South America Essays (Examples)

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America Grade Level Social Studies This Activity

Words: 1237 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12201927

America

Grade Level:

Social Studies

This activity is intended to focus on developing critical thinking, research, reading and writing skills in Students by making students motivated about learning necessary facts about United States, its demographics, history and distinctive attributes of U.S.

Education Standards Addressed

This particular lesson plan adheres to the Education Standard of United States (Teaching standards of the respective states)

Enable students to develop report writing skills by following a given template.

Enable students to develop and demonstrate their understanding regir undertsanding e elop report writing skills by fts about United States, its demographics arding overall geography of the states, its history, important places of tourists interests, structure of the government, general economy, and demography

Enable the students to understand the report making process and develop reports using electronic tools such word processor and other softwares. The activity will also focus on developing graphs and necessary tables as…… [Read More]

Resources

Props will be required for role playing. Available at the School.

Activity

1) Comprehension of seceding states and the possible reasons behind these actions. Seceding states will be removed progressively from the board.

2) Students will be divided into two groups representing Union and Confederacy. They will select their leaders, design and make their own flags, slogans, other recruitment posters.
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South African Perspective on AFRICOM

Words: 2147 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90337307

South African Perspective on United States Africa Command

As the United States continues its drawdown of troops in the Middle East and reevaluates its prosecution of the global war on terrorism following the recent elimination of key Al-Qaeda leaders, most especially Osama bin Laden, it is important to assess the impact of these events on American military forces elsewhere, especially in sub-Saharan Africa in general and South Africa in particular. The so-called BIC (Brazil, ussia, India and China), with China taking the lead, are taking an increasingly active interest in developing improved trade and political ties with sub-Saharan African nations, and misperceptions of American global hegemonic intentions may interfere with the legitimate goals of the U.S. military in establishing improved relations with these countries. To help identify key challenges and potential solutions, this paper reviews the relevant literature to describe current U.S. military strategy in South Africa to provide salient…… [Read More]

References

"AFRICOM." (2011). (2011). GlobalSecurity.org. [online] available: http://www.globalsecurity.

org/military/agency/dod/africom.htm.

Gilbert, L. D,. Uzodike, U.O. & Isike, C. (2009). "The United States Africa Command: Security

for Whom?" The Journal of Pan African Studies 2(9): 264-266.
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South This Report Is About

Words: 1398 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35057427



Some of the biggest incentives for manufactures are the outrageously low tax bases in southern states. "When taxes are paid, southern levies are lower than most Northern states. GM's Hamtramck, MIG, plant, for instance, has one of the highest property tax mileages in the United States at 88 mills." (Corbett, 2002) Taxes are some much lower than in say Michigan or New Jersey and southern state officials are very open to negotiations to land the new factories and the plethora of jobs. In other words, land values are low and government incentives are extraordinary so the automobiles industry would be crazy to not migrate south for those reasons alone. "Furthermore, utilities costs are lower. After the products have been assembled, the South's location is superior to the Midwest or the East Coast for delivery." (Corbett, 2002) but there are other incentives.

Not only is the land for the new facilities…… [Read More]

References

Corbett, Brian (2002). Southern hospitality. Ward's Auto World, August.

Business
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America at War 1865-Present a Survey of

Words: 2692 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12649879

America at War 1865-Present

A Survey of America at War from 1865 to Present

Since the Civil War, America has seldom seen a generation of peace. In fact, a nonstop succession of wars has kept what Eisenhower termed "the military industrial complex" in lucrative business. From the Indian Wars to the World Wars to the Cold War to the war on Terror, Americana has expanded its foothold as an imperial power every step of the way -- even when isolationism appeared to be momentarily in vogue following World War I. This paper will look at the history of the progression of war in America from 1865 to present, showing how that history -- through social, economic, literary, political, and religious changes -- has both shaped and been shaped by American foreign and domestic policy.

Unit Once: 1865-1876

The Civil War had just ended on the home front, but that did…… [Read More]

Reference List

Boyd, J.P. (2000). Indian Wars. Scituate, MA: Digital Scanning, Inc.

Jarecki, E. (2008). The American Way of War. NY: Free Press.

Jones, E.M. (2000). Libido Dominandi. South Bend, IN: St. Augustine's Press.

Morehouse, M. (2007). Fighting in the Jim Crow Army: Black Men and Women
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America's Diet

Words: 3416 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82404694

America's Diet

The typical American diet is one high in sugars and processed foods. Accordingly, The United States has earned the unfortunate nickname of "Fast-food Nation." The initiation of the rapid growth in fast-food consumption rates in America is likely a result of this country's lack of a widely embraced and highly diverse national cuisine. The United States as a country is truly a melting pot for cultures, religions, ethnicities and beliefs. This vast assortment has certainly carried over into the world of food. That is, most Americans have easy access to a large array of different cuisines on a daily basis and this chronic presence of other cultural food choices has virtually destroyed any possibility of creating a truly American cuisine. Therefore, American citizens along with the rest of the world have transfixed fast-food into this national category. Without question, on the global stage, McDonald's and urger King are…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allison, C. (2010, May). Barbecue Master. Retrieved October 18, 2011, from  http://barbequemaster.blogspot.com/2010/05/chopped-pork-bbq-sandwich-with-sam-dog.html 

Baker, E.A., Schootman, M., Barnidge, E., & Kelly, C. (2006, July). The Role of Race and Poverty in Access to Foods That Enable Individuals to Adhere to Dietary Guidelines. Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research Practice and Policy, 3 (3).

Bedell, J. (2008). Food, Fitness, Obesity and Diabetes in the Bronx. Retrieved October 17, 2011, from New York City Department of Health: www.phanyc.org/files/food-fitness-obesity-in-bronx-bedell.ppt

Block, J.P., Scribner, R.A., & DeSalvo, K.B. (2004). Fast Food Race/Ethnicity, and Income: A Geographic Analysis. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 27 (3).
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South Australia Ambulance Service Organizational Behaviour Case

Words: 5163 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58704794

South Australia Ambulance Service

Organizational Behaviour Case Analysis

Who

ay Main should develop a system which empowers the culture of organization along with the shift towards automation and excellent customer service.

Has to do what

The leadership of South Australia Ambulance Service is required to do the following:

To set a strategic direction for SAAS this would be compatible to the new strategic plan.

Meet the service expectations of the clients by focusing more on efficient customer services.

Empower the service delivery personnel fully and hold them accountable for every action.

The expectations of donators and community should be aligned.

Make SAAS compatible to respond to mass casualties.

Workforce retention should be increased.

Emergency sector and healthcare should be integrated to respond efficiently to any casualty.

Interventions should be prioritized.

The impact of any change should be evaluated on the patient as patients' life is more important. (Daniels 2009)

The…… [Read More]

References

Steven McShane, Sandra Steen, (2008). Canadian Organizational Behaviour, Seventh Edition. McGraw-Hill Ryerson Higher Education; Canadian edition

Abernathy, W.B. (2006). Designing and managing an organization-wide incentive pay system. Memphis, TN: Abernathy & Associates.

Abernathy, W.B. (2006). The sin of wages: Where the conventional pay system has led us and how to find a way out. Memphis, TN: PerfSys Press.

