3350 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3745896

political representation of African-Americans in the southern United States. The author explores many different theories as well as the ideas of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King to explore the under presentation of Blacks politically. There were eight sources used to complete this paper.

African-Americans have come a long way since the nation's inception. From the days of slavery, to the present time many bridges have been crossed and many battles have been won. Gone are the days that Blacks were required to sit at the back of the bus.

No longer can Blacks be told they must eat at a certain restaurant. Black and white children go to school together daily, they grow up on the same streets and they marry into each other's race with increasing frequency. It is becoming the America that the founding fathers envisioned at the time the nation was created. One of the reasons…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ellison, Ralph. Invisible Man

Cornell, Stephen. The Return of the Native: American Indian Political Resurgence

Oxford University Press; Reprint edition (October 1990)

Swain, Carol. Black Faces, Black Interests: The Representation of African-Americans in Congress
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Global Warming Fact or Fiction

Words: 1781 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97846171

Climate Change

Global arming:

Fact or Fiction

Global arming is a controversial topic largely because of its sprawling prediction of worldwide catastrophe, an image which is far exaggerated from the reality of global climate change. If it were to be a more subtle phenomenon, say an increase in cloud cover, or more sunny days in February, then people would not pay any attention to the matter and would go on living their carefree lives. This is not the reality however, as science predicts massive changes to the way all of humanity will have to live due to climate change. Some may scoff at this allegation, and some may seriously change their habits in fear of the future. For the sake of comparison, I will present global warming believers, and global warming deniers and will analyze the motivations for each side to stretch its influence, whether in the political realm or…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"The Basics of Global Warming - Science of Global Warming - Environmental Defense Fund." Environmental Defense Fund - Finding the Ways That Work. Web. 25 July 2011. .

Klein, Naomi. Global Warming, Fact or Fiction. Web. 25 July 2011. .

NOAA - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Web. 25 July 2011. .
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Global Warming Fact Rather Than Fiction the

Words: 4657 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39479025

Global Warming: Fact ather Than Fiction

The focus of this paper is on global warming and its causes. In the introduction phase, we have given a brief overview of the problem alongside a brief look at the details of the problem itself. It is mentioned here that how much change has actually recorded in the previous decades and what the future might hold on for the planet if the trend keeps on going as it is right now. It has also mentioned the consequences of rise in temperatures which can result in many different scenarios.

We then focused on the causes of the problem and again had a brief overview of it, the causes were divided into two main sections and proper emphasis was given on one of it in order to give the root cause of the phenomena. The discussion phase have a more in-depth look at the causes…… [Read More]

References

Johansen, B. (2002). The Global Warming Desk Reference. Connecticut: Greenwood Press.

Uzawa, H. (2003). Economic Theory and Global Warming. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Press.

Weart, S. (2003). The Discovery of Global Warming. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Press.

Harris, P. (2003). Global Warming and East Asia. New York: Routledge.
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Global Warming Fact or Fiction

Words: 632 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35820876

Specifically, it has risen a full degree since 1957 (Crittenden & White, 2010; Muller, 2008). Similarly, there is no doubt that carbon dioxide levels have also risen significantly, thirty-six percent since their first recording (Muller, 2008). Proponents of the global warming hypothesis argue that this increasing level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is a cause of the greenhouse effect that traps warmth under the lower layers of the atmosphere and increases severe weather patterns and weather instability in general (Crittenden & White, 2010).

In many respects, the principle flaw in the global warming theory is not so much that it is illusory but that it is not necessarily harmful and also, not necessarily attributable to human behavior. The most responsible proponents of global warming acknowledge both of those uncertainties but argue that if the observed evidence is significantly related to global warming, and if global warming is the cause…… [Read More]

References

Crittenden, J.C. And White, H.S. "Harnessing Energy for a Sustainable World"

Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 132, No. 13; (2010): 4503 -- 4505.

Muller, R.A. (2008). Physics for Future Presidents: The Science behind the Headlines.

New York, NY: W.W. Norton.
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Repo Men 2010 Is a

Words: 2066 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43011746

Science fiction and horror both offer narrative closure and "the restoration of the social order," as does Repo Men, only in this case the social order being preserved is completely amoral and evil (Grant 21). It does not end with the monster or alien menace defeated, like Independence Day, Star ars, Terminator or The ar of the orlds, but just a literal return to the

6

status quo and business as usual. Repo Men is definitely not an adolescent or 'infantilized' film, with heavy reliance on special effects and light and magic shows, nor do the good guys win in the end -- insofar as there are any good guys at all. It has no real hope or comport to offer, and n this absolutely dehumanized world of the future that lacks redeeming features of any kind, Remy's fantasy existence might actually be preferable to 'reality'. Thus the film is…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Grant, Barry Keith. "Sensuous Elaboration': Reason and the Visible in Science Fiction Film" in Redmond, Sean (ed). Liquid Metal: The Science Fiction Film Reader. Wallflower Press, 2004: 17-23.

