Sickle Cell Anemia Essays (Examples)

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Sickle Gene Therapies for Sickle

Words: 1128 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95693355

Implications for ongoing research into genetic therapies and side effects/later developments are discussed at length.

Yannaki, E. & Stamatoyannopoulos, G. (2010). Hematopoietic stem cell mobilization strategies for gene therapy of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1202: 59-63.

Though the clinical trial these two researchers are involved in does not yet have results that are ready for publication, the review of the risks they provide regarding the use of stem cell mobilization with G-CSF in patients with sickle cell is highly useful information. So, too, is the practice of pre-treating patients with hydroxyurea before administering the stem cell treatment, which the authors describe in detail and which forms the basis of the related clinical trial. Potential reduction of risks appears to be quite promising, though final results from the clinical trial and other supporting evidence will of course be required.

Ye, L.,…… [Read More]

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Stem Cells Without a Doubt One of

Words: 2215 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2707824

Stem Cells

ithout a doubt, one of the most controversial topics of popular discourse is stem cell research. Indeed, one would be hard pressed to peruse the newspaper or magazine stand without encountering some reference to the global stem cell debate -- but what, exactly, are stem cells, and why are they so controversial?

Stem cells intended for use in human applications are harvested from humans, umbilical cords and embryos. The reason these cells are so valuable is because of their capability to produce or "become" other cell types -- for example, brain cells, heart cells, skin, etc. In short, these are "master cells," holding the ability to divide in cultures, and to be manipulated allowing it to transform into any type of cell. Of course, this is extremely important due to the fact that scientists can use this capability to either create organs (thereby helping to meet the tremendous…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hall, MiMi and Kiely, Kathy. "Proponents of Stem-Cell Research Put on Pressure." USA Today. Online. July 2001. 10 April 2002. Retrieved from Web site on 15 March, 2004<[

http://www.usatoday.com/news/washdc/july01/2001-07-27-stemcell.htm. Michael J. Fox Foundation.

Laino, Charlene. "Navel 'seeds' Sprout Brain Tissue." MSNBC. Online. Feb. 2002. 20 Feb 2002. Retrieved from Web site on 15 March, 2004 http://www.msnbc.com/news/532672.asp

Rosenberg, Samuel and Civin, Curt. "Scientific Debates Best Left to States." SunSpot.net. Online. April 2002. 09 April 2002. Retrieved from Web site on 15 March, 2004 http://sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.cloning05apr.story.htm
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Stem Cell Cience Must Be

Words: 852 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86882230



Unfortunately, a tremendous amount of valuable research has been put on hold ever since the ban of federal funding for stem cell research. In the United States, the vast majority of medical research of all types that eventually lead to cures for disease are funded by the federal government. The federal ban on stem cell research does not completely prohibit it, but the effect is nearly the same, just as it would be if the federal government withdrew funding for cancer or diabetes research.

The main opposition to stem cell research comes from the Religious Right who believe that any form of research using fetal stem cells is wrong, because according to their religious views, every fertilized human egg should be considered as much a human being as any living person, even a microscopic zygote consisting of nothing more than four cells of human tissue. Certainly, the concept of religious…… [Read More]

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Hydroxyurea Segal J B Et Al 2008 Hydroxyurea

Words: 990 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99155433

Hydroxyurea

Segal, J.B., et al., (2008), Hydroxyurea for the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease,

Baltimore, MD: AHRQ

Variables/Key Concepts

To determine efficacy, effectiveness, harms, and barriers of the use of hydroxyurea treatment of sickle cell disease for determining solutions and further research need.

Sampling

Research studies based on variables.

Conducted by experts in sickle cell disease management, clinical trial methodology, systematic review, epidemiological studies, and ethics and adherence research.

Instruments/Data Collection

Instruments were quality assessment, data extraction, and evidence grading. Literature inclusion tailored toward research questions. Studies on children and adults evaluated separately. Included randomized trials, non-randomized trials, cohort studies with control groups, and pre/post studies. Evaluations of data was based on variable-based research questions.

Results

Hydroxyurea lowered the rate of hospitizations among children with sickle cell disease and raised HbF cell percentages.

Strengths/Limitations

Limited evidence for toxicity, barriers, and guide dosing. Insufficient evidence for efficacy and safety.

Critique

Even…… [Read More]

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Student Degree Health Adminstration I Worked a

Words: 539 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50970112

student, degree Health Adminstration. I worked a health care staffing supervisor 10 years. personal experience incorporated paper fact husband sickle cell anemia I cared 20 years.

I have always been drawn to helping people, both in my life and in my career pursuits. In planning the next phase of my life, I wanted to follow a path which would allow me to better the lives of others while also learning new things every day. I have come to realize that nursing is the profession that suits me best because of my interests, my experience, and my goals.

A degree in nursing would be the second degree that I have pursued. My first degree was in Health Administration. I chose to study that field because I knew that I wanted to work in a health care setting, where my actions would be at least indirectly responsible for aiding in the well-being…… [Read More]

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Case Study Identification and Rationale of Disease

Words: 618 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63590215

Alterations of Hematology and Cardiovascular Systems

Sickle Cell Anemia

Ms. A is suffering from Sickle cell anemia. In this disease, the red blood cells appear in the shape of sickles or letter C. The normal red blood cells are disk-shaped. The disk-shape allows them to move smoothly in the blood vessels. Normal red blood cells have hemoglobin. The hemoglobin is responsible the red color. It helps in the transportation of oxygen. Sickle cells, on the other hand, have abnormally low hemoglobin, which results in the C-shape. This form is sticky and stiff and so cannot move easily through the blood vessels. Ms. A's condition was a case of Menorrhagia as well as dysmenorrhea. The sickle cells lump together and block the flow of blood through the blood vessels leading to the organs and the limbs. Such blocked blood vessels may lead to pain, infections and even organ damage (Health 24,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Health24. (2014, APRIL 30). The seven types of anaemia. Retrieved from Health24.com: http://www.health24.com/Lifestyle/Your-Blood/Anaemia-20130216-2

UoM. (n.d.). Sickle cell disease. Retrieved from University of maryland: https://umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/sickle-cell-disease
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Hemolytic Disease of the Newborn

Words: 2311 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51187925

History of Pediatric Hemolytic Monitoring

Retrospect to the career of physician, Dr. James A. olff I and his early progress in treatment of Rh hemolytic disease as described in Pochedly (1984), looks at the development of interest in hematology in European field hospitals during orld ar II. After the war period, the transformation of olff's research in this area was advanced by research conducted during a pediatric residency at the Boston Children's Hospital, between 1945 and 1947. During his tenure at Children's he was engaged with Dr. Louis Diamond in his seminal investigation on treatment of erythroblastosis fetalis by exchange transfusion.

Collaborative efforts with Drs. Diamond and Farber focused on preliminary clinical trials of aminopterin for the treatment of acute leukemia, of which olff was in observation. Instrumental to the development of the concept of treating erythroblastosis fetalis by exchange transfusion; collaborative in the area of pathophysiology of disease where…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Al-Eisa, A. And Al-Hajeri, M. Hemolytic uremic syndrome in Kuwaiti Arab children. Pediatric Nephrology 16.12 (2001): 1093-1098.