Alvero, A.M., Bucklin, B.R., and Austin, J. An objective review of the effectiveness and essential characteristics of performance feedback in organizational settings. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management vol. 21 (2001). pp. 3 -- 29
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South West Airlines it Is

Words: 475 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82416417

Not only is the airline the lowest cost operator, but is also one of the most successful airlines, which has managed to maintain the same amount of success through numerous years, winning quite a few awards for excellence and performance over the years. The success may be attributed to no small extent to the fact that there is no actual P Department or even a Personnel Department; rather, there is a peoples department, which will take up the total responsibility of sorting out the people's problems. This gave the employees a sense of ownership in the company, and this contributes to the innate feeling of responsibility that the employees showed towards achieving success for their 'own' organization. (Leadership and Change - an oxymoron?)

eferences

Bunz, Ulla K; Maes, Jeanne D. "Learning Experience, South West Airlines Approach" etrieved at http://64.233.187.104/search?q=cache:7Ta4-qN0jWgJ:www.scils.rutgers.edu/~bunz/southwest.pdf+organization+culture+of+South+West+Airlines+&hl=enAccessed on 17 February, 2005

Leadership and Change - an oxymoron?" etrieved…… [Read More]

References

Bunz, Ulla K; Maes, Jeanne D. "Learning Experience, South West Airlines Approach" Retrieved at http://64.233.187.104/search?q=cache:7Ta4-qN0jWgJ:www.scils.rutgers.edu/~bunz/southwest.pdf+organization+culture+of+South+West+Airlines+&hl=enAccessed on 17 February, 2005

Leadership and Change - an oxymoron?" Retrieved at http://www.anneriches.com.au/article-ct6.html. Accessed on 17 February, 2005

South West Airlines' Organizational Culture" Retrieved at http://icmr.icfai.org/casestudies/catalogue/Human%20Resource%20and%20Organization%20Behavior/HROB021.htm. Accessed on 17 February, 2005
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America Moves West Reconstruction Is the Name

Words: 1371 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70627495

America Moves West

econstruction is the name for the period in United States history that covers the post-Civil War era, roughly 1865-1877. Technically, it refers to the policies that focused on the aftermath of the war; abolishing slavery, defeating the Confederacy, and putting legislation in effect to restore the nation -- per the Constitution. Most contemporary historians view econstruction as a failure with ramifications that lasted at least 100 years later: issues surrounding the Civil ights were still being debated in the 1970s, corrupt northern businessmen "carpetbaggers" brought scandal and economic corruption, monetary and tariff policies were retributive and had legal results in the north as well. Despite the failure of this period as an equalizer or integrator of races in the Old South, there was an equally robust push westward that not only encouraged individuals of all ethnicities to move, but changed the political and economic texture of the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Immigration and Labor. (2009). Encarta.MSN. Retrieved from: http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761552683_11/new_york.html.

Railroads Following the Panic. (2001). U.S. History.com. 2001. Retrieved from:

 http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h873.html .

Teaching With Documents: The Homestead Act of 1862. (2007). National Archives.
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America-Afghanistan Relations While it Might Seem Counter-Intuitive

Words: 1348 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7209705

America-Afghanistan elations

While it might seem counter-intuitive to the average American, it would be beneficial to the United States to remain allies with Afghanistan. The most passionate argument against this opinion is generally one which recounts the events of September 11th, and which argues that given the pure evil that was waged on U.S. soil and the lives that were lost, not to mention the sense of safety and security that was forever damaged, no possible alliance could ever be possible between the U.S. And Afghanistan. Such an opinion does have its validity in some perspectives, but more than anything, such a perspective fails to keep in mind that it was not the nation of Afghanistan which condoned such savage attacks on the U.S.; it was renegade forces within this country known as the Taliban. A brief history of Afghanistan is useful at this point.

Afghanistan is a country the…… [Read More]

References

Breede, C. (2008). A Socio-economic profile of Afghanistan. Retrieved from army.forces.gc.ca: http://www.army.forces.gc.ca/caj/documents/vol_11/iss_3/CAJ_Vol11.3_09_e.pdf

Harvey, K. (2003, June 5). Afghanistan, The United States, and the Legacy of Afghanistan's Civil War. Retrieved from Stanford.edu: http://www.stanford.edu/class/e297a/Afghanistan,%20the%20United%20States.htm

Merrill, L., Paxson, D., & Tobey, T. (2006). An Introduction to Afghanistan Culture. Retrieved from Ucdavis.edu:  http://afghanag.ucdavis.edu/country-info/culture-and-working-locally/Man_Afghan_Culture_CWTI.pdf 

Pfaff, W. (2013, January 8). Continued American Presence in Afghanistan a Recipe for More Disaster. Retrieved from truthdig.com: http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/continued_american_presence_in_afghanistan_a_recipe_for_more_disaster_20130/
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America One Enduring Aspect of

Words: 1242 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4611527

Although Friedman claims that the use of religion as a common bond among early Americans is no longer relevant, there are scores of Americans who still believe that the nation is essentially a Christian one. The identity of Tea Party people is inextricably tied into an identity that may seem outmoded to many Americans. Yet to the Tea Party, their identity is more American than any apple pie.

Most Americans throughout most of American history considered it perfectly fine to deny half the (white) population the right to vote on the basis of gender. Being female was considered a handicap, which systematically denied women the right to be Americans even if they identified with the culture of the United States. Asian men who worked on the railroads in nineteenth century America were not even permitted to start families because their Otherness was too much for the ASP majority. Now, Asians…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alba, Richard. Ethnic Identity. Yale University Press, 1992.

Friedman, Michael J. "American Identity: Ideas, Not Ethnicity." 2008. Retrieved online: http://www.america.gov/st/peopleplace-english/2008/February/20080307154033ebyessedo0.5349237.html

Huntington, Samuel P. Who Are We: The Challenges of America's National Identity.

Rorty, Richard. Achieving Our Country. Harvard, 1998.
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America and the Bay of

Words: 1614 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77940580



One of the best points is brought forth by Higgins, who writes that an estimated force of 1500 men were sent to take on no less than 25,000 Cubans (Higgins 1987). "In the end, of approximately 1300 men who actually landed on the beaches from the Brigade, almost 1200 were captured and about 100 killed in combat (Higgins 149). The Brigade, if they failed, were expected to escape into the protected areas that connected to the Bay of Pigs; when in fact those areas, the conditions of the terrain, the poor training and preparation of the Brigade, made such escape impossible (Higgins 149).

Years later, declassified papers and tapes from the hite House would lend insight into the fiasco, but not clarity. One thing that was evidenced from the hite House tapes is that the Bay of Pigs continued to be a source of humiliation and annoyance to President Kennedy…… [Read More]

Works Cited www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105514152

Blight, James G. And Peter Kornbluh, eds. 1999. Politics of Illusion: The Bay of Pigs Invasion Reexamined. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105514456.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=24098536

Chomsky, Noam. 1993. Rethinking Camelot: JFK, the Vietnam War, and U.S. Political Culture. Boston: South End Press. http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=24098683.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=105410509
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America as a Multinational Society

Words: 3513 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55099431

In years before, America was a collection of Chinese, Germans, Italians, Scots, Croats, etc., all craving freedom. Today, even the simple concept of an English-speaking nation is fading off the continent. In the past, immigrants were taught in English in the public schools. In America today, children are taught in German, Italian, Polish, and 108 other languages and dialects. Most of these schools are funded by 139 million federal dollars. "The linguist's egalitarian attitude toward dialect has evolved into the multicultural notion that dialect as a cultural feature is part of one's identity as a member of that culture."

Due to their ethnic or cultural heterogeneity, multiethnic societies in general are more fragile and have a higher risk of conflicts. In the worst case such conflicts can cause the breakdown of these societies. Recent examples of this were the violent breakdown of Yugoslavia and the peaceful separation of Czechoslovakia. Forced…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Cruz, Barbara C. Multiethnic Teens and Cultural Identity: A Hot Issue. Berkeley Heights, NJ: Enslow Publishers, 2001.

Dawisha, Adeed. Arab Nationalism in the Twentieth Century: From Triumph to Despair. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2002.