Landsberg, Alison. "Prosthetic Memory: Total Recall and Blade Runner" in Ballard, David and Barbara M. Kennedy (eds). The Cybercultures Reader, Second Edition. Routledge, 2007: 286-96.

Milner, Andrew. "Dark City: Urban Dystopia and Science Fiction Cinema." International Journal of Cultural Studies, 7(3) 2004: 259-79.

Sobchak, Victoria. "Images of Wonder: The Look of Science Fiction" in Liquid Metal: 4-10.
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Woman on the Edge of Time

Words: 1458 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15780475

Women Science Fiction Writers as Probing Pathfinders

Author Marge Piercy's Woman on the Edge of Time was written in 1976, and it has received critical acclaim for the science fiction future it depicts, but it was likely given literary wings by a bizarre science fiction tale written in 1818, according to a scholarly essay in Critique: Studies in contemporary Fiction (Seabury, 2001). The science fiction tale Seabury alludes to is in fact "often called the first work of science fiction," and that is the classic story of Frankenstein.

Additionally, Seabury uses a quote to tip the cap to Frankenstein's author, Mary Shelley, who, in penning Frankenstein, has written "perhaps the single most influential work of science fiction by a woman." And so, in the genre of feminist science fiction, even though Frankenstein is quite the opposite of feminine, to say the least, the author was clearly a pathfinder of tremendous…… [Read More]

References

Davidson, Phebe. "Lost in Space: Probing Feminist Science fiction and Beyond." Belle

Lettres: A Review of Books by Women 9, 27-29.

Piercy, Marge. Woman on the Edge of Time. New York: Fawcett Crest, 1976.

Rudy, Cathy. "Ethics, reproduction, Utopia: Gender and Childbearing in 'Woman on the Edge of Time' and 'The Left Hand of Darkness'." NWSA Journal 9 (1997): 22-39.
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Fantasy Mark Chadbourn's 2008 Assessment

Words: 590 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71008756

limate change, income disparity, terminal illnesses and continued wars all plague our world. The means by which we typically understand such phenomenon is through science. We have created vast canons of academic texts in fields like psychology, sociology, and other social sciences. Even politics is now "political science." Anything that cannot be codified or empirically researched is not deemed worthy of discussion. It is this over-emphasis on science that creates a boom in fantasy literature.

Fantasy writing is also a "special skill," according to hadbourn (2008). "Being able to see beyond the boundaries of the world around us" requires a different approach to writing than other genres (hadbourn 2008). Many reluctant readers find that fantasy liberates them from the tyranny of science. As the new religion of the world, science demystifies. Many readers find reading mundane because it too closely resembles the predictable world of science.

Of course, not all…… [Read More]

Chadbourn is absolutely correct about the role fantasy plays in the modern world. The reason why fantasy has surpassed all other genres, including science fiction, in sales is partly related to the nature of the world we live in today. Climate change, income disparity, terminal illnesses and continued wars all plague our world. The means by which we typically understand such phenomenon is through science. We have created vast canons of academic texts in fields like psychology, sociology, and other social sciences. Even politics is now "political science." Anything that cannot be codified or empirically researched is not deemed worthy of discussion. It is this over-emphasis on science that creates a boom in fantasy literature.

Fantasy writing is also a "special skill," according to Chadbourn (2008). "Being able to see beyond the boundaries of the world around us" requires a different approach to writing than other genres (Chadbourn 2008). Many reluctant readers find that fantasy liberates them from the tyranny of science. As the new religion of the world, science demystifies. Many readers find reading mundane because it too closely resembles the predictable world of science.

Of course, not all readers enjoy fantasy and science fiction. The otherworldly aspect of these genres may be too detached from daily life for some readers to understand. Some readers might also not relate to the symbols and codes used by fantasy and science fiction writers. I have always devoured works of historical fiction because they re-create the world of the past and make that universe relevant. Although I appreciate historical fiction more than fantasy, the two genres are not totally dissimilar. When I read a work of historical fiction, I encounter names, places, imagery, and motifs that are not present in any work that is set in the 21st century. While the author does not stretch the boundaries of physics to convey the central themes of the novel, the author does appeal to my sense of imagination. This is what all good fiction should share in common.
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Fatwas of the Virtuous Vampire

Words: 1794 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64136043

" After effectively damning her to a life as a vampire, Ibrahim, himself abused by the man who made him one of the undead, tries to 'make good' on his promise to himself to help Lina: "Despite the many shortcoming of Ibrahim's moral probity, he had known from the start that he would live his life as a vampire much the same way he had lived his life as a normal human -- trying to be good, even if he failed miserably most of the time." This is, Taylor suggests, not unlike that of a terrorist who rationalizes his conversion of another man (or woman) to the cause, that he is at least trying, and saving the new convert from a worse fate.