Blouin, P. et al. Syndrome d'Evans: etude retrospective de la societe d'hematologie et d'immunologie pediatrique (36 cas). Archives De Pediatrie: Organe Officiel De La Societe Francaise De Pediatrie 12.11 (2005): 1600-1607.

Feldman, S.D. And Tauber, A.I. Sickle Cell Anemia: Reexamining the First "Molecular Disease." Bulletin of the History of Medicine 71.4 (1997) 623-650

Friedmann, A.M. et al. Fatal autoimmune hemolytic anemia in a child due to warm-reactive immunoglobulin M. antibody. Journal Of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology: Official Journal Of The American Society Of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology 20.5 (1998): 502-505.
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Genomic Medicine

Words: 741 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65995336

Human Genome Project

Launched in 1990 as a collaborative initiative between the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Department of Energy, the Human Genome Project completed its goal ahead of time despite the enormous challenges that were involved (Greene, 2006). The goals of the Human Genome Project included developing comprehensive genetic and physical maps of the human genome in order to determine the complete nucleotide sequence of the three billion base pairs that make up the human DNA and to identify the estimated 100,000 genes that are contained within the human genome (Greene, 2006). To determine the importance and implications of the HGP, this paper reviews the relevant literature, followed by a summary of the research and salient findings concerning this initiative in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion

1)

How will research in the Human Genome Project further medical research? What disorders are most likely to benefit from the…… [Read More]

References

Burnes, D.P. & Antle, B.J. (2008, August). Mothers raising children with sickle cell disease at the intersection of race, gender, and illness stigma. Health and Social Work, 33(3), 211-

Greene, L.A. (2006, January). Human Genome Project information. Environmental Health

Perspectives, 109(1), 19.

Human Genome Project. (2015). National Portfolio Online Reporting Tools. Retrieved from http://report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/ViewFactSheet.aspx?csid=45&key=H#H.
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Cultural Differences That Surface When

Words: 2655 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50518383

These, then, eventually die leaving the transfer of oxygen in your blood being absolutely limited and far below the point at which the flow of oxygen needs to be in a human body. The flow of blood and transfer of oxygen eventually slows down tremendously and can cause terrible pain as well as make the immune system to be vulnerable to a variety of different diseases. There are many medical procedures that can allow the individual to find a relief (Lozoff et al., 2003).

In our case study, we will mainly highlight how the mother's approach was tentative and skeptical and how the four points that have been mentioned initially (communication, social organization, spatial dynamics and locus of control) are impacted through her approach. The first important thing to note about the attitude of the mother is that she does seem very forthcoming to find out as much as she…… [Read More]

References

Black R. (2003) Micronutrient deficiency -- an underlying cause of morbidity and mortality. Bulletin of World Health Organization, 81:79.

Dr Izumi, S., (2008) Japanese Patients' Descriptions of 'The Good Nurse', accessed on February 28, 2009.

Kino*****a, J., & Palevsky, N. (1992) Gateway to Japan (Rev. ed.). Tokyo: Kodansha International.

Lozoff B, De Andraca I, Castillo M, Smith JB, Walter T, Pino P. (2003) Behavioral and developmental effects of preventing iron-deficiency anemia in healthy full-term infants. Pediatrics.112:846-854.
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Race Genetics

Words: 658 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58844915

ace and Genetics

On the surface, race seems like a legitimate way of categorizing human beings. Physical characteristics are passed down from parent to child, thereby recreating racial markers. However, the concept of race is generally rooted in ignorance. ace is an ephemeral construction, and genetic science is proving this to be so. If race were real, then there would be ways of tracing different races back to a few ancestors: such as an ancestral Polynesian, ancestral African, and ancestral Jew. As it stands, though, all human beings trace ancestry to the same basic gene pool from humanoid ancestors in Africa. This one fact alone is sufficient to debunk the concept that race "exists," or is a form of biological determinism. There are other reasons to believe that race is not as real as was once thought. ace is not real, and the reasons are rooted in genetic science, anthropology,…… [Read More]

References

Adelman, L. (2003). Race and gene studies: what differences make a difference? Retrieved online:  http://www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-background-01-02.htm 

Entine, J. (2012). Jews Are a 'Race,' Genes Reveal. The Jewish Daily Forward. Retrieved online: http://forward.com/articles/155742/jews-are-a-race-genes-reveal/?p=all
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Premarital Screening Program in Saudi Arabia

Words: 5506 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71851874

Edit Research Premarital Screening

Evaluating Premarital Screening Knowledge in Saudi Students

The purpose of this research was to investigate the impact of premarital screening (PMS) in Saudi Arabia. The use of PMS as a means to identify and approach both and infectious and hereditary disease was investigated in order to determine the impact of this practical approach.

A cross-sectional study was conducted at Jazan University from January to June 2014 to perform this research. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 1000 Jazan University Students, both males and females. The questionnaire consisted of 3 main parts. The first part was based on socio-demographic data, the second part dealt with the students' knowledge about the premarital screening program while the third part explored their attitudes towards the screening program.

Results

The vast majority of the participants (922; 94%) believed that a PMS program was a preventive measure. More than two thirds of…… [Read More]

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Genetic Screening

Words: 2160 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55745991

Genetic screening is one of the most controversial topics in the scientific arena today. The advent of the Human Genome Project, which maps the complete human genetic code, has brought this issue to the forefront. This paper will discuss the basic science that underlies genetic screening, applications of genetic screening, and investigate some of the common misconceptions and ethical questions about its use.

Genetic screening itself is simply "the systematic search within a population for persons possessing particular genotypes, which are either associated with disease, predisposing to disease, or leading to disease in descendants" (Miller). In simpler terms, genetic screening involves testing and determining whether "an individual's genetic material to predict present or future disability or disease either for oneself or one's offspring" (McCarrick). Essentially, genetic screening is conducted for several basic reasons, including the care of the ill and the prevention of disease, providing reproductive information, determining the incidence…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alberts, Bruce. 2002. Molecular biology of the cell, 4th ed. New York: Garland Science.

Genetic Science Learning Center. 2004. Genetic Disorder Corner. University of Utah. 07 May 2004. http://gslc.genetics.utah.edu/units/disorders/

McCarrick, Pat Milmoe. 1993.Genetic Testing and Genetic Screening. Scope Note 22. National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature, Georgetown University, 1993. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal (KIEJ), Reprinted September 1993, 17 p. (Last updated February 2002). 07 May 2004. http://www.georgetown.edu/research/nrcbl/scopenotes/sn22.html

Miller, Kelly. 1999. Genetic Screening. Phil McClean, Professor, Ph.D. Colorado State University, PLSC 431/631 - Intermediate Genetics. 07 May 2004. http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/instruct/mcclean/plsc431/students99/miller.htm. The mundane by excellent cinematography and an effective cast.
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Maternity Nursing Labor and Delivery and Newborn

Words: 3389 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35692201

Maternity Nursing, Labor & Delivery / Newborn

Labor and Delivery Terms

Para: Para refers to the number of live births a woman has had (it might be a stillbirth, or twins, or even triplets) past the 20-week gestation period (Zimmerman, p. 116).

Gravida: this refers to the number of times a woman has been pregnant, whether she actually gave birth, had an abortion or a stillbirth (Zimmerman, p. 116).

