Self Directed Learning Essays (Examples)

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Self-Directed Teams Self-Directed Work Teams

Words: 4972 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73555757



Moreover, the strong correlation between confidence in peers and communication/problem understanding demonstrated that it is the confidence and ability of these co-workers that encourage members of self-managing teams to gather new information and knowledge, so that they may create useful decisions in relation to problem solving. Confidence in peers resulted in a negative, not positive, impact on organization and negotiation. This suggested that confidence in peers has a negative effect in the process of organizing the dissemination of knowledge in self-managing teams. Thus, it is imperative for team members to trust their peers and management and, in doing so, create and share new knowledge and further the organization's opportunity to offer best solutions to clients. Present research lacks the empirical evidence supporting the relationship between interpersonal trust and knowledge acquisition. Especially, academicians and practitioners are interested in studying whether "interpersonal trust" advances the follower's knowledge acquisition practices -- knowledge sharing…… [Read More]

References

Abbott, J.B., Boyd, N.B, and Miles, G. (2006) Does Type of Team Matter? An Investigation of the Relationships Between Job Characteristics and Outcomes Within a Team-Based Environment. The Journal of Social Psychology

146(4) 485-507

Attaran, M. And Nguyen, N.U. (1999) Succeeding with self-managed work teams. CT Industrial Management. 41(4). 24-29

Brannick, M.T. And C. Prince. An overview of team performance measurement. In Team performance assessment and measurement-Theory, methods, and applications, ed. M. Brannick, E. Salas and C. Prince. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Brannick, M.T., E. Salas and C. Prince. 1997. Team performance assessment and measurement: Theory, methods, and applications. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
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Learning a Language Gaining Fluency in a

Words: 1741 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37044938

Learning a language: Gaining fluency in a language to be free

The acquisition of language is never a culturally neutral process. When someone learns his or her first or even a second language, that individual also acquires a status in the eyes of the world, based upon how that language is perceived. The race of the speaker, his or her perceived level of education, gender, and race all interact with the stereotypes that exist in the gazer's mind. In Christine Marin's essay "Spanish Lessons," Marin chronicles how her unsteadiness in Spanish did not initially bother her, given the fact that she grew up in a society that prized whiteness. Gradually, as she grew older and her attitude towards her heritage changed, her lack of fluency in her native tongue became a burden. Similarly, Malcolm X was forced to grapple with his complex relationship with the English language. On one hand,…… [Read More]

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Learning Organizations Leadership and Learning

Words: 4434 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79874533



2. True learning organizations allocate the time and resources that are required to develop a competitive advantage based on the lifelong learning and training opportunities that are provided to everyone in the organization.

3. A learning organization not only develops the opportunities for learning but it also provides a corporate culture that encourage all of its members to become self-actualized, thereby contributing to the advancement of the larger society in which the organization competes. .

4. The leadership of true learning organizations ensure that the corporate vision is communicated to all members and provides a framework in which their feedback is welcomed and acted upon, as well as ensuring that an environment exists in which there "are no bad questions" concerning the direction in which the enterprise is headed.

5. Learning organizations make it possible to consolidate work and learning as well as encouraging all members of the enterprise to…… [Read More]

References

Albert, M. 1998 "Shaping a Learning Organization through the Linkage of Action Research

Interventions." Organization Development Journal, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 29-31.

Avolio, B.J., & Bass, B.M. 2002 Developing potential across a full range of leadership:

Cases on transactional and transformational leadership. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence
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Learning Can Be Categorized Into Three Distinct

Words: 1767 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61148239

learning can be categorized into three distinct groups: behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Behaviorism refers to the student's interaction with the environment and focuses on the external aspects of learning and on that which encourages learning such as positive reinforcement on the one hand and punishment on the toehr. Cogntivism, on the other hand, focuses on attitudes, motivation, and ideas and refers to the brain's interaction with the academic environment and with subject taught. Finally, constructivism represents and describes the situation where the learner actively builds new ideas or constructs learning situations.

Other approaches include humanism (where the focus is placed on respecting and motivating the individual student as encouragement to learning) and social / situational (namely those situational / social constructs interact in shaping a student's motivation and classroom attitude.

Behaviorism

Behaviorism believes that external actions and manner dominate if not replace cognition. adical behaviorists believe that mind / cognition…… [Read More]

References

Brown, B. & Ryoo, K (2008). Teaching Science as a Language: A "Content-First" Approach to Science Teaching. Journal of Research in Science Teaching 45 (5): 529 -- 553.

Charles, C. (2005). Building classroom discipline. USA: Pearson Pub.

Baron, R.A., Byrne, D., & Branscombe, N.R. (2006). Social Psychology (11th Ed.). Pearson Education, Inc.

Benson, N.C. (1998). Introducing Psychology. U.K: Totem Books.
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Learning Process Through Several Adult

Words: 2117 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92705101

e. The adult learners are always encouraged to understand why they need to study or learn a certain aspect, what can be its various potential categories and how it can be applied with minor adjustments in different scenarios. Furthermore, the andragogic learning processes encourage that the adult learner is an independent and self-dependent thinker and is able to draw in the previous experiences whenever required. Andragogic learning also encourages the understanding of the importance of using both the human and material assets in an experience. Andragogic learning encourages the learner to invest his knowledge and abilities around his personal experiences and personal growth.

Hence, the andragogic learning model is mainly built around the self-direction of an individual but allows the individual to use a certain set of rules within a specific environment to put his self-directed learning to test in order to sharpen it under strict and proper guidance.

Transformative…… [Read More]

References

Knowles, M.S. (1975) Self-Directed Learning. A guide for learners and teachers, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall/Cambridge.

Knowles, M.S. et al. (1998) the Adult Learner, Butterworth-Heinemann

Merriam, S. And Caffarella, R. (1991) Learning in Adulthood. A comprehensive guide, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Mezirow, J. (1991). Transformative dimensions of adult learning. San Francisco, ca: Jossey-Bass.
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Learning and Respiratory Care Problem-Based

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5012745

In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that…… [Read More]

Many studies have shown that PBL students experience greater motivation toward learning than their traditional counterparts (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Beachey, 2007, Rogal & Snider, 2008). Further PBL has been associated with greater satisfaction in the learning process by physicians than its traditional counterpart (Beachey, 2007; Op't Holt, 2000; Rogal & Snider, 2008). Evaluations of PBL programs have found that not only do students take pleasure in the process, they also believe that they have the capacity to out perform their peers from traditional curricula in clinical settings (Op't Holt, 2005; Kaufman & Mann, 1996). Studies have shown that the teaching method has little bearing on the learning of academically talented students (Hwang & Kim, 2006; Distlehorst, Dawson, Robbs, & Barrows, 2005; Op't Hoyt, 2005). In fact it has been proposed that the positive impact observed of PBL on motivation may come from these academically talented individuals rather than the intervention itself (Hwang & Kim, 2006). GPAs and demographic characteristics were not found to be correlated to PBL (Ceconi et al., 2008).

White et al. (2004) found in a study regarding that PBL was not shown to be superior to other learning styles in assisting students to acquire or retain knowledge regarding asthma management. This finding is consistent with the majority of research that has not found greater knowledge acquisition or retention amongst PBL students vs. traditional teaching methods (Albanese, 2000; Beers, 2005; Rogal & Snider, 2008). However, it is not that PBL produces inferior results, most studies have found that there are no significant differences between PBL students and those from traditional curricula on standardized knowledge tests (Beachey, 2007). Beers (2005) points out that one would expect significant improvement in clinical knowledge and performance in order to advocate for the use of PBL in the classroom due to the extensive resources that are required to utilize PBL curricula.

One would expect that PBL students would be at a significant advantage over their traditional peers due to the clinical application in the classroom (Colliver, 2000). Some
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Child Obesity and Its Affects on Their Self-Esteem Learning and Development

Words: 7029 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71624181

Childhood Obesity and Its Affects on Self-Esteem, Learning and Development

Childhood obesity has reached alarming proportions in developed nations of the world and its prevalence is continuously rising from 1971. In the Scandinavian countries, childhood obesity is less than compared to the Mediterranean countries; yet, the amount of obese children is increasing in both cases. Even though the highest rates of childhood obesity have been seen in developed countries, and at the same time, obesity is increasing in developing countries as well. Childhood obesity is at increased levels in the Middle East and Central and Eastern Europe as well. As an example, in 1998, The World Health Organization project assessing of cardiovascular diseases had showed that Iran was one among the seven countries, which had the highest rates of childhood obesity. (Dehghan; Akhtar-Danesh; Merchant, 2005, p. 1485)

In UK, observations state that there has been a noticeable enhancement in obesity…… [Read More]

References

Abell, Steven C; Richards, Maryse H. 1996. The relationship between body shape satisfaction and self-esteem: an investigation of gender and class differences. Journal of Youth and Adolescence. Vol: 25; No: 1; pp: 61-64

