Slave Trade Essays (Examples)

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Slave Population in the U S

Words: 1144 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11212645

" And as for this article's information on mortality among slaves in South America, "Death rates among slaves in the Caribbean were one-third higher than in the south...and sometimes Latin American slaves were forced to wear iron masks to keep them from eating dirt or drinking liquor." It was cruel to force slaves in Latin America to produce their own food "in their free time" (Digital History), but that was what was expected of them.

So while slaves were dying in huge numbers due to the difficulties of working in the mines and in the sugar cane plantations in Brazil, many slaves in America were actually working indoors in kitchens, doing domestic work, helping white mothers raise the white children. They received, by all accounts, ample food to eat, and even were treated with some dignity in some instances.

hile there were no doubt numerous instances of brutality on the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cooper, Joseph. The Lost Continent: Slavery and the Slave-Trade in Africa in 1875. London:

Frank Cass & Co. LTD, 1968.

Digital History. "African-American Voices: American Slavery in Comparative Perspective."

2006). Retrieved Dec. 2, 2007, at http:/ / the.net/encyclopedia/article/wahl.slavery.us.
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Slave Culture

Words: 1276 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89394284

Slave Culture

The trans-Atlantic slave trade shackled together persons from disparate cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Forced contact and communion, pervasive physical and psychological abuse, and systematic disenfranchisement became the soil in which a unique subculture would be born. Slave subcultures in the United States were also diverse, depending on geography, the nature of the plantation work, the prevailing political and social landscape of the slave owner culture, and factors like gender and ethnic backgrounds of the slaves. Presence and type of religion in the community also impacted the evolution of slave culture. Common factors that link disparate slave subcultures include religion, music, crafts, food, social norms, and political philosophies. In spite of the tremendous variations in theme and tone of slave cultures, such as those in Maryland, Virginia, Georgia, or the Carolinas, there did emerge some consistencies that draw attention to commonalities. The forced bondage of slavery created the means…… [Read More]

References

"African Diaspora," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www2.coloradocollege.edu/Dept/HY/HY243Ruiz/Research/diaspora.html

Chen, A. & Kermeliotis, T. (2012). African slave traditions live on in U.S. CNN World. Dec 10, 2012. Retrieved online:  http://www.cnn.com/2012/12/07/world/africa/gullah-geechee-africa-slavery-america/ 

Sambol-Tosco, K. (2004). Education, arts, and culture. Slavery and the Making of America: Historical Overview. PBS. Retrieved online:  http://www.pbs.org/wnet/slavery/experience/education/history.html 

"Slave Culture," (n.d.). Retrieved online: http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtid=2&psid=3043
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Slave Life in the South

Words: 1769 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1214892



In conclusion, these narratives paint a vivid picture of slave life from the 17th and 18th centuries, and illustrate why slavery was such a vicious and evil institution. Without these narratives, a historical view of slavery would be incomplete, and they illustrate a distressing and immoral element of American history. Slavery differed between the North and the South, but it shared many common characteristics, as slave narratives continue to illustrate.

eferences

Abdur-ahman, Aliyyah I. "The Strangest Freaks of Despotism": Queer Sexuality in Antebellum African-American Slave Narratives." African-American eview 40, no. 2 (2006): 223+.

Barrett, Lindon. "African-American Slave Narratives: Literacy, the Body, Authority." American Literary History 7, no. 3 (1995): 415-442.

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 1. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001..

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 3. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001.

Clayton, onnie W. Mother Wit: The Ex-Slave Narratives…… [Read More]

References

Abdur-Rahman, Aliyyah I. "The Strangest Freaks of Despotism": Queer Sexuality in Antebellum African-American Slave Narratives." African-American Review 40, no. 2 (2006): 223+.

Barrett, Lindon. "African-American Slave Narratives: Literacy, the Body, Authority." American Literary History 7, no. 3 (1995): 415-442.

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 1. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001..

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 3. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001.
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Slave Rebellion Comparison The Nat

Words: 4025 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33899488

Still it is not completely unheard of for a name to be derived from a longer epitaph of Nat, property of man, Mr. Turner. This is how many people's last names resulted in ending with "man."

Nat Turner was born a slave in Virginia in 1800 and grew to become a slave preacher. He did not use tobacco or liquor and maintained a clean, disciplined life. He was very religious man and became passionate about the Scripture. He began preaching to slaves in and around the area of Southampton County, Virginia in 1828. As a result he became well-known and liked in the area. It was at this time he began having visions. It was these visions that inspired him to revolt. hile he waited for further signs, unrest was already evident in on plantations, in the hills and on boats in ports of call (Greenberg, 85). Gradually he built…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Short History of Salvador da Bahia, Brazil. Bahia-Online. Retrieved December

10, 2004 from the World Wide Web: http://www.bahia-online.net/history-bahia.htm.

Gates, H.L., & Appiah, K.A. (Eds.). (1994). Toni Morrison: Critical Perspectives Past and Present. New York: Amistad Press, Inc.

Goldman, S. (2003). Nat Turner Revolt of 1831. HistoryBuff.com. Retrieved December
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Slaves Created Their Own Society

Words: 1023 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75038031

One of the major challenges that the Africans faced was speaking in English as it took them time to understand the language since it was the national language, but with the help of the Americans they slowly understood it.

Use for Luxurious Purposes:

The other aspect that helped the slaves in creating their own society and culture is through allowing themselves to be used for luxurious purposes. They were more often used as a means of acquiring wealth and since they adhered to this, they became very close to the Americans, which helped in reducing the issue of slavery. As a result, the Americans no longer practiced racism on the Africans but allowed them to practice their culture. As this practice later pleased the whites, they were soon introduced to the new culture.

Growth of Individualism:

The growth of individualism is another factor that enabled the slaves to create their…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Pearson Education . "Chapter Four -- Slavery and Empire." Pearson Education, n.d.

 http://wps.prenhall.com/wps/media/objects/170/174992/IM_Chapter04.pdf  (accessed December 7, 2012).

Slavery as Capitalism -- the Shape of American Slavery. "The Shape of American Slavery."

The Unjust Media, n.d. http://theunjustmedia.com/Banking%20&%20Federal%20Reserve/Capitalism/Slavery%20as%20Capitalism%20The%20Shape%20of%20American%20Slavery.htm (accessed December 7, 2012)
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Importance of the Slave Dancer Book

Words: 1098 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54345467

Slave Dancer: How to teach the book, how to teach about slavery, race, and ethics

The Slave Dancer by Paula Fox, viewed from the eyes of a student, is an adventure tale with a young protagonist who can be easily identified with, in the eyes of a young reader. Plot wise, the book tells the story of a young, thirteen-year-old boy in 1840, when the American slave trade was still legal. The boy, Jessie Bollier, has recently lost his father. He makes money for his family by playing his fife on the docks of New Orleans. Suddenly, one day, he finds himself on board a ship called "The Moonlight." The Moonlight is a slave ship bound for the coast of Africa.

An exciting story from the point-of-view of a student, but a potential lesson in history and ethics in the eyes of a teacher, for Jessie, as compelled by the…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Fox, Paula. The Slave Dancer. New York: Random House, 1974.