Amniotic Sac: this is a membrane around which the fetus is surrounded. It is a strong series of membranes that is visible after 7 weeks of gestation. (Jurkovic, et al., 2011).

Cervical Effacement: this phrase refers to the measurement of the expansion of the cervix as the baby gets closer to being born. hen the cervix is 50% effaced, it is halfway to being ready for the baby to be born (Jurkovic, et al., 2011).

Cervical dilation: Slowly but surely the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Encyclopedia Britannica. (2010). Childbirth. Retrieved August 17, 2011, from http://www.britannica.com/bps/search?query=childbirth.

Heller, Michelle E., and Veach, Lynette M. (2008). Clinical Medical Assisting: A Professional,

Field Smart Approach to the Workplace. Florence, KY: Cengage Learning.

Jailkhani, R., Patil, VS., Laxman, HB, Shivashankara, AR, Kulkarni, SP, and Ravindra, MS.
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Strokes and African Americans

Words: 4072 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81628730

Strokes and African-Americans

African-Americans are reported to be nearly twice as likely to experience a stroke as their white counterparts however, African-Americans are much less likely to know the risk-factors and symptoms of stroke or to seek early treatment. The purpose of this study is to examine the issue of African-Americans and stroke. The significance of this study is the additional knowledge that will be added to the already existing base of knowledge in this area of study. The methodology employed in this study is of a qualitative and interpretive nature and has been conducted through a review of literature in this area of study.

Strokes and African-Americans

African-Americans are reported to be nearly twice as likely to experience a stroke as their white counterparts however, African-Americans are much less likely to know the risk-factors and symptoms of stroke or to seek early treatment.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose…… [Read More]

References

National Stroke Association (2010) What is Stroke? Retrieved from: http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=STROKE

The Office of Minority Health (2010) U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Retrieved from: http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/content.aspx?ID=3022

National Stroke Association (2010) African-Americans and Stroke. Retrieved from: http://www.stroke.org/site/PageServer?pagename=AAMER

Neipris, Louis (1998) African-Americans and Stroke Risk. My Optum Health. Retrieved from: http://www.wtvm.com/global/story.asp?s=12834243
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Applying the Nursing Process to

Words: 3260 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69113498

Therefore, a nurse must be fully aware of these sensitivities when providing care to a patient, especially when the patient is a member of cultural group from outside the U.S.

The third criteria is social organization. For example, most African-American families tend to be based on a matriarchal system with either the mother or another female member of the family serving as its leader. This matriarch may also serve as the source for advice on certain

family matters; of course, the patriarch of the family (i.e., the father figure) also plays a role in family decision-making. Thus, most African-American families are composed of a support network made up of mothers, fathers and other close relatives, something which often creates tension and dissent. In this respect, a nurse must be aware of this matriarchal system and its network in such a way as to gain the trust of family members when…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Duncan, Veronica. (2005). Towards achieving maat: communication patterns in african-american, european-american and interracial relationships. New York:

Kendall-Hunt.

Giger, Joyce and Ruth Davidhizer. (2004). Transcultural nursing: assessment and intervention. Philadelphia: Elsevier Health Sciences.

Glanze, Walter D. (2005). Mosby's nursing and allied health encyclopedia. 8th ed.
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Improving the Quality of Medical

Words: 4818 Length: 18 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29120759

This is particularly the case in sub-Saharan Africa where clinicians have often come to rely on signs and symptoms alone to make diagnoses." (Nicoll, Walraven, Kigadye, Klokke, 1995)

The laboratory environment is critical to administering testing to determine population rates of HIV / AIDS throughout nations and perhaps continents where the lacking of resources facilitates a substandard environment for care. In the case of the African nation of Mozambique, which perhaps can be understood as a case indicative of the environmental assessment one would find throughout Africa and therefore, can be labelled to be a median statistical nation. A nation representing the median would indicate that half of the population nations that are categorized as resourced deficient, half would be above Mozambique in terms of resource allocation and half would fall below.

esearch into the quality of HIV / AIDS case-detection and case-reporting system in Mozambique was conducted by (Chilundo,…… [Read More]

References

Chappuis, F., Loutan, L., Simarro, P., Lejon, V., and Buscher, P. Options for Field Diagnosis of Human African Trypanosomiasis. Clinical Microbiology Reviews, January 2005, p. 133-146, Vol. 18, No.1

Chilundo, B., Sundeep S., Sundby J. The Quality of HIV / AIDS case-detection and case reporting systems in Mozambique. African Journal of AIDS Research 2004, 145-155. Copyright NISC Pty Ltd.

Clark. Blood Safety PPT. CDC, WHO

Loefler, I. Surgical wound infection in the Third World: the African experience. Journal of Medical Microbiology. Volume 47, 471-473. 1998. The Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland
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Business Law Discuss the Doctrine

Words: 1088 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35418091

A company cannot refuse to hire someone with sickle cell anemia (a disease that primarily affects persons of African ancestry), because the person might require costly health insurance, for so long as the person was strong enough to perform the job, discrimination would not be acceptable as it would affect persons disproportionately of one racial category.

Question

Explain trade secret and how it could be protected legally and in day-to-day operations. Provide an example.

According to Nolo.com, an online legal dictionary, a trade secret is:

in] most states, a formula, pattern, physical device, idea, process, compilation of information or other information that 1) provides a business with a competitive advantage, and 2) is treated in a way that can reasonably be expected to prevent the public or competitors from learning about it, absent improper acquisition or theft" ("trade secret, 2007, Nolo.com). Perhaps the most famous trade secret in business is…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Elias, Stephen. (1998)."Trade Secret Law: Overview." Nolo Press. Retrieved 8 Apr 2007 at:  http://www.marketingtoday.com/legal/tradesec.htm#1 

Estoppel." (2007). Nolo.com. Retrieved 8 Apr 2007 at http://www.nolo.com/definition.cfm/term/7F1E56D5-7EC1-4CEB-86B3943F6990FF77

Messiha, Dominic J. & Hillary R. Ross. (May 2006). "EEOC Revises Compliance

Manual to Target More 'Contemporary' Forms of Discrimination." ASAP: Littler Mendelson Time Sensitive Newsletter. Retrieved 8 Apr 2007 at http://www.littler.com/collateral/print/61A7D18C32514B88187D50664174D11F.html
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Cholecystitis Biliary Colic and Cholecystitis Are in

Words: 1392 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49859266

Cholecystitis

Biliary colic and cholecystitis are in the spectrum of gallbladder disease, ranging from asymptomatic gallstones to biliary colic, cholecystitis, choledocholithiasis, and cholangitis (Santen pp). hen gallstones temporarily obstruct the cystic duct or pass through into the common bile duct, gallstones become symptomatic and biliary colic develops, however, if the cystic duct or common bile duct becomes obstructed for hours or gallstones irritate the gallbladder, then cholecystitis develops, and when the stones become lodged in the common bile duct, choledocholithiasis occurs, resulting in possible cholangitis and ascending infections (Santen pp).