Boyles, Salynn; Smith, Michael. 2003. Mental Illness Common in Childhood Obesity; Defiance, Depression Cited in Study. April, 7. WebMD Medical News. Retrieved October 17, 2005, from the World Wide Web:

http://my.webmd.com/content/article/63/71937.htm?z=1728_00000_1000_ln_03

Bullying and Overweight and Obese Children. Retrieved October 18, 2005, from the World Wide Web: http://kidshealth.org/research/bullying_overweight.html
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Self-Advocacy Steps to Successful Transition

Words: 2911 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38290680

Still, Mason indicates that the opposite is often true in public education settings, where educators, parents and institutions collectively overlook the implications of research and demands imposed by law. Indeed, "despite the IDEA requirements, research results, teacher perceptions, and strong encouragement from disabilities rights advocate, many youth have been left out of IEP and self-determination activities. For example, 31% of the teaches in a 1998 survey reported that they wrote no self-determination goals, and 41% indicated they did not have sufficient training or information on teaching self-determination." (Mason et al., 442)

This is a troubling finding, and one which implicates the needed paradigm shift discussed already in the research endeavor. Clearly, as the matter is framed by Mason et al., educators and researchers have already acknowledged the value in the strategies addressed here. By contrast, institutional change has been hard won, with schools and administrators balking at making broad-based alterations…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Beresford, B. (2004). On the Road to Nowhere? Young Disabled People and Transition. Child: Care, Health and Development, 30(6).

Department of Education (DOE). (2007). Guide to the Individualized Education Program. United States Department of Education. Online at http://www.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/iepguide/index.html.

Katsiyannis, A.; deFur, S. & Conderman, G. (1998). Transition Services -- Systems Change for Youth with Disabilities? A Review of State Practices? The Journal of Special Education, 32(2), 55-61.

Mason, C.; Field, S. & Sawilowsky, S. (2004). Implementation of self-determination activities and student participation in IEPs. Council for Exceptional Children, 70(4), 441-451.
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Learning as a Way of

Words: 1800 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8130328

Judgment, however, should be suspended long enough to try to determine why someone does something a certain way. If this can be determined, it is another lesson worth having. This is true of the student that is just learning about business, and true of the established businessperson.

Unlike that student learner, the businessperson that has already been working in the world for a while will be much harder to teach. Once someone has gotten used to doing something a particular way, it becomes more difficult to change that person's behavior. However, those that lead others in business, such as human resource personnel, can take many of the suggestions in Vaill's book and use them to show others in their company how they can change only small things and still be more self-directed learners.

As they become more self-directed, their desire for knowledge will rise and they will begin to try…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Vaill, Peter B. (1996). Learning as a way of being: strategies for survival in a world of permanent white water. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
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Learning Teams Website Assigned Facilitator E-Campus Website

Words: 2735 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82526873

Learning Teams; Website Assigned Facilitator

E-Campus Website -- Phoenix.edu

The ecampus website that governs the user portal for the University of Phoenix is an aggressive and modern website design. The Phoenix brand has integrated a marketing approach that incorporates Macromedia flash as a primary means to engage the user to identify the mobile web for use to integrate learning with mobility. The website is able to effectuate the transition from user activity to the classroom by using the Macromedia to visually accentuate the transition.

The use of web design to convey a message regarding the use, convenience, and service of the website is at the heart of proper design. "For organizations engaged in electronic business, the corporate website has emerged as the single most important interface through which transactions are carried out. This being so, appropriate design characteristics are required to make websites effective. Customers expect websites to be designed…… [Read More]

References

Fonseca, A., Macdonald, A., Dandy, E., & Valenti, P. (2011). The state of sustainability reporting at canadian universities. International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 12(1), 22-22-40. doi:10.1108/14676371111098285

Kovacs, P., & Rowell, D. (2001). The merging of systems analysis and design principles with web site development: One university's experience. T.H.E.Journal, 28(6), 60-60-65. Retrieved fromhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/214800316?accountid=13044

Monideepa T., Jie, Z. 2006. "Analysis of Critical Website Characteristics: A Cross-Category

Nelson, J.L. (2011, Help from higher education. New Jersey Business, 57(4), 53-53. Retrieved fromhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/863372809?accountid=13044
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Self-Regulation Issues in Children and Adolescents With ADHD ODD and OCD

Words: 6305 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39399907

Self-egulation Issues in Children and Adolescence with ADHD, ODD, and OCD

Self-regulation in children and adolescence who suffer from ADHD, ODD, and OCD (Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and Oppositional Defiant Disorder) is often evident due to several things. A lot of the issues in relation to self-regulation stem from additional anxiety the child/teen may feel from the difficulties experienced from these kinds of mental disorders. OCD is known to cause anxiety and isolationist behaviors leading to decreased emotional self-regulation. ADHD at times can cause hyperfocus, making it difficult for the child/teen to switch tasks therefore limiting their ability to handle their emotions and activities that assist in regulating themselves. ODD, connected to ADHD, is a disorder that has the child react angrily and spitefully to people in otherwise normally responsive situations. The extreme feelings of children or adolescence who manifest ODD make it hard for them to…… [Read More]

References

Barkley, R.A. (2013). Oppositional Defiant Disorder: The Four Factor Model for Assessment and Management - by Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D. Retrieved from  http://www.continuingedcourses.net/active/courses/course079.php 

Blum, K., Chen, A.L., & Oscar-Berman, M. (2008). Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and reward deficiency syndrome. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 4(5), 893-918. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2626918/ 

Campbell, S.B. (1990). Behavior problems in preschool children: Clinical and developmental issues. New York: Guilford Press.

Cheng, M., & Boggett-Carsjens, J. (2005). Consider Sensory Processing Disorders in the Explosive Child: Case Report and Review. Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 14(2), 44-48.
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Self-Organization Case Study How Could

Words: 724 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33717695

This is a situation where each of these different skills sets and the personalitites required to carry them off can actually work well as a whole to contribute to the team's bottom line.

In a self-driven organization, individual team members recognize what areas their personalities, skills and abilities can contribute most in. They will pursue those opportunities and situations which will allow them to showcase their talents and assist the organization in a manner that is familiar.

ith a more top down directed approach, employees may not be as apt to take advantage of their differences, and the leader may not be utilizing individual employees to their fullest potential, because the leader may not be aware of the exact skill sets certain employees are bringing to the table.

In a customer service-based organization, where employees are dealing with clients from multitudinous backgrounds, it is important that differences are embraced and…… [Read More]

With a more top down directed approach, employees may not be as apt to take advantage of their differences, and the leader may not be utilizing individual employees to their fullest potential, because the leader may not be aware of the exact skill sets certain employees are bringing to the table.

In a customer service-based organization, where employees are dealing with clients from multitudinous backgrounds, it is important that differences are embraced and acknowledged, to help facilitate knowledge sharing and communication between team members and clients.

3. discuss how leadership following the self-organizational approach could implement change by focusing on attractors rather than trying to overcome resistance to change case study; a computer systems has a large customer service center faciity. 153 memeber customer serivice teams that work directly with clients. most clients are division chief at large corporations and average systems purchase price is over 500,000 teams composed of a technicaal consultant, customer service rep, an adminstrator, responsible for billing, referrals and all phone communications with clients are assigned toa specific team and there is a yearly customer satisfaction survey mailed to each client (clients recieve a 100 gift certificate for completing the survey and 94% of the 358 clients respond customer satisfaction scale is from 1 "poor" to 5 'excellent. 2003 overall customer service center rating was 3.1 individual customer service team ratings ranged from 1.2 to 4.9 manger is concerned with the overall fair 3.1 rating for the center, as well as the very low satisfation rating for several of the teams. he believes that to stay competitive, the company needs an excellent product and able to satisfy it's customer in all aspects
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Adult Learning Andragogy Adult Learning as a

Words: 2887 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17218108

Adult Learning: Andragogy

Adult learning as a concept was first introduced in Europe in the 50s (QOTFC, 2007). ut it was in the 70s when American practitioner and theorist of adult education Malcolm Knowles formulated the theory and model he called andragogy. He defined andragogy as "the art and science of helping adults learn (Zmeryov, 1998 & Fidishun, 2000 as qtd in QOTFC)." It consists of assumptions on how adults learn, with emphasis on the value of the process. Andragogy approaches are problem-based and collaborative as compared with the didactic approach in younger learners. It likewise emphasizes the equality between the teacher and the learner (QOTFC).