Wassynger, Jane. The Slave Dancer: Teacher Support Site. Retrieved 9 Dec 2004 at. http://www.randomhouse.com/teachers/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=0440404029& view=tg
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History of the Atlantic Slave

Words: 4085 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86148004

A "linguist" would bring the slave broker on board the ship that had traveled upriver, and at that point there were negotiations and the broker (owner of the slaves that he had kidnapped) wanted to know of course what merchandise was being offered, what the commission the captain of the vessel was to receive, and he wanted to know what other offers might be out there on the coast from the other slavers. At the end of the day, if the broker liked the deal, and if the trader liked the slaves that the broker brought to the river (or the coast), the company "surgeon" was called in to check the health of the prisoners, and if that passed muster, a deal was struck. The male slaves were put in irons on the main deck; the children and women (not ironed) were placed on the quarterdeck; and the boys were…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anstey, Roger. (1975). The Atlantic Slave Trade and British Abolition 1760-1810. Atlantic

Highlands, NY: Humanities Press.

Dodson, Howard, Moore, Christopher Paul, and Yancy, Roberta. (2009). Becoming American:

The African-American Journey. New York: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.
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Trans-Saharan Trade Involved the Trading Across Sahara

Words: 666 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65951886

Trans-Saharan trade involved the trading across Sahara desert that linked the Mediterranean countries and the sub-Saharan Africa. The type of trade was initiated by omans after the introduction of camels in the regions of North Africa. This gave a room for the residents of central Sahara and the Berbers of North Africa to adopt the use of camels for transportation and as a source of food. Formerly, trading across desert was sporadic, however this became possible when camels were introduced thus making the contact and trading between Mediterranean world as well as, sub-Saharan West Africa to flourish. The commodities which were traded include weapons, textiles, and horses all these came from the Mediterranean while gold, animal products, and slaves came from the West Africa (Wright, 2007). However there were some commodities which came from central Sahara which included salt that was mined from prehistoric lakes that got dried up. The…… [Read More]

References

McKay, Hill, Buckler, Ebrey, Beck, Crowston, & Wiesner-Hanks, (2008). A History of World

Societies. Eighth Edition, Volume 1

Benanav, M. (2006). Men of salt: crossing the Sahara on the caravan of white gold. London:

Lyons Press.
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Transatlantic Trade and Slavery in

Words: 2512 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64561277

The problem with European slaves was mainly that they had recourse to legal action for the protection of their rights and redressing their grievances. Like the Native Americans, European slaves were also unfamiliar with the soils and cash crops of the New World. Furthermore, they tended to use their status as slaves only as a vehicle for traveling to the United States, after which they would claim their freedom on the grounds of their Christianity and their race (Gilbert and Reynolds 154).

On the other hand, the main disadvantage of using Africans as slaves was the expense and danger involved in capturing and transporting them from the continent (Gilbert and Reynolds 155). Their knowledge and familiarity with both the tropical environment and the soils of the area however favored them highly over their European and Native American counterparts. This, along with their skill in extracting ores from American soils, as…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Gilbert, Erik & Reynolds, Jonathan T. "Chapter 8: Slavery and the Creation of the Atlantic World." Africa in World History: From Prehistory to the Present. Pearson/Prentice Hall: 2nd Edition, 2007.

Gilbert, Erik & Reynolds, Jonathan T. "Chapter 9: West and West-Central Africa: 1500 -- 1880." Africa in World History: From Prehistory to the Present. Pearson/Prentice Hall: 2nd Edition, 2007.

Gilbert, Erik & Reynolds, Jonathan T. "Chapter 10: North African and the Sudan: 1500 -- 1880." Africa in World History: From Prehistory to the Present. Pearson/Prentice Hall: 2nd Edition, 2007.

Gilbert, Erik & Reynolds, Jonathan T. "Chapter 11: East Africa: 1500 -- 1850." Africa in World History: From Prehistory to the Present. Pearson/Prentice Hall: 2nd Edition, 2007.
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A Look Into How Slaves Were Treated When They Arrived in North America

Words: 1458 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28213449

Seasoning Process

How did the African slaves receive guidance, physical preparedness, and social support ("seasoning") as they were brought from their home continent to the Americas? This paper covers the transition from freedom to slavery, and how Africans were given certain tools to help them handle the raw socialized cruelty from freedom to being put on ships and transported to North America.

hat are the phases of the "Seasoning Process"?

hile no readily available reference cited a specific "five phases" of the seasoning process, there clearly are at least five phases that can be reported. According to Assistant Professor Brenda E. Stevenson, the first phase of seasoning began "before many [slaves] reached Virginia," and she is referencing the "harsh lessons learned during the Middle Passage." Going through the sickness from new surroundings caused many slaves to suffer from pneumonia, malaria, smallpox, sickle cell anemia, typhus, worm infestations, whooping cough, dysentery,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bear, Storm. "Black History: Inside the Seasoning Camps." Bilerico. Retrieved November

7, 2015, from http://www.bilerico.com. 2008.

Curtin, Philip D. "Epidemiology and the Slave Trade." In The Slavery Reader, Volume 1, G.

Heuman, J. Walvin, Editors. New York: Psychology Press, 2003.
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Effect of Trade Slavery on Wes

Words: 1966 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86220264

million Africans were abducted forcibly from West Africa alone and enslaved (Centre for lack & African Arts & Civilisation, 2002, 1). This paper endeavours to explore the "impact of the slave trade on West Africa." The historical injustices of the slave trade have undeniably affected West Africa detrimentally in the political, economic and social arenas. The gravity of such a negative impact is what leaders of nations historically involved in the slave trade are discussing as they determine what reparations can be made to the victims of this inhumane practice.

efore embarking on the political, economic and social fallout of the slave trade on West Africa, it is important to give a brief description of this blight in history. From the middle of the 15th century, the Portuguese initiated the slave trade. They were followed by the Spaniards, and at a lengthier period (1562) by the ritish. Then in rapid…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Akinjogbin, (1967) Dahomey and its Neighbours, 1708-1818. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

The Anti-Slavery Society (2002) "West African Slave Trade." www.anti-slaverysociety.addr.com

BBC News (August 6, 1999) "West Africa's Child Slave Trade." www.news.bbc.co.uk

Center for Black & African Arts & Civilization (2002) "Slave Trade in Africa." www.cbaac.org
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Black Slaves in North America

Words: 538 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19255918

Once they arrived, they were brought to a slave market and usually auctioned off to the highest bidder just as cattle and horses were auctioned off. he slaves then spent their lives of servitude helping white farm and plantation owners in their agricultural operations. he slaves weren't typically compensated and lived in deplorable conditions. Slavery helped many white land owners become rich, and the southern colonies, which turned into the southern states, remained slave states, while those in the north became know as free states, where slavery was not legal. his dichotomy of cultures, between the northern and southern states, eventually led to further economic and cultural rifts leading up to the Civil War in 1860.

During the Civil War, the northern states allowed blacks to serve in the Union Army. Southern states, eager to fight for their way of life and economic interests, were against the abolition of slavery.…… [Read More]

The English Colonies were set up as resource providers for the English Monarchy and economy in Europe. Products like cotton, tobacco, and other crops were planted and harvested in the rich soils of the colonies. The land and plantation owners were eager to cut costs, and with the African slave trade to places like the Caribbean and southern Spanish colonies booming, black slaves were an abundant and relatively cheap labor resource, especially for the farms and plantations in the southern colonies. Unlike the southern colonies, the northern colonies' economies began to differentiate themselves as producers of manufactured goods as well as services. In this way, even though slavery was legal in all of the English Colonies, the northern colonies had less of a demand for black slaves than the southern ones.

