Sociological Perspective Essays (Examples)

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Sociological Theory

Words: 3338 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14590401

Sociological Theory

Sociology as a field of study entails examining and understanding the behavior of human groups and associated social behavior. In understanding these aspects, the sociologists have, their focus primarily concentrated on the human interactions. These human interactions revolve around how the different social relations influence the behavior and attitudes of the people and how the societies originate, form and change. Human interactions are vast, and so is the field of sociology. It covers virtually all the topics of human life, from gender, race, religion, education, politics, health, group behavior and conformity among others. Sociologist focus on how the society and people influence other people since most personal experiences has their origin from external or social forces.

Sociological imagination

The social and external forces exist within the society in the form of interpersonal relationships between families and friends. Additionally, these relations form from the encounters in the academic, religious,…… [Read More]

References

Schaefer, R.T. (2007). Sociology. Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Ballantine, J.H., & Roberts, K.A. (2010). Our social world: Introduction to sociology. Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press, An Imprint of SAGE Publications.

Giddens, A., & Sutton, P.W. (2009). Sociology. Cambridge, UK: Polity.

King, L., & McCarthy, D. (2009). Environmental sociology: From analysis to action. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
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Sociological Analysis of Hyperconnectivity Sociology Hyperconnectivity Is

Words: 1133 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97221229

Sociological Analysis of Hyperconnectivity

Sociology

Hyperconnectivity is a fairly new concept that it is indigenous to the 21st century. The term was coined only a few years ago by Canadian social scientists as a way to describe how people are connect via machines, networked organizations, and networked societies overall. Thus, this is a term that could have been coined now. "Hyper" is usually an adjective to describe a state of excess excitement and unruly energy; "hyper" as it exists as a prefix coming from the Greek language, means abnormal, unusual, and appearing in quantities beyond what is normal. Both definitions can be useful when considering the global culture or state of hyperconnectivity that much of the world finds itself in during the 21st century. We have mobile devices that connect to the internet wherever we are and wherever there is an internet connection. We have long since had computers and…… [Read More]

References:

Anderson, J.Q. (2012). Millennials will benefit and suffer due to their hyperconnected lives. PewResearchCenter, Web, Available from: http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2012/PIP_Future_of_Internet_2012_Young_brains_PDF.pdf. 2013 July 10.

Eicker, G. (2012). Hyperconnectivity leading to Social Inequality? Stumble, Web, Available from:  http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1dFckC/wir-sprechen-online.com/2012/08/05/hyperconnectivity-leading-to-social-inequality/ . 2013 July 10.

Lanir, L. (2012). The Digital Millennial: Will Hyperconnectivity Affect Teens and Young Adults Cognitively? Decoded Science, Web Available from: http://www.decodedscience.com/the-digital-millennial-will-hyperconnectivity-affect-teens-and-young-adults-cognitively/11210. 2013 July 10.

Rainie, L., & Anderson, J. (2008). Hyperconnectivity will Create Unrealistic Work Expectations and Stress, and Intrude on Lives. PewInternet, Web, Available from: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/The-Future-of-the-Internet-III/11-Scenario-8-The-Evolving-Concept-of-Time-for-Work-Leisure/4-Hyperconnectivity-Will-Create-Unrealistic-Work-Expectations-and-Stress-and-Intrude-on-Lives.aspx. 2013 July 10.
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Sociological Explanation of Sexual Initiation and Negotiation

Words: 2084 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56787503

Sociological Explanation of Sexual Initiation and Negotiation

Part of the desire to initiate and negotiate sex stems from the sociological desire to couple or be partnered with another human being. Many people grow up with fantasies and notions of finding Mr. Of Mrs. ight, hoping that at some point in their life they will fall into love and have "an affair of the heart" (Michael, et. al, 1994: 67). The reality of existence however is that most meetings that result in long-term relationships can be mundane. Choice of long-term partners and sexual partners can sometimes differ. In general however, most people seek out people that they think are similar in nature and personality to themselves, even without having intimate knowledge of the social context in which the potential partner lives and exists (Michael, et. al, 1994: 69).

The initiation and negotiation of sex often stems from familiarity. Most people fantasize…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Clements-Schreiber, M.E., Rempel, J.K., and Desmarais, S. (1998). "Women's Sexual Pressure Tactics and Adherence to Related Attitudes: A Step Toward Prediction." Journal of Sex Research, 35, 2, 197-205

Holland, J., Ramazanoglu, C. & Thomson, R. (1996). "In the Same Boat? The Gendered (in) Experience of First Heterosex." Richardson, D. (ed) Theorizing Heterosexuality: Open University Press, Buckingham.

Michael, R.T., Gagnon, J.H., Laumann, E.D. & Kolata, G. (1994). Sex in America: A Definitive Survey. Little, Brown & Co.: Boston, Chapter 4

O'Sullivan, L.F., & Allgeier, E.R. (1998). "Feigning Sexual Desire: Consenting to Unwanted Sexual Activity in Heterosexual Dating Relationships." Journal of Sex Research, 35, 3, 234-243
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Sociological Theories the Theory of

Words: 3250 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16562043



Many different views abound on the origins of modern capitalism, causalities that range from economic to political, from religious to cultural, or for some, an amalgamation of societies need to expand and the resources necessary to fuel that expansion. Max Weber's the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism is a study of the relationship between the ethics of ascetic Protestantism and the emergence of the spirit of modern capitalism. An ascetic Protestant is one who practices self-denial and self-discipline. Weber argues that the religious ideas of groups such as the Calvinists played a role in creating the capitalistic spirit. Calvinism focused on predestination and God's infinite power, a hierarchical system that transcended religion and moved into economic and social activities.

This is true not only in cases where the difference in religion coincides with one of nationality, and thus of cultural development . . . . The same thing…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Durkheim, E. (1997). The Division of Labor in Society. New York: Free Press.

____. (2008). The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. New York: Oxford University

Press.

Grusky, D., ed. (2000). Social Stratification: Class, Race, and Gender in Sociological
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Sociological Theory in the 21st

Words: 2675 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4609524

In addition, the views presented by sociologists concerning idealistic tradition is based on the significance of the concerned group that is sort to motivate, influence to belief and the subject of interest. In this regard, sociologists will not disassociate from the scientific data but will involve the subject of interest to attempt to understand the environment in its own context, showing how sociologists have subjective explanations and not objective ones (Adams et al. 267).

ith regard to the above, there exists queries on whether the sociological theory is a micro or a macro understood occurrence. Apart from the philosophical aspects of knowledge, the micro and macro aspects of sociological theory are highly debated in there associations. It inquires on how these sociological theories on character, reactions, and interpersonal procedures can associate with other social influences. Just like in sciences where there exists micro-macro differences which even with the advanced technology…… [Read More]

Works cited

Adams, Bert, et al. Sociological theory. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press. 2001. Print.