Adult Learning Principles

Knowles developed these principles from observed characteristics of adult learners. They have special needs and requirements different from those of younger learners (Lieb, 1991). Adults are internally motivated and self-directed. They bring life experiences and knowledge into their learning experiences. They…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Chen, I. (2008). Constructivism. College of Education: University of Houston. Retrieved on June 6, 2011 from http://viking.coe.uh.edu/~ichn/ebook/et-it/constr.htm

Corley M.A. (2008). Experiential learning theory. California Adult Literacy Professional

Development Project. CALPRO: California Department of Education. Retrieved on June 13, 2011 from  http://www.calpro-online.org/documents/AdultLearningTheoriesFinal.pdf 

Kolb, D.A. et al. (1999). Experiential learning theory. "Perspectives on Cognitive
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Graduate Certificate Nursing Education Learning of Anorexia

Words: 3674 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90582302

Graduate Certificate Nursing Education

Learning of Anorexia Nervosa & Handling Its Patients

Final Learning Report

DESCRIPTIN F BJECTIVES & THEIR STATUS

Drafting a learning contract and adhering to it along with constant support from my supervisor, was an effective activity which constituted of four weeks. every objective had a milestone plan and necessary measures which were required to be taken for achieving them. Self-expectation after reaching these goals was also documented in order to have a clear picture of my proficiency level in the developing knowledge of Anorexia Nervosa after this activity. The primary objective was to have clear understanding of Anorexia Nervosa, its causes, symptoms and possible treatments. Furthermore, second main objective was to deal with patients having this disorder and their families. These two major goals encompassed the rest. Through reading of the concerned topic were performed and were brought into practical application. Furthermore, efforts were made to…… [Read More]

Owen, T. (2002). Self-Directed Learning in Adulthood: A Literature Review.

William, J. (2009), Anorexia Nervosa: Self Sabotage in Adolescence

Final Report-Anorexia Nervosa Page 4
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Managing a Multimedia Learning Environment

Words: 3283 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59280858

learning and teaching has drastically changed all over the world, in general, and in America, in particular. This is because of the sudden increase of information technology. Of late, both the teachers and learners, all over the world, have come to the realization that the old technologies cannot compete with the latest technological developments when it comes down to the practice of teaching and the process of learning. Therefore, the old technologies are being quickly replaced by the new multimedia technologies. It is important to note here that multimedia and its ever-increasing technological products have become very popular tools of both teaching and learning. This is because it allows the learners to pace their training in line with their capacity to learn; it allows the learners to gain control over the process of learning; and it allows the learning process to be individualized. The transformation of the methodology and approach…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sorel Reisman. Multimedia Computing: Preparing for the 21st Century. Harrisburg:IDEA Group Publishing. 1994.

Shousan Wang. Multimedia and Some of Its Technical Issues. International Journal of Instructional Media. Volume: 27. Issue: 3. 2000.

Patricia Deubel. An Investigation of Behaviorist and Cognitive Approaches to Instructional Multimedia Design. Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia. Volume: 12. Issue: 1. 2003.
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Adult Learning Abstract Self-Direction in Adult Learning

Words: 613 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76509716

Adult Learning Abstract

Self-Direction in Adult Learning Forums

Technology has radically changed the face of adult learning during the past 25 years. The traditional brick-and-mortar classroom, while still dominant, has been joined by a wide variety of technology-based learning venues known as Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs). These virtual venues have been particularly successful in the field of adult education, where the freedom of location and schedule that these platforms offer are particularly attractive to learners. One trend that has been increasingly present in VLE education, and to some extent in the traditional classroom, is the use of self-directed learning.

Self-directed learning is defined as a "training design in which trainees master packages of predetermined material, at their own pace, without the aid of an instructor" (Simmering et al., 2009). Because it does not rely on the presence of an instructor, self-directed learning fits well in VLE platforms. It is particularly…… [Read More]

References

Rager, K. (2009). I feel, therefore, I learn: The role of emotion in self-directed learning. New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development, 23(2), 22-33.

Silen, C. & Uhlin, L. (August 2008). Self-directed learning -- a learning issue for students and faculty! Teaching in Higher Education, 13(4), 461-475.

Simmering, M.J., Posey, C., & Piccoli, G. (January 2009). Computer self-efficacy and motivation to learn in a self-directed online course. Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, 7(1), 99-121.

Terry, M. (2006). Self-directed learning by undereducated adults. Educational Research Quarterly, 29(4), 28-38.
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Adult Learning Styles in the

Words: 7981 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98200563

For countries such as the U.S. And France, these needs can be reasonably expected to relate to the respective national cultures involved. For instance, in their book, Education in France, Corbett and Moon (1996) report, "An education system needs to justify itself constantly by reference to the values which underpin a nation's culture. In a democracy it is expected to transmit a range of intellectual, aesthetic and moral values which permeate the curriculum and approaches to teaching and learning" (p. 323).

Just as the United States has been confronted with a number of challenges in recent decades in identifying the best approach to providing educational services for an increasingly multicultural society, France has experienced its fair share of obstacles in this regard as well. According to Corbett and Moon, "In societies forced to come to terms with change, values are always challenged. French society, like others, had to adapt to…… [Read More]

References

Atkinson, R.D. (2006, May-June). Building a more-humane economy. The Futurist, 40(3), 44.

Blanchard, E. & Frasson, C. (2005). Making intelligent tutoring systems culturally aware: The use of Hofstede's cultural dimensions. Montreal, Quebec Canada: Computer Science Department, HERON Laboratory.

Bryant, S.M., Kahle, J.B. & Schafer, B.A. (2005). Distance education: A review of the contemporary literature. Issues in Accounting Education, 20(3), 255.

Calder, J. (1993). Disaffection and diversity: Overcoming barriers for adult learners. London: Falmer Press.
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Adult Learning Training and Development This

Words: 1624 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94476210



The importance in training and development with regard to understanding how adult learning works provides the ability to develop effective programs for adult learners in field of employment, education and interests.

When these two articles are blended together, however, they do not have to be mutually exclusive. The tips and training ideas can be taken from Lieb's works and applied to adult learning programs while the cautions of Brookfield's can also be respected and investigated more thoroughly.

Conclusion

As adult education continues to expand through online abilities, classroom learning and on site instruction at the workplace the understanding of how adults process information will continue to be important. Using the tips provided by Lieb will allow adults to be taught new material while at the same time investigating the concerns of Brookfield can be given attention.

It will be important to determine which of the experts is correct as future…… [Read More]

References

Issues in Understanding Adult (accessed 7-3-07) Learning http://www.nl.edu/academics/cas/ace/facultypapers/StephenBrookfield_AdultLearning.cfm

Leib, Stephen (1991) Principles of Adult Learning (Accessed 7-3-07) http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/adults-2.htm

Noe, Raymond (2004) Employee Training and Development 4th Edition.
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E-Learning and Traditional Learning at

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21613258

With proper instructional techniques, the effects of online education could potentially be altered significantly in a positive direction. This research will attempt to determine the specific obstacles that still exist to online education and the current best practices for overcoming these obstacles, as demonstrated by a variety of independent and original research studies conducted on the topic.

Many studies have pointed out that inadequately equipped e-learning systems can result in 'frustration, confusion, and reduced learner interest' (Zhang et al. 2004). An example of this is the fact that many e-learning course offer only text-based learning materials, which could lead to a student's boredom and disengagement in students, preventing them from gaining a good understanding of a topic (2004). However, multimedia technology is becoming more and more advanced and now e-learning systems are able to incorporate materials in different media such as text, image, sound, and video (2004), all sources of…… [Read More]

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Foster Learning Performance Improvement Effective

Words: 1875 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8276091

The author did not limit his study to researchers who supported one side of an argument but included both, those for and against any idea, bringing more understanding to the reader.

The article is further strengthened by the fact that the author identifies the side where she belongs in an argument that had contradictory statements from other authors. For instance, when she discusses objectivism and constructivism she presents both ideas but states that she is for constructivism. She also brings more understanding of the methods of learning by stating how helpful they are and the limitations associated with them and how to make the methods more effectively including practical examples in every case. In fact, she concludes by suggesting that the integration of two or all of the methods is the best practice.

Discussion of the strengths

Inclusion and proper utilization of different resources was a very positive step the…… [Read More]

Reference

Yi, J. (2005). Effective ways to foster learning, Performance Improvement, 44(1).
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Traditional Forms of Learning Do

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35922237

It does not happen overnight; 3) eflective practice occurs best when learners work with role models; 4) as noted by Fink, instruction needs to be learner-centered, of interest to the learners and long-lasting; 5) the institution in which the nurses learn must be supportive of reflective learning.

The PICOT is a useful format for developing a clinical research question. It helps to answer questions and decrease uncertainty and determine the appropriate choice of action. In this case, the PICOT is the following:

Nursing student population

Provide long-term knowledge to make reflective decisions

Traditional learning situations

eflective practice offers several benefits over traditional learning

Time frame (optional)

eferences cited:

Fink, L.D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Loughran, J. John (2002) "Effective reflective practice: in search of meaning in learning about teaching." Journal of Teacher Education 53(1): 33+.

Osterman, K. (1998) Using…… [Read More]

References cited:

Fink, L.D. (2003). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass

Loughran, J. John (2002) "Effective reflective practice: in search of meaning in learning about teaching." Journal of Teacher Education 53(1): 33+.