Francis, Samuel. "The Other Face of Multiculturalism." Chronicles. April 1998.

Huggins, Nathan I. Revelations: American History, American Myths. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
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America and the Great War

Words: 1940 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43088527

America and the Great War

How the Forces of Nationalism, Imperialism, and Militarism Irrevocably Led to World War I

At face value, it can be concluded that WW started as a result of increasing military power in the participating European nations. It may also be argued that the arms race played a role too. However, an in-depth interrogation of the circumstances that surrounded the outbreak of the war reveals that there were more reasons why countries rose against each other.

To begin with, countries in Europe experienced a strong sense of nationalism that set them apart from the rest. This euphoric nationalistic tendencies and patriotism was also the seed for hatred for other countries. It seemed to the people of that age that for one to excel, the other must be under subjugation or eliminated altogether. Economic competition that existed at the time also played a major role in fuelling…… [Read More]

Reference:  https://www.reference.com/history/did-alliances-contribute-outbreak-world-war-eeccfc725528d22a# 

Wilson, W. (1914). President Wilson's Declaration of Neutrality, issued by The World War I. Retrieved from http://wwi.lib.byu.edu/index.php/President_Wilson%27s_Declaration_of_Neutrality
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America Is Supposedly the Melting

Words: 2761 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32206192



A further stereotype about Asians that cannot be ignored is that regarding the sexuality of the Asian female. "Asian Pacific women have generally been perceived by Hollywood with a mixture of fascination, fear, and contempt....If we are 'good' we are childlike, submissive, silent, and eager for sex or else we are tragic victim types. And if we are not silent, suffering doormats, we are demonized dragon ladies -- cunning, deceitful, sexual provocateurs." (Hagedorn) the pornography industry is highly populated with Asian women fulfilling the male desire for sexual stereotypes. Japanese school girls in short skirts with lollipops and repressed sexual needs are a popular fetish. The subservient Geisha wife in kimonos, pale make-up, and most importantly donning a subservient, unthreatening, submissive sexual attitude is another. Look again and one is certain to find the "dragon lady" as mentioned above: the over-sexed, wild, uninhibited Asian girl looking to please as many…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hagedorn, Jessica. "Asian Women in Film: No Joy, No Luck."

Mura, David. "Fargo and the Asian-American Male."

Shah, Sonia. "Race and Representation: Asian-Americans." 1999.

Gilliam, Frank. "The Local Television News Media's Picture of Children - 2001." Study on Race, Ethnicity and the News. October 2001.
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Illicit Arms Trade in South

Words: 2310 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78740334

Involved people in these illegal transfers take advantage of institutional weaknesses and corruption to achieve their objectives.

One of the constant features found along the research is the weak handling of systematic information by the state authorities, especially from the police bodies. At the same time, the lack of channels that facilitate the free access to information about official proceedings make it difficult for the citizens to take part in solving the problem (ibid.).

The borders' porosity is another risk for democracy because bordering zones are strategic spaces for different illicit traffics which look to be controlled by organized crime. Internationalization of crime and its organization structures represent a problem for national security and for the region's stability.

Illegal traffic of fire arms is associated with other illicit traffics which are complemented mainly with drug traffic. Economic resources generated with those actions at the sideline of law are higher than…… [Read More]

References

Camacho, Daniel Avila . " Interrelationship between Drug Trafficking and the Illicit Arms Trade."

Unidir.org. Unidir.org, 2012. Web. 9 Apr 2012.
art918.pdf>.

Cullinan, Jeanna . "Latin American Leaders Demand Action on Illicit Arms Trafficking ."
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Latin America History

Words: 1173 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 32221883

indigenous people were conquered and colonized. The writer will focus on the Incas and discuss their many evidences of colonization and being conquered. The evidence the writer will present will be in religious, economic and social discussion to illustrate the writer's belief that they were indeed conquered against their will and then later colonized. There were three sources used to complete this paper.

The Spanish were interested in development and growth in the 16th and 17th century and to that end they examined areas of the world that they believed would provide them with natural resources and power and they took the land over (Schwartz PG). Often times there were already indigenous people living there and the Spanish would forcefully conquer and colonize those people (SPANISH DEVELOPMENT (http://www.econ.org/octlessons/ushistory3,2-3.htm).One of the most interesting cases of the Spanish conquering and taking over an indigenous people was the Incas conquer. It was most…… [Read More]

References

Victors and Vanquished: Spanish and Nahua Views of the Conquest of Mexico by Stuart B. Schwartz Hardcover: 272 pages; Dimensions (in inches): 0.77 x 8.58 x 5.77

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; (March 2000)

ISBN: 0312228171

INCAS http://www.wsu.edu/~dee/CIVAMRCA/INCAS.htm
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Native Art of North and Meso America

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57549790

Native Art of North and Meso America

The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between native North American art and the art of Mesoamerica? Is an exchange of artistic influences seen between these two neighboring regions?

etween 20,000 and 30,000 years ago, the first inhabitants of the Americas arrived in North America. This time was approximately around the time of the last glacial age. The oceans of the world due to water forming into ice were lower than they presently are and a land bridge approximately 1,000 miles wide connecting Siberia to Alaska formed. This is known as the ering land bridge. Some of these new inhabitants settled in North America and others migrated to Central and South America. There were great civilizations flourishing throughout the Americas at different times and in different locations. (Education Department of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 2000, paraphrased)

Meso-America…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Art of the Americas: Information for Educators (2000) Education Department of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. Retrieved from:  http://deyoung.famsf.org/files/ArtoftheAmericasEducatorGuide.pdf 

Messenger, LC (2010) The Southeastern Woodlands: Mississippian Cahokia -- Late Prehistoric Metropolis on the Mississippi. Making Archaeology Teaching Relevant in the XXI Century (MATRIX). Retrieved from: http://www.indiana.edu/~arch/saa/matrix/naa/naa_web/mod13D.html

Sorenson, JL (2012) Mesoamericans in Pre-Columbian North America. Meal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship. Brigham Young University. Retrieved from: http://maxwellinstitute.byu.edu/publications/books/?bookid=71&chapid=829

Thornton, R. (2010) The Mesoamerican connection: the Toltecs, artisans, scholars, priests and fearsome warriors. The Examiner. 22 Apr 2010. Retrieved from:  http://www.examiner.com/article/the-mesoamerican-connection-the-toltecs-artisans-scholars-priests-and-fearsome-warriors
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Race Minority Groups in America

Words: 1651 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42857747

A very large number of Mexicans and Puerto icans came into the country in order to get away from poverty and to find a way to make a living. The 20th-century Cuban migration, which started in 1959 when Fidel Castro took over the government of Cuba, was mostly for political motivations (The Story of Hispanics in the Americas, n.d.).

According to data collected by the United States Department of Commerce, Hispanics are a younger, less well off, and less educated group than the rest of the population. Their median age is about 23. Sixty-three percent were under age 30 in 1992, and 40% were 18 or younger. The median family income was $23,400. This was higher than the median for blacks but lower than the rest of the non-Hispanic median of $35,200. Of the three groups, Mexican-Americans, Puerto icans, and Cubans, the Puerto icans had the lowest incomes and the…… [Read More]

References

Calloway, Colin G. (2009). Native Americans First View Whites from the Shore. Retreived October 31, 2010, from American Heritage Web site:

http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/ah/2009/1/2009_1_50.shtml

Johansen, Bruce E. (2005). The Native Peoples of North America. New York: Rutgers

Anderson, Talmadge and Stewart, James. (2007). Introduction to African-American Studies.
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Protea and South Africa

Words: 2195 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3906402

protea, one of the world's most striking flowers, is a crucial part of South African culture, economy, and politics. The largest (and arguably the most spectacular of the proteas), the king protea, has an important place in the country's coat of arms and on the official currency, as well as acting as the nation's national flower. Today, the understanding and preservation of the protea has become an integral part of understanding and preserving the very nature of the nation of South Africa.