Taylor's extended metaphor of Islamic terrorism and fundamentalism and vampirism, of one life as an outsider in real life with life as an outsider in a science…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ahmad, M.A. "Islam and Science Fiction: Islam SciFi Interview of Pamela Taylor."October

13 th, 2010.

Taylor, Patricia. "50 Fatwas of the Virtuous Vampire." November 1, 2010.
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George Melies's Movie A Trip

Words: 603 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83488604

The existence of people such as the Selenites, who burst whenever they are hit, is such an example, as is the fact that the capsule falls into the water to the bottom of the ocean and is rescued from there (although, in broad lines, this is indeed how things happen nowadays as well, although, at the beginning of the 19th century, this must have certainly belonged to the science fiction genre).

Finally, it is worth pointing out that the movie also involved nature laws that, at that point, belonged to the science fiction. The main such nature law was the law of gravity: at the moment of the movie, there was no perception that gravity could be in fact surpassed and that la launch in space was a possible endeavor for the human race.

Melies work was certainly fundamental for the future evolution of the science fiction genre in cinematography.…… [Read More]

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Satisfaction Guaranteed by Isaac Asminov

Words: 770 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56661909

In this case it is a robot the outcast one that has to overcome the misgivings of the world around him. This would become to model of many other robot stories of our time, about the eternal battle between humans and machines, and the myth that humans can create machines powerful enough to destroy them. However the story has a bit of reality in it, since humans do use robots to do the house work. Only that they still haven't created one that would perform all activities together, but design one specific robot for each task. They don't look human-like, perhaps, especially to avoid this kind of emotional conflict between machines and their owners.

The story was written in 1951, when the world's image of robots was much different than it is today. In spite of all the technologic and scientific advances made by that period, in the mid 20th…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1- 'The complete robot" by Isaac Asimov, 2000, BBC Home, Accessed January 18, 2007, http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A455898

2- "Satisfaction Guaranteed, Robot Story," 2002, Accessed January 18, 2007, http://homepage.mac.com/jhjenkins/Asimov/Stories/Story234.html

3- "Satisfaction Guaranteed," 2006, Wikipedia Accessed January 18, 2007, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satisfaction_Guaranteed
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Siegel's 1956 Film Version of the Invasion

Words: 3311 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83255999

Siegel's 1956 film version of The Invasion of the Body Snatchers uses a number of realistic techniques like undistorted camera angles, and shots of mundane activities and locations to establish the rationality and logic of the daytime world of small-town California. As the movie begins to shift into the nightmarish world of the alien invasion, the shots become increasingly distorted, dark and gloomy, showing the slip into the subconscious, emotional existence. Here, the movie begins to adopt a moral stance, as we see that the main characters are truly at their most human as they live through the overt terror and emotion of the night time distortions of logic and reality. It is in the daytime world of logic that they can explain away the loss of their humanity to the aliens, but in the nighttime their humanity is revealed as the emotional, subconscious mess that defines them. As the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Invasion of the Body Snatchers. 1956. Director: Don Siegel. Producer: Walter Wanger.

Starring: Kevin McCarthy, Dana Wynter, King Donovan, Carolyn Jones, and Larry

Gates.
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Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Words: 1151 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27246678

Dominican Fantasies, ritten and Unwritten:

The use of science fiction in the Brief ondrous Life of Oscar ao

Juan Diaz's novel The Brief ondrous Life of Oscar ao details the life of an overweight Dominican boy who has aspirations of being a romantic hero that are continually thwarted by his great size and unattractive physical appearance. However, one of the dominant themes of the book is that appearances can deceive. Despite the fact that he is ugly on the outside, Oscar has a beautiful soul. His inner life is at odds with his outer life. One way in which Oscar deals with this is by escaping into a world of fantasy novels and characters. Diaz's coming-of-age novel is thus very much a book 'about' other books, just as much as it is a book about a man's life. Its postmodern nature is clear in the sense that the novels and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Diaz, Juan. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. New York: Riverhead, 2008.

Lingam, John. Review of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.