Operationally, slaves were brought in primarily from West African locales to work in agriculture-related servitude. Many of the slaves were separated from their families and many died during the long voyage via slave ship to the English Colonies. Once they arrived, they were brought to a slave market and usually auctioned off to the highest bidder just as cattle and horses were auctioned off. The slaves then spent their lives of servitude helping white farm and plantation owners in their agricultural operations. The slaves weren't typically compensated and lived in deplorable conditions. Slavery helped many white land owners become rich, and the southern colonies, which turned into the southern states, remained slave states, while those in the north became know as free states, where slavery was not legal. This dichotomy of cultures, between the northern and southern states, eventually led to further economic and cultural rifts leading up to the Civil War in 1860.

During the Civil War, the northern states allowed blacks to serve in the Union Army. Southern states, eager to fight for their way of life and economic interests, were against the abolition of slavery. This is not to say that the Civil War was fought on the question of whether black slavery should be legitimized, but slavery, as an economic mechanism, had much to do with the build up to war that had been occurring for nearly a century previous. After the Civil War, slavery was abolished. But though the institution of slavery was outlawed, the cultural and social norms were still left intact. Across the country, Jim Crow laws were left on the books that held blacks as second-class citizens with fewer rights than whites. Even after the reconstruction period, blacks had a hard time assimilating into mainstream American culture, and were economically and socially disadvantaged because of their history.
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One Is Made a Slave Not Born a Slave

Words: 4059 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30985055

Slave, Not Born a Slave

The Making of Slavery

The sense of proprietorship of slave traders, owners, and other propagators of chattel slavery that was prevalent in the United States until the middle of the 19th century would be absurdly laughable -- were it not steeped in a legacy of perversion, of anguish, of tragedy and of perniciousness. The notion that one had the right to actually own another, the latter of whose sole existence would be to serve the former in any way, shape or method which the "owner" deemed appropriate, has been disproved as largely imaginary, and not something based on any sense of right or morality (no matter how such a historically ambiguous term was defined) numerous times, both during the tenure of slavery in the United States and well afterwards. A casual examination of the wording of the Declaration of Independence confirms this fact (McAulifee, 2010,…… [Read More]

References

Bland, Sterling. (2001). African-American Salve Narratives: An Anthology, Volume 1. Westport: Greenwood.

Chesnutt, C. (1889). "The Sherriff's Children." The Independent. 41: 30-32.

Davis, A.Y. (1981). "Reflections on the Black Woman's Role in the Community of Slaves." Black Scholar. 12 (6) 2-15.

Douglass, F. (1845). Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave. Retrieved from  http://www.ibiblio.org/ebooks/Douglass/Narrative/Douglass_Narrative.pdf
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Life of a Slave Girl Harriet Jacobs

Words: 2099 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52478415

Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs relates to the readers her experiences as a slave girl in the Southern part of America. Her story started from her sheltered life as a child to her subordination to her mistress upon her father's death, and her continuing struggle to live a dignified and virtuous life despite being a slave. Her struggle involves her constant degradation from her master; the danger of being sexually exploited by her mistress' husband, Dr. Flint; her broken relationship with a free colored man; her pregnancy to a man named Mr. Sands; and her fight for her and her children's freedom from slavery. All of these experiences helped Linda learn to fight justly for her right to become a free individual, but most of all, to be subordinated to Dr. Flint, the man who wanted so bad to exploit her, yet, was not able to because of…… [Read More]

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Primary Source Written by Slave Have Picked

Words: 1303 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41570694

primary source written by slave have picked ewis Clarke and his book Narrative of the Sufferings of ewis Clark. In my opinion, excerpts from this book give a clear account about the condition of a slave in the South in the first half of the 19th and a revelatory story of a fugitive slave and his experience as he ran for freedom.

ewis Clarke was born in 1812, in Madison County, Kentucky, as the son of a Scottish emigrant and a black mother. As such, he was a slave, owned by William Campbell. Upon his death, ewis Clarke was sold to Betsy Branton and spend his years without his mother, who had been sold at a different plantation, several tens of miles away. Escaped from the plantation in 1841, he lived the remainder of his years, until his death in 1897, in Canada, where he published his book, Narrative of…… [Read More]

Lewis Clarke's biography gives us a good idea about the life and condition of many of the household slave in the South in the first half of the 19th century. His account are expressed with the feelings of a man who had lived the pain he is telling us about and for who the trip to freedom and freedom itself is indeed a trip to Heaven, a transformation, a process of evolvement to a superior level.

However, many parts of his book are naive, both in style and in the way they are told. For example, the fact that a black person could escape from his household, ride a pony for tens of miles through the country, peacefully eat in the saloon without anybody getting an idea that he might be a runaway slave and alerting the authorities may seem rather far-fetched. This leads us to believe that, not necessarily on purpose, some of the parts of his story are omitted. We cannot help, however, to see in his work a biographical accomplishment.

All quotations are from Lewis Clark's book, Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clark. Excerpts from the book and a short account on Clark's life can be found on the Internet at http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USASclark.htm
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Nature of U S -mexican Trade Relations it Is

Words: 4198 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37626195

nature of U.S.-Mexican trade relations, it is difficult indeed not to think of the statement of Mexican President Porfirio Diaz at the turn of the last century, "Poor Mexico, so far from God, and so close to the United States." For Mexico does continue to seem to occupy a benighted position vis-a-vis its richer and more powerful neighbor to the north, a position that is in no small measure defined and continually recreated by the nature and mechanisms of international trade between the two nations. This paper examines the nature of the trade relations between the United States and Mexico in the light of several classical economics theories and models as well as in respect to recent developments in the wake of the 1992 signing of the NAFTA accord and the last decade's worth of increasing globalization.

Economic Theories and Models

We begin by discussing and summarizing some of the…… [Read More]

References

Danaher, K. & Burbach, R. (eds.) (2000). Globalize this!: The battle against The World Trade Organization. Los Angeles: Community Archives Publications.

Esty, D. (1994). Greening the GATT: Trade, environment, and the future. Washington DC: Institute for International Economics.

http://www.econ.iastate.edu/classes/econ355/choi/ho.

http://internationalecon.com/v1.0/ch60/60c110.html
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Edward Ball Chronicles His Family's Slave-Owning History

Words: 1276 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91658536

Edward Ball chronicles his family's slave-owning history in the compelling historical narrative Slaves in the Family. Ball traces the lineages of his white relatives and their slaves and where possible recreates life as it was on the Ball plantations in South Carolina. Descendents of the Englishman Elias Ball bought and sold enough slaves to populate a city. By no means singular in their treatment of the Africans, the Balls prove nevertheless to be a prime example of a Southern plantation dependent on the blood, sweat, and tears of families and individuals ripped from their homeland and bought and sold as commodity. Cruelty was meted out equally among black males and females, but it is worthwhile to contrast the unique experiences of enslaved women on the Southern plantations. If nothing else, motherhood and childrearing set the women apart. They watched their newborns emerge into a world of shackles, often completely losing…… [Read More]

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International and Trade Policy of

Words: 2928 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75313189

' (Adams, 1982) Local agencies helped the magistrate, remedied public mores, and also inspected the conduct of the "Hyangni" and served as power base for the local "yangbans. "Yangbans" were dispatched to the province from the capital. Yangbans -- constituted of the class of advantaged / privileged civil and military servicemen. Yangins constituted of middle-level bureaucrats, peasants and merchants, whose children were allowed to sit the exam for governance service. "Chungins" -- were technical personnel and professional specialists composed of the side children of 'Yangbans"

Leonid (2011) points out that 'The literati composed of the dominant social class in Choson Korea. Most of them were the "Yangbans" the members of the two orders of officialdom who served as civil or military officials.' Since it was this yangbans who directed the government, economy and culture of Choson Korea, it may be designated a Yangban society as opposed to the aristocratic society…… [Read More]

Works cited

Buzo, Adrian. (2002). The Making of Modern Korea: A History. New York: Rout ledge

Carter J. Eckert, Kibalk Lee (2009) Korea Old and New, A history, Lehokak: Publishers for Korea Institute, Harvard pp 107-131.