Cholecystitis is an inflammation of the gallbladder caused by obstruction, usually a gallstone, of the cystic duct, and the inflammation may be sterile or bacterial and the obstruction may be acalculous or caused by sludge (Santen pp). Bacterial infection is believed to be a consequence, not a cause, of cholecystitis, approximately 75% of bile cultures are positive, with the most…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Kato, Norman S. (2004, July 14). Acute cholecystitis. Retrieved July 03, 2005 from National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Web site: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000264.htm

Cholecystitis. (1996). The Mosby Medical Encyclopedia. Retrieved July 03, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site.

Keeffe, Emmet B. 2000, March 15. Management of Gallstones and Their Complications.

American Family Physician. Retrieved July 03, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site.
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Africans Had Poor Health Care in the

Words: 1577 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90177845

Africans had poor health care in the 1950s

There is much that still remains swept under the proverbial carpet about America's treatment to its African immigrants. One of the chapters, little known and often left untold has only recently started to emerge and concerns American health care system and its using Blacks as guinea pigs.

Attorney and author Vernellia . Tandall tells the story in her book 'Dying While Black' showing how America's health care system was built on the bodies of African-American individuals from the 19th century continuing to present days. Some f the information is unbelievable at best shocking at worst such as her allegations that AIDS was created by a government-sanctioned health care for the purposes of medical advancement.

Countless stories from Black residents of both North and South tell about how they were unwillingly and unknowingly abducted and exploited for medical experiments. There were the 'night…… [Read More]

References

Brooking Institute (2008) "Meeting the Dilemma of Health Care Access" (PDF). Opportunity 08: A Project of the Brookings Institution. Retrieved on 2/19/2011

http://www.opportunity08.org/Files/FD.ashx?guid=98a417e5-5972-4031-b361-e11e00981f55

Orlando Sentinel. (Dec., 04. 1993). Clinic On Wheels To Take Health Care To Elderly Poor . retreived 11/7/2011 from  http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/1993-12-04/news/9312040190_1_clinic-project-care-seniors 

Skloot, H. (2010) The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks NY. Random House.
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Marketing Case Study Explain What You Think

Words: 1206 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11966605

Marketing Case Study

Explain what you think would be an appropriate promotions strategy for both of them. In doing so compare and contrast the two promotions strategies explaining why you think they would be similar or different.

NINE POSSIBLE PODUCT -- MAKET COMBINATIONS

POSSIBLE TAGET MAKETS

GAY MEN O WOMEN

BLACK WOMEN AGED 18-30

HANDGUN OWNES

PODUCT CATEGOIES

VACATIONS

NON-LETHAL PESONAL SECUITY PODUCTS

FITNESS / EXECISE PODUCTS

More than one billion adults worldwide are overweight. In the United States alone obesity is responsible for an estimated 300,000 deaths annually. What's interesting is that nearly all of these deaths are preventable through proper exercise and nutrition. As such, fitness is a very contentious issue plaguing many of the developed nations worldwide. Statistics indicate that nearly 33% of all Americas are obese. This bodes very well in regards to marketing as 1 in 3 Americans could use the fitness and exercise related…… [Read More]

References

1. Swarming the shelves: How shops can exploit people's herd mentality to increase sales." The Economist. 2006-11-11. p. 79-90.

2. Kotler, Armstrong, Philip, Gary. Principles of Marketing. (2011)Pearson education.

3. Joshi, Rakesh, (2005) International Marketing, Oxford University Press, New Delhi and New York ISBN 0-19-567123-6
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Healthcare Leadership & Prejudices Healthcare

Words: 1543 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3466094



Conclusion

Prejudice and ethical/leadership issues with healthcare are nothing new but the fight to keep those standards and ethics on an even keel and prevent racism, bigotry and predudice of any sort including based on class, money, political ideology, nationalism, and so forth should be stomped out and eviscerated whenever it can be. People are people and should treated with dignity and respect regardless of their race, gender, beliefs and so forth. Even convicted murderers and rapists should not be treated disdain due to their actions because doing otherwise lowers the ethics and standards of the healthcare community that can and should still apply at all times.

eferences

Callahan, M. (2008). Healthcare providers constricted by financial, legislative, and regulatory issues. The Journal of Medical Practice Management: MPM, 24(3),

143-146.

Cobaugh, D., Angner, E., Kiefe, C., ay, M., Lacivita, C., Weissman, N., & ... Allison, J.

(2008). Effect of racial differences…… [Read More]

References

Callahan, M. (2008). Healthcare providers constricted by financial, legislative, and regulatory issues. The Journal of Medical Practice Management: MPM, 24(3),

143-146.

Cobaugh, D., Angner, E., Kiefe, C., Ray, M., Lacivita, C., Weissman, N., & ... Allison, J.

(2008). Effect of racial differences on ability to afford prescription medications.
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Ethics of Human Cloning in 1971 Nobel

Words: 3026 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65746623

Ethics of Human Cloning

In 1971, Nobel Prize winning-scientist James atson wrote an article warning about the growing possibility of a "clonal man." Because of both the moral and social dangers cloning posed to humankind, atson called for a worldwide ban on any research leading to cloning technology (atson 8).

Until then, cloning had been largely relegated to the realm of science fiction. Scientific research concerning cloning and in vitro fertilization was obtuse and technical, and hardly written about in the news. atson, however, was a highly-respected scientist, a Harvard professor famous for his discovery of the double helix structure of the DNA. The article he wrote sparked an intense debate over cloning, a debate that was renewed with the 1996 birth of Dolly the lamb, the first cloned mammal.

The argument no longer centers on whether cloning is possible, but on whether cloning is ethical. This paper examines the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Annas, George. "Scientific Discoveries and Cloning: Challenges for Public Policy." Flesh of My Flesh: The Ethics of Cloning Humans. Gregory E. Pence, ed. Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998.

Bailey, Ronald. "Cloning is Ethical." Ethics. Brenda Stalcup, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2000.

Garcia, Jorge L.A. "Cloning Humans is Not Ethical." The Ethics of Genetic Engineering. Lisa Yount, ed. San Diego: Greenhaven Press, 2002.

Kass, Leon. "The Wisdom of Repugnance." Flesh of My Flesh: The Ethics of Cloning Humans. Gregory E. Pence, ed. Oxford: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998.
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Sexual Enhancement Viagra Levitra and

Words: 1669 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74006254

(American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. 2009 )

IV. Side Effects of Sildenafil

Side effects of taking Sildenafil include those as follows:

headache heartburn diarrhea flushing (feeling of warmth)

nosebleeds difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep numbness, burning, or tingling in the arms, hands, feet, or legs muscle aches changes in color vision (seeing a blue tinge on objects or having difficulty telling the difference between blue and green)

sensitivity to light (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. 2009 )

Serious side effects are the following and occurrence of this requires immediate notification of the physician:

sudden severe loss of vision (see below for more information)

blurred vision sudden decrease or loss of hearing ringing in ears

erection that is painful or lasts longer than 4 hours dizziness or lightheadedness fainting chest pain worsening shortness of breath itching or burning during urination rash (American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. 2009…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Sildenafil (2009) AHFS Consumer Medication Information. American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Online available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/bookshelf/br.fcgi?book=meds&log$=drug_bottom_one&part=a699015

Swearingen, S. And Klausner, J. (2009) Sildenafil Use, Sexual Risk Behavior, and Risk for Sexually Transmitted Diseases including HIV infection. The American Journal of Medicine, Vol. 118, Issue 6. Online available at: http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002934305000860

Rosenfeld, Dana and Faircloth, Christopher a. (2006) Medicalized Masculinities. Temple University Press 2006. Online available at: http://books.google.com/books?id=8rXT7-EL0jcC&dq=SEXUAL+ENHANCEMENT:+viagra,+levitra+and+cialis&lr=&source=gbs_navlinks_s

Loe, Meika (2004) the Rise of Viagra: How the Little Blue Pill Changed Sex in America. NYR Press 2004. Online available at: http://books.google.com/books?id=h25piGXAHukC&dq=SEXUAL+ENHANCEMENT:+viagra,+levitra+and+cialis&lr=&source=gbs_navlinks_s
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Speech on the Benefits of

Words: 1420 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1325449



Since the war in Iraq, thousands of American soldiers have been injured, and some of them paralyzed by explosions that shattered their spinal columns.