The King Protea

The king protea (Protea cynaroides) is the national flower of South Africa. The king protea was first seriously considered for South Africa's official national floral emblem in 1962, when a commission was set up to study its use as a national emblem. The South African Association of Botanists supported the choice of the spectacular flower, the king protea, however the choice of the flower as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Agriculturalist Online. Protea for flower power in South Africa. 08 December 2003. http://www.new-agri.co.uk/01-5/focuson/focuson8.html

Department of Foreign Affairs. South African Coat of Arms. 08 December 2003. http://www.dfa.gov.za/department/coa.htm

International Marketing Council of South Africa. FLORA: Feast of flora. http://www.safrica.info/ess_info/sa_glance/fauna_flora/flora.htm

Protea Atlas Project. 08 December 2003. http://protea.worldonline.co.za/default.htm
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Latino Opportunities in America Is

Words: 1638 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25591579

Latino community leaders want to achieve equality in the United States for Latino-Americans and immigrants, but they want to preserve their cultural uniqueness and traditions in the same way that other immigrant groups have done in America. hile the academic opportunities that are now open to Latinos in America are encouraging, and the career opportunities that are becoming available through alternative dispute resolution is helpful, Latinos are still struggling, as has every immigrant in American society, with maintaining their identity as a cultural group. Assimilation, Latino experts hold, is a good thing, but loss of cultural identity is not (119). So there remains an emphasis on helping the Latino community recognize and to celebrate its own identity.

orks Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102099818

Contreras, Josefina M., Kathryn a. Kerns, and Angela M. Neal-Barnett, eds. Latino Children and Families in the United States: Current Research and Future Directions / . estport, CT: Praeger, 2002.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102099818

Contreras, Josefina M., Kathryn a. Kerns, and Angela M. Neal-Barnett, eds. Latino Children and Families in the United States: Current Research and Future Directions / . Westport, CT: Praeger, 2002. Questia. 22 Feb. 2009 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=102099820.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020787821

Shaunessy, Elizabeth, et al. "Understanding the Experiences of Bilingual, Latino/a Adolescents: Voices from Gifted and General Education." Roeper Review 29.3 (2007): 174+. Questia. 22 Feb. 2009 http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5020787821.
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Theories Showing How People Crossed the Ocean to North America

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51917874

Humans made it to the Americas

Since the first humans originated in Africa and somewhere in the Middle East, anthropologists and historians have been figuring out how the first humans made it to the Americas. Archaeologists agree that these first Americas relocated from Asia via Beringia and settled in North America. Based on new and emerging evidence, we can doubt this theory and suggest new possibilities. Many explanations exist about how the early man migrated to the New World. This paper looks at three predominant theories of how humans made it to the Americas. The oldest is the Bering Land Bridge Theory, recently the Coastal Theory, and the Pacific/Atlantic Theory

The Bering Land Bridge Theory

The theory of the Bering Land Bridge is the most widely held. Human beings hunted and gathered for food. As sources of food became scarce, people began looking for ways to hunt large animals. Larger…… [Read More]

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Adam Smith Globalization America

Words: 1752 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63007170

discovery of the New World and attendant new trade routes can certainly be described as momentous and significant, but the benefits of conquest and contact have been eclipsed by the inhumane, unjust, and hypocritical consequences thereof.

Three major aspects demonstrating Old and New World exchanges.

Discovery of new raw materials creating market demand and shifting patterns of trade, eg. Tobacco, cotton, corn.

Global trans-Atlantic slave trade creating free labor for the owners of the means of production and generating massive humanitarian disasters.

Decimation of indigenous populations throughout the Americas, representing genocide on unprecedented levels, justified by newfound sense of European superiority.

Five (5) specific groups that were affected by this event and two (2) examples for each cohort describing how they were affected.

A. Native Americans

Diseases

Forced migration and stripping of access to wealth.

B. Africans

Slave labor, brutality

2. Lack of access to wealth, resources, power, fruits of…… [Read More]

References

Forman-Barzilai, F. (2008). Adam Smith as a globalization theorist. Critical Review 14(4): 391-419.

Grolle, J. (2013). The "Columbian Exchange': How discovering the Americas transformed the world. Der Spiegel International. Retrieved online: http://www.spiegel.de/international/world/a-923220.html

London, C.R. (2013). When did globalization start? The Ecoomist. Sept 23, 2013. Retrieved online: http://www.economist.com/blogs/freeexchange/2013/09/economic-history-1

Muthu, S. (2008). Adam Smith's critique of international trading companies. Political Theory 36(2): 185-212.
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Crime in America - The Racial and Class Implications

Words: 4614 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31983701

Race, Class & Crime

The confluence of race, class and crime is a hot topic nowadays. This is especially true when discussing events or topics of various types. Very or fairly specific examples of this would include the recent shooting of Mike Brown in Ferguson, MO and the subsequent non-indictment of the officer who shot him despite the fact that Brown was not armed and the ongoing discussion about how paying a "wage" should be a moral imperative of all employers and how people in poverty are much more apt to commit crimes. Throw in the fact that people that exist in racial minorities are much more likely to be in poverty, it seems to make sense to some that minorities are also more commonly incarcerated and committing crimes in general. However, this is not entirely true as white people commit plenty of crimes themselves. However, blacks and Hispanics are…… [Read More]

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First Contact of America and European Creation Myths vs Those of the Native Americans

Words: 2111 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55323269

Visions

New Lands? Old Ideas

The Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries were the great age of European exploration in the New World. Spain concerned itself with South America and the Caribbean, while countries such as France and England turned northward to the great, unknown vastness of the North American continent. Men such as Verrazzano, Hariot, and Champlain arrived to explore and to record their experiences of this mysterious land. Strange new plants and animals, curious native customs, and assessments of natural resources all appear in the pages of their respective accounts. Yet their visions of this New World were colored by the expectations of the old. European dreams of hidden riches, and Spanish discoveries of gold and silver enliven their observations. These earliest of descriptions of North America are as much commentaries on contemporary European society and its aspirations, as they are catalogs of new things and new places.

The earliest…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Doughty, Arthur G. "Samuel de Champlain." The Catholic Encyclopedia. 1999.

Hariot, Thomas. "A Brief and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia." 1588. From The Heritage Education Program - National Park Service - Cape Hatteras. (No date) http://www.nps.gov/fora/hariotpart1.htm

Wroth, I., Ed. S. Tarrow, Trans. The Voyages of Giovanni da Verrazzano. 1970.
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South Secede in 1861 Why Did the

Words: 2558 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98700491

South Secede in 1861?

Why did the South decide to secede from the Union? What were all the circumstances, political, social, economic and moral that led to the South's decision to slice the nation in half? This paper reviews those issues -- including all the political and economic issues leading up to the secession -- through the use of available scholarly literature.

The South -- Just Prior to the Civil War -- Prepares for Secession

Prior to the national presidential election of 1860, the South was in very good shape politically, in terms of the federal government. In the book Liberty, Equality, Power: A History of the American People, Volume 1: To 1877, the authors explain that through the Jacksonian Democratic coalition, Southern political leaders had "maintained effective control of the national government right up to 1860" (oyer, et al., 2010, p. 427). As long as the "pliant James uchanan…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bowman, Shearer Davis. 2010. At the Precipice: Americans North and South During the Secession Crisis. University of North Carolina Press: Chapel Hill, NC.

Boyer, Paul S., Clark, Clifford E., Kett, Joseph F., Halttunen, Karen, and Salisbury, Neal. 2010. The Enduring Vision 1877. Cengage Learning: Florence, KY.