Cumings Bruce. (1997). Korea Place in the Sun: A Modern History. New York: W.W. Norton.

Pp 45-67
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United States Trade Policy With

Words: 3707 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76454115

Farmers are stated to have become "risk takers, created new markets, developed rural industries and migrated to urban areas. Farmers were no longer slaves to the state..." (1996)

Dorn notes the statement of Jianying Zha (1994:202) in the book "China Pop" that:

The economic reforms has created new opportunities, new dreams, and to some extent, a new atmosphere and mindsets. The old control system has weakened in many areas, especially the spheres of economy and lifestyle. There is a growing sense of increased space for personal freedom."

Dorn states that the optimism of Zha would certain be shared by anyone who has: "...seen the vibrancy of the market, the dynamism of the people, and the rapid growth of urban areas..." (1996) Dorn states: "Commercial life in China is evolving naturally as people flee the countryside for improved living conditions and the chance to strike it rich in the growing nonstate…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Daniel T. Griswold, CATO Institute, (2005)"Trading Tyranny for Freedon: How Open Markets Till the Soil for Democracy."

Dorn, James a. (1996) Trade and Human Rights: The Case of China. The Cato Journal Vol. 16 No.1. Spring-Summer 1996 Online available at http://www.cato.org/pubs/journal/cj16n1-5.html

Fewsmith, Joseph (2007) the Political Implications of China's Growing Middle Class. China Leadership Monitor. No. 21 the Hoover Institution. Online available at http://www.hoover.org/publications/clm/issues/8535722.html

Gresser, Edward (2006) Trading in Myth - Blueprint Magazine 9 February 9, 2006. Progressive Policy Institute. Online available at http://www.ppionline.org/ppi_ci.cfm?knlgAreaID=108&subsecID=206&contentID=253726
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American History Slave Revolts Although

Words: 6354 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54831518

Alexander Hamilton carried on an affair with the wife of "a notorious political schemer," Maria Reynolds. Andrew Jackson married Rachel Jackson before her divorce from Lewis Robards was finalized and therefore was accused of marrying a married woman. Jackson's opponent in 1828, John Quincy Adams, was in turn accused of "corrupt bargaining" during his term. Jackson also championed Margaret O'Neill Timberlake, who married his secretary of war, John Eaton. "Peggy O'Neill" was considered a woman of "questionable virtue," and as a result Martin Van Buren became Jackson's successor in the presidency. After the death of Jackson and Eaton, Peggy married a 19-year-old dance teacher (which raised eyebrows, as she was 59), who embezzled her money and ran off to Europe with her 17-year-old granddaughter.

Other scandals concerned Richard Mentor Johnson, who ran for vice president in 1836 with Martin Van Buren. He supposedly shot Tecumseh during the ar of 1812,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ferling, John. Adams vs. Jefferson: the tumultuous election of 1800. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
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Mission Trade A Primary Goal

Words: 1359 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45562122



Silence, Endo uses the background of persecution to contemplate these knotty questions. ("Silence")

Endo seeks to show within Silence, then, how the missionaries themselves misunderstood which aspects of Christianity to emphasize to Japanese would-be converts, just as he himself had misunderstood the universal appeal that Christianity could potentially have in areas outside the western world, including Japan, until he had visited Palestine. As a missionary religion, as Endo also implies, Christianity must rely on persuasive power in order to truly capture the hearts and minds of people anywhere that it seeks to convert. Japanese feudalism and European trade, on the other hand, rely only on force, coercion, and violence - no match for Christian missionaries in an area like Japan, especially if those missionaries' Christianity is not accepted in Japan in the first place. Religious zeal, then, in order to have any real hope of vanquishing competing economic forces, must…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Endo, Shusaku. Silence. London: Taplinger, 1980.

Joffe, Rolfe (Dir.). The Mission.

With Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons.

United Kingdom. 1986.
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Slavery and Race Relations Slavery

Words: 1838 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29591358

But tat doesn't really cange te istory or te reality of any event. Emancipation sould ave been our first concern but fortunately it was not even one of te main concerns let alone te first one. Lincoln along wit oter political eavyweigts were more interested in appeasing te Sout and various efforts were made to please te Soutern elite since secession was an imminent possibility.

So for various political and economic interests, te ugly practice of slavery was allowed to continue in te country tat claimed to be te campion of democracy. Te blacks and Americans will forever remember Abraam Lincoln as te man wo emancipated te slaves and abolised tis abominable practice once and for all, but te trut is tat Lincoln did tis only for political reasons. As researc indicates: "Despite te common perception to te contrary, te Civil War was not fougt primarily on te slavery issue.…… [Read More]

http://www.britannica.com/presidentsWebapp/article.do?articleID=9116928

Abraham Lincoln: Inaugural address:

http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/ebooks/pdf/LinFirs.pdf.
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History of Africa

Words: 2584 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88645817

Harmony to Holocaust

The Portuguese reached the Gold Coast of Africa in 1439. At first, they were impressed with the culture they found. As they worked their way down the coast "[t]hey found people of varying cultures. Some lived in towns ruled by kings with nobility and courtiers very much like the medieval societies they left behind them." (Obadina). Many years later, a visitor from Holland was equally impressed and records his impressions of Benin City in 1600: "As you enter it, the town appears very great. You go into a great broad street, not paved, which seems to be seven or eight times broader than the Warmoes Street in Amsterdam... The houses in this town stand in good order, one close and even with the other, as the houses in Holland stand..." (qtd. In Obadina). Clearly, at this early stage, the Europeans had a fairly positive view of the…… [Read More]

References

Beard, Oscar L. "Did We Sell Each Other Into Slavery." Hartford-Hwp.com Web Site.

24 May 1999. 5 May 2003. http://www.hargord-hwp.com/archives/30/145.html.

Hooker, Richard. "The Forest Kingdoms." Washington State University Web Site. 6

June 1999 5 May 2003. http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~dee/CIVAFRCA/FOREST.htm
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Modern World History

Words: 691 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13613217

million Africans who were enslaved and transported to Europe and America between 15th and 19th which was part of the Atlantic trade. This trade was motivated by the plantations in America which had a strong demand for labor. The slave trade was eventually integrated into international trading system where North Americans and Europeans were exchanging merchandise for humans along Africa's western as well as the West Atlantic Oceans. There were various events that took place in the African slave trade between 1450 and 1850. This paper will look at these key events and show their importance.