Osterman, K. (1998) Using Constructivism and Reflective Practice to Bridge the Theory/Practice Gap. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Diego, CA, April 13-17, 1998) ED425518 ERIC

Peters, M. (2000). Does constructivist epistemology have a place in nurse education? Journal of Nursing Education, 39, 166-172
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Similarities and Differences Between Pedagogical and Andragogical Learning Approaches in Adult Learners

Words: 957 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58532215

Pedagogical and Andragogical Learning Approaches in Adult Learners

There are a number of fundamental differences between pedagogical and andragogical approaches to both instruction and learning. However, the principle point of distinction between the two is this: the former is designed for young learners (Miemstra and Sisco, 1990) and for those who have a circumscribed amount of information and life experience to bring to a particular subject, whereas the latter is designed for adults and for individuals who can substantially enhance a discussion or points of education about a topic. In the use case in which a senior supervisor or manager of an organization asked an individual to design a program to increase employee awareness of sexual harassment and train workers in the appropriate ways to deal with harassment or complaints, one would obviously favor the andragogical method because it caters more towards adult learners. However, there are still some basic…… [Read More]

References

Barton, R. (2007). Pedagogy vs. andragogy. Robmba.blogspot.com. Retrieved from http://robmba.blogspot.com/2007/09/pedagogy-vs.-andragogy.html

Gibbons, H.S., Wentworth, G.P. (2001). Andrological and pedagogical differences for online instructors. www.westgate.edu Retrieved from  http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/fall43/gibbons_wentworth43.html 

Hiemstra, R., Sisco, B. (1990). Moving from pedagogy to andragogy. www-distance.syr.edu. Retrieved from http://www-distance.syr.edu/andraggy.html
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Problem-Based Learning vs Traditional Teaching in Respiratory Care Education

Words: 2324 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71070351

PBL vs. Traditional

Two of the methods of pedagogy that are currently employed in respiratory therapy are Problem-Based Learning and Traditional Teaching. Both instructional methods can provide a strenuous curriculum for the student interested in comprehensive training in the field of respiratory therapy, and each method has its advantages and (of course) its disadvantages. The focus of this study will be to determine which pedagogical methodology provides the most efficient and effective results in a respiratory therapy educational setting.

To accomplish that objective, the study will administer surveys in questionnaire form to students attending two separate schools that offer training in respiratory therapy. The questionnaires will provide a quantifying response to qualitative, and quantitative, information. Each school's pedagogy will represent either problem-based or traditional teaching methods and students from each school will be asked to complete pre and post training questionnaires and surveys. Additionally, students will be tested on their…… [Read More]

References

Albanese, M.A. & Mitchell, S. (1993) Problem-based learning: A review of literature on its outcomes and implantation issues, Academic Medicine, Vol. 68, Issue 1, pp. 52-81

Ali, M.; Gameel, W.; Sebai, E.; Menom, N.A.; (2010) Effect of problem-based learning on nursing students' approaches to learning and their self-directed learning abilities, International Journal of Academic Research, Vol. 2, Issue 4, pp. 188 -- 195

Allie, S.; Armien, M.N.; Bennie. K.; Burgoyne, N.; Case, J.; Craig, T.; (2007) Learning as acquiring a discursive identity through participation in a community: A theoretical position on improving student learning in tertiary science and engineering programmes, Cape Town, South Africa, accessed at http://www.cree, uct.ac.za., on January 15, 2011

Biggs, J. (2003) Teaching for quality learning at university (2nd ed.), Buckingham: The Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press
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Opportunities of a Problem-Based Learning

Words: 2989 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6887204

In addition, the classic version of problem-based learning "requires students to collaborate, formulate learning issues by determining factors that may contribute to the cause or solution of a problem, identify relevant content, and generate hypotheses. Most problem-based learning models also contain student reflection components as a means of self-evaluation" (Knowlton & Sharp, 2003, pp. 5-6).

Although the positive effects of using a problem-based learning approach have been documented in a number of studies, the findings of other studies have indicated that problem-based learning may not compare favorably with more traditional teaching methods with regards to student's knowledge base, technical skills, or the resources expended; however, Dadd (2009) suggests that the benefits of using a problem-based learning approach justify the additional resources this method requires. Moreover, Simons et al. (2004) report that students using a problem-based learning approach "tend to develop more positive attitudes toward learning than students in more traditional…… [Read More]

References

Alavi, C. (1999). Problem-based learning in a health sciences curriculum. New York:

Routledge.

Albion, P.R. (2003). PBL + IMM = PBL2: Problem-based learning and interactive multimedia development. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 11(2), 243-244.

Dadd, K.A. (2009). Using problem-based learning to bring the workplace into the classroom.
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Computer Mediated Learning

Words: 668 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80811283

Computer Mediated Learning

For busy adults with conflicting schedules facing a multitude of family and work demands, who still wish to add to their academic credentials or vocational qualifications, computer mediated learning may seem like an ideal way for such adults to satisfy their educational needs. For an elementary school instructor, however, computer mediated learning lacks the supervisory, mentoring, and hands-on capacity that is usually deemed necessary for imparting basic skills. An "online, collaborative learning approach using the Internet offers solutions to many of the problems plaguing university education," such as oversubscribed classes and the difficulty for university students to gain access to the required classes that they need to graduate on time. (Jones, 2004) At a higher education level, computer mediated learning allows for students to be enrolled in more sections on a year 'round basis in a university environment -- but this is not an advantage enjoyed by…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jones, David. (2004) "Solving Some Problems of University Education: A Case Study." Horizon. Retrieved 14 Jun 2005 at  http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/monograph/CD/Science_Mathematics/Jones.asp 

Perez, Lucia. (1996) "The Effectiveness of the Internet in the Foreign Language Classroom." Horizon. Retrieved 14 Jun 2005 at Horizon. Retrieved 14 Jun 2005 at  http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/monograph/CD/Language_Music/Perez.asp 

Shaw, Robin. (1996) "Conversion of a Mathematics Course to Tutor-Supported Computer-Assisted Flexible Learning." Horizon. Retrieved 14 Jun 2005 at  http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/monograph/CD/Science_Mathematics/Shaw.asp
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Teachers performance and learning outcomes

Words: 9267 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21485460

Learner in Monitoring His/Her Own Learning Progress

The following are various ways I use to make learning effective by helping the pupil to monitor their own learning. These approaches encourage positive relationships in the class environment and enhance the emotional well-being of the learners. They also encourage learners to participate in the class activity. Effective application of these qualities depends on how well I have combined them with pedagogical skills and other appropriate behavior management strategies that are tailored for the learners in focus. This section describes a number of these pedagogical skills (Cooper & Cefai, 2013).

Pedagogical skills

As an effective teacher I take my time to plan lessons in detail. This planning ensures that the learning needs of a diverse class are taken into consideration. The details include auditory and visual approaches to the delivery of content. It also aims at encouraging learners to actively participate in the…… [Read More]

References

Afasic. (2016). Language Disorder - Receptive Language Disorder. London: Helplines Partnership.

Cooper, P., & Cefai, C. (2013). Understanding and Supporting Students with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties. Malta: European Centre for Educational Resilience and Socio-Emotional Health.

Mary Magee, Q., David, O., Cynthia, W., Tom, H., & Dehaven, B. (2000). Teaching and Working with Children Who Have Emotional and Behavioral Challenges. . Washington, DC: American Institutes for Research - Center for Effective Collaboration and Practice.

Ministry of Education - Province of British Colomb. (2011). A Guide for Teachers - Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities. Ministry of Education.
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Computer Assisted Writing Learning Applied

Words: 6823 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52847352

" Shin (2006) Shin also states that the CMC literature "illustrates shifts of focus to different layers of context." Early on, research relating to CMC in language learning and teaching looked at the linguistic content of CMC text to examine how language learners could improve certain communication functions and learn linguistic figures through CMC activities (lake, 2000; Chun, 1994; Kern, 1995; Ortega, 1997; Pellettieri, 2000; Smith 2000, Sotlillo, 2000; Toyoda & Harrison, 2002, Tudini, 2003; Warschauer, 1996) Recent studies of "tellecollaborative projects have examined how language learners jointly construct the contexts of their CMC activities, as part of their focus on tensions among intercultural communication partners. (elz, 2003, 2003; Kramsch & Thorn, 2002; O'Dowd, 2003; Ware 2000, War & Kramsch, 2005) IN the study of Shin (2006) which was "informed by Ware's (2005) examination of a tellecollaborative communication project between American college students and German students" Shin (2006) looks into…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Introduction to Computational Linguistics (2006) Computer-Assisted Language Learning http://www.georgetown.edu/faculty/ballc/ling361/ling361_call.html.

Lusnia, Karen B. (1000) Teaching Teachers Long-Distance: A Paradigm-Shift for the Teacher-Planner in Mexico - Applied Linguistics. Paper presented at the International Conference on Language Teacher Education.