Cooper, William J. 2010. The Critical signpost on the Journey Toward Secession. The Journal of Southern History, Vol. LXXVII.

Cooper, William J., and Terrill, Thomas E. 2009. The American South: A History, Volume 2. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
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America and the Great War and the New Era

Words: 988 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51958895

America and the Great War" and "The New Era"

Brinkley, Alan. The Unfinished Nation. Vol. 2: A Concise History of the American People .4th Edition. McGraw-Hill 2004.

What were the causes of WWI in Europe in 1914? Why was President Wilson so reluctant for the U.S. To get involved until 1917 and what finally put the U.S. "over the edge" and decide to enter the conflict directly?

Nationalism, imperialism, and secret treaties all played a role in the instigation of WWI in Europe, but President Wilson was initially reluctant to become involved, because of a long history of American isolationism in regards to entangling European affairs, particularly the secret alliances that stimulated the conflict. His refusal to involve the U.S. In WWI became a crucial part of his re-election campaign. But President Wilson began to protest German violations of American neutrality more vehemently in his public rhetoric than British violations,…… [Read More]

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America Without the Constitution Without

Words: 3372 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94195078



Articles of Confederation: The Articles of Confederation were approved in November, 1777 and were the basic format for what would become the Constitution and Bill of ights for the United States. There were, of course, deficiencies in the document, this was a new experiment and getting the delegates to agree in kind to pass any sort of document was challenging at best. The Articles did allow a semblance of unity, the further impetus to remain at war with the British, and the conclusion that there would be some sort of Federal government. The Articles, however, failed to require individual States to help fund the Federal (National) government, a template for an Executive and National Judicial Branch, or the issuance of paper money and a central banking system. In essence, the largest failure was the Articles' inability to allow a Federal government to regulate commerce, tax, or impose laws upon the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Amar, a. (2005). America's Constitution: A Biography. New York: Random House.

Bailyn, B., ed. (1993). The Debate on the Constitution. Library of America Press.

Beeman, R. (2009). Plain, Honest Men: The Making of the American Constitution.

Random House.
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America Before Columbus The Website

Words: 1398 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68404788

This can be seen in the Catholics who were so tightly bound to the Vatican in Rome (17). The textbook points out that this wasn't just the case for Catholics, the Protestants in the New orld were also closely tied to their Protestant religion in England.

The relationship that the colonists had with the Native Americans was an important one because the European colonists needed the Native Americans to help them build their New orld; in short, the Europeans needed the Indian workforce (Ruckman 17). Sadly, Indians became slaves who were bought and sold, or they were forced (indentured) workers (17). Ruckman notes that the colonists needed major work done and the Indian workforce was not enough to meet the demands of a growing society, which is why slaves for Africa were being imported -- roughly beginning around the year 1502 (17).

Spain came to the New orld in 1492…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ruckman, FIRST NAME. NAME of TEXTBOOK. PLACE, PUBLISHER, DATE.
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America Has Been Involved in a War

Words: 1587 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88616492

America has been involved in a war on drugs. Part of the reason for this, is because of the negative social impacts that they have on society. As public officials, want to limit those substances that are considered to be addictive or dangerous. This has led to increased efforts to enact and enforce laws, with the federal government spending $1 trillion in 40 years. ("After 40 Years," 2010)

However, the problem is that during the process of achieving these goals, the criminal justice system is becoming overwhelmed with the large numbers of dealers and addicts. In most situations, the courts will often try to plea bargain the majority of these cases to deal with the backlog. At which point, the system will become full of another round of dealers and users. Once this begins to occur, it means that this repeating cycle will lead to overcrowding in many prisons and…… [Read More]

Bibliography

After 40 Years. (2010). Fox News. Retrieved from: http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/05/13/ap-impact-years-trillion-war-drugs-failed-meet-goals/

Huddleston, C. (2008). Painting the Current Picture. Washington DC: National Drug Council Institute.

The National Association of Drug Court Professionals Drug Court Standards Committee. (1997). Defining Drug Courts: Ten Key Components. U.S. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Ngo, F. (2006). An Evaluation of Drug Courts. University of South Florida. Retrieved from: http://www.sarasota.usf.edu/Academics/CAS/Capstone/2009-2010/Criminology/Albritton%20-%20An%20Evaluation%20of%20Drug%20Courts.pdf
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America by Claude Mckay Analysis

Words: 1644 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67190626

Jericho Brown & Claude McKay

African-American Poets

The poetry of Claude McKay defined and portrayed the experience of African-Americans during the years surrounding World War I, the Great Depression, and the first steps toward what would become the Harlem enaissance. Six decades after McKay's death, Jericho Brown echoes the frustrations of McKay's generation, but Brown's voice is relays a degree of self-awareness -- urgent in 2011, impossible in 1921 when America was published in Liberator (Sherman, 1999), and a time when exigencies were about the people and less about the self.

Jericho Brown, American Poet. To experience another person's death or another person's torment, Jericho Brown would have the reader follow his emotions and then follow the words to an understanding. This is the way Jericho Brown writes -- this is the way he himself understands his own poetry.

I mean to write poems that are felt before they are…… [Read More]

References

Brown, Jericho. (n.d.) Crossroads, New American Poets, Poet Society of America, Retrieved March 2, 2011, from  http://www.poetrysociety.org/psa/poetry/crossroads/new_american_poets/jericho_brown/ 

Clyde McKay. (n.d.) Poets.org, Academy of American Poets. Retrieved March 2, 2011, from http://www.poets.org/poet.php/prmPID/25

Danger by Desire: A Conversation between Jericho Brown & James Allen Hall. Boxcar Poetry Review. (September 2011) Retrieved March 2, 2011, from  http://www.boxcarpoetry.com/022/conversation_brown_hall.html 

Filreis, Al. (2011). Penn Sound, Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania: Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing. Retrieved March 2, 2011, from  http://writing.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/sonnet.html
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America Revolution

Words: 1417 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98186320

stand on the same level as the French Revolution or the Russian Revolution of 1917, because the changes that it implied were not achieved by the thorough bloodshed that these two encountered, there were many keen to develop the subject of radicalism in the American Revolution, mainly through the changes it implied after its achievement rather than through the means these changes were obtained during the Revolution itself.

In this sense, perhaps the first idea we should be referring to when discussing the Radicalism of the American Revolution is the fact that it was a "catalyst of social change"

The American society up to the Revolution was characterized by the same hierarchical structures that dominated every territory of the ritish Empire. As a colony, the American territories were ruled by the King's representative, who was on top of the pyramid. The aristocracy, mostly ritish, subsequently followed down the line, including…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Gordon S. Wood. The Radicalism of the American Revolution. First Vintage Books Edition. 1993. Quote from the Internet, at  http://www.brothersjudd.com/index.cfm/fuseaction/reviews.detail/book_id/1275/Radicalism%20o.htm 

2.
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America Even the Native Americans

Words: 1407 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55251499

This represented a sharp turn in public beliefs, and it represented a new type of America that no longer welcomed immigrants with open arms, and that has continued unchecked to the present day.

This shift in public thought and government legislation resulted in the first immigration law to exclude immigrants because of their race and class, and laws continued to tighten until after World War II ended in 1945. Potential immigrants were screened for health problems, but they were also interviewed, tracked, and monitored, something new to immigrants in the country. They began being treated as if they were second-class citizens, and they started settling in specific areas of a city or town, and keeping to themselves, attempting to hold on to their culture and way of life for as long as possible (Lee). This regulation resulted in many more laws governing who could immigrate and why, and led to…… [Read More]

References

Katzenstein, Krissy A. "Reinventing American Immigration Policy for the 21st Century." Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law 41.1 (2008): 269+.