Beginning of slave trade

The commencement of slave trade was seen to be when a ship that was sailing from Portugal came back with 12 Africans who were meant to be solved into slavery. This event marked the beginning of a very dark and brutal trade that would involve Africans being taken to do…… [Read More]

References

ABC News, (2013). Timeline of Atlantic Slave Trade. Retrieved March 27, 2013 from http://abcnews.go.com/U.S./story?id=96659&page=1

Clarke, J.H., (2009) .The African Holocaust -- the Slave Trade. Retrieved march 27,2013 from  http://www.nbufront.org/MastersMuseums/JHClarke/EdRealityAfricanWorld/EdWorldPart3.html 

Understanding Slavery, (2011). Europe Before Transatlantic slavery. Retrieved march 27,2013 from http://www.understandingslavery.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=315&Itemid=145
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Hannah More

Words: 1460 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91726858

Hannah More

Like many abolitionists, Hannah More built her philosophy on a firm foundation of religion and spiritual thought. Her poems "Sensibility" and "The Slave Trade" present imagery related to spiritual concepts and ideals that she uses to persuade a sensible Christian audience against the slave trade. More crafts her abolitionist poetry around philosophical ideals as well as spiritual ones, and the poet appeals to reason as much as to emotion. In her poem "Sensibility: An Epistle to the Honourable Mrs. Boscawen," More emphatically elevates sensibility above religiosity: "if RELIGION'S bias rule the soul, / Then SENSIBILITY exalts the whole," (353-4). More elaborates on the theme of distorted religion throughout "The Slave Trade," by accusing proponents of slavery of arrogance, "insulted reason," and "natural evils," (141; 156). However, More's argument is rooted in sensibility, that elusive quality that, like God, cannot be defined. More describes sensibility like she would describe…… [Read More]

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Abolition of Slavery Abolition of

Words: 2137 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72178216

The manner in which consumer goods can affect human affairs, however, differs. hile demand for certain consumer goods can lead to oppression, the way people demand consumer goods may also destroy oppressive practices. hen Britons demanded sugar with no regard to the way sugar and coffee they enjoyed for the breakfast were produced, slavery flourished. But when the Britons began to demand goods that they believed were not causing slavery, the change of tastes undermined slave trade and contributed to the ending of slavery. hile tobacco and cotton were not as important at the time as sugar, they played a similar function in abolitionist and independence movements that fought against slavery.

The function of consumer goods is also linked to material culture. This was the case in the eighteenth century, as books by Dubois and Carrigus and Hochschild demonstrate. European colonial practices that led to the enslavement of tens of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dubois, Laurent and John D. Carrigus. Slave Revolution in the Caribbean, 1789-1804: A Brief History with Documents. Boston: St. Martin's Press, 2006. Print.

Hochschild, Adam. Bury the Chain: Prophets and Rebels in the Fight to Free an Empire's Slaves. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2005. Print.
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History of Slavery

Words: 3408 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66576323

Abolitionist Movement

Black Africans helped the Portuguese and the Spanish when they were on their exploration of the America. During the 16th century, some of the explorers who were of black origin went ahead to settle within the Valley of Mississippi as well as in areas that came to be known as New Mexico and South Carolina. However, Esteban was the most celebrated black explorer of the, who followed the Southwest route in the 1530s. Blacks in the United State and their uninterrupted history can be traced from 1619; this was after 20 Africans were landed within the English colony of Virginia. Though these blacks were by then not slaves, they served as servants who were bound to an employer for a limited number of years as it was to most of the white settlers. By 1660s bigger numbers of Africans were taken to the English colonies. By 1790, the…… [Read More]

Reference

Greene, Meg. Slave Young, Slave Long: The American Slave Experience. Minneapolis, Minn.: Lerner Publications Co., c1999.

Haskins, James. Bound for America: The Forced Migration of Africans to the New World. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1999.

Lisa Vox, (2012). The Start of Slavery in North America." Accessed April 29, 2012 from http://afroamhistory.about.com/od/slavery/a/The-Start-Of-Slavery-In-North-America.htm

Morgan Edmund, (2003). American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia W.W. Norton & Company, 2003.
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Constructing Responses Titles I Listing In Response

Words: 2184 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3485179

constructing responses titles I listing. In response make show reference entry. (01) Discuss

One of the most powerful movements that transformed European society during the early modern era was the dissemination of information and the propagation of reading material due to Johannes Gutenberg's invention of the printing press around 1450 A.D. The movement that would prove to have the most impact upon society as a whole, however, was the imperialist movement that many credit to have originated with Columbus' journeys to the Americas, the first of which was in 1492. The imperialist movement would allow the appetite for power and conquering to expand beyond Europe and eventually encapsulate the entire globe. This movement is directly responsible for today's globalization, and the previous (and perhaps current) colonization and tyranny of many non-European nations. Another major movement during this time period was the beginning of the Protestant eformation, which began around 1517…… [Read More]

References

Benjamin J. Kaplan (2007), Divided by Faith. Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.

Bentley, J., Ziegler, H., Streets, H. (2006). Traditions & Encounters: A Brief Global History. New York: McGraw Hill

Equiano, O. Life On Board. International Slavery Museum. Retrieved from   http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk /ism/slavery/middle_passage/olaudah_equiano.aspx 

The Applied History Research Group, 1998. The Ottoman Empire. Retrieved from http://www.ucalgary.ca/applied_history/tutor/islam/empires/ottoman/
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City State of Genoa 900-1550

Words: 2514 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49783827

The goods from Asia were shipped to Venice and Genoa from where they were carried over the Alps to France and Germany, or through the strait of Gibraltar to Britain and the Scandinavian countries. The Black Sea port of Caffa, controlled by the Genoese during the 14th century, was an important terminal point on the silk route. Apart from the fur and slaves that it normally imported, Caffa is also reputed to have introduced the dreaded "Black Death" epidemic to Europe through fleas on rats that traveled on Genoese ships to Constantinople. (Ibid)

Genoese Trade with the Ottomans

Until the rise of the Ottoman Empire in the 14th century, the Genoese had prospered in trading through their relations with the Byzantines, the Christian principalities of the East, and even their sworn enemies -- the Arabs, while fighting for domination of trade with Venice. Thereafter, most of their trading activities depended…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Carden, Robert W. The City of Genoa. London: Methuen, 1908.

Epstein, Steven A. Genoa & the Genoese, 958-1528. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

Fleet, Kate. European and Islamic Trade in the Early Ottoman State: The Merchants of Genoa and Turkey. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Genoese Trade Route." Roman Art Lover Website. N.d. September 1, 2005. http://members.tripod.com/romeartlover/Galata.html
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Movie Different but Equal Different

Words: 1930 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91946616

The ideology of race only came to justify the existence of slavery after all 'equal' men were said to have inherent rights. Until then, virtually all peoples of the world had been enslaved at one point or another, even before the existence of 'races,' and inferiority as a category could be applied to the poor, to despised ethnicities like the Irish, or even to despised members of other tribes in Africa.

orks Cited

Fields, Barbara. "Presentation." Race: The Power of an Illusion. PBS ebsite. 2001. February 9, 2009. http://www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-background-02-02.htm

Davidson, Basil.

Africa: A Voyage of Discovery with Basil Davidson. RM Arts, 1984.

Horton, James O. "Origin of race, slavery." Race: The Power of an Illusion. PBS ebsite. 2003.