Calhoun, Craig, et al. Contemporary sociological theory. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2007.

Print.

Dunaway, Wilma. Emerging Issues in the 21st Century World-system: New theoretical directions for the 21st century world-system. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood
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Sociological and Psychological Characteristics

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17769066

Terrorists

Profile of a Terrorist

It is common for people to assume that a potential terrorist might be influenced by political causes or social pressures. hile this may be true in some cases, the actual motivations for joining a terrorist group could be among a plethora of various reasons. Furthermore, it is very difficult to study terrorism. Primarily because a terrorist is unlikely to participate in studies on their own free will (DeAngelis, 2009). Terrorist are not likely to volunteer as experimental subjects or offer reliable data through interviews. Therefore the data pool surrounding terrorism is extremely limited and must of the research takes are more subjective approach given these limitations.

There are three primary approaches to studying terrorism which include macro-sociological, psychological, and psychosocial (de la Corte, 2007). The macro-sociological perspective considers social dysfunctions or conflictive trends in the society and social systems. This perspective will try to identify…… [Read More]

Works Cited

de la Corte, L. (2007). Explaining Terrorism: A sychosocial approach. Retrieved from Perspectives of Terrorism:  http://www.terrorismanalysts.com/pt/index.php/pot/article/view/8/html 

DeAngelis, T. (2009, November). Understanding Terrorism. Retrieved from American Psychological Association: http://www.apa.org/monitor/2009/11/terrorism.aspx
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Perspectives of Crime in the US

Words: 2097 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24007414

Sociology of Crime

Sociologists claim that crime is a social construction

The term "crime" refers to various forms of misconduct that are forbidden by the law (Eglin & Hester, 2013). There are different justifications as to shy sociologists classify crimes as a social construction. All social problems are the product of social construction; defining, naming and labeling them into place through which people can make sense of them. It is evident that crime is formed socially. The constructionist angle draws on a varying sociological inheritance, one that looks at the society as a matrix of meaning. It gives a primary role to the procedures of constructing, generating and spreading meanings. Under this perspective, it is impossible to understand reality in a direct and unmediated manner. People will often mediate reality by meaning. Proponents of this school of thought believe that what people experience is the "social construction of reality." How…… [Read More]

References

Eglin, P. & Hester, S (2013). A Sociology of Crime. Toronto: Routledge
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Sociological Theories Functionalism Is Usually Defined as

Words: 1073 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46881781

Sociological Theories

Functionalism is usually defined as viewing society from the aspect of its different parts, and how those parts relate to each other and society as a whole. Many functionalists liken society to a biological form, such as the human body, with its different organs all working in conjunction to keep the body as a whole functioning. Each of the elements of the body has a "function- to maintain the whole, so ensuring the stability or order of the system." (Bissell, 2005, p.41) But while each element has a manifest function, or the function that is expected from it, there are also unexpected functions called latent functions.

On the other hand, Conflict Theory states that the different parts of a society are in a state of conflict over the limited resources available to society. While Functionalism stresses the unity between the different groups, "conflict theory emphasizes strife and friction"…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Margaret, Howard Francis Taylor. (2008). Sociology: Understanding a Diverse Society. Belmont, CA: Thomson Wadsworth. Print.

Bissell, Paul, Janine Morgall Traulsen. (2005). Sociology and Pharmacy Practice. London: Pharmaceutical Press. Print.

Ritzer, George. (1992). Sociological Theory. New York: McGraw Hill. Print.

Sifferlin, Alexandra. (9 Dec. 2013). "Sandy Hook Families Seek Privacy On Anniversary
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Sociological Theory What Makes Democracy Work

Words: 1768 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11144404

Sociological Theory: hat Makes Democracy ork?

hen it comes to "Classical Sociological Theory" and "Contemporary Sociological Theory" there are numerous sociological theories that try to inspect and interpret why and how society purposes; looking at the influences such as mass media, education, the family and the church. All of these theories have their own ideas as to how these numerous establishments distress how should be and is -- some facets of these theories intersect with each other and other facets are totally different. Theories for instance Functionalism and Marxism attempt to describe civilization as an 'absolute truth' (they each look at culture on a macro scale) they trust that set development of society is unavoidable; there is a construction to life and civilization that seldom permits for change.

According to Tocqueville (pp.104) concerning Classical Sociological Theory, his argument is that throughout time our world has seen a lot of different…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Civil Society and Polotical Public Sphere." Habermass, Jurgen. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1996. 470-489.

Kant, Emmanuel. "What is Enlightment?" New York City: Random House, 1949. 132-139.
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Sociological Research and Undocumented Labor

Words: 3088 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29987220



esearch Caveat - esearch surrounding undocumented workers can often be problematic and unreliable. Primarily this is due to the nature of the subject matter -- individual on both sides of the issue are unwilling to talk because of the volaltility of the subject, language barriers, legal issues, access issues, fear of anything that even remotely feels governmental, and the validity of responses. Briefly, we can view these issues and the mitigating circumstances:

Language barriers -- Any viable research study will need to be dual language based; therefore it must be translated into the appropriate lanage and level (typically Spanish), with an emphasis on clarity, removal of hidden meanings or linguistic variations. In addition, the person or persons administering any research questionnaire would likewise need to be bilingual.

Mistrust -- Undocumented workers are often reluctant to particpate in any project that has a written component; they are mistrustful of the system,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Effects of Immigration on Natives' Earnings. (1995, December 11). Retrieved from Immigration - the Demographic and Economic Facts: http://www.cato.org/pubs/policy_report/pr-immig.html#contents

Difficult Moral Questions Surounding Undocumented Workers. (2006, March). Retrieved January 2011, from twotj.org:  http://www.twotlj.org/G-3-171.html 

U.S. Immigration Debate. (2007, June 28). Retrieved from BBCNews.com:  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4850634.stm 

Immigration Act of 1924. (2009, December). Retrieved from United States History.com:  http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1398.html
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Sociological Security the Sociological Structure

Words: 1616 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5251499



The DHS is consistent with the larger social trend on a global scale concerning institutional security measures insofar as Risley (2006) reports that "the securitization of an ever-expanding number of realms is a distinguishing feature of the contemporary political landscape." (1) This is to argue that in addition to the events such as 9/11 which can be seen as a clear catalyst to the changes in structure which have been underway since the end of 2001, there is also something of a broader sociological pattern which is reflected in the merger undertaken in the national security sector. The diminishing lines between commerce, governance and military engagement are perhaps best reflected in this parallel between the security community and the corporate world. The sociological implications are therefore rather significant in coming to understand why certain changes have been sought and in producing reasonable expectations as to what these changes may produce.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Ball, H. (2005). U.S. Homeland Security. ABC-CLIO.