Bakhtin, M.M. (1981). Excerpts from discourse in the novel. In M. Holquist (Ed.), The dialogic imagination: Four essays by M.M. Bakhtin. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

Bateson, G. (2000). Steps to an ecology of mind: Collected essays in anthropology, psychiatry, evolution, and epistemology. Chicago, IL: University Of Chicago Press.
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Self-Renewal You Are Never Too

Words: 713 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11596019

The world changes, and we must change with the world, and that is a good thing, as talents we took for granted suddenly seem more remarkable, if we develop them and they are recognized and nurtured by others.

I also believe that education, when embarked upon at a later date, can quite frequently be more enriching, given the greater self-knowledge that comes with age. As an adolescent, avoiding homework is a frequent act of childish rebellion. But the adult knows that time is finite and making the most of the here and now means embracing rather than avoiding work. An adult also knows better what he or she likes and dislikes, what are his or her strengths and weaknesses, and so the can better cope with these deficits and compensate for them.

Yet an adult may fear to take more risks, unlike the child that joyously learns to walk by…… [Read More]

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Learning Clinical Interview Revision How

Words: 1793 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59252012



If teachers fail to design connected scaffolds than the class will develop only limited capabilities. He explains that this can be done by choosing only those scaffolding tools which have similar structures, assignment objectives, and interactive styles (Tabak, 2004). Hence when considering the scaffolds for developing skills of weak students, I will make sure that the scaffolds are complementing not only the main learning objective but also one another.

eferences

Biehler, S.M. (2010). Psychology Applied to Teaching: 12th edition. Wadsworth Publishing.

Bilal, D. (2002). Perspectives on children's navigation of the World Wide Web: Does the type of search task make a difference? Online Information eview, 26(2), 108-127.

Cho, K. & Jonassen, DH (2002). The effects of argumentation scaffolds on argumentation and problem solving. Educational Technological esearch and Development, 50(3), 5-22.

Hogan, K., & Pressley, M. (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches & issues. Cambridge, M.A.: Brookline Books, Inc.

Jones, P.…… [Read More]

References

Biehler, S.M. (2010). Psychology Applied to Teaching: 12th edition. Wadsworth Publishing.

Bilal, D. (2002). Perspectives on children's navigation of the World Wide Web: Does the type of search task make a difference? Online Information Review, 26(2), 108-127.

Cho, K. & Jonassen, DH (2002). The effects of argumentation scaffolds on argumentation and problem solving. Educational Technological Research and Development, 50(3), 5-22.

Hogan, K., & Pressley, M. (1997). Scaffolding student learning: Instructional approaches & issues. Cambridge, M.A.: Brookline Books, Inc.
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Self-Confidence at Present I Would

Words: 1000 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38680032

A person with high self-esteem is a (6) risk-taker (DuBrin 2004: 86-87). Nothing is more risky yet more fulfilling than learning something new.

Explain how they can help you strengthen your self-confidence

Self-acceptance of who I am right now gives me knowledge of where I want to go in the future. Self-esteem means being confident that my learning and personal investments will pay off, that I am truly 'worth it' in terms of the ventures I attempt. In all of the above-cited examples, education seems like the key to building self-esteem. Education shows a sense of personal confidence in one's ability to advance (and is reinforced by positive self-talk and building upon one's core skills).

Analyze how self-confidence can affect job performance and how inter-office relationships are affected by differing levels of self-confidence.

Everyone has been in an office setting where a 'bullying' boss has dominated his or her employees.…… [Read More]

References

Burton, James P. & Jenny Hoobler. (2006). Subordinate self-esteem and abusive supervision.

Journal of Managerial Issues. Retrieved July 19, 2011 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb6703/is_3_18/ai_n29301186/

Denton, L. Trey & Constance Campbell. (2010). Dementors in our midst: Managing the highly productive but morale-killing employee. Journal of Applied Management and Entrepreneurship. Retrieved July 19, 2011 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa5383/is_200901/ai_n31513452/

DuBrin, A. (2004). Applying psychology: Individual and organizational effectiveness. Pearson.
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Self-Injurious Behavior

Words: 5019 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41574937

Deliberate self-harm (DSH) or self-injurious behavior (SI) involves intentional self-poisoning or injury, irrespective of the apparent purpose of the act. (Vela, Harris and Wright, 1983) Self-mutilation is also used interchangeably with self-mutilation, though self-mutilation is one aspect of DSH. Approximately 1% of the United States population uses physical self-injury as a way of dealing with overwhelming feelings or situations, often using it to speak when no words will come. There are different ways in which DSH is manifested: cutting, burning, and abusing drugs, alcohol or other substances. This occurs at times of extreme anger, distress and low self-esteem, in order to either create a physical manifestation of the negative feelings which can then be dealt with, or alternatively to punish yourself. Extremely emotional distress can also cause DSH -- this is sometimes linked with hearing voices, particularly as a way of stopping the voices.

DSH is also often called parasuicide,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Vela, J., Harris, J., and Wright, J.K. "Self-Mutilation." Journal of Trauma 23 (1983): 165-67.

Favazza, A.R. "What Do We Know About Affective Disorders?" Am J. Psychiatry 143.10 (1986): 1328.

Why Patients Mutilate Themselves." Hospital Community Psychiatry 40 (1989): 137-45.

Pies, R.W., and Popli, A.P. "Self-Injurious Behavior: Pathophysiology and Implications for Treatment." J. Clin Psychiatry 56.12 (1995): 580-8.
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Learning Needs

Words: 1846 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45296580

Lsa

Cunningham, D. & Kelly, D. (2005). he evaluation of multiprofessional learning needs assessment tool. Education for Primary Care 2005, 16. 547-55.

his article argued for the need to evaluate the evaluation methods for needs assessment within a healthcare environment. he research for this article was compiled in Scotland where the researchers sought to find ways that health care teams can become more efficient by determining a tool to evaluate what needs to be altered or included within healthcare teams.

he article designed a tool called "QUES" that helped determine the best ways in which teams work. his qualitative evaluation helped determine how these healthcare teams may benefit from this or any other similar assessment tool. he research ultimately concluded that this type of assessment tool can be used by healthcare staffs to identify their non-clinical learning needs. his information is important because it highlights the need for self-improvement through…… [Read More]

This research is useful because it offers another example of a tool that has been tested in an real world situation. The article suggested that a needs assessment tool using interviews and observation provides the necessary structure to cover the many open ended problems and questions encountered by the nurse on a daily basis. The ideas are explained from several different perspectives including the nurse educator, the staff nurse and the nurse manager offer a useful explanation for how needs must be tailored to a specific cause or purpose.

Poulton, B., Lyons, A. & O'Callaghan, A. (2008). A comparative study of self-perceived public health competencies: practice teachers and qualifying SCPHNs. Community Practitioner, Sep 2008, 81, 9.

This article is a look at the technological aspects of needs assessment within the nursing profession. The article is premised upon the idea that computer skills are recognized as essential for success in the nursing education and in general nursing practice. This research reported on the perspectives of nursing students and how they view their own computer skills. This inquiry aimed to learn about self-identifying learning needs assessment and relating it to the technological skills assumed to be necessary for professional success. This article is beneficial because it suggested that many students need help with basic computer skills within the nursing educational realms. As a result the research predicted that this problem will continue for years unless it is properly addressed within the learning cycle. To help remedy this problem, the research suggested that a computer graded assessment tool would be an effective tool to address the problems highlighted throughout the article.
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Direct Instruction The Effect on Special Education

Words: 2685 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32104831

Direct Instruction: The Effect on Special Education Students

Direct Instruction Overview

Direct instruction is an increasingly popular and supported education technique that has been utilized for several years. Direct instruction has historically been used as a method of instruction for special education students (Goral, 2001). Many educators have claimed that direct instruction has helped students regardless of their learning capability or any defined learning disabilities (Goral, 2001). Direct instruction is based on the idea that a teacher led classroom that involves active participation and well choreographed lesson plans and learning instruments is a more effective learning environment than a less involved or student led learning situation.

Kozloff (2002) a firm proponent of direct instruction suggests that it provides an effective method for instruction by helping students learn to organize and activate knowledge. Further Kozloff suggests that direct instruction shifts the emphasis of teaching to mastering and acquiring proficiency of tasks…… [Read More]

References

Allington, R.L. (2001). "Research on reading/learning disability interventions." In A.

Farstrup & S.J. Samuels (Eds.), What research says about reading instruction, 3rd ed. Newark: International Reading Association.

Boyd-Zaharias, J., & Pate-Bain, H. (1998). Teacher aides and student learning: Lessons from Project STAR. Arlington: Educational Research Service.

Beard, L.A. & Harper, C. (2002). Student perceptions of online and campus instruction."
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Learning Disabled During the Course of a

Words: 1262 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24918403

Learning Disabled

During the course of a child's school years they will learn to define themselves as a person and shape their personality, sense of self-concept and perception of their potential for achievement for life (Persaud, 2000). Thus the early educational years may be considered one of the most impacting and important with regard to emotional, social and cognitive development for students of all disabilities. Labeling is a common by-product of educational institutions, one that has been hotly debated with regard to its benefits and consequences by educators and administrators over time. There are proponents of labeling and those that suggest that labeling may be damaging to students in some manner.