Traumatic paralysis is often irreversible because the network of nerves in the human spinal cord cannot repair themselves when they are badly damaged.

Applications of cloning technology will allow us to grow new nerve tissue for implantation into damaged spinal cords to restore their functions (Sagan, 1997).

Seventh Point - Cloned Human Organs Can Save Thousands of Lives Every Year:

Medical applications of cloning technology already allows doctors to grow human skin for burn victims.

The exact same technology will allow us to make human organs by actually cloning the cells from the same person to make replacement organs (Soares, 2002).

This means an end to long waiting lists for donor organs and will make the difference between life and death for thousands of people every…… [Read More]

References

Krock, L. (2001) on Human Cloning: Three Views. (NOVA/PBSonline)

Accessed November 1, 2007 at www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/baby/cloning.html

Sagan, C. (1997) Billions and Billions: Thoughts on Life and Death at the Brink of the Millennium. Random House: New York

Soares, C. Why Human Clones Won't Work Yet. Discover (Jan/02)
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Phenotype How Variations Arise Within a Phenotype

Words: 1091 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81307836

Phenotype

How variations arise within a phenotype?

Phenotype is the specific characteristics that are displayed by the organism. Phenotypic variation is a prerequisite for evolution due to natural selection, thus without the former, there is no latter. Qualitative traits are traits that show a difference between phenotypes like skin color, sex, and eye color. However, such descriptions are controlled by a small number of genes so environmental influence on these traits is low since it involves the genetics of individuals. Quantitative traits are traits that exhibit a continuous range from one phenotype to another. Therefore, there is no difference between phenotypes and are usually influenced by several gene pairs while the environment has a significant influence on the trait. This type of trait involves the genetics of populations. It is a combination of genetic and environmental factors to produce phenotypes that blend into each other. Phenotypic variance or VP is…… [Read More]

References

Bellevue College Science Division (2011) Mutation and Genetic Diseases, [online] Available at:  http://scidiv.bellevuecollege.edu/rkr/Biology211/lectures/pdfs/GeneticDisease211.pdf  [Accessed: 20 April 2011].

Biology 346-Evolution (2011) Chapter 13-Evolution of Phenotypic Traits, [online] Available at: www.cbu.edu/~esalgado/BIOL346/ch13.doc [Accessed: 20 April 2011].

Chicago Center for Jewish Genetic Disorders (2008) Intro to Genetics, [online] Available at: http://www.jewishgenetics.org/?q=content/intro-genetics [Accessed: 20 April 2011].

Grimmel College (2011) Lab 2 -- Sources of Phenotypic Variation, [online] Available at:  http://web.grinnell.edu/individuals/brownj/edu/136_lab2.html  [Accessed: 20 April 2011].
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Physical Life Science Genes Are

Words: 698 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53783681

During the gene decoding process the double stranded DNA splits up to reveal a single strand from which the base sequence of the gene is copied onto a single stranded nucleic acid known as the messenger ribonucleic acid or mRNA. This implies that we have an exact copy of the gene base in the mRNA except that Urasil (U) replaces the T. base and deoxyribose is replaced by ribose. Translation on the other hand is the actual process of protein synthesis from the mRNA strands. Ribosomes work with the mRNA for protein synthesis within the cells. [the State University of New York]

4) Mutation, Gene Migration, Genetic Drift, Non-random Mating and Natural Selection are the five processes that can affect the frequency of genes in a population. [CMGS]

5) Kindom Protista is considered to be the ancestor of all eukaryotic kingdoms and includes algae, plant like, animal like and fungus…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cherie Dimaline, "Inheriting Sickness When Finding Your Roots is a Matter of Life or Death" Accessed on 15th December 2004, http://www.metisnation.org/metisVOYAGEUR/MVcurrent/disease.html

Dr. Joseph F. Smith, "Genetic Counseling," Accessed on 15th December 2004, http://www.chclibrary.org/micromed/00049280.html

IBAC, "The Basics of Life," Accessed on 15th December 2004, http://www.ibac.org.nz/booklet/basics.html

CMGS, "Disturbance of Gene Frequencies in a Population," Accessed on 15th December 2004 http://www.ich.ucl.ac.uk/cmgs/genefreq.htm
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Management of Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Words: 3435 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7686776

Osteomyelitis in the Diabetic Patient

Management OF OSTEOMYELITIS IN THE DIABETIC PATIENT

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone or bone marrow which is typically categorized as acute, subacute or chronic.1 It is characteristically defined according to the basis of the causative organism (pyogenic bacteria or mycobacteria) and the route, duration and physical location of the infection site.2 Infection modes usually take one of three forms: direct bone contamination from an open fracture, puncture wound, bone surgery, total joint replacement, or traumatic injury; extension of a soft tissue infection such as a vascular ulcer; or hematogenous (blood borne) spread from other infected areas of the body such as the tonsils, teeth or the upper respiratory system.2(p807) Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli are the most common causative agents of the disease, although viruses, parasites and fungi may also lead to the development of osteomyelitis.3

Patients…… [Read More]

References

1. Stedman's Medical Dictionary. 27th ed. Baltimore, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2000.

2. Butalia S, Palda V, Sargeant R, Detsky A, Mourad O. Does This Patient With Diabetes Have Osteomyelitis of the Lower Extremity?. JAMA: Journal of The American Medical Association [serial online]. February 20, 2008; 299(7):806-813. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

3. Lavery L, Peters E, Armstrong D, Wendel C, Murdoch D, Lipsky B. Risk factors for developing osteomyelitis in patients with diabetic foot wounds. Diabetes Research & Clinical Practice [serial online]. March 2009; 83(3):347-352. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.

4. Turns M. The diabetic foot: an overview of assessment and complications. British Journal of Nursing [serial online]. August 12, 2011;:S19-S25. Available from: Academic Search Premier, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 19, 2012.
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Genetic Counseling

Words: 2111 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79630310

Genetic counseling involves the sharing vital information and knowledge by experienced and well trained experts in the field of genetics for individuals with high risks of suffering some genetic disorders or transferring it to their children. It is the responsibility of a genetic counselor to provide relevant information concerning the hereditary nature of certain diseases and their risks of reoccurrence; addresses the concerns of patients, their health care providers and their families; and lends assistance to both the patients suffering these hereditary ailments and their families.