LeClerc, P. (2006). Review: The New Politics of Surveillance and Visibility. Canadian Journal of Sociology Online.

Noakes, J.A. (2000). Official Frames in Social Movement Theory: The FBI, HUAC, and the Communist Threat Hollywood. The Sociological Quarterly, 41(4), 657-680.

Risley, S.H. (2006). The Sociology of Security: Sociological Approaches to Contemporary and Historical Securitization. Annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Online at http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p105192_index.html
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Sociological Paradigms

Words: 506 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23130473

Sociological Paradigms: Structural Functionalism, Conflict, And Symbolic Interactionism

In the field of sociology, there are three paradigms that reflect the ideologies, concepts and ideas prevalently used in sociological studies and research: structural functionalism, social conflict and symbolic interactionism. These paradigms are categorized as such because of their differences; however, they also complement each other because each provides information and explanation about social phenomena in various perspectives. Hence, each paradigm complements the other.

Structural functionalism is the first paradigm that emerged from study of sociology. Structural functionalism was patterned after the principle of empiricism, wherein objectivity and scientific and logical thinking are valued. Structural functionalists believe that social phenomena can be explained objectively and empirically. An objective explanation of social phenomenon involves looking at the phenomenon based on information that is observed by the social scientist. Thus, one must gather facts and information that proves how such phenomenon occurs -- to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

McClelland, K. (2000). "Theoretical perspectives in Sociology." Available at  http://web.grinnell.edu/courses/soc/s00/soc111-01/IntroTheories/IntroTheoriesIndex.html .
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Sociological Class Theories

Words: 1940 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41664843

Sociological Class Theories - ush

In every society, people are grouped into a variety of categories in order to determine how they earn a living, and how much they earn that actually affects or is affected by the economy. This kind of social stratification is common in virtually all of modern societies, but social class theories can help explain or provide some insight as to why a certain economy works smoothly or inadequately. In effect, the real question becomes, is each social class being served fairly, or does one appear to have a class advantage over the others? The three primary theories of social class are 1) conflict, 2) functionalist, and 3) interactionist. If we examine George ush's economic policies we'd notice that these were implemented for the express purpose of benefiting the upper classes even though tax cuts may at first glance, seem like an equal benefit for all.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Kornblum, William. Sociology in a Changing World Sixth edition New York: Thomson-Wadsworth, 2002.

Greider, William. "Bush's Touchy-Feely Economics: The Rich Still Get Richer and the Rest Get the Shaft, But It's Done in a Friendlier Way" The Nation (August 7, 2000) v271 i5 p24.

Herbert, Bob "There's A Catch: Jobs" New York Times (Oct 27, 2003) A21.

Graham Jill and Charlie Mitchell. "Pivotal Events in Congress" National Journal Feb 10, 2001 v33 i6 p416
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Sociological Views on Marriage Argument

Words: 546 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32969727

In fact, the cohabitation option serves a valuable function for many couples, especially where living together allows them to discover possible problem areas in their relationship that would have made marriage a bad idea. If anything, that is preferable to the traditional situation where couples really only begin learning about one another after making the lifelong commitment to a marriage. Finally, Congressman McDonald's point about childbirth out of wedlock ignores the tremendous advantages to children born in stable marriages and suggests that high rates of unwanted pregnancies among unmarried couples somehow negates the benefits of planned pregnancies within marriage.

The Functionalist Perspective Applied to Marriage:

In some respects, there are valid criticisms that justify reevaluating certain aspects of modern marriage, including the unfairness of child custody decisions that favor mothers and financial settlements that obligate married partners who supported the marriage financially to share more of what they earned than…… [Read More]

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Sociological Theories the Adfc Program

Words: 618 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 53003570

The criminal justice system, according to Karl Marx, is thought to work for the rich while the resulting policies are more concerned with controlling the poor. Seigel and Welsh state that, "conflict theorists observe that while spending has been cut on social programs during the past few years, spending on the prison systems has skyrocketed." This leads to the conclusion that when there is a disparity between police and public and the rich and the poor, the conflict creates or influences antisocial or deviant behavior ( ).

The Secure Communities program exists in certain states and is a Department of Homeland Security initiative, which aims to identify and remove criminal aliens. Law enforcement officials in certain states will fingerprint every person booked into jail and those fingerprints will be run through Homeland Security's national database to check for illegal immigrant status. Morton believes the program could transform the face of…… [Read More]

References

Reavy, Pat. (2010) "Program aids to better identify illegal immigrants." Deseret News.

Retrieved on May 20, 2010, from the Website:

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4188/is_20100401/ai_n53004413/?tag=rel.

res2
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Sociological Analysis of the Reality

Words: 797 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17765017

Conflict between the contestants and the management emerges as they are forced to compete and antagonize each other in order to win the prize. Thus, being a contest, conflict in "Survivor" is inevitable, and it is only through a successful power struggle that one will be able to win over the management, thereby winning $1 million. Among the Survivors, meanwhile, the initial conflict that happens is between groups or "tribes." As each contestant is eliminated, one tribe emerges as more dominant in terms of number, thereby necessitating a fusion of the two tribes. This fusion leads to a tension among each contestant, wherein everyone tries his/her best to remain in the contest; conflict now happens as contestants try to establish allegiances and affiliations with others, which, in the process, results to conflicts with other contestants.

However, the inherent presence of conflict in "Survivor" is mainly based on the daily interactions…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Renzetti, C. And D. Curran. (2000). Living Sociology. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
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Sociological and Therapeutic Bias on Understanding Brain Disease

Words: 1446 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16568786

Sociological and Therapeutic Implications of the Brain Disease

Inspiration for professionals who authored the account on chronic brain illnesses came from findings on drugs' impacts on the human brain. The assurance that strong anti-addiction medicines can be found appeared great. The budding scientific branch, addiction biology, implies that addiction --a condition which starts off with the clear, intentional decision to have a go at drugs, spiraling quickly down to an irrepressible, involuntary state --would now be considered seriously, and forever, as an ailment. Using this knowledge, authors hoped to sensitize lawmakers as well as the society to drug-addicts' needs, including improved coverage of private insurance and public treatment access. The agenda also included moderating of puritanical outlooks and smoothing of penal law enforcement. The neuro-centric approach supports unjustified optimism with regard to pharmaceutical treatments, overrating the requirement of professional aid. Conditions characteristically remitted in young adulthood are branded as "chronic."…… [Read More]

References

Clark, M. (2011).Conceptualizing addiction: How useful is the construct. International Journal of Humanities & Social Science, 1(13), 55-64.