Students who are labeled at the elementary and middle school level as learning disabled may face greater difficulties achieving their true potential in part due to a decreased sense of self-esteem, self-concept and personal achievement (Persaud, 2000). The intent…… [Read More]

References

Beilke, J.R. & Yssel, N. (Sept., 1999). "The chilly climate for students with disabilites in higher education." College Student Journal, Retrieved October 19, 2004 from LookSmart. Available: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles.mi_m0FCR/is_3_33/ai_62839444/pg_3

Clark, M. (1997). "Teacher response to learning disability: A test of attributional principles." The Journals of Learning Disabilities, 30 (1), 69-79. Retrieved Oct 4, 2004 from LDOnline. Available:

 http://www.ldonline.org/ld_indepth/self_esteem/teacherresponse.html .

Clark, M. And Artiles, A. (2000). "A cross-national study of teachers' attributional patterns." The Journal of Special Education, 32(2), 77-99.
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Learning Model Morris Goes to School by

Words: 1085 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52255253

Learning Model

"Morris goes to School" by B. Wiseman.

Heading:

Your name, whole group, 5th grade, all, 09/03/2012.

Objectives for Lesson

The students will engage in reading and writing activities with reflection and understanding.

The students will be motivated to connect the story to their own particular cultural/ethnic / routine experiences

The students will be encouraged to generate situations and to apply to new circumstances using the story as their base

The students will be encouraged to imagine a recipient of their story and to direct the writing of their story to this recipient.

CSO's or SOLs (WV New Generation Content Standards and Objectives)

Student will:

Engage in reading of the text with understanding and motivation

Apply the story to their own circumstance be able to find launch pads from the story with which they can craft their own informative and meaningful tale.

Participate in collaborative conversation with partners and…… [Read More]

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Learning Journal for Organizational Behavior

Words: 2302 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24870783

Given the capriciousness of the human condition with respect to continuing redefinitions of personal and professional success, human resource managers are faced with some difficult choices in formulating recommendations for best practices. Therefore, the learning journal would undergo a series of draft versions that would be used to solicit feedback from experts in the field who could point out flaws and areas that required additional research or support to be valid and trustworthy. The solicitation of feedback process would follow the guidance provided by Neuman (2003) who recommends having a manuscript reviewed by knowledgeable individuals who possess the requisite credentials to provide informed feedback. This feedback would be carefully reviewed and the collaborative process would result in changes and additions where they were deemed necessary and appropriate.

4)

Outcomes and New Learning

Some of the overriding themes that emerged from the learning episodes outlined above was that the more researchers…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association. (2002). Publication manual of the American Psychological

Association (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Cheverton, J. 2007. 'Holding our own: Value and performance in nonprofit organizations.'

Australian Journal of Social Issues, vol. 42, no. 3, pp. 427-428.
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Learning Organization Critically Reflect on Your Organizational

Words: 3301 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85995289

Learning Organization

Critically reflect on your organizational context (procurement department) and how it contributes to or hinders a learning organization

Enhancing Individual Learning at the Procurement Department

Unlike traditional organizations, which were static, organizations are becoming dynamic with the consistent changes that are taking place in the market, and in order to take a competitive advantage constant learning is essential. This has formed the basis for a learning organization, whose idea is to gain a competitive advantage through learning. According to Saw, Wilday, and Harte (2010), a learning organization is one that not only appreciates and promotes learning from its own practices, but also looks further than its own systems for lessons, and avoids self-satisfaction. This means that the learning process should be both an internal and external process with the organization appreciating that learning from daily experiences is critical. Learning organization gets its basis on the idea that both…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Garavan N.T., & McCarthy A. (2008). Collective Learning Processes and Human Resource Development. Advances in Developing Human Resources. 451 (10).New York: SAGE.

Giannakis, M. (2008). Facilitating learning and knowledge transfer through supplier development. Supply Chain Management, 13(1), 62-72. Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/13598540810850328

Ji, H.S. & Thomas, J.S. (2008). A Theoretical Approach to the Organizational Knowledge Formation Process: Integrating the Concepts of Individual Learning and Learning Organization Culture. Human Resource Development Review, 7(4), P. 424 -- 442.

Jones, P., & Robinson, P. (2012). Operations management. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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Learning According to the University of Canberra's

Words: 1529 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84269176

Learning

According to the University of Canberra's Academic Skills Centre (2008), learning is a highly complex process that "takes place at different levels of consciousness, and in different ways, in everything we do. Moreover, individual people learn in different ways and have their preferred learning styles." One of the keys to improving student learning is to understand the different types of learning styles and apply that knowledge to study habits and practices. Study skills are themselves behaviors that need to be learned like any other. Using a combination of disciplinary techniques and cognitive shifts, students can improve their capacity for learning. This will, in turn, help boost grades and test scores. However, learning in an academic context is about more than earning grades. Learning should ultimately enhance one's view of the world and increase tolerance of diversity.

The theory of multiple intelligences has formed the theoretical foundation for the study…… [Read More]

References

Armstrong, T. (2010). Multiple intelligences. Retrieved online: http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/multiple_intelligences.php

Dartmouth College Academic Skills Center (2011). Managing your time. Retrieved online:  http://www.dartmouth.edu/~acskills/success/time.html 

Gardner, H. (2006). Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons. Perseus.

Langer, J.A. (1986). Learning through writing: Study skills in the content areas. Journal of Reading. Feb 1986.
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Learning Organization Analyze Concept Learning Organization & 8226

Words: 2445 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5024446

Learning Organization

Analyze Concept Learning Organization, • The Organizational Conditions Suited A Managerial Intervention; • Its Implications Managing People; • Its Likelihood Success

Under what conditions is it likely to be successful?

The idea of a 'learning organization' has become one of the most popular concepts in managerial theory. It originated with the theorist Donald Schon, who stressed that given the mutability of the exterior environment, business organizations must likewise be responsive to changes and change with the times (Smith 2001) . Only by learning from the exterior environment can an organization be effective, and that means creating a workforce that is similarly responsive, teachable, and able to 'learn' in a dynamic fashion.

However, the extent to which such a concept can be realized and what constitutes a learning organization has been hotly debated. "While there has been a lot of talk about learning organizations it is very difficult to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bersin, Josh. 2012. 5 keys to building a learning organization. Forbes. Available:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/joshbersin/2012/01/18/5-keys-to-building-a-learning-organization / [23 Jan 2013]

Fenwick, Tara. n.d. Questioning the learning organization concept S.M. Scott, B.

Spencer, & A. Thomas (Eds.). Learning for life: Readings in Canadian adult education.
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Direct Instruction Teaching Method Is

Words: 863 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99357075



Direct instruction has shown most effective in the early K-3 years, where significant IQ gains have been found and the program has shown to be effective among students with a "higher probability of failure in school over the long-term" (Becker & Engelmann, 2004). High school follow up has been conducted however and shows that direct instruction students perform better academically and are more likely to stay in school (Becker & Engelmann, 2004). Further the research supports the notion that Direct Instruction can be generalized across time and populations (Becker & Engelmann, 2004).

The Direct Instruction Model also receives the highest positive effects and outcomes among students who have been exposed to other educational models including the Open Classroom Model, the Cognitive Oriented Curriculum Model and the Behavioral Analysis Model (Becker & Engelmann, 2004).

In fact a high correlation between "academic and affective outcomes" suggest that the Direct Outcome Model should…… [Read More]

References

Becker, W.C. & Engelmann, S. (2004). "Sponsor findings from project follow through."

University of Oregon. October 11, 2004,  http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~adiep/ft/becker.htm 

Kozloffm, M. (n.d.). "Direct Instruction." Department of Specialty Studies, University of North Carolina at Wilmington. October 12, 2004, http://people.uncw.edu/kozloffm/effectivefeatures.html

Lindsay, J. (2004). "Direct Instruction: The Most Successful Teaching Model." October
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Direct to Consumer Advertising History of Drug

Words: 16271 Length: 59 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71118969

Direct to Consumer Advertising

HISTRY F DRUG ADVERTISING

THE DTC ADVERTISING PHENMENN

CREATING DEMAND

DECEPTIVE ADVERTISING - A WLF IN SHEEP'S CLTHING

CAUSE F DEATH

PRFIT

UTILIZATIN, PRICING, AND DEMGRAPHICS

LEGISLATIN, PLITICS AND PATENTS

LEGISLATIVE INITIATIVES REGARDING DTC

RECALLED and/or DEADLY DRUGS

In order to provide the most efficient method of evaluation, the study will utilize existing stores of qualitative and quantitative data from reliable sources, such as U.S. Government statistical references, University studies, and the studies and publications of non-profit and consumer oriented organizations. Every attempt will be made to avoid sources of information sponsored by or directly influenced by the pharmaceutical industry.