The first genetic counseling center was the Hereditary Clinic established at the University of Michigan in the United States in 1940. Since then, several such centers have been established in different parts of the world.

Through genetic counseling, information is made available to give the needed support to people who are dealing with any genetic disorder or at risk of developing one. When dealing…… [Read More]

References

Brickell, K., Steinbart, E., Rumbaugh, M., Payami, H., Schellenberg, G., Deerlin, V. V.,... Bird, T. (2006). Early-onset Alzheimer disease in families with late-onset Alzheimer disease: a potential important subtype of familial Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol, 63(9), 1307-11.

Campion, D., Dumanchin, C., Hannequin, D., Dubois, B., Belliard, S., Puel, M.,... Frebourg, T. (1999). Early-onset autosomal dominant Alzheimer disease: prevalence, genetic heterogeneity, and mutation spectrum. Am J. Hum Genet, 65(3), 664-70.

CDC. (2015, March 3). Genetic Counselling. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/genetics/genetic_counseling.html

Goldman, J. S., MS, M., Hahn, S. E., Catania, J. W., Larusse-Eckert, S., Butson, M. B.,... Bird, T. (2011). Genetic counseling and testing for Alzheimer disease: Joint practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors. Genet Med, 13(6), 597 -- 605.
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Important Factors in Treating Huntington's Disease Patients

Words: 6558 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22789764

Huntington's disease (HD) was the first autonomic dominant disorder for which genetic prediction became possible" (Harper, et al., 2000, Journal of Medical Genetics, p. 567). HD is a disease that occurs due to an inherited disorder leading to the death of brain cells. A diagnosis of HD is accomplished through genetic testing which can be implemented at any age regardless of whether the symptoms manifest or not. Although, the specific symptoms vary between people, nevertheless, symptoms can start with people between 35 and 45 years of age and can also start in some individuals at even anearlier age. The disease may affect successive generations if health interventions are not implemented (Mandel, 2016).

Additionally, "the cause of HD is due to a dominant mutation of autosomal form of the gene called Huntington. This shows that a child born by an affected person has a 50% chance of developing or inheriting the…… [Read More]

References

Causes and risk factors. (2016). Health Communities. Retrieved from http://www. healthcommunities.com/huntingtons-disease/cause.shtml.

Denbo, S. M. (2013, January 1). Balancing the rights of children, parents and the state: The legal, ethical and psychological implications of genetic testing in children. Southern Journal of Business and Ethics, 5, 188-190.

Domaradzki, J. (2015, January 1). Lay constructions of genetic risk. A case-study of the Polish Society of Huntington's Disease. Polish Sociological Review, 189, 107-111.

Draper, B. (2004). Dealing with dementia: A Guide to Alzheimer's Disease and other dementias. Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin.
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Spirit Catches You the World

Words: 1976 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45402548

They cannot ignore the socioeconomic issues of adversity so often present and, where necessary, need to act as advocates, mediators and social brokers (Compton, Galaway, & Curnoyer, 2005).

The concern is that the issue of healthcare for culturally diverse individuals is so complex, there are no exact rights and wrongs. For example, in Fadiman's book, no person(s) can be said to be ultimately correct or incorrect in his/her behavior or actions; everyone did what he/she thought was right. In order to help others who have different cultural backgrounds and experiences, as the Hmong, it is essential to be 1) proactive. That is, to forecast the transforming demographics in the U.S. over the coming decades and put plans into place that will best serve these individuals and 2) collaborative. The best results occur when professionals from different backgrounds and expertise share best practices and learn from each other. What could have…… [Read More]

References

Compton, B., Galaway, B., & Curnoyer, B.R. (1994). Social work processes (7th ed.).

Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

Fadiman, Anne (1997) the Spirit Catches You, and You Fall Down. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Gladwell, M. (2002). The tipping point: How little things can make a big difference. Boston: Little Brown
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Ethics and Professional Responsibility in

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22912972

However, this form of racism rejects racial rights and instead calls for active racial competition among races towards achieving mastery and territorial dominance. This is a form of racial survival for the fittest in which there is no belief of the existence of racial rights (McCulloch 2010, p. 1).

Despite the negative connotation of racism, there is a need to have some form of racism, but in a positive manner. Arguably some form of racism is necessary. For example, there is a need to socially map and define the racial landscape and this cannot be done without the use of some form of racism. This has indeed been a historically compelled action because throughout history, racial lines have naturally existed between men and thus could not be ignored (Pataki & Levine 2004, p. 87-90). Therefore, it can be conclusively stated that the society cannot cast a blind eye to racism;…… [Read More]

In conclusion, the question as to whether all races should be considered equally goes back to considerations of ethical stands on whether there is actually a just preservation of individual rights, life and liberty. Racism is a naturally occurring phenomenon that has been widely understood to be a negative aspect in the society largely due to the manner in which it has been expressed through the Darwinian approach of competition among races; with each race seeking to dominate the other. In the end, this has led to social and economic inequalities as well as injustices throughout time thus giving the strong negative connotation of racism which is hence identified with suppression and denial of basic rights to some races. However, alongside this form of racism, there has always existed a form of racism that has been moral and considerate to the enhancement of justice and equality based on all races.

The Relevance of Ethics in Contexts of Military Conflicts

In basic terms, ethics comprise of all those standards by which an individual or group of individuals is expected to abide based on values. Hence ethical values basically take into consideration what is considered right or wrong and in that regard, such values prevail over values considered unethical when it comes to the ethical decision making process. As Annen and Royl (2010, p. 82) note, the relevance of familiarizing soldiers with the standards of moral behavior at the
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Rheumatic Fever

Words: 1197 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46012770

heumatic Fever

The Etiology, Incidence and Treatment of heumatic Fever Today

Like many diseases such as smallpox and polio, Zamula (1987) reports that until fairly recently, rheumatic fever was described by most public health officials as being a vanishing disease. "After World War II," Patlak (1991) reports, "the number of cases of rheumatic fever dramatically declined until, during the 20 years between 1965 and 1985 alone, the yearly number of cases of rheumatic fever among school-age children dropped by more than 90%" (p. 24). At the time, clinicians assumed that less crowded living conditions and the use of antibiotics were controlling the disease and some physicians called rheumatic fever a "vanishing disease in suburbia" (Patlak, p. 24). As a result, the children's hospitals that were previously dedicated to the care of rheumatic fever sufferers closed because of a lack of patients and disease registries that had been rigorously maintained by…… [Read More]

References

Arocha, J.F., & Patel, V.L. (1995). Novice diagnostic reasoning in medicine: Accounting for evidence. Journal of the Learning Sciences 4(4), 375.

Patlak, M. (1991, October). 'Strep' demands immediate care. FDA Consumer, 25(8), 24.

Zamula, E. (1987, July-August). Rheumatic fever: Down but not out. FDA Consumer, 21, 26.
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Jazz Biography

Words: 1126 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84589490

Miles Davis

One cannot think of Jazz without thinking of Miles Davis. Davis is widely regarded as one of the foremost jazz trumpeters. However, it would be a mistake to believe that Davis' influence on the world of jazz was limited to his abilities as a trumpeter. Davis was recognized as a composer, a bandleader, and a keyboard player. In addition, Davis helped develop improvisational playing techniques, which incorporated modes. Finally, "Davis had an uncanny ability of always selecting great sidemen for his recording sessions. These recordings are full of original and creative sensitivity and are outstanding examples of jazz recordings made at that time." (The Official Miles Davis Website, 2001).