Deviance and Addiction. (n.d.). Retrieved November 17, 2015, from http://alcoholrehab.com/addiction-articles/deviance-and-addiction/

GOODE, E. (2011, March 19). THE SOCIOLOGY OF DRUG USE. Retrieved November 17, 2015, from https://edge.sagepub.com/system/files/Ballantine5e_6.2SK_0.pdf

May, C. (2001).Pathology, Identity and the Social Construction of Alcohol Dependence Sociology 35, 385-40.
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Sociological Aspects of Temporary Workers

Words: 1340 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63485881

.." while more than sixty percent of women in the developing world represent those employed in domestic work, street trading and other low paying jobs lacking in "security, benefits, and legal protections..." (2005) Within the informal sector of employment there exists a hierarchy and Stoparic states that employers running small informal enterprises "women are disproportionately represented in the lowest-paying categories, and even within those subcategories they earn less than men, further increasing their risk of poverty.

The work of Heyzer entitled: "When Work Just Traps People in Poverty" published in the Herald Tribune states that: "Rural women spend backbreaking hours on family plots often for no payment at all. Those in urban areas work in unregulated factories, earning pennies for products shipped to markets far away." (Heyzer, 2005) Furthermore, "In virtually all countries, women still bear the primary responsibility for taking care of children, the ill and the elderly, limiting…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Weather, Charles (2001) Changing White-Collar Workplaces and Female Temporary Workers in Japan. Social Science Japan Journal 4:201-218 (2001)

Benjamin O. (2006)

The Shaping of Opportunity Structures: A Work History Perspective on Israeli Working Poor Women Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Online Retrieved 2006-10-05 at http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p103325_index.html

Stoparic, Bojana (2005) Women's Paid Labor Keeps Door Open to Poverty. Global Policy Forum 5 Sept 2005. Online available at http://globalpolicy.org/socecon/inequal/gender/2005/0905lucy.htm
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Sociological Theories Understanding Society Also

Words: 315 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83805486

From a functionalist perspective, colleges are crucial parts or systems in the society because it promotes and makes possible education for the society. However, from a conflict theory standpoint, colleges can be considered structures or systems through which only those with access to education continue to perpetuate the 'oppression' of the "have-nots" -- people who cannot afford a college education. Symbolic interactionism, meanwhile, looks at colleges as an important tradition and process in the American society, wherein people are expected to be educated and go through the process of entering and having a college education, towards the goal of becoming a productive and/or learned member of the society. Primarily, symbolic interactionism focuses on the tradition of continuing education, and education as a critical part of every person's being and identity in his/her society.

eference

enzetti, C. And D. Curran. (2000). Living Sociology. MA: Allyn and…… [Read More]

Reference

Renzetti, C. And D. Curran. (2000). Living Sociology. MA: Allyn and Bacon.
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Biomedicine Explain How Sociological and Lay Ideas

Words: 1640 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41193251

Biomedicine

Explain how sociological and lay ideas about illness differ from those of biomedicine

Individuals and societies have over the years engaged in identifying the causal factors which can be attributed with an ailment. Illness and its related explanation has been a focal point of health professionals. It is also important to note that the attribution of illness with a specific cause may not be the same in terms of biomedicine and sociological or lay ideas. Sociological ideas tend to lay emphasis on the norms, values and subjective experiences of the individuals as the core elements which formulate their perception about an illness (Blaxter 2010). The layman is more likely to base the explanation of an ailment on social causes rather than exploring the dimensions of the illness through medical explanation. On the other hand, medical professionals (biomedicine) seek causal factors which are linked with the physiological and anatomical aspects…… [Read More]

References:

Barker, KK 2010, 'The social construction of illness: medicalization and contested illness' in Bird, CE, Conrad, P, Fremon, AM & Timmermans, M (ed.) Handbook of medical sociology. Vanderbilt University Press, USA.

Blaxter, M 2010, Health, 2nd edn, Polity Press, USA.

Bury, M 2005, Health and Illness, Polity Press, USA.Nettleton, S 2006, The Sociology of Health & Illness, 2nd edn, Polity Press, USA.

Naidoo J & Wills, J 2008, Health Studies: An Introduction, Palgrave Macmillan, USA.
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Ukrainian Civil War in a Sociological Context

Words: 582 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28535091

Current Event Due 11:55p Sunday eek 5 the eek 5 Homework 2 Assignment meets objectives: Apply a sociological perspective social world. Analyze contemporary social issues sociological imagination sociological theories concepts analyze everyday life.

The Ukraine conflict has generated much controversy in recent months as a community of experts has gotten actively involved in discussing the topic and in attempting to provide solution to the crisis. Even with the fact that initial decisions were related to getting an international body to intervene and influence the two belligerent camps to put down their weapons, it gradually became clear that the situation would require more thought and that the people involved are reluctant to yield to their adversaries. Shaun alker and Howard Amos's article "Ukraine civil war fears mount as volunteer units take up arms" provides information with regard to the critical nature of the conflict.

By analyzing matters from a sociological perspective,…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Newman, E., & DeRouen, K. (2014). Routledge Handbook of Civil Wars. Routledge.

Walker, Shaun, & Amos, Howard. Ukraine civil war fears mount as volunteer units take up arms. Retrieved on May 16, 2014, from:  http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/15/ukraine-civil-war-fears-mount-volunteer-units-kiev-russia
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Somalia- Social Perspective on the

Words: 2501 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47421796

This idea is also strengthen by the example of the inhabitants from the northern region. Yet, the idea is not completely tolerated. There are, of course, groups which benefit from the current context, like the elite groups that one would furthermore refer to when analyzing social stratification.

Along with the political context of Somalia, which is the principal factor of the economical failure of the country, another significant reason consists in Somalia's vulnerability and lack of defense in front of the world's biggest states which transformed it, at the beginning of the 1990s in a sort of testing ground for all the issues they confronted with.