February 9, 2009. http://www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-background-02-04.htm

Obadina, Tunde. "Role of African Slave Traders." Edofolks. February 9, 2009. http://www.edofolks.com/html/pub157.htm

Smedley, Audrey. "Origin of the idea of race." Anthropology Newsletter. November 1997.

Reprinted 2003 on Race:…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fields, Barbara. "Presentation." Race: The Power of an Illusion. PBS Website. 2001. February 9, 2009.  http://www.pbs.org/race/000_About/002_04-background-02-02.htm 

Davidson, Basil.

Africa: A Voyage of Discovery with Basil Davidson. RM Arts, 1984.

Horton, James O. "Origin of race, slavery." Race: The Power of an Illusion. PBS Website. 2003.
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Comparative Criminal Justice

Words: 2204 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38104998

Human Sex Trafficking

Introduction to the Issue

Globalism may be increasing human trafficking

Sex Trafficking is a global issue, developed and developing countries alike

Trade is both overt and covert

Statistics on the trade

easons for the trade (incentive)

Pathways

Use of trickery and subterfuge to entice young people and parents

Use of drugs and addiction to make "slaves" pliable

The underdeveloped world

Economic issues with larger families

Attitude of girls being "disposable" as cultural tenet

Techniques used to ply trafficking trade (intimidation, drugs, brainwashing)

The response

Difficult to coordinate response and law enforcement because of locations

Those involved in many underdeveloped countries are part of the wealthy or elite -- corruption part of culture

c. U.S. And Interpol working together

d. Nature of legal scrutiny and substance via technology

Conclusions

a. Global Problem and the United Nations

b. Education and techniques for mitigation

c. Future goals and prospects

Human…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Human Trafficking: A Brief Overview. (December 2009). Social Development Notes. No 122. Retrieved from: http://siteresources.worldbank.org / EXTSOCIALDEVELOPMENT/Resources/244362-1239390842422/6012763-1239905793229/Human_Trafficking.pdf

Trafficking Family on America's Most Wanted. (March 2, 2009). Nobodies -- Modern American Slave Labor and the Dark Side of the Global Economy. Retrieved from: http://johnbowe.wordpress.com/category/sex-slavery/

Basil, N. (2009). Factors Sustaining Human Trafficking in Contemporary Society. Psychologia. 17 (1): 161-69.

Bureau of Justice, U.S. Department of Justice. (2012). Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force Initiative. BJA.GOV. Retrieved from: https://www.bja.gov / ProgramDetails.aspx?Program_ID=51
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Curtin the Plantation Complex the

Words: 357 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79920351

However, the population was not self-sustaining and therefore depended on a continual influx of new laborers (p. 2). The result was to dramatically alter the world's demographic features, and not only those of the Americas and Africa. The plantation complex was also an offshoot of feudalism; its structure resembled medieval feudal societies in which a land-owning master exerted authority over his subjects but who was at the same time subject to his own political master. Finally, Curtin shows how the creation of highly specialized goods transformed the global market system, encouraging or even forcing nations from all corners of the globe to participate in a massive network of trading. In the early days of the plantation complex, Europeans used silver mined in South America to purchase goods from India which were in turn used to purchase slaves in Africa; those slaves were imported as property to the plantations in the…… [Read More]

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Black Films as a Reflection

Words: 4019 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90025348

"

The Aftermath

Uncle Tom characters were common in both white and black productions of the time, yet no director before Micheaux had so much as dared to shine a light on the psychology that ravages such characters. By essentially bowing to the two white men, Micheaux implied that Old Ned was less than a man; an individual whittled down to nothing more than yes-man and wholly deprived of self-worth. At this point in the history of black films, with some of the most flagrant sufferings of blacks exposed to the American public, the only logical path forward that African-Americans could take was to begin making cogent demands to improve their collective social situation.

Slowly, black characters in film took on greater and more significant roles in film. Sidney Poitier was one of the most powerful film stars of the mid twentieth century. In roles like the 1950 film by…… [Read More]

Reference List

Finlayson, R. (2003). We Shall Overcome: The History of the American Civil Rights

Movement. Lerner Publications Company, Minneapolis, MN.

King, Jr., M. And Jackson, J. (1963). Why We Can't Wait. Signet Classic, New York,

NY.
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Narrative of the Life of

Words: 1696 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39673242

1 p.81)

Why a]re the dearest friends and relations now... prevented from cheering the gloom of slavery with the small comfort of being together and mingling their sufferings and sorrows? Why are parents to lose their children, brothers their sisters, or husbands their wives? Surely this is a new refinement in cruelty, which, while it has no advantage to atone for it, thus aggravates distress, and adds fresh horrors even to the wretchedness of slavery... I have even known them gratify their brutal passion with females not ten years old; and these abominations some of them practised to such scandalous excess, that one of our captains discharged the mate and others on that account." (Vol. 1 p. 206)

On the other hand, there is a paradoxical problem that probably undermines that hope: awareness of how much worse slaves were treated earlier in their lives could have also allowed some of…… [Read More]

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1415 Europeans Began a Long Process of

Words: 1046 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1575099

1415 Euopeans began a long pocess of expansion though impeial conquest and colonization. This ealy moden fom of impeialism continued up to the late eighteenth o ealy nineteenth centuy. Explain how and why the vaious Euopean powes expanded beyond thei oiginal bodes and in many instances beyond the continent. Be sue to distinguish between at least thee of the pincipal Euopean impeial powes, among which wee the Potuguese, Spanish, Bitish, Fench, Dutch, and Russians.

Thee wee many factos that caused Euopean powes to expand beyond thei oiginal bodes and, in many instances, beyond the continent.

One of these was simply colonization whee one county battled anothe and claimed its teitoy as its own. Anothe facto was tade whee the tade dealings of specific counties bought them into contact with anothe and, theeby impoted thei influence into foeign soil. The slave tade too was a contibutoy facto whee people fom one…… [Read More]

references

Jiu-Hwa Upshur (2012) World History Wadsworth; comprehensive, compact 5th edition)

John M. Cohen (1969) The Four Voyages, Penguin: UK
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Difficulty Wealthy White American Settlers Created and

Words: 1775 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91924023

difficulty, wealthy white American settlers created and dominated a stable plantation society in which slaves, Indians, and poorer whites accepted the justice of their subordination.

There is sound evidence that slavery had spread through America long before 1776. Like a vile cancer, slavery spread throughout with the early settlers. As they arrived from Europe, white settlers began to push inward. As they moved into vast uncharted territories, they brought along their concept and belief in slavery.

When the American Revolution initiated with the signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, slavery was well rooted. Many leaders of the Revolution regarded the elimination of slavery as impossible. The American slaveholders had effectively protected their beloved institution.

Laws were enacted that reinforced slavery as an institution. Legal language included, "That all servants imported and brought in this country, by sea or land, who where not Christians in their native county...shall be…… [Read More]

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Important Events in World History

Words: 709 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17735865

world's nations and citizens was the Cold ar. Indeed, slave trade was important, and the formation of American colonies in the 17th century has had an enormous impact on the history of the planet. Also the Seven Years' ar and imperialism had enormous implications and impacts. But the years of the Cold ar stand out as more pivotal in terms of the history of the world. This paper will explain why the Cold ar was most important.