Existing data regarding the history, levels, content and growth of direct-to-consumer advertising will be examined. In addition, the industry's composition prior to and after the proliferation of direct-to-consumer advertising will be examined, with regard to market share, type of substances sold, benefits of substances sold, and…… [Read More]

On January 9, 2002, Dr. Darlene Jody, Vice President of Medical Marketing for Bristol-Myers Squibb, issued a manufacturer's "Important Drug Warning Including Black Box Information." The Important Drug Warning advises healthcare practitioners that "cases of life-threatening hepatic failure have been reported in patients treated with SERZONE." The manufacturer's Warning indicates that numerous persons have or will suffer liver failure, death or transplantation. The manufacturer's Warning also indicates that the current estimate of the rate of liver failure associated with Serzone use is "about 3-4 times the estimated background rate of liver failure." A new Warning is being added to the Serzone prescribing information, advising that "patients should be advised to be alert for signs and symptoms of liver dysfunction (jaundice, anorexia, gastrointestinal complaints, malaise, etc.) and to report them to their doctor immediately if they occur." According to Warnings, Serzone should be promptly discontinued if signs or symptoms suggest liver failure.

Vioxx belongs to a class of drugs known as COX-2 inhibitors. When the drugs were introduced a few years ago, COX-2 inhibitors were thought to be safer and more effective than other drugs such as Aspirin and Ibuprofen. However, several studies have questioned the cardiovascular safety of Vioxx. Studies indicate that people taking Vioxx have four times the risk of a heart attack.

In May 2002, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Talk Paper about new label warnings for the popular arthritis and pain drug know as Vioxx (rofecoxib). The new label warnings are based on the results of the Vioxx Gastrointestinal Outcomes Research (VIGOR). According to the FDA, recent studies demonstrate that Vioxx is associated with a higher rate of serious cardiovascular thromboembolic adverse events (such as heart attacks, angina pectoris, and peripheral vascular events). Based on the recent study, the FDA agreed with the Arthritis Advisory Committee recommendations February 8, 2001 that the label for Vioxx include gastrointestinal and cardiovascular warning information. Serious side effects attributed to Vioxx are heart attacks, seizures, strokes, or liver/kidney problems. http://www.recalleddrugs.com
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Self-Efficacy Believing in Oneself Self-Efficacy

Words: 3109 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67918030

).

As a top manager, the person possesses three distinct categories of self-efficacy beliefs (Yun, 2007). These are his individual participant's abilities, his team's capabilities, and the organization's capabilities. Team capabilities are not simply the sum of the abilities of the individual members. And organizational capabilities are different from team capabilities. These being distinct from one another, the top manager can build his efficacy beliefs on himself, the team and the organization. Organizational efficacy can then proceed from the top manager's belief in the organization's capabilities to create competitive advantage as well as attain high performance (Yun).

Self-Efficacy in the Work Environment

Employee Empowerment

According to Newstrom and Davis, self-efficacy is the conviction that one can successfully perform a given task and make meaningful contributions (Edralin, 2004). Causes of powerlessness and low self-efficacy in the workplace are job-related, boss-related, and reward system-related. Unclear roles and expectations, lack of opportunity to…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Bandura, a. (1994). Self-efficacy. Vol 4: 71-81 Encyclopedia of Human Behavior:

Academic Press. Retrieved on March 24, 2010 from http://www.des.edu/mfp/BanEncy.html

Beckman, R.H., et al. (2007). Effect of workplace laughter groups on personal efficacy beliefs. 28: 167-182 The Journal of Primary Prevention: Springer Science- Business

Media. Retrieved on March 23, 2010 from http://www.laughterlinks.com/research/AuthorsFullText.pdf
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Learning Specialized Vocabulary

Words: 2788 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87234390

Learning Specialized Vocabulary

Educators that provide instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL) must provide students with the primary concepts of English in the early stages of language development. As students progress and become more familiar with the language and its idiosyncrasies, advanced training is likely to acclimate students to much of the daily slang as well as complex vocabulary that they hear from native English speakers in routine conversation. It is the responsibility of the ESL instructor to provide this teaching at the appropriate juncture, and the most advantageous route is specialized vocabulary. The following paper will provide a discussion of the concept of word elements in the English language. The paper will continue with an analysis of the methods by which ESL instructors teach technical or specialized vocabulary in their coursework, including various learning strategies for students. Finally, a brief discussion of the importance of specialized vocabulary…… [Read More]

References

American Guidance Service, Inc. (1997). Building Vocabulary

Skills. Minnesota: American Guidance Service, Inc.

Cohen, A., & Steinberg, J. (1983). Effects of three types of vocabulary on readability of intermediate grade science textbooks: an application of Finn's transfer feature theory. Reading Research Quarterly, 19(1), 87-101.

Coxhead, A. (2000). A new academic word list. TESOL
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Learning Differences and Learning Needs

Words: 1817 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77545748

Learning Differences and Learning Needs

Learning Styles and Learning Preferences

For many years a great debate has existed in the field of education. Teachers and educators have attempted to uncover the best method for teaching students. The majority of evidence available suggests that multiple factors influence a student's ability to achieve in the classroom, none the least of which is learning styles and preferences. There is ample evidence supporting the notion that intelligence aside, most students have a learning preference related to their cognitive style of thinking that is ingrained or innate.

Because of this students will react to material presented to them in the classroom in different ways. It is vital that teachers begin recognizing the significance of these individual learning differences and uncover methods for coping with and addressing learning style differences and preferences within the classroom. Only then will all children be afforded the opportunity to learn…… [Read More]

References:

Fields S.C. ( 1985, April 15-18). Assessment of aptitude interactions for the most common science instructional strategies. Paper presented at the 58th annual meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching, French Lick Springs, IN.

Grabowski, B.L. & Jonassen, DH (1993). Handbook of individual differences in learning and instruction. Hillsdale, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Merrill M.D. ( 1973). "Content and instructional analysis for cognitive transfer tasks." A

V Communication Review, 21,109-125.
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Learning & Memory the Accuracy of Memory

Words: 1445 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87602775

Learning & Memory

The Accuracy of Memory

The research I completed for this assignment was fairly straightforward. Upstairs in my living room on a day in which I had yet to leave the house, I tried to imagine my front door. I did so without having looked at it for at least 14 hours -- since I had arrived at home the evening before. Once I was able to visualize the door, I then wrote down all of the details that I could conceive of related to its physical appearance. My annotations on this subject included the fact that the door is white and is at the base of approximately 20 steps which lead to the main unit of the domicile. In this tall foyer, the white of the door stands out against the creme color of the walls around it (I was able to see this same color on…… [Read More]

References

Baars, B. (1997). In the Theater of Consciousness: the Workspace of the Mind. San Diego: Oxford University Press.

Dehon, H., Laroi, F. "Affective valence influences participant's susceptibility to False Memories and Illusory Recollection." Emotion. 10 (5): 627-639.

Gallo, D.A. (2010). "False memories and fantastic beliefs: 15 years of DRM illusion." Memory & Cognition. 38 (7): 833-848.

Lindsay, D.F., Read, D.J. (1994). "Psychotherapy and memories of childhood sexual abuse: a cognitive perspective." Applied Cognitive Psychology. 8: 281-338.
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Learning Organizations Dynamism and Flexibility

Words: 2015 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13433977

Strategizing is required, but the learning fostered is not necessarily pre-determined and linear in fashion. After all, life and the way that the economic marketplace shifts and changes are often unpredictable in the extreme. Similar in the ways that the parts of a body must adjust to unexpected changes in the exterior environment, such as changes in temperature, the different components of the organization must adjust to the external economic environment to remain healthy and vital.

Judgments about the capacities and performance

The work practices that define a learning organization include investing in employees, team learning, and existing in a state of mutual interdependence so that employee's rights to be heard, to have decent wages and benefits, and to make a contribution to the organization are honored. Soliciting input, informing employees about necessary changes well in advance, and rewarding excellent levels of performance are common practices in most 'learning' organization…… [Read More]

References

Apple. (2011). The New York Times. Retrieved August 30, 2011 at http://topics.nytimes.com/top/news/business/companies/apple_computer_inc/index.html

Apple. (2011). Official website. Retrieved August 30, 2011 at  http://www.apple.com/contact/ 

Argyris, C., & Schon, D. (1978) Organizational learning: A theory of action perspective.

Reading, Mass: Addison Wesley.
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Direct Response Marketing Survey of

Words: 606 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12758479

I agreed, out of good will, since it is a small town and it needs the money."

Respondent 8: Nutrisystem

"My high school reunion was coming up and I needed to lose 15 lbs. (well, more like 20 lbs). I was really inspired by some of the stories, too, I admit."

Respondent 9: Bona Mop

"I had just purchased hardwood floors -- this promised an easy way to clean them, without ruining the finish."

Respondent 10: Doggie steps

"My dog is getting old. I heard later the stairs were available at Pet Smart, but I hadn't seen them there. I suppose I could have made some myself, but this seemed easier and more aesthetic. I feel bad seeing my dog strain to try to get up on the couch -- this enables her to be more like her old self."