For example, one knows the fact that a significant amount of the local economy before the 1990 stood in natives' activity of fishing, as both the Aden Gulf and the Indian Ocean are known as being rich in piscicultural resources. After becoming independent in…… [Read More]

References:

Mubarak, Jamil Abdalla (1996). From Bad Policy to Chaos in Somalia: How an Economy Fell Apart. Westport, CT: Praeger.

Abdullahi, Mohamed Diriye (2001). Culture and Customs of Somalia. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press

Feldman, Stacy, Slattery, Brian (2003). Living without a Government in Somalia: An Interview with Mark Bradbury: Development Processes in Somalia Exist Not as a Result of Official Development Assistance, but in Spite of it. Journal of International Affairs, 57 (1), pag 1.

U.S Department of State- Bureau of African Affairs (2011). Background Note: Somalia [January 3, 2011]. Retrieved from  http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/2863.htm
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Life After Execution -- Perspectives

Words: 3684 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52465057

Paradoxically, states with harsher criminal statutes and higher conviction rates tend to maintain fewer inmate developmental programs because high-volume prisons tend to be run on a for-profit basis that discourages "unnecessary" spending. The most cynical suggestion is that decreasing recidivism is against the financial interests of private prisons and (although to a lesser extent,) those of government-run prisons as well (Schmalleger, 2008).

Other aspects of many types of contemporary criminal trends may also significantly undermine any strategy of deterrence through awareness of strict prosecution and sentencing. In that regard, law enforcement authorities across the nation have catalogued volumes of information about criminal subcultures in general and of the street gang mentality in particular (Pinizzotto, Davis, & Miller, 2007). Urban street gangs in particular have given rise to a culture of remorseless violence and disregard for the consequences of even the most violent crime that largely precludes any real deterrent value…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Dershowitz, A. (2002). Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. New York:

Bantam Books.

Friedman, A. (2005). A History of American Law. New York: Touchstone.

Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2008). Psychology and Life. New York: Allyn & Bacon.
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Understanding Police Shootings From a Sociological View

Words: 1368 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48933599

Police Shooting Incidents

Cities across the United States have experienced numerous incidents of police misconduct, which occur several times in every decade, particularly when a high profile case takes place. Actually, police misconduct including police shooting has always been exposed by high profile cases, which highlight some forms of police abuse and violation of human rights. While police officers are mandated with the task of making several decisions and taking necessary actions in protecting the society, they sometimes use force irresponsibly and end up hurting the people they are supposed to protect. In the past few months, there have been increased incidents of police shooting, which can be effectively examined and understood through a sociological perspective.

The Phenomenon of Police Shooting

The increased cases of police shooting in the past few months are not a new phenomenon that has been highlighted by increased media coverage. This case of increased shooting…… [Read More]

References

CBS Interactive. (2015, March 28). Boston Police Officer in Coma after Shooting. CBS News. Retrieved December 17, 2015, from http://www.cbsnews.com/news/boston-police-officer-in-coma-after-being-shot-without-provocation/

Chappell, A.T. & Piquero, A.R. (2004). Applying Social Learning Theory to Police Misconduct. Deviant Behavior, 25, 89-108.

"Deviance and Social Control." (n.d.). Chapter 7. Retrieved December 17, 2015, from http://files.meetup.com/19005440/SampleChapter07_final.pdf

Farago, R. (2013, September 29). Hawaii: This is the Gun Control Paradise they're Looking for. Retrieved December 17, 2015, from http://www.thetruthaboutguns.com/2013/09/robert-farago/hawaii-this-is-the-gun-control-paradise-theyre-looking-for/
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Sociology Diversity - A Sociological

Words: 868 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77183261

If students are not able to come up with answers the chances are high there is little diversity, or the diversity prevalent is not part of the culture. However, on asking the same question of a culturally diverse organization, sociologists may find students enthusiastic and willing to talk about events, fairs, classes geared toward cultural understanding and an overall sense of multiculturalism and belief systems on campus.

One interesting insight as to the effects of diversity on the educational environment would be to measure student success outcomes, and the presence or lack thereof of support structures including clubs and fraternities that promote diversity and cultural education and acceptance. Sociologists can look at overall attendance rates, it can look at the student population and sociologists may interview or observe students to identify whether they feel included as part of the university culture or whether they feel excluded or like an outsider…… [Read More]

References

Andersen, M.L., & Taylor, H.F. (2006). General sociology: Sociology in everyday life. Indiana:

Better World Books.

Morrow, R.A. (1985). Critical theory and critical sociology. Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, 22(5): 710.

Sociology: Diversity
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Strategic Perspectives in Management Accounting and Finance

Words: 2965 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49188738

Strategic Perspectives in Management Accounting and Finance

The main reason for differentiation in the accounting studies seemed to occur due to the functionalist perceptions in the expertise of social studies. According to Dellaportas and Davenport (2008) professions are being separated by occupation on the basis of the level of distinctiveness one occupation has from another; a model first designed by Greenwood in 1975.

Abercrombie et al. (1994, p. 335) in their study explained that such distinctiveness is surrounded by the concept which results in more beneficiary outcomes for the public than for an individual's professional interest in providing services. This simply means that it was an original human demand that gave birth to all professions. There's an equality on profession's social compulsion i.e. there is a balance between a professional's job and his obligation to serve the public. In this regard Carey (1965, p. 376) asserted that it was in…… [Read More]

References

Abbott, A. The system of professions: an essay on the division of expert labor. Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1988).

Abercrombie, N., Hill, S., Turner, B.S. The penguin dictionary of sociology. 3rd ed. Ringwood: Penguin Books (1994).

Bedard, J. The disciplinary process of the accounting profession: protecting the public or the profession? The Quebec experience. Journal of Accounting and Public Policy; 20 (2001) (4/5): 399 -- 437.

Bivins, T.H. Public relations, professionalism, and the public interest. Journal of Business Ethics; 12 (1993) (2): 117 -- 26.
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Sociological Theory Sociology There Were Several Theories

Words: 1215 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68955335

Sociological Theory

Sociology

There were several theories that I found interesting as a part of the course, yet the theory that I connected with most personally was Symbolic Interaction. This theory was established first by George Herbert Mead, who coined the phrase "symbolic interactionism" first. The theory has been present in the field of sociology for several decades, and after the death of Mead, other sociologists took on the theory in their own works, studies, and theories. This theory is one of my favorites for a few reasons, one of which is because I believe I have seen it at work in my own life and in the interactions of others in their lives.