Lee, Erika. "Echoes of the Chinese Exclusion Era in Post-9/11 America." Chinese America: History and Perspectives (2005): 1+..
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Why America Is Not the Greatest

Words: 2135 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25685671

America

While every American wants to believe that America is the greatest country, the reality is that in order to be the greatest, a country has to work hard at it. That means having the best systems, and constantly working to improve the country in all aspects. There are some things that America does better than any other country, to be sure. But using many objective measures, it is clear that there are ways in which America stands to improve its performance. Indeed, looking at this issues is a critical component of keeping America on top. A country that buys into the rhetoric that it is the greatest will start to believe its own hype. That country will start to think that it will always be the greatest, just by showing up. But nations all over the world are working hard to make themselves better, and as a result many…… [Read More]

References

Berlow, A. & Witkin, G. (2013). Gun lobby's money and power still holds sway over Congress. Center for Public Integrity. Retrieved May 31, 2015 from http://www.publicintegrity.org/2013/05/01/12591/gun-lobbys-money-and-power-still-holds-sway-over-congress

CIEB (2015). Top performing countries. Center on International Education Benchmarking. Retrieved May 31, 2015 from http://www.ncee.org/programs-affiliates/center-on-international-education-benchmarking/top-performing-countries/

Goldman, D. & McGlynn, E. (2005). U.S. Health Care: Facts about cost, access and quality. Rand Corporation. Retrieved May 31, 2015 from https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/corporate_pubs/2005/RAND_CP484.1.pdf

Mehta, S. (2014). Global 500-2014. Fortune. Retrieved May 31, 2015 from http://fortune.com/global500/wal-mart-stores-1/
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Slavery Pattern in North America Took a

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96948140

Slavery pattern in North America took a funny trend since initially the blacks had some social positions and had a voice in the running of the community. his however later changed and the North also started to own slaves at a higher rate. here are several factors that led to this change in events in the north that made it to fancy slavery just as much as the South was with its plantations.

It is worth noting the background of the slavery trend in order to fully comprehend the drastic shift in slavery from the class servitude to racial slavery which was predominantly in the late 17th century and early 18th century. he black laborers and white laborers from the working class used to work on the same level and the Europeans used to be allowed to have slaves from the non-Christians population regardless of the color. he class determined…… [Read More]

The Emancipation Proclamation was a categorical document that sought to spell out the status of the U.S.A. As concerns slavery. It was to declare the people who had hitherto been held as slaves, free and forever would remain free and be protected by the executive and the military and the naval authority of the U.S.A., as well as being granted the freedom and not suppressed just like any other American who was not a slave there before. It however had the exemption states in the south where the slaves were not immediately emancipated but the proclamation was a beginning to the quest for the freedom of the slaves.

The South and their leaders believed that each state had a right just like the nation to manage its domestic affairs without external influence and one of these is the issue of slavery, that each state must be given the chance to decide whether slavery is good for their state or not, actually he advocated for the autonomy of each state to decide their internal matters independently without external influences, (National Park Service, (2007).

4. From the early colonial period to the Civil War, enslaved people -- who were descended from many African nationalities and ethnicities -- managed to construct a broadly common culture and ethnic identity of their own. Explain how they did this, what cultural resources they drew on, and what the main forms of this culture were. Evaluate the importance of the emergence of African-American culture under slavery to the history of African-Americans and to the U.S.
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North-South Issues & Development Assistance

Words: 2991 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79823243

Primary and processed primary products still account for nearly half the South's total merchandise exports to the North, and for many developing countries remain the sole source of foreign exchange earnings. Moreover, both casual observation and serious research (halley & Colleen, 1996) suggest that trade in primary products is shaped by differences in natural resource endowments, in accordance with the general principles of H-O theory (halley & Colleen, 1996).

However, land is of much less concern in the narrower context of this thesis. Of course, all manufactures contain some primary products (and what are called here 'processed primary products are classified as manufactures in production and employment data). Possession of a particular natural resource may therefore give a country a comparative advantage in manufactured goods embodying the primary product concerned. But this is not necessarily or generally the case, even for processed primary products, since most raw materials are internationally…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Abreu, Marcelo de Paiva. "Developing Countries and the Uruguay Round of Trade Negotiations." Proceedings of the Worm Bank Annual Conference on Development Economics 2009: 21-57.

Adams, John. "Trade and Payments as Instituted Process: The Institutional Theory of the External Sector." Journal of Economic Issues 21, 2007: 1839-1860.

Agosin, Manuel R., Diana Tussie, and Gustavo Crespi. "Developing Countries and the Uruguay Round: An Evaluation and Issues for the Future." In International Monetary and Financial Issues for the 1990s: Research Papers for the Group of Twenty-Four, vol. VI. New York: United Nations, 2007.

Backus, D.K., and P.J. Kehoe, 2002, "International evidence on the historical properties of business cycles," American Economic Review, Vol. 82, pp. 864-888.
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Industrialization in America the Process of Industrialization

Words: 1300 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65542009

Industrialization in America

The process of industrialization can be categorized as the first step towards a social and economic transformation which affected the whole world in ways beyond comprehension. In a nutshell, the world we live in today was nowhere near what it is today before industrialization changed the face of the world. America too greatly adapted to this change and saw itself changing and advancing in the face of the new inventions and advancements. However, with the benefits of the phenomenon came some drawbacks which could not be ignored. The next sections focus on two ways in which industrialization proved to be a blessing for the Americans as well as two ways that it created problems (Alonso, 1994).

Positives:

One industry that saw phenomenal changes after industrialization came about was the American agricultural industry. The farming techniques became greatly advanced and mechanization made things much easier and reduced the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Alonso, I.T. (1994). Trade, Industrialization and Integration in the 20th-Century Central America. Praeger Publications.

Amsden, A.H. (2000). The Rise of the Rest: Challenges to the West from Late-Industrialization Economies. Oxford University Press.

Walker, R. (2004). The roots of American Industrialization. The Geographical Review .
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How Did America React to the Japanese Seizure of Manchuria in 1931

Words: 3106 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14180616

America react to the Japanese seizure of Manchuria in 1931?

To begin with we have to analyze the situation around China and international relations between the U.S. And Japan as they were two major powers of the Pacific region for a long time after ussian Empire had collapsed. There is no doubt that China was a desirable region both for the U.S. And Japan as it had extremely rich natural resources and huge market for foreign goods (Chinese industry was not developed at all). Japanese imperialists and owners of leading American corporations dreamed of strengthening their positions in the region and gaining unlimited access to the huge Chinese markets and resources. Japan was a new superpower of the region after it rose from feudal country to developed industrial state and became a dangerous rival both for the United States and ussian Empire. After ussian evolution, United States and Japan became…… [Read More]

References:

1. 1. Lafeber, W. The Clash: U.S.-Japanese Relations Throughout History Norton & Company; 1998

2. Rosenfeld, Michael Japanese aggression Chesterfield publishing, 1972

3. Tomine, T. Manchurian Crisis JTR, 1967.

4. Rana, M. The Manchurian Myth: Nationalism, Resistance, and Collaboration in Modern China by University of California Press2000p.
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Economic Developments in America From

Words: 1945 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63328180

More importantly, the puritans had considered essential for the future of economic success the access to education and therefore established elementary schools throughout the state (Wright, 1947). Therefore, the degree of literacy was greater than in other parts of the country because there was a comprehensive access to education.