Slave Trade: The International Slavery Museum (ISM) explains that European slave traders "forcibly uprooted millions of people" from est African and est Central Africa between the years 1500 to 1900. In particular, the 16th century was a century in which millions of African peoples were forcibly shipped in cruelly over-crowded slave ships to the Americas. These individuals from Africa were "…farmers, merchants, priests, soldiers, goldsmiths and musicians" (ISM). hile crossing the oceans from…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Anderson, Fred. Crucible of War: The Seven Years' War and the Fate of Empire in British North

America, 1754-1766. New York: Knopf Publishing, 2007.

International Slavery Museum. "The trade triangle." Retrieved December 8, 2013, from  http://www.liverpoolmuseums.org.uk . 2008.
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1500 History of World Societies

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40673914

The British created a well-educated, English-speaking Indian elite middle class d. new jobs were created for millions of Indian hand-spinner and hand-weavers

The Indian National Congress can best be described in which of the following ways:

Answer:

a. An Indian Civil Service that administered British rule.

b. A group of upper-caste professionals seeking independence from Britain.

c. white settlers who administered British rule.

d. anglicized Indians who were the social equals of white rulers.

Under the Culture System, Indonesian peasants had to Answer:

a. learn to speak and read Dutch b. plant one-fifth of their land in export crops to be turned over to the Dutch colonial government c. convert to the Dutch Reformed Church d. join large state-run farms.

Modern Vietnamese nationalism traced much of its inspiration to Answer:

a. Japanese modernization.

b. China's "Hundred Days" Reform program.

c. The U.S. Declaration of Independence.

d. British Fabian socialism.

The…… [Read More]

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Inductive Argument Analysis Original Argument

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29882421



It might be said that, had Lincoln not been elected, the war might have been put off by a few years, and then a solution might perhaps have been reached. However, as has been demonstrated, the country was moving inexorably toward war and no other solution would work. If the war had been put off by a few years, the result would more than likely have been even more terrible and bloody than it was. General Grant was of the opinion that the war was inevitable. "The Southern rebellion was largely the outgrowth of the Mexican war," he wrote in his Personal Memoirs, in accord with his belief that the Mexican-American War was the result of the South's attempts to extend slavery into Mexican-controlled Texas, "Nations, like individuals, are punished for their transgressions. We got our punishment in the most sanguinary and expensive war in modern times." Grant would then…… [Read More]

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Deborah Gray White's AR'n't I

Words: 1844 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51686137

Therefore, the slave woman became emotionally isolated from her husband. This emotional isolation, when combined with the physical isolation that inevitably happened when slaves were sold, led to slave women having a greater affection and affinity for their children than for the men that fathered them (especially when such men included slave masters and slave traders). The result, White explains, is that slave women came to seek and accept the society of one another, and developed a hierarchy as such in which there was an informal set of rankings and prioritization. The Mammy character was generally at the forefront of this hierarchy, which was essentially a coping mechanism to deal with all of the perverted occurrences that chattel slavery in the U.S. inflicted upon all involved, (including slave owners).

White reinforces her contention that this institution was inordinately worse for slave women than for their male counterparts. The final mythological…… [Read More]

References

White, D.G. (1985). Ar'n't I a Woman? Female Slaves In The Plantation South. New York: W.W. Norton and Company.
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Human Trafficking

Words: 555 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29431578

Poverty has a particularly strong influence on world affairs today and it is especially difficult for particular individuals to survive as long as they do not get involved in activities that very much resemble the form of slavery that was abolished more than 140 years ago. While some might interpret certain jobs to be no different from others, given that they entail individuals doing things they are not particularly fond of, the reality is that these respective jobs involve people being unable to leave and forced to work.

Many people leave their homes because they are poor and hope that they are going to make it in other locations. However, once they actually get there they realize that they are abused and forced to work for little to no compensation. These people are, by definition, slaves, in spite of the fact that the social order has a tendency to regard…… [Read More]

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Patrick Henry's Speech

Words: 1427 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 224998

Patrick Henry's Speech

Slavery had existed for a very long time. It is still existent; however, the form may have changed. Anti-slave laws and abolitionist movement had been there in the past to stop slave trade in Africa. Provisions had been there but there has been no significant impact. This report focuses on Henry's speech in which he has argued how the masters (British) used to control their slaves (American colony). Henry holds the view that British should be thrown away from their executive power and Americans should fight for their freedom. Hence, the Thesis Statement is:

Patrick Henry was imageries, metaphors and analogies to persuade his audience to join the freedom struggle against the British.

Analysis of Henry's speech

Henry stresses in the first paragraph on the need to fight for freedom by saying, "I consider it as nothing less than a question of freedom or slavery." In Henry's…… [Read More]

References

Sue, G. (2005) Rhetorical Analysis of Persuasion: Patrick Henry's Speech to the Virginia Convention. Language Arts and Social Studies
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Zinn a People's History of the U S

Words: 594 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 93923448

Zinn's a People's History of the U.S.

Should the U.S. apologize for slavery and its legacy? ho benefits if the U.S. doesn't apologize?

It is difficult to determine the answer to such a polarizing question. Some argue that slavery has been a form of life since the beginning of mankind and that if the African-American community is apologized to, then the Jewish people who were slaves should get apologies too. They argue that the sins of our ancestors are not our own and that we are not responsible for their actions. Yet, the American form of slavery was especially heinous. According to the text, the American form of slavery was the cruelest. Zinn points to two reason that American slavery was the most horrible: "the frenzy for limitless profit that comes from capitalistic agriculture" and "the reduction of the slave to less than human status by the use of racial…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Zinn, Howard. A People's History of the United States. New York: Harper. 1999. Print.
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Free Labor the Majority of

Words: 1452 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75113645

These newspapers continuously wrote that there is no essential conflict between labor class (referring to wage earners) and the capitalists and that each should not suspect the other in the development of America.

outhern slave society: An essential conflict with free labor social order

There were many distinctions in the Northern and outhern economic and social outlook of America. There were conflicting ideologies being pursued in these regions and the economic progress of Northern region was associated to the free enterprising class known as the middle class. The class thrived in the Northern region by investing in their own businesses, small and large. On the contrary, outhern society was based on slavery system. The Northerners demanded that the slavery of fugitives' slaves shall be abolished and free soil in the west was to be enforced. The essential elements that divided the Northerners and outherners were the matter of slavery. The…… [Read More]

Such deep was the issue of slavery that it broke down the part of Whigs during 1850s and led Republicans to replace them as a symbol of hope, prosperity, and economic progress. The main reason of elimination of Whigs from national scene was their persistence to support the slave system in south whereas its own leaders were not willing to support such oppressive practice while rest of Americas strived for economic progress. Such diverse and conflicting was the issue of slavery and the difference in Southern and Northern concepts of economic progress that 'The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854' nearly destroyed two political parties, Whigs were totally eliminated from political scene and Democrats saw their party divided on sensational lines. W.C. Pennington quoted that the slavery impacted each and every aspect of economic and thus the social life of African-Americans. He said "the being of slavery, its, and its body, lives and moves in the chattel principle, the property principle, and the bill of sale principle" (Henretta, Edwards & Self, 358). The domestic slave trade was considered to be absolutely what Republicans essentially wanted to abolish in figurative sense as well. The Republicans held the view that "Free labor meant independence from wage earning with fixed salaries, if northern person is wage earning and dependent for whole life, he is no different from southern slave" (Foner, 15). Thus, the Republican viewed dependence of a northern on the wages for whole of his life as being equal to the status of a southern slave. This figurative explanation indicates that the southern way of life and economic conduct was fundamentally conflicting with that of Republican's notion of free labor and enterprise, let alone being inconsistent with Republican ideology.