I also agree with the validity of this theory because I feel that it coincides with other theories in other fields, such as psychology. There are psychologists, such as Freudian psychologists and Lacanian psychologists that have…… [Read More]

References:

Sage Publishing. (nd). Chapter 16: Symbolic Interactionist Theories of Identity. Web, Available from: http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/50436_ch_16.pdf. 2013 July 08.

Shott, S. (1979). Emotion and Social Life: A Symbolic Interactionist Analysis. The American Journal of Sociology, 84(6), 1317 -- 1334. 2013 July 08.

Smith, Ronald W. And Bugni, Valerie, "Symbolic interaction theory and architecture" (2006). Faculty Publications (S). Paper 5. Available from: http://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/sociology_pubs/5. 2013 July 08.
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Sociological Theory Social Order Institutions Socializations and the Performance of Social Roles

Words: 1271 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27349311

Social Order: Institutions, Socializations, And the Performance of Social Roles

Erving Goffman dramaturgical theory is a seminal theory in the field of sociology. An example of "micro-sociological analysis," it forced sociological analysis back into the examination of things which actually exist, individual behavior, instead of mere concepts. Goffman demonstrated that the examination of real things can not only clarify existing lines of thought, but open up new avenues for the study of social behavior. Thesis: Through his emphasis on the individual's performance of social roles, Goffman demonstrates that, although social organization and dynamics do influence individual behavior, it is the individual herself who determines the final shape of this behavior.

Summary of the Theory

Erving Goffman's work, often classified as "symbolic interactionism," is highly valuable for the study of socialization and the performance of social roles. Erving studied how individuals used symbols in the performance of their social roles and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Calhoun, C.J. (2002). Contemporary sociological theory. Oxford: Blackwell
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Sociological Approach to Reducing Alcoholism

Words: 1253 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84347242

Moreover, even content-based restriction would be irrelevant to the competitive strength of market competitors, since they would apply across the board and to all equally. The only likely negative effect on manufacturers of alcohol products is precisely the objective that increased regulation of the content of alcohol product advertising would hope to achieve: namely, reducing the instances of new users responding to advertising and reducing the ability of manufacturers to drive consumer behavior through deliberate psychological manipulation.

In principle, the most appropriate distinction would be between content that presents specific objective attributes of the product (i.e. taste, quality, versatility, company reputation, etc.) and content that is expressly designed to exploit known psychological and social tendencies conducive to increasing alcohol consumption. In practice, alcohol product advertising copy that promoted flavor and quality, (for example), would be permitted; conversely, advertising copy that exploited the psychological influence of sex appeal, social popularity, or…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dershowitz A. (2006). Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. New York:

Touchstone.

Fisher G.L. (2006). Substance Abuse: Information for School Counselors, Social

Workers, Therapists and Counselors. New Jersey: Allyn & Bacon.
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Sociological Concept

Words: 1242 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 596992

Suicide and Society

Suicide: An Individual Phenomenon or a Societal Construct?

Statistics show that suicide rates in the U.S. are highly predictable. It is annually expected each year that over 30,000 suicides will occur, as compared to about 17,000 homicides. This stable and predictable estimate of suicide rate stems from a precise analysis of social factors describing four separate categories of suicidal influences: egoistic, altruistic, anomic, and fatalistic. According to the functionalist theory described by Emile Durkheim, rates are social facts based on other established social facts, and thus have a sociological basis. As suicide rates are social facts, Durkheim set out to provide an empirical basis of social explanation regarding suicide, providing a far different account of trends than the previously perceived notion that suicide is based purely on individual or psychological reasons. Thus, the phenomenon of what actually motivates the occurrence of suicide can be examined from a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Dunman LJ. "Suicide." The Emile Durkheim Archive. 2003. The Bettmann Archive. 18 Mar. 2004. http://durkheim.itgo.com/suicide.html

Henslin JM. Down to Earth Sociology, 12th Edition. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2003.

Knapp P. "The Functionalist Analysis of Deviance." Peter Knapp Homepage. 1994. Villanova

University. 18 Mar. 2004. www94.homepage.villanova.edu/peter.knapp/Intro1-24.ppt
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Sociological Differences Amongst Cultures of

Words: 2246 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74741143

Many cultural studies state that the Qur'an provides for the mercy killing of women who have been failed to have been adequately protected and have, as a result thereof, been raped. In fact, Muslim countries have a disproportionate amount of honor killings; yet, this should be understood as a cultural phenomenon as the scripture and the practice of the Qur'an do not dictate or specifically set forth the proposition that women should die as a result of being assaulted (Quraishi,, 2000).

Conclusion and Commentary:

Importance of Cultural elativism and Understanding the Sociological Differences Between Women of the United States and Women of Islam

After September 11th and the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City by Osaama Bin Laden and his progeny, a cultural relativist approach which bases itself in understanding the Islamic worldview became under attack and, as a society, we have created less understanding,…… [Read More]

References

Ahmed, a.S. (1994). Living Islam: from Samarkand to Stornoway. New York: Facts on File.

Ashraf, S. (1998). Shattering Illusions: Western conceptions of Muslim women. Stanford Boothe Prize for Excellence in Writing. Retrieved from Questia.com.

Brandt, R. (2009, September 11). 10 Differences Between Christianity and Islam | Relijournal. Retrieved May 7, 2010, from http://relijournal.com/religion/10-differences-between-christianity-and-islam/

CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Sociology of the Church. (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04060a.htm
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Sociological Problem in the U S

Words: 1638 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41684237

Childhood Epidemic

Obesity is a significant problem for today's American children. In fact, the NCCC calculates that more than 23 million children and teenagers are overweight. Since 1980, the obesity rate amongst children has more than doubled and amongst children aged 2-5 years almost tripled, whilst it has more than tripled in adolescents aged 12-19 years (Ogden et al., 2008.).

The problems of childhood obesity in children include the following:

Obese children are at a higher risk for asthma

Obese children are more likely to suffer from psychosocial problems, fatty liver, orthopedic-related problems and sleep apnea

Childhood obesity has also corresponded with a rise in with type 2 diabetes, particularly among adolescent minority populations

Obese children are found to be at greater risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as high cholesterol levels, high blood pressure and abnormal glucose tolerance

The causes of childhood obesity have been reduced to various…… [Read More]

References

Arizona law blog http://blog.sdsfamilylaw.com/child-custody-debate-state-intervention-to-remove-obese-children-from-their-homes/

Building a healthier America http://www.buildinghealthieramerica.org/index.asp?Type=B_BASIC&SEC={FEB23E39-070A-4D02-8B7B-D9E360BDFF8B}

Boon, R & Clysedale, P (2005) Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 45

Cleveland.com (December 04, 2011) Childhood obesity: Government was wrong to intervene in Cleveland Heights casehttp://blog.cleveland.com/letters/2011/12/childhood_obesity_government_w.html
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Women and Sociology the Sociological

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36442537

e. As waitresses.)