By comparison, the South was different in this area. The southern society had a particular system of private tutoring which allowed children to have access to education. However, for ordinary people, this was not an option and they most often appealed to the assistance of the minister. Still, the quality of education received in this way was limited and in many situations the young generation remained illiterate. It can be said therefore that the poor level of education was in part due to the lack of financial support and in part to the economic practices existing in the South which did…… [Read More]

References

Jenkins, P. A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave, 1997.

McAllister, J. "Colonial America, 1607-1776." The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 42, No. 2. (May, 1989), pp. 245-259.

Weinberg, Meyer. A Short History of American Capitalism. Gloucester: New History Press, 2002.

Wright, Louis B. The Atlantic Frontier: Colonial American Civilization, 1607-1763. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1947.
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Slave Life in the South

Words: 1769 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1214892



In conclusion, these narratives paint a vivid picture of slave life from the 17th and 18th centuries, and illustrate why slavery was such a vicious and evil institution. Without these narratives, a historical view of slavery would be incomplete, and they illustrate a distressing and immoral element of American history. Slavery differed between the North and the South, but it shared many common characteristics, as slave narratives continue to illustrate.

eferences

Abdur-ahman, Aliyyah I. "The Strangest Freaks of Despotism": Queer Sexuality in Antebellum African-American Slave Narratives." African-American eview 40, no. 2 (2006): 223+.

Barrett, Lindon. "African-American Slave Narratives: Literacy, the Body, Authority." American Literary History 7, no. 3 (1995): 415-442.

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 1. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001..

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 3. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001.

Clayton, onnie W. Mother Wit: The Ex-Slave Narratives…… [Read More]

References

Abdur-Rahman, Aliyyah I. "The Strangest Freaks of Despotism": Queer Sexuality in Antebellum African-American Slave Narratives." African-American Review 40, no. 2 (2006): 223+.

Barrett, Lindon. "African-American Slave Narratives: Literacy, the Body, Authority." American Literary History 7, no. 3 (1995): 415-442.

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 1. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001..

Bland, Sterling Lecater, ed. African-American Slave Narratives: An Anthology. Vol. 3. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2001.
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International Business in South Florida Premise and

Words: 1319 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34412930

International Business in South Florida

Premise and Conclusion

The location of any business entity, but especially one engaged in international commerce, is a complex and critical pre-condition for serving customers, providing a nurturing and productive environment for employees, and achieving profitable operations. Of the many factors management must consider, the following are generally thought to be the most influential: access to capital, favorable tax advantages, excellent transportation and technological infrastructure, and a skilled multilingual and multicultural workforce. (web eFlorida 2010)

South Florida, comprising Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, does not present a perfect record on any of the success factors, but a close examination of the efforts made and the resulting accomplishments leads to a favorable recommendation for the formation or expansion of international business functions in the region.

Access to Capital

Depending on the stage of company development, a business may need venture capital, commercial bank lenders, or…… [Read More]

References

Enterprise Florida, Inc., 2010, a public-private partnership serving as Florida's primary organization devoted to statewide economic development. www.eFlorida.com

Florida International Bankers Association, 2010, a non-profit trade association founded in 1979.  http://www.fiba.net 

Florida Development Finance Corporation. 2010 Created by special state statute as an issuer of tax-exempt revenue bonds. www.floridafinance.org

Fodor's South Florida, 2010. Word of mouth tips from fellow travelers. www.fodors.com/guidebooks/9781400004775/
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History of Multi-Cultural America Different Mirror A

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38747750

History of Multi-Cultural America

Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America - Ronald Takaki

What was the result of the 1903 Supreme Court Lone Wolf Decision and the 190 Burke Act? The Lone Wolf Decision came about partly in response to a law passed by Congress in 1902. That law "accelerated the transfer of lands from Indians to whites," according to Takaki (237). The provisions of the 1902 law required that those who inherited the land must sell all allotted lands at public auctions - once the original owners had passed away. Basically, this meant that unless an Indian had the money to purchase their own family lands, they would lose what had been their property. The President (Theodore Roosevelt) was informed that this new law would ensure that all Indian lands will pass into the hands of settlers within a short few years.

But, notwithstanding this injustice, when Chief…… [Read More]

6) Why do you think the author named this chapter, "Through a Glass Darkly"? One can see that the tumultuous times following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor were "dark" times in more ways than one. First, the fear and loathing generated against Japan by the sneak attack on Hawaii was nearly universal and immediate among the American population. And secondly, it is a dark time indeed in American history when pure paranoia is the motivation for "interring" (e.g., placing in concentration camps) tens of thousands of Japanese-Americans. Even so-called responsible media members such as the LA Times (380) behaved with racist spite; "A viper is nonetheless a viper wherever the egg is hatched," the Times editorialized. "So a Japanese-American, born of Japanese parents - grows up to be a Japanese, not an American."

7) To what was the NAACP responding when they said, "A Jim Crow army cannot fight for a free world"? Discuss the effect of the 1941 Executive Order 8802 on the U.S. labor force. The NAACP statement was responding to the fact that a) many blacks felt that they didn't really enjoy all the fruits of democracy in American anyway, so why would they shed their blood to "save democracy" from the Nazis; and b) while fighting for the U.S. In WWII blacks were in general assigned to segregated units because, according to the War Department, "social relationships" between blacks and whites had "been established...through custom and habit." Racial segregation is very much akin to Jim Crow laws from the South's history. When FDR instituted Executive Order #8802, it in effect allowed over a million blacks to take jobs in the defense industry during the war. But more than that, it set in motion the movement of many blacks from the South to better paying jobs in the industrial north.

8) List three (3) things you learned from your cross-cultural presentation and one (1) you learned from someone else's cross-cultural presentation.
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Roles of Women in America 1700-1780

Words: 2118 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23940219

omen's Roles in Early America (1700-1780)

hat were the roles of women in the early American period from roughly 1700-1780? Although a great portion of the history of families and people in early America during this period is about men and their roles, there are valid reports of women's activities in the literature, and this paper points out several roles that women played in that era.

The Roles of omen in Early America -- 1700 -- 1780

In the "Turns of the Centuries Exhibit" (TCE) relative to family life in the period 1680 to 1720, the author notes that colonial societies were organized around "…patriarchal, Biblically-ordained lines of authority." Males basically asserted the authority over their wives, their children, their servants and any other dependents that may have been in the household. One reason for the male dominance in this era was do to the fact that "…law did not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Breneman, Judy Anne. (2002). The Not So Good Lives of New England's Goodwives. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from  http://www.historyofquilts.com/earlylife.html .

Cody, Cheryll Ann. (2003). In the Affairs of the World: Women, Patriarchy, and Power in Colonial South Carolina. Journal of Southern History, 69(4), p. 873.

Letters of Abigail Adams. (2002). Letters Between Abigail Adams and her Husband, John

Adams. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from  http://www.thelizlibrary.org/suffrage/abigail.htm .
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Vietnam Letters From America Dear

Words: 562 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12721215

The Northerners are better prepared, better led, and more respected, and deserve a chance to govern their country with any political system they see fit. The war in Vietnam to them is about decolonization, and the removal of Japanese, French, and American forces from Vietnamese shores. The choice of communism is in order to receive military support from other communist countries, but the expansion of communism in Vietnam is not dangerous to American strategic interests, in my humble opinion.