Conclusion

The Republican concept of free labor, as described by Zachariah Chandler, meant "that a young man goes out for service, for labor by wages and earns enough money to start his own farm and becomes employer of labor." Thus, it was contradictory to the oppressive and conservative notions of labor held by the southern slave owners. The progress of American society, according the Republican perspective, lay in the enterprising and middle class men who strived for better economic prospects. The practices of slavery and such oppressive social and economic systems were opposed to the very concept of economic justice that was held by Northerners.
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History African Diaspora Subject - Fredrick Douglass Ambassor

Words: 1455 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86818821

History African Diaspora (Subject)- Fredrick Douglass Ambassor Hatti. (Objectives )-Two primary sources Two secondary sources, Outline, Structure, Thesis, Arugument, Motives, Primaries a Tittle.

Frederick Douglass and the African Diaspora

Africa is presently perceived as a land of origin by millions of people from around the world, as numerous Africans have either willingly or unwillingly left their homes throughout time. Although the term African Diaspora generally refers to a series of Africans who left their home continent from antiquity and until the present day, it is widely used to relate to Africans who descend from individuals who were forcefully brought to the American continent during the Atlantic slave trade. In spite of the fact that they were persecuted and forced to work as slaves in the Americas, some Africans actually rose against their oppressors and are presently remembered as some of the most reputable individuals in all of history.

Africans have…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Gomez, William Angelo, Reversing Sail: A History Of The African Diaspora, (Cambridge University Press, 2005)

McFeely, William S. Frederick Douglass (New York W.W. Norton, 1991)

"Lecture on Haiti," Retrieved March 3, 2012, from the Webster University Website: http://www.webster.edu/~corbetre/haiti/history/1844-1915/douglass.htm

The Liberator, 27 March 1846; Reprinted in Philip Foner, ed., Life and Writings of Frederick Douglass, vol. 1 (New York: International Publishers, 1950), p. 138.
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Black Culture Films Black Culture Documentaries Quite

Words: 619 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77888875

Black Culture Films

Black Culture Documentaries

Quite often and particularly in the United States, it is commonplace to understand the black cultural experience largely through the lenses of slavery and the Civil Rights movement. And to be certain, these are aspects of the experience that have left indelible imprints on black identity. However, as the collection of documentaries assessed here denotes, the black cultural experience is diverse and nuanced in a way that often goes unnoted in the discourse over struggle and oppression. This is particularly on display in the pair of documentary installments by Basil Davidson, which are concerned with the cultural conditions both historical and present in different parts of Africa.

Indeed, what is so compelling about works such as Caravans of Gold is that such films alter the discussion on the black cultural experience by reflecting on the variant of positive contributions made to the evolution of…… [Read More]

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West African Kingdoms

Words: 1527 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8440656

est African Kingdoms

Ghana, Mali, Songhay

The discovery of the New orld opened new markets for European colonizers, as well as new sources wealth. In the Americas, the rich and abundant land meant much wealth could be generated through industries such as agriculture. The only missing factor was a cheap source of labor in order to clear and farm the land.

For this purpose, European colonizers turned to Africa. The kingdoms of Mali and Ghana were particular sources of slaves, since those kingdoms already had a system of slavery in place.

This paper examines the cultural and political history of the kingdoms of Ghana, Mali and Songhay. From this study, the paper seeks to shed light on how the system of slavery in these kingdoms differed significantly from the system of slavery in the Americas. Furthermore, the paper looks at how the African slaves sought to preserve their African heritage,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Davidson, Basil. Africa in History. New York: Macmillan Publishing, 1981.

Der, Benedict. The Slave Trade in Northern Ghana. Ghana: Woeli Publishing Services, 1998.

Harris, Joseph E. Africans and Their History.

New York: Penguin, 1998.
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Enslaved Africans A Discussion of

Words: 970 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66538940



Life had not been easy for the prisoners that survived, as they had been taken over and prepared for their lives as slaves. The operation of preparation had been called "seasoning" and it involved a sort of training process which would make blacks good slaves for the American world.

The main African centers had been found in Senegambia, Sierra-Leone, Oyo, Dahomey, and Benin. The trip from inland towards the ports in which the European awaited for the slaves had also been unforgiving for the prisoners. Captives would have to travel for hundreds of miles while they were tied up in order to prevent them from running away. Many of them died on their way towards the ports.

The time it took for ships to get from Africa to America varied between forty days and six months. The conditions onboard ships had been horrible and prisoners had been packed by ship…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clark Hine, William C. Hine, Stanley Harold. "The Africa-American Odyssey." Prentice Hall, 2005.

Doudou Diene. "From Chains to Bonds: The Slave Trade Revisited." Books/UNESCO, 2001.

Darlene Clark Hine, William C. Hine, Stanley Harold. "The Africa-American Odyssey." Prentice Hall, 2005.

A idem
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African Slavery With New World

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14567619

S. The lives of the slaves were sharply divided from the whites on the plantation. The slaves lived away from the main house in the slave quarters, and only the house slaves were allowed in the main house. The slaves not only worked in the fields, they had to grow their own gardens for food, and they usually only got Sunday off. During planting and harvest, they worked long hours, from sunrise to sunset, and they faced harsh retribution if they attempted to complain. They were the most harshly treated of any of these groups of slaves, and they suffered the most, too.

During the four centuries of the Atlantic slave trade, an estimated eleven million Africans were transported to North and South America" (Notes), and as noted, millions of them died along the way, so it is really not known how many left Africa never to return. Slaves in…… [Read More]

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Development of Northern and Southern Colonies Before the Civil War

Words: 2623 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88275499

Northern and Southern Colonies before the Civil War

In the middle of the 19th century, the industrial revolution that was growing depicted the presence of the two countries all of the most progressive independent states. The symbolic status in England laid the foundation of working class exploitation, urbanization and industrialization and the other one based on village, farmhouse, agriculture, and trustworthy relations between tenants and squires in 1845. egarding the census of the 1850, the population of the United States was about twenty-three million; this was a rise from thirteen million in the year 1830. As of 1850, the North saw increased populations of immigrants incoming. The census that was carried out in 1860 showed the population of the United States to be about thirty-one million. This represented a thirty-nine percent increase in a span of ten years where the South only had eighth million whites compared to twenty million…… [Read More]

Reference List

Fitzhugh, George. Cannibals All! Or, Slaves Without Master. (Port Royal, Caroline, VA: 1857). A. Morris, Publisher, chapter 1, 1-4

Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs and Gjerde Jon "Commercial development and immigration in the North at midcentury" in Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs and Gjerde Jon. Major Problems in American History: To 1877. (Boston, Massachusetts: 2007). Houghton Mifflin Company, chapter 11, 304-334

Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs, and Gjerde Jon. "Agriculture and Slavery in the South at Midcetury" in Hoffman, Elizabeth Cobbs and Gjerde Jon. Major Problems in American History: To 1877. (Boston, Massachusetts: 2007). Houghton Mifflin Company, chapter 12, 335-360

McPherson James M. "The United States at Midcetury" in McPherson James M. Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era. (Oxford: 1988). Oxford University Press, Chapter 1, 7-46