The Quarterly Conversation, 2008. [7 Dec 2012]

 http://quarterlyconversation.com/the-brief-wondrous-life-of-oscar-wao-by-junot-diaz-review
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Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao

Words: 1730 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10144625

(Diaz)

Clearly, Junot Diaz is using symbolism throughout the novel The rief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, to illustrate how a host of events would shape the kind of person that Oscar would become. This is accomplished by looking at: science fiction and how it helped Oscar to escape. Early on this was used to show the way he dealt with: the sense of isolationism and rejection he felt in when he was growing up. While, at the same time this is intertwined with the conflicts of love and its underlying meanings that are influencing Oscar's behavior. To compare these differences, Diaz will use Yunior to show an alternate reality to that of Oscar's (as he is the story teller of the novel). Once this occurs, this helps to provide insights about: what events shaped Oscar's life and how he used science fiction to escape from reality. This is significant,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Diaz, Juniot. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. New York, NY: Riverhead Books, 2007. Print.

MLA Format. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/
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Dreamed of Creating Magic - And He

Words: 1956 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40462341

Dreamed of Creating Magic - and He Does

One of my dreams was to grow up and become a magician. ell, that's what happened. I'm not a science fiction writer. I'm a magician. I can use words to make you believe anything." -Ray Bradbury

Ray Bradbury is one of the classic authors of our day- one of the fathers of science fiction. At nearly 82 years old, and over 500 works later, he is still going strong. He is still writing, creating and producing.

Ray Douglas Bradbury was born in aukegan, Illinois on August 22, 1920. He was the third son of Leonard Spaulding Bradbury, a telephone line worker, and Esther Marie Bradbury, a Swedish immigrant. Bradbury credits his mother, with jump-starting his love of fantasy and the supernatural. His mother was fascinated with the new motion pictures. She would sneak Bradbury in with her when he was only two…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About Ray Bradbury." June 18, 2002.  http://www.raybradbury.com 

Biography of Ray Bradbury." June 18,2002. http://www.gradesaver.com/ClassicNotes/Authors/about_ray_bradbury.html

Eyman, Scott. "Q&A with Ray Bradbury." Palm Beach Post. Sunday March 10, 2002.

Fat Chucks Index." May 21, 2002. June 18, 2002. http://www.fatchucks.com/z4.bb.html
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Michael Cunningham's Specimen Days Post-Modernism

Words: 1541 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28326319

..I am with you, and know how it is." Cunningham utilizes this idea of hitman's timelessness to weave him through the narratives that build character in his work. hitman's issues are clearly still timely as his call to question those things that are seen as progress is universal in the developed and developing worlds, alike. Post-modernism is also often though to as post-colonial as the standardization of borders has seemed to stagnate over the last 50 or so years and colonization is conducted in much subtler ways, than were evident in alt's lifetime. Cunningham, no doubt weaves his artistic interpretation of hitman into his works, but it is clear that it is with the careful reader's vision of the subtle and constructionist leanings of hitman. Cunningham's writing is truly an incarnation of the relevance of hitman to the modern context. He utilizes the turn of many an artful phrase to…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bahr, David. "After Hours: Acclaimed Author Michael Cunningham Channeled His Love of Virginia Woolf in the Hours. In Specimen Days, He Considers the World after Walt Whitman." The Advocate 7 June 2005: 60.

Cunningham, Michael. Specimen Days: A Novel New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2005.

Gambino, Richard. "Walt Whitman: He Was a Liberator of People and Culture, Using a Liberated Poetic Form." The Nation 21 July 2003: 14.
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2001'space odyssey film analysis

Words: 1067 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14838167

Stanley Kubrick’s 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey is a masterpiece in the science fiction genre. Based on a story by Arthur C. Clarke, the film epitomizes the features of science fiction, including an overarching theme questioning the role of humanity in the universe. The film could just as well be classified as an epic, given its length and breath, as it begins with the origin of human beings through a depiction of evolution from primates, through the story of a space mission occurring millions of years later. Plot practically takes a back seat to cinematography and design in 2001: A Space Odyssey, in which Kubrick employs multiple cinematographic tools including music, mise-en-scene, editing, lighting, design, and script elements.

The mise-en-scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey is simply extraordinary, because each image captures the tension and existential angst that pervades the movie. Because the bulk of the film takes place…… [Read More]

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Junot Diaz The Brief Wondrous

Words: 2603 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56999288



However, this may not have been Diaz's intention at all. He may have simply been trying to emphasize the third person viewpoint and that the reader is merely witnessing the events. This opening statement requires the reader to place themselves in a position somewhere, hovering above the lives of the characters, viewing them from an unattached vantage point. This is much the way in which one views an ant hill. We look at the ant hill and see it as a whole. We may see individual ants going from here to there. We have no idea what is going on in the heads of the individual ants. We do not know where they intend to go, but we see them scurrying about on the way to something that is apparently important to them. At that point, we can either choose to focus in one a single ant and follow its…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Asim, Jaban. it's a Wonderful Life. 30 September 2007. Washington Post. 1 October 2008.


dyn/content/article/2007/09/27/AR2007092701840.html>.

Diaz, Junot. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, First edition, New York: Riverhead. 2007.