The use of the draft in this war has forced many young American boys to leave for war when they are needed in the States. The draft is a tool that should only be used in a last resort situation, when the homeland is under threat from external forces. It should not be used to fight wars of choice, or wars of simple strategy, like the Vietnam War is for America.…… [Read More]

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Standard Joke About America in the 1960s

Words: 3939 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52676921

standard joke about America in the 1960s claims that, if you can remember the decade, you did not live through it. Although perhaps intended as a joke about drug usage, the joke also points in a serious way to social change in the decade, which was so rapid and far-reaching that it did seem like the world changed almost daily. This is the paradox of Todd Gitlin's "years of hope" and "days of rage" -- that with so much social and cultural upheaval, the overall mood at any given moment in the 1960s must surely have seemed contradictory. How then can we assess the three most important themes in this broad social change? I would like to make the case that the three longest-lasting social changes came with America's forced adjustment to new realities on the international scene, with Vietnam; on the domestic scene, with the Civil ights movement; and…… [Read More]

References

Bloom, Alexander and Breines, Wini, (Editors). "Takin' It to the Streets "u: A Sixties ?Reader. Third edition. New York and London: Oxford University Press, 2010. Print.

Buzzanco, Robert. Vietnam and the Transformation of American Life?

New York and Oxford: Blackwell, 1999. Print.

Chafe, William H. The Unfinished Journey: America Since World War II. Sixth edition. New York and London: Oxford University Press, 2010. Print.
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Unions in America Today the Document Outlines

Words: 2038 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12719302

Unions in America today

The document outlines the pros and cons of unions in America. It takes into consideration how unions improve the working environments for workers. The paper considers the power of unions on law makers, collective bargaining and other advantages. The cons include decline in competitive advantage for American companies, low productivity and motivation and many others.

In any organization, unions act as binding agreements between employees and management. In this case, a group of persons are responsible for conducting negotiations with the management for the purpose of enhancing the welfare of workers. Unions originate from the period of American depression when workers faced various work challenges including low remuneration, and unfavorable working conditions. The purpose of this essay is to explore the pros and cons of unions in America in the current times.

Pros

Unions improve the working conditions and welfare of workers

One of the positive…… [Read More]

References

Bennett, J.T., & Kaufman, B.E. (2002). The future of private sector unionism in the United

States. Armonk, N.Y: M.E. Sharpe.

Pride, W.M., Hughes, R.J., & Kapoor, J.R. (2012). Business. Mason, OH: South-Western

Cengage Learning.
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60's in America

Words: 2162 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88077308

Sixties in America

60s in America

Debating the easons for the U.S. Entry into the Vietnam War

From 1960s to late 1970s, American army experienced the Vietnam War, which was not well understood irrespective of lasting for many years. There were no clear consensus to its purpose, and it divided the country at a time when it most needed to be unified. The war left scars to many Americans that will take long to heal. There are no clear information regarding the reasons behind the war but historical records indicate that the war started with the sending of American advisors to train the South Vietnam army. The intentions were to assist the South Vietnamese army resist aggression from the north. The roles later changed, and it turned out to be an American led and financed war. From the late 1960s, the American government realized the war would be endless and…… [Read More]

References

Porta, G. Perils of Dominance: Imbalance of Power and the Road to war in Vietnam. London:

University of California Press, 2006. Print

Weist, A.A. The Vietnam War. New York: Rosen Publishing Group Inc., 2009. Print

Christopher, R. The Vietnam War / the American War: Images and Representation in Euro-
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Old South

Words: 1430 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92159444

Old South and Secession

What Led Southerners to Choose Disunion?

The South had several grievances against the North and the federal government. First they resented and feared the intent of some Northerners to limit the spread of slavery or to abolish it. Slavery was becoming more and more an issue of contention as time passed. Second, Southerners hated the high tariffs imposed by the Northern dominated Congress. Since the South had little manufacturing capacity, it had to import finished goods, and thus was interested in low tariffs. The North wanted to protect its industry from foreign competition and favored high tariffs. Some have argued that this issue more than slavery led to succession. Third, Southerners felt that the federal government was making more investments in the North with regard to transportation systems and infrastructure. The government favored a strong central banking system as well. Many Southerners felt that the investments…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Catton, Bruce. The Coming Fury. London: Phoenix Press, 1961.

Crofts, Daniel W. Reluctant Confederates: Upper South Unionists in the Secession Crisis.

Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1989.

Davis, William C. The Deep Waters of the Proud: Volume I of the Imperiled Union: 1861-
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Women of the South During the Civil War

Words: 821 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63035173

Women of the South During the Civil War

Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War. (New York: Vintage Books, 1997).

Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War is a book about women in the South during the Civil War. The broader issue of this book is how women can empower themselves even in the face of hardship and - although the word is strong - the oppressions that society puts on them.

The preface to Faust's book contains a quote which Faust attributes to her mother:

I am sure that the origins of this book lie somewhere in that youthful experience, and in the continued confrontations with my mother, until the very eve of her death, when I was 19, about the requirements of what she usually called femininity. It's a man's world, sweetie, and the sooner you…… [Read More]

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Inhabitants of N America the

Words: 991 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90606353

Game animals may have been negatively impacted so that both animals and humans had to move to better areas -- most likely along the rivers and coastlines of Southwestern Europe where they could hunt and fish. Solutrean artists left evidence in rock art, which shows sea mammals, deep water fish, and great auks.

Faunal collections also show Solutreans were making use of marine resources, which were available all year round. All this would have required tool kits, waterproof clothes, nets, harpoons, and watercraft.

The authors theorize that seal would have played a large role in their lives. Probably, the Solutreans developed techniques for hunting seal during a colder period, and when the weather got warmer they would have had to travel farther out to find seals, eventually making extended trips. They came to the Atlantic Coast by following the migration of Canadian seals. Some families decided to stay. The authors…… [Read More]

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Slave in America in the

Words: 808 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87162760

I like to lead the other slaves in singing Negro Spirituals. One of my favorites was "Wade in the Water," because the melody allowed voices to reach out to Jesus Christ and God through music. I am religious because I believe there is a heaven and a hell and that Christ really did come to earth to save humanity from sins. Slavery is a sin, an awful sin and someday the South will pay for their sins. I don't know how, but they will, because I have faith in what God wants people to do.

My family has been separated since we were brought to America on a horrible ship. I was sold to a large plantation owner and I don't know where my sisters went. My mother and father are both dead; my mother was raped and killed back in Africa when she tried to resist being captured. I…… [Read More]

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Social Significance of 1763 in America an

Words: 1083 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88961375

Social Significance of 1763 in America

An Inevitable First American Revolution

In 1763, France and Spain ceded much of eastern North America to the British as part of the peace deal that took place in Paris on February 10 (Galloway 8). This brought to an end the Seven Years ar, otherwise known as the French and Indian ar. The amount of land that Britain won with its victory was massive, extending east from the Mississippi River, north to the Hudson Bay, and south to Florida. Concessions were also made in an effort to appease France and Spain. The British monarchy returned Havana, Cuba to Spain, a critical way point for ships entering and leaving the Gulf of Mexico and ports south. France retained the northern most sections of Canada around Hudson Bay and several Caribbean Islands, including the sugar-producing economic dynamo Guadalupe.

On the surface, it seemed that all three…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Galloway, Colin G. The Scratch of a Pen: 1763 and the Transformation of North America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Print.
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Television and America There Have Been Many

Words: 1429 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81160321

Television and America

There have been many technological advances within the past sixty years that have fundamentally influenced the way that we live in the United States. Among the most influential is the invention and proliferation of the television.

Though there are other advances which, are equally important it is still the television that dominates the background noise of nearly every home. In fact most homes have more televisions than they have bathrooms. It is not unusual for television to be the single most used avenue for national and international information. "From its early position as a new medium for political coverage in the 1950s, television quickly supplanted radio and eventually newspapers to become by the early 1960s the major source of public information about politics."

This information includes political, social and popular issues that have helped shape the culture of America. It is through the influence of television and…… [Read More]

Lynda Lee Kaid. "Political Process and Television." 2003

http://www.museum.tv/archives/etv/P/htmlP/politicalpro/politicalpro.htm

Paul Schatzkin "Television is 75" 2002 http://www.philo75.com