II. Social Action

Max eber developed the concept of social action as a means of describing those actions that take into account actions and reactions of other people, then modifying that action based on those occurrences. Sociologists employ social action as a conceptual model as a means of determining how certain behaviors are modified in specific environments. hen we evaluate the norms of social discourse and the customs that prevail in any given society, we see how social action works.

Importantly, social action takes into consideration reactions of others. hen the reaction of an individual or group is not wanted, then the action will be modified accordingly. Sociology is essentially the study of social action, as it takes into account the way society functions and the way human behavior is established in societal structures. According to social action theory, people change their actions according to what social…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cohen, Roger. "Her Jewish State." The New York Times Magazine, July 8, 2007.

Mills, C.W. The Sociological Imagination. London: Oxford University Press, 1959.
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Health Topic With a Sociological

Words: 1997 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68132507



Does Socio-economic Status Impact lives of People with HIV and AIDS?

Individuals with a lower socio-economic status are more prone to contracting HIV and AIDS virus. This measure also determines how individual status, relates to proper medical care. Lack of socioeconomic strength associated to the practice of risky sexual behaviors results to HIV contraction. Men engage in sexual intercourse with many partners without using a condom (Will 2000). Women at this lower level engage in riskier sexual behaviors. Homeless people are more vulnerable to infection, women in such situations are prone to rape and, men are most likely drug users. Individuals with low socioeconomic resources are prone to injury, which makes the susceptible to the effects of the virus that affects the central nervous system (Earnshaw, Valerie and Stephenie 2009).

Does HIV Infection Affect the Socio Sconomic Status of Infected Persons?

HIV and AIDS have negative impacts on the productivity…… [Read More]

References

Semple, S.J., Patterson, T.L., Temoshok, L.R., McCutchan, J.A., Straits-Troster,

K., Chandler, J.A., & Grant, I. 2003. "Identification of psychobiological stressors among HIV-positive women." Women & Health, 20(4), 15-36.

Earnshaw, Valerie a., and Stephenie R. Chaudoir.2009. "From conceptualizing to measuring HIV stigma: a review of HIV stigma mechanism measures." AIDS

and Behavior 13.6 (2009): 1160-1177.
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Sociology and Religion Sociological Study

Words: 1646 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66440978

The emphasis on social stability, as seen in many institutions' suspicion regarding social change, can lead to the perpetuation of social inequality. In some instances, there is even a stronger link between religion and power structures.

The caste system in India privileges the rights of the priestly class. However, political leaders in India have also formed strong ties with the Brahmin class. These ties serve to "legitimize" the power in the political government.

Evaluating conflict theory

Conflict theory provides several important insights regarding the conservative role that religion has played in society. McGuire and Collins' study provide specific cases that uphold Marx's original premise. These studies show how conflict thinking still remains relevant, even until today.

However, the emphasis on the conservative and status quo orientation of religion also glosses over religion's liberating potential. Theologians like Gustavo Gutierrez, a priest who served in a Peruvian slum in the 1960s, argued…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, Randall (1981). Sociology since mid century: Essays in theory cumulation. New York: Academic Press.

Durkheim, Emile. (1912). The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life. New York: Oxford University Press

Hunter, James Davison. (1983). American evangelicalism: Conservative religion and the quandary of modernity. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press.

Lawson, R. (1998). From American church to immigrant church: the changing face of seventh-day Adventism in metropolitan new York. Sociology of Religion, Winter 1998. Retrieved Oct 23, 2004, at http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0SOR/is_4_59/ai_53590308.
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Male Consciousness-Raising From a Sociological

Words: 525 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49852094

The authors are successful in this aim up to a large extent. However, they have not discussed gender discrimination individually; rather this topic has been explained collectively with the multi-cultural workforce management. The OB theories, models, and organizational justice approaches which the authors have used in writing this book can help in explaining the inequality practices which modern business organizations have adopted at their workplaces.

"The New American Workplace"

By James O'Toole, & Edward E. Lawler

This book is based on the results of a nation-wide survey conducted by the Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare in the United States. The purpose of the survey was to analyze the working conditions in the country from the perspective of working patterns, equal opportunities, flexible work options, gender inequality, and the like. The book is co-authored by the Chairman of the team himself. The findings of the research suggest that business organizations…… [Read More]

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Social Perspective

Words: 648 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96427937

Sociology

Symbolic interactionism is the theory suggesting human beings are best understood in "interactive relation to their environment," (University of Twente, 2014). The three core principles of symbolic interactionism including meaning, language, and thought. Meaning refers to the fact that people ascribe meaning to their relationships, institutions, and other social structures. This meaning is what guides human emotion and cognition. Language is the symbolic type of human communication. Like meaning, language also impacts human emotional and cognitive states. Thus, the third component of symbolic interactionism is thought. How a person perceives, judges, and interacts with the world is covered by symbolic interactionism. Symbolic interactionism also suggests that the self is a mirror for others, and vice-versa in what is known as the "looking glass self," ("The Symbolic Interactionist Perspective," n.d.). Symbolic interactionism is an ideal sociological lens through which to understand how social media has transformed the nature of human…… [Read More]

References

Fernback, J. (2007). Beyond the diluted community concept. New Media and Society 9(1), 49-69.

Satell, G. (2014). If you doubt that social media has changed the world, take a look at Ukraine. Forbes. Retrieved online: http://www.forbes.com/sites/gregsatell/2014/01/18/if-you-doubt-that-social-media-has-changed-the-world-take-a-look-at-ukraine/

"The Symbolic Interactionist Perspective," (n.d.). Retrieved online: https://www.boundless.com/sociology/textbooks/boundless-sociology-textbook/sociology-1/the-theoretical-perspectives-in-sociology-24/the-symbolic-interactionist-perspective-157-3185/

University of Twente (2014). Symbolic interactionism.
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Social & Cultural Perspective in

Words: 1296 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32605340

This is because workers, managers, and other employees know their roles within the company. This awareness enables them to work towards improving service delivery to the consumers according to the standards of the industry. Since extensive research is done to determine what the consumers perceive to be best, execution of expectations is easy from the part of the formal leadership or management of the firms. The company is able to associate effectively with the clients since they have a better knowledge than before on what is appropriate for the market (Brey, 2011).