Analysis:

All of these responses share common themes. The first…… [Read More]

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Self-Expression of Identity Literature Review

Words: 3575 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7364266

Each outside label has an affect on that individuals own conception of them, effectively rising or lowering self-image. These categories allow individuals of the same label to sometimes band together in order to further develop their own unique identities away from the labeling and discrimination from the larger group who may view them as abnormal, (Oxoby & McLeish, 2007: 13). Once inside a more specific group, these individuals have the capacity to flourish, and gain more and more self-esteem, (Handler, 1991: 223). However, when placed outside of these smaller groups into the larger population, this identity is once again viewed in a discriminatory manner, (Taylor & Moghaddam, 1994: 134). This occurs mainly due to the xenophobia each group portrays towards other groups, which then creates a hostile environment for the establishment of strong individual identities.

One way to examine the formations of deaf and queer identities using the Social Identity…… [Read More]

References

Adam, B. 2000. "Love and Sex in Constructing Identity Among Men Who Have Sex

With Men." International Journal of Sexuality and Gender Studies 5(4).

Barry, P. (2002). Lesbian and gay criticism. Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory. Manchester: Manchester University Press.

Bourdieu, P. & Passeron, J.-C. (1977) Reproduction in Education, Culture and Society,
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Learning Autobiography the Development of

Words: 1148 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5628435

This program experience, concurrent with my faith-based experience developing an additional residential treatment program provided the core of my personal and professional learning of both direct patient care and cemented my belief in the need for such programs to exists and grow to better meet the needs of the growing drug problem in my community and many others.

Upon completion of the position of Director of Residential Programs for the Jefferson County Council on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, I sought out in 2006 another position that would further my learning as a community service provider. My new task would be based around not the management of one county facility but the development of regional programming needs in the are as a member of the Southeast Texas Regional Planning Commission -- Quality Management-Substance Abuse Division. I currently hold this position which includes a variety of tasks and learning opportunities: Conducting organizational…… [Read More]

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Dispositional and Learning Theory

Words: 1143 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37398491

Dispositional and Learning Theory

The objective of this study is to describe the role of personality in affecting situational behavior and examine the personality characteristics attributed to each of the theories. This work will additionally explain the interpersonal relational aspects associated with the theories selected.

Personality is defined by Gordon Allport as the "dynamic organization within the individual of those psychophysical systems that determine a person' behavior and thought." (Psychological Musings, 2011, p.1) Dispositional theory is reported to be such that "holds an optimistic view of human nature and believes healthy people are consciously motivated, maintain healthy relationships, and relate realistically to their environment." This theory is reported to be such that provides a description of personality traits referred to as 'dispositions'. It was theorized by Allport that "central traits from the fundamental structure of individual personalities and secondary traits contribute to less important characteristics." (Psychological Musings, 2011, p.1) Allport…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Critique of Learning Perspectives on Personality (2003) Wilderdom. 29 Sept 2003. Retrieved from:  http://www.wilderdom.com/personality/L9-4CritiqueLearningTheory.html 

Introduction to Learning Perspectives on Personality (2003) Wilderdom 29 Sept 2003. Retrieved from:  http://www.wilderdom.com/personality/L9-0LearningPerspectivesPersonality.html 

Introduction to Personality (2011) Psychological Musings. 8 May 2011. Retrieved from:  http://psychological-musings.blogspot.com/2011/05/introduction-to-personality.html 

Personality Analysis: Humanist/Existential and Learning Theories (2011) Psychological Musings. 27 May 2011. Retrieved from:  http://psychological-musings.blogspot.com/2011/05/personality-analysis.html
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Comparing E-Learning and Camus Learning

Words: 1637 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18832470

Education

A Comparison of Online Learning and Campus-Based Learning

The development and growth of online learning has created opportunities for both students and academic institutions alike. The online learning environment may be argued as offering many benefits such increasing accessibility to education and support of diversity as well as providing a potentially lucrative revenue streams for the institutions. These benefits have driven the growth, but the benefits are not without drawbacks, with online courses reporting a higher attrition. The aim of the paper is to look at online learning, discussing the advantages and the disadvantages of the online environment comparing it to campus-based learning and the blending environment.

An online course has been defined as one where there is a minimum of 80% of the content is delivered through the online environment (Allen & Seaman, 2014). Online delivery may include a range of different mediums, including, but not necessarily limited…… [Read More]

References

Allen IE; Seaman J, (2014), Grade Change: Tracking Online Education in the United States, The Sloan Consortium

Bauman, P, (2002), Student Retention: What You Can Control, & How, Distance Education Report, 6(16), 41

Cluskey, G.R. Jr.; Ehlen, Craig R; Raiborn, Mitchell H, (2011), Thwarting online exam cheating without proctor supervision, Journal of Academic and Business Ethics, 4, 1-7

Diaz, D.P. (2002), Online drop rates revisited, The Technology Source, accessed 11th March 2-014 at  http://technologysource.org/article/online_drop_rates_revisited/
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Continuous Learning in Organizations

Words: 4264 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74262239

Learning in Organizations

Continuous Learning

This assignment is a review journal for the book 'Continuous Learning in Organizations: Individual, Group, and Organizational Perspectives', by Sessa & London (2006).

Preface & Preliminary Material

I like to read the introductory material for books before diving in. It gives one a hint of the author's personal thinking, motivations, and other insights. In this preface the authors explain how the book was put together, with the input from individuals as well as corporate involvement, including 'focus' or discussion groups addressing the topic of 'Continuous Learning: what does it mean?'.

I found this statement about the rapidity of ongoing change to be thought-provoking: 'These changes raise the potential of rewards for those with insight' (Sessa & London, 2006: ix). The authors define learning for each of the three categories (individual, group, and organization), and talk about its importance. They also state that their purpose is…… [Read More]

References

Sessa, V.I. & London, M. (2006). Continuous Learning in Organizations: Individual, Group, and Organizational Perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. ISBN: 0-8058-5018-X.
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Slda Revisions

Words: 2900 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2425791

Self-Directed Learning Activities -- December

Self-Directed Learning Activities Recording Sheet

Student Dianisia White Term Fall 2010 Date: December 14, 2010

Tracking Sheet

Date of Activity

Duration of Activity

Relevant Quadrant

Met with Justice Manager with Miawpukek First Nation

-hour

Quadrant A, B & C

Healing Circle -- Pre-charge for people in conflict with the law.

hours

Quadrant A, B, C, D

Met Director of Health & Social Services & the community social worker with Miawpukek First Nations regarding mental health

hours

Quadrant A, B, & C

Attended Miawpukek First Nation Annual General Assembly -- (Emphasis on Justice; Health & Social Services)

hours

Quadrant A, B, C, D

Nov 20/10

Viewed Documentary "Kanehsatake 270 Years of Resistance" regarding the 1990 armed standoff of a small group of Mohawk Indians in Kanehsatake Canada.

hours

Quadrant A

Nov 24/10

Viewed Documentary "Griefwalker" 2008 about a counsellor who counsels patients on how to accept…… [Read More]

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Preferences in Learning Between American

Words: 23082 Length: 65 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88878710

The trainer will then focus on the steps to be taken to develop new skills. For example, if the trainer wants to talk about motivating, leading, negotiating, selling or speaking, it is best to start with what the learners do well before showing some chart on Maslow's theory, Posner's leadership practices, or selling skills from some standard package that has been develop elsewhere. Many foreign trainers make grave errors because they do not consider the values and beliefs of the trainee's culture. Training must make a fit with the culture of those being trained, including the material being taught, as well as the methods being used (Schermerhorn, 1994).

Abu-Doleh (1996) reports that Al-Faleh (1987), in his study of the culture influences on management development, asserts that "a country's culture has a great influence on the individual and managerial climate, on organizational behaviour, and ultimately on the types of management development…… [Read More]

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Adults With Learning Disabilities it Has Been

Words: 14280 Length: 53 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 855258

Adults ith Learning Disabilities

It has been estimated (Adult with Learning Disabilities) 1 that 50-80% of the students in Adult Basic Education and literacy programs are affected by learning disabilities (LD). Unfortunately, there has been little research on adults who have learning disabilities, leaving literacy practitioners with limited information on the unique manifestations of learning disabilities in adults.

One of the major goals of the (Adult with Learning Disabilities) 1 National

Adult Literacy and Learning Disabilities Center (National ALLD Center) is to raise awareness among literacy practitioners, policy makers, researchers, and adult learners about the nature of learning disabilities and their impact on the provision of literacy services. This fact sheet provides: a definition of learning disabilities in adults; a list of common elements found in many useful LD definitions; and a list of areas in which LD may affect life situations of adults.

Background

In 1963, the term "learning…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Author Unkown. Adult with Learning Disabilities

http://www.niwl.org/nalldc/ALLDissues.html

Corley, Mary Ann & Taymans, Juliana M. Adults with Learning Disabilities:A Review of Literature

http://www.josseybass.com/cda/cover/0,0787960624%7Cexcerpt,00.pdf