If Davis' mother had her way, jazz music today would be dramatically different. Davis was born to Miles Henry Davis, a dentist, and Cleota Davis. Cleota Davis was a blues pianist, but she kept that fact hidden from her…… [Read More]

Referenced

Frankling, K. (1986). Miles Davis: life size. Retrieved November 9, 2005 from Jazzhouse.org

Web site:  http://www.jazzhouse.org/library/library2.php3?read=franckling1 

The Official Miles Davis Website. (2001). Biography. Retrieved November 9, 2005 from MilesDavis.com

Web site: http://www.milesdavis.com/bio.htm
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Science in Spite of Its

Words: 982 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64276502

Geneticists have been trying to unearth so-called founder mutations: one original genetic mutation that subsequently caused generations of people to carry and/or suffer from a serious illness like sickle cell anemia. Unlike many other mutations, founder mutations can be traced to one original ancestor. The discovery and study of founder mutations allows anthropologists to research the general patterns of human migration, providing a more complete understanding of history. Religion views genetic mutations in a different light. Many fundamentalist Christians, for example, might propose that disease is God-given. Yet if Mary Schweizer, an Evangelical Christian scientist, can unite religion with science then anyone can. Her devotion to fundamental Christian thought is not at odds with her scientific endeavors, according to Yeoman. In fact, Schweizer views science as a spiritual endeavor, as a means to discover the meaning of life, death, and seeming anomalies. Religion and science share common goals and objectives…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Atwood, Roger. "The Story of the Iraq Museum."

Davies, Paul. "That Mysterious Flow."

Drayna, Dennis. "Founder Mutations."

Stone, Richard. "Mystery Man of Stonehenge."
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Cobra Health Insurance Health Insurance How Cobra

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70972221

OBRA Health Insurance

Health Insurance

How OBRA Works

Davis was terminated from his employment because of long absence from work and not because he voluntarily resigned or any gross negligence on his part. Therefore, he and his family are eligible for health insurance coverage under the onsolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (OBRA) provided his company maintains its group health plan and still has 20 or more employees for which they currently have 100. If his former employer were to have fewer than 20 employees, then he might still be eligible for what is called mini-OBRA. The OBRA Act was put into law in 1986 in order to provide continuation of group health coverage for workers who have lost their jobs. The Act allows for the unemployed individual to avoid any gaps in coverage that would prevent them from having pre-existing conditions excluded once they were able to obtain group health…… [Read More]

Challenges Facing the State or Local Government

It has been estimated that 46 million Americans were uninsured in during 2006-2007 (Gulley, 2011 p. 368). Chronically ill adults often require expensive health care services, which put a drain on available resources available to provide health care to uninsured, low-income individuals. When these adults forego the care they need, they become sicker and will then require increased health services, which will incur additional expense. These expenses need to be covered somehow and under the law; hospitals cannot refuse to provide treatment to individuals who are in need of emergent care to save the life of or to stabilize a critically ill patient. State governments are required to fund programs such as Medicaid, which provides coverage for low-income persons who cannot afford to pay for health care. Individuals with chronic health issues that require extensive medical care cause a drain on that system. Studies have also shown that patients on Medicaid often are underinsured and receive a poorer quality of care, which has raised mortality rates among those individuals (McWilliams, p. 479).

A solution to providing better coverage to chronically ill patients would be to reform health care through the Affordable Care Act at the state level by opening up the availability of state-sponsored health insurance programs such as Medicaid. The state's have the option of receiving extra funding from the federal government, however some have chosen not to receive it. (Jacobi, 2011, p.69). In the case
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Home Computerized Medical Records Computerized Medical Records

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82065271

Home Computerized Medical ecords

Computerized Medical ecords

Advantages

One major advantage of computerizing medical records is that this method saves money and time for medical professionals. A traditional record system consists of files stored in a filing cabinet or other physical location. Files stored this way can easily become lost or displaced; the t time and resources to track down files that are missing can have a huge effect on the efficiency, effectiveness and revenue of the medical practice. Missing files can result in duplicate paperwork, lost time and productivity. For example, a medical office assistant that spends 20 hours a week searching for missing files, at an hourly rate of $15 costs the office over $14,000 a year in wasted time and money! Computerized medical records eliminate all these issues. With files kept in one database, they can be quickly located and retrieved. esulting in less rework and less…… [Read More]

References

Computerized medical records: Security, privacy, and confidentiality. (n.d.). Med League. Retrieved November 8, 2011, from www.medleague.com/blog/2010/10/13/computerized-medical-records-security-privacy-and-confidentiality

National-Academies.org | Newsroom. (n.d.). News. Retrieved November 8, 2011, from  http://www8.nationalacademies.org/onpinews/newsitem.aspx?RecordID=13269 

Safety risks seen in computerized medical records . (n.d.). STL Today. Retrieved November 8, 2011, from http://www.stltoday.com/news/national/safety-risks-seen-in-computerized-medical-records/article_3de79c9a-da52-5c83-8236-fcad7e0b6991.html#ixzz1dDxPqTTI

The Benefits, and Potential Side Effects, of Sharing Medical Records Online - Knowledge @ Wharton. (n.d.). Knowledge @ Wharton. Retrieved November 9, 2011, from http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article.cfm?articleid=1846
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Philosophy of Happiness Are There

Words: 2405 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69596797

eligion has the ability to give people hope especially the hopeless. Despite the harsh situations and challenges that people face, religion plays a fundamental role of giving them hope and optimism from which they draw strength. eligion is also an agent for socialization. It is no doubt meeting with other believers for religious events is more than just practicing faith (eeve 2006).

People use the opportunity to meet old friends and make new ones, sing together and above all socialize. Interactions can be a powerful source of happiness to individuals. eligion provides more than just individual hedonism to guide behavior. In essence, religion provides guidelines for faithful to follow and in the end live an orderly and moral life (Furness & Gilligan 2010). Even though people appear to be happier within the spheres of religion, many researchers show that people in relatively nonreligious nation are the happiest lot. Scandinavian societies…… [Read More]

References

Eid, Michael, & Larsen, Randy J. (2008). The Science of Subjective Well-being. Guilford Pubn.

Fitzgerald, J.T., Obbink, D., & Holland, G.S. (2003). Philodemus and the New Testament world. Leiden: Brill.

Furness, S., & Gilligan, P. (2010). Religion, belief and social work: Making a difference. Bristol:

Policy.
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Racial Categories

Words: 2065 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77554257

Fiction of ace

ace

ace: The cultural power of the fiction of race

A recent PBS documentary was titled ace: The power of an illusion. This underlines what constitutes race -- race is a fiction, created by the faulty observational perceptions of human beings, and the history of human culture. ace is not a scientific reality. Because we can see color (and hair texture, facial shapes, and other characteristics) we perceive something we call race. But our scientific knowledge tells us that race does not exist. This is not to deny that race is a very powerful fiction that has influenced human history. The idea of racial categories proved to be deadly and destructive to the lives and the cultures of indigenous peoples. It was used to validate slavery, genocide, colonialism, and exploitation. But race is not 'real,' any more than the idea of 'carrying the white man's burden' was…… [Read More]

References

Duster, Troy. (2005). Race and reification in science. Science, 307 (5712). 1050-1051.