Deeper understanding of hospitality enables managers and senior employees to adopt appropriate measures to revive the industry in cases of crisis. In order to adopt appropriate measure to help boost the industry, it is crucial to understand the structure, organization, and proceedings within the hospitality industry. Managers are also capable of determining approaches vital for improving the conditions…… [Read More]

References

Brey, E.T. (2011). Developing a Better Understanding of Resort Management: An Inquiry into Industry Practices. Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management, 20(1), 79-102.

doi:10.1080/19368623.2011.530188

Hemmington, N. (2007). From Service to Experience: Understanding and Defining the Hospitality Business. Service Industries Journal, 27(6), 747-755.

doi:10.1080/02642060701453221
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Field Experiment on the Interactive Perspective of Deviance

Words: 983 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66312090

Behavior Experiment

The experiment took place in a busy office building at around five o'clock in the evening. It started on the ground floor and involved walking into an elevator and not turning around. The total number of people who entered the elevator was six, two stopped on the third floor, which was the first stop and the other three stopped on the fifth, which was the last stop. The experiment ended on the fifth floor and took a little over three minutes.

eactions

The other five people upon entering the elevator realized that not everybody turned to face the entrance as usual. The group seemed baffled with the occurrence. Two people, a female and a male laughed asking jokingly if they were supposed to turn around. They appeared friendly and continued with interesting comment until they left the elevator. The other three smiled but seemed less concerned. However, the…… [Read More]

Reference

Alder, P., & Alder, P. (2012). Constructions of Deviance: Social Power, Context, and Interaction (7th ed.). Belmont: Wadsworth Cengage Learning.

Beauvais, F. (1992). Characteristics of Indian Youth and Drug Use. American Indian and Alaska

Native Mental Health Research Journal .

Cullen, F.T., & Cullen, J.B. (1978). Toward A Paradigm of Labeling Theory. NCJRS, 53.
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Current Sociological Issue Using an Explicitly Marxist Perspective

Words: 1997 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1511508

economic crisis that hit the international community and the world economies has determined, since 2008, a slow, almost invisible shift in the doctrinal preferences of more and more people in terms of deciding on the right economic approach to be followed in order to avoid such crises from taking place in the future. Although there have been numerous attempts to convince on the benefits of capitalism, the economic crises that have taken place since the 70s on a cyclical basis have been used as counterarguments for the efficiency of capitalism and free market economies as we know it today. In this sense, more and more people, scholars, professors, and even politicians, advocate a more moderate approach to capitalism to include several aspects of apparently long-forgotten economic doctrines such as Marxism. However, Marxism in its purest form is not the solution; yet, it offers the justifications for what is now seen…… [Read More]

References

Dunleavy, Patrick, and Brendan O'Leary. Theories of the state. The Politics of Liberal Democracy. London and New York: Macmillan and Meredith, 1987.

Harris, Richard L. "Marxism and the Transition to Socialism in Latin America." Latin American Perspectives, Vol. 15, No. 1, Transition to Socialism. 1988, pp. 7-53.

Jeffries, Stuart. "Why capitalism is on the rise again?." The Guardian. 4th July, 2012, available at http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jul/04/the-return-of-marxism

Marx, Karl and Frederick Engels. "Manifesto of the Communist Party." 1988. Marxism Page. N.d.  http://www.anu.edu.au/polsci/marx/classics/manifesto.html
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Macro Sociological Issue Being Addressed

Words: 2937 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51088516

They are words that last forever, and when we face challenges where racial inequities and inhumane horrors cause to pause in stunned silence, often times these words of inspiration come to us and move us take action for social justice. Harrell explains Mandela's gift in this regard saying:

"Mandela exhibited the characteristics that made jeremiad in South Africa social protest feasible: he combined lament and call to consciousness in sustaining South Africa's democratic mission. His ultimate success depended upon his rational appeal to those who saw his course of action would be the most sensible choice (7 of 15)."

Indeed, with words so carefully crafted as to emphasize the essences of democracy, Mandela ensured the support of those in South Africa who had long been deprived democracy. He also appealed to those who understood that the only way to bring about a world peace, was to pursue democratic principles, ensuring…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harrell, Willie J. (2009). "We Shall Crush Apartheid: Nelson Mandela, Steve Biko, and the Rhetoric of the South African Anti-apartheid Jeremiad. Ethnicity and Race in a Changing World: A Review Journal, Vol 1 Issue 1, January 2009, found online at http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/journals/journal.asp?id=18, retrieved March 20, 2010.

Downing, David (2003). Apartheid in South Africa,
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Compare and Contrast Theories Collective Behavior Emergent Norm Theory Added Perspective Assembling Perspective

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98447664

Collective Behavior: Comparisons

Theories of Collective Behavior: Emergent-Norm Theory vs. Value-Added Perspective

Collective behavior, in basic terms, could be defined as a voluntary activity in which individuals engage. The behavior in this case is largely non-institutionalized. There are various theories that have been used over time to explain collective behavior. These include the emergent-norm theory, value-added perspective, and assembling perspective. In this text, I concern myself with two of these, i.e. The emergent-norm theory and the value-added perspective.

The emergent-norm theory according to Stolley (2005, p. 186) posits that "new norms develop (emerge) as events happen." The value added perspective, on the other hand, suggests that "people are likely to engage in social movements and other forms of collective behavior when society has certain characteristics" (Crawford and Novak, 2013, p. 455).

It should also be noted that while the emergent-norm theory largely focuses on the relevance of social norms in…… [Read More]

References

Crawford, L. & Novak, K. (2013). Individual and Society: Sociological Social Psychology. New York, NY: Routledge.

Locher, D.A. (2001). Collective Behavior. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Stolley, K.S. (2005). The Basics of Sociology. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.
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Social Psychology and the Perspectives

Words: 1940 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25591850

Therefore, the person who chooses to suspend his interests to comply with those artificial externally-imposed social values for the benefit of others will ultimately always suffer disadvantage because others cannot be counted upon to do so consistently and in a meaningful way, at least not beyond the ability of the state to control and ensure.

To Freud, modern civilization provides various tangible benefits to the individual but only at a tremendous cost. While living in society and with the benefits of government protection against the uncontrolled expression of the selfish will of others is a benefit, the fact that our goals and values, and the component elements of our psychological personas are determined and shaped to such a great extent by external society generates much if not all of the psychological pain and trauma experienced by individuals.

Personal Response and Conclusion

There is substantial value as well as inherent weaknesses…… [Read More]