Retrieved:

http://www.sciencemag.org/content/307/5712/1050.full?ijkey=CrQywbf6JKCIs&keytype=ref&siteid=sci

Garcia, Richard. (2003). The misuse of race in medical diagnosis. The Chronicle of Higher
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Scientist Cannot Simply Do Pure Research Because

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36155597

scientist cannot simply do "pure" research, because in almost all branches of science, there is no such thing. Science is embedded in our society, and when science is applied, it has repercussions that are broad-reaching, whether it is the discovery and application of a new drug, a new material, or a new type of computer or diagnostic tool. Therefore, scientists must understand the culture in which they are working, and advocate for the support of their research as well as its ethical application.

A case in point is genetic anthropology, a field of research that uses the human genome to trace our origins on this planet and also to understand the differences between groups of people. Subtle but consistent differences in our genome may lead to a deeper understanding not only of our origins and the way we spread out on this planet, but of genetic vulnerabilities to certain illnesses…… [Read More]

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Selective Mutism

Words: 1511 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16973602

Mutism

Parents not with great joy as their children meet important developmental milestones. oth first steps and first words are celebrated and described in detail to friends and family. ut sometimes as a child gets older, changes occur. Inexplicably, sometimes children who have talked for several years suddenly stop talking. Typically the child becomes selectively silent, talking animatedly with family and known friends but becoming mute at school or with strangers. When the problem is severe and exists over a period of time, the child may be diagnosed with selective mutism.

In one example, a child who was almost five years old started preschool, and after two weeks, refused to speak either to the teacher or his classmates. He also cried at arrival and would ask his parents to take him home. At home he spoke, but only to his mother, but clearly and in complete sentences. He communicated only…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fairbanks, Janet A. 1997. Systematic assessment of 50 children with selective mutism." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, May.

McCracken, James T. 2002. "Prevalence and description of selective mutism in a school-based sample." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Aug.

Rapin, Isabelle. 2001. "Selective mutism." Pediatrics, April.

Roberts, Susan Jo. 2002. "Identifying mutism's etiology in a child." The Nurse Practitioner 27:10, Oct.
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State Involvement in Healthcare

Words: 1640 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22131679

History Of State Involvement in the Delivery of Health Care

Eugenics

Eugenics is the belief and practice that involves the improvement of genetic quality of the human population.it is a science that deals with influences that are able to bring an improvement in inborn qualities of race also with those that develop them to their utmost advantage. There is a considerable difference between goodness in various qualities and in the entire character as a whole. The character largely depends on the proportion that exists between these quantities whose balance can be greatly influenced by education. This is a social philosophy that advocates for the improvement of the human genetic traits by promoting higher reproduction of people that posses' desired traits also termed as positive eugenics and reducing the reproduction of people that posse's undesired ort less desired traits which is negative eugenics. Therefore Eugenics is a social movement that is…… [Read More]

Norrgard, K.(2008). Human Testing, the Eugenics Movement, and IRBs. Retrieved May 6,2014 from  http://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/human-testing-the-eugenics-movement-and-irbs-724 

Galton, F.(2009).Eugenics: its definition, scope, and aims. Retrieved May 6,2014 from  http://galton.org/essays/1900-1911/galton-1904-am-journ-soc-eugenics-scope-aims.htm 

Bergman, J.(2000). A Brief History of the Eugenics Movement . Retrieved May 6, 2014 from  http://users.adam.com.au/bstett/BEugenics72Bergman73Potter77.htm
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A Look Into How Slaves Were Treated When They Arrived in North America

Words: 1458 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28213449

Seasoning Process

How did the African slaves receive guidance, physical preparedness, and social support ("seasoning") as they were brought from their home continent to the Americas? This paper covers the transition from freedom to slavery, and how Africans were given certain tools to help them handle the raw socialized cruelty from freedom to being put on ships and transported to North America.

hat are the phases of the "Seasoning Process"?

hile no readily available reference cited a specific "five phases" of the seasoning process, there clearly are at least five phases that can be reported. According to Assistant Professor Brenda E. Stevenson, the first phase of seasoning began "before many [slaves] reached Virginia," and she is referencing the "harsh lessons learned during the Middle Passage." Going through the sickness from new surroundings caused many slaves to suffer from pneumonia, malaria, smallpox, sickle cell anemia, typhus, worm infestations, whooping cough, dysentery,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bear, Storm. "Black History: Inside the Seasoning Camps." Bilerico. Retrieved November

7, 2015, from http://www.bilerico.com. 2008.

Curtin, Philip D. "Epidemiology and the Slave Trade." In The Slavery Reader, Volume 1, G.

Heuman, J. Walvin, Editors. New York: Psychology Press, 2003.
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Genetics Option 3 Darwin's Perspective According to

Words: 1309 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51827752

Genetics

Option 3: Darwin's Perspective

According to Darwin, the survival of a species is determined by the degree of strength of its members. Thus, the "fittest" in terms of physical prowess as well as to a degree mental capacity survives. Human beings have long used their mental capacity to overcome the challenges of the physical environment. The very first discoveries of tools, fire and the wheel have set the species apart from the rest of life on earth. Human beings use their mental capacity to create tools in order to ensure and facilitate their survival in the face of challenges such as weather, predators and illness. From the Darwinian viewpoint, genetic engineering is simply the next step in the evolution of the human capacity to ensure the survival of their species. Some of the unforeseen results of technological advancement have admittedly been devastating, but another uniquely human capacity is accountability.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Chartrand, Sabra. "Patents: A Human Gene Is patented as a Potential Tool Against AIDS, But Ethical Questions Remain." Human Genome Sciences Inc. (www.hgsi.com)

Ehrenreich, Barbara. "The Economics of Cloning."

Kolata, Gina. "A Clone is Born." Reprinted from: Clone: The Road to Dolly and the Path Ahead 1998.

Longstaff, Simon. "Genes for Sale."
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Clinical Decision Making Guide Subjective

Words: 1292 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20564934

Clinical Decision Making Guide

SUBJECTIVE DATA

Chief complaint: Acanthosis nigricans

History of Present Illness: Patient was good in health until...(put the chronological history of your patient for example..2 years prior to consult patient experienced....)

Current health data is obtained

Current medications: NA

Allergies: NA

Last physical examinations: 2 years

Immunization status: NA

LMP and type of birth control (if applicable)

Past Medical History

Illnesses / trauma: NA

Hospitalizations: NA

OB History: NA

Sexual History: NA

Emotional/Psychiatric History: NA

Family History: Family history for Diabetes, Type II maternal grandparents, and hypertension in grandparents on both sides of the family.

F. Personal/Social History: NA

G. Review of Systems (appropriate to clinical scenario)

OBJECTIVE DATA

A.

Her Vital signs from school are BP 144/92, HR 88, RR 16, Temp 97.9.Wt. 195 pounds, Ht: 62 inches, BMI =35.6.

The results of the fasting labs are as follows:

Fasting blood sugar = 118

Total Cholesterol…… [Read More]