Stroke Essays (Examples)

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Nurse Instruction

Words: 1104 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71688732

nursing development class. The theme of Stroke and brain injury will be continued to be used in order to highlight how an instructive class may be developed, instituted and assessed. This essay will discuss the learning objectives and present their delivery in a form that outlines basic teaching and learning principles that reflect the essence of healing and the professional medical community.

Class Need Assessment

Evaluating the learning for this class will come in different stages. The first half of the class is based on the cognitive and basic knowledge skills that nurses need to have to identify the important factors dealing with stroke. This knowledge can be assessed with a simple testing procedure that quizzes the student on their knowledge using multiple choice questions and answers. The second half of the instruction is more hands on and requires the students to perform their job in a simulated activity of…… [Read More]

References

Cronenwett, L., Sherwood, G., Barnsteiner, J., Disch, J., Johnson, J., Mitchell, P., ... & Warren, J. (2007). Quality and safety education for nurses. Nursing outlook, 55(3), 122-131.

Hanger, H.C., Walker, G., Paterson, L.A., McBride, S., & Sainsbury, R. (1998). What do patients and their carers want to know about stroke? A two-year follow-up study. Clinical rehabilitation, 12(1), 45-52.

Mant, J., Carter, J., Wade, D.T., & Winner, S. (1998). The impact of an information pack on patients with stroke and their carers: a randomized controlled trial. Clinical Rehabilitation, 12(6), 465-476.

Rodgers, H., Bond, S., & Curless, R. (2001). Inadequacies in the provision of information to stroke patients and their families. Age and ageing, 30(2), 129-133.
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Marketing in Health Care

Words: 613 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44766636

Marketing in Health Care

Problems Faced by the Stroke Center

Some of the problems faced by the Stroke Center are caused by lack of information and knowledge acquired by stroke patients and their families in the course of heart attacks, and the financial capability of the Stroke Center to build up more teams that can specialize in the administration of heart attack patients.

The foremost problem of the Stroke Center is the limited knowledge of heart attack victims and their families in managing a heart attack event, especially knowledge on TPA and the immediate medical attention required by victims to be administered with TPA. Such lack of knowledge results to the victim missing the chances of overcoming the battle against the consequences of a stroke such as disability. It also results to a very low percentage rate of heart attack victims who get TPA treatment.

Another problem the Stroke Center…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Borfitz, Deborah. Stroke Centers: Hospitals Seek Payoff with Quicker Care, Shorter Stays Resources Secondary to Education, Coordination, and a Can-Do Attitude.

Marketing for Stroke Centers.

Social Marketing and Franchising for Essential Health Care.

Naco.Nic.In. 13 June 2003. http://www.naco.nic.in/nacp/public.pdf
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Biomechanical Principles

Words: 1555 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68633730

Biomechanical Priciples

Biomechanical Principles

Biomechanics is the study of mechanical and physics principles in relation to motion in sports. Every sport has its biomechanical theories and each one is specialized to that particular skill with equations derived from Newtonian physics and knowledge of the human body and its capabilities. When combined and properly practiced, biomechanics can improve an athletes overall performance, making the athlete superior to their competitors.

The freestyle arm-pull in swimming is a precise study in the art of biomechanics introduced for an efficient result. It is an established fact that water is 773 times as dense as air and 55 times as viscous (Miller, 1975). What this means is that planning an efficient stroke in water is going to require greater strategy than planning an efficient stroke in air. The primary factors that go into creating the ideal stroke in swimming are vectors, motion, force, work, and…… [Read More]

References

Boone, Tommy; Birnbaum, Larry (2005). Exercise Physiology: Professional Issues, Organizational Concerns, and Ethical Trends. Edward Mellen Pr.

Burkett, Brendan (2012). Basic principles for understanding sport mechanics. Human Kinetics. Accessed 14 March 2012 from  http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/basic-mechanical-principles 

Miller, Doris (1975). Biomechanics of Swimming. Exercise and Sport Sciences. Vol. 3.1, 219-248.

Richardson, AR (1986). The Biomechanics of Swimming: The Shoulder and Knee. Clin Sports Med. Vol 5.1, 103-13.
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Absence Within the Neurological Community of Executive

Words: 1250 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71645576

absence within the neurological community of executive function performance testing for various real-world activities (that include multi-tasking) on subjects who have suffered brain damage (Baum & al, 2008). By testing real-world functioning via the EFPT, the researchers, as occupational therapists, hoped to provide more accurate information on the ability of subjects to function independently in their day-to-day existence and to perform functions within society (Baum & al, 2008). This study served as a test of the validity and reliability of the EFPT model on patients with mild to moderate stroke, as a follow-up to previous studies of EFTP validity and reliability on subjects with multiple sclerosis and schizophrenia (Baum & al, 2008). Hypothesis: Stroke will have a negative effect on executive functioning in real-world tasks.

esearch study design and characteristics

This was an empirical, quantitative, conclusion-oriented, lab/simulation research study using the EFTP. The EFTP measures executive cognitive functions (initiation, organization,…… [Read More]

References

Baum, C., & al, e. (2008). Reliability, Validity, and Clinical Utility of the Executive Function Performance Test. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62 (4), 446-454.
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Executive Function Performance Test Efpt for Healthcare

Words: 736 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50147096

Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) for healthcare practitioners who deal with mild and moderate-severity stroke patients. Executive function is important to overall health because it allows us to regulate our actions, plan our behavior, and set goals. Stroke patients frequently suffer from executive-function related losses; this study proposes a measure that will help quantify the extent of executive function loss.

The design of this study was a basic experimental 3x1 design. The authors compared three groups on their performance of the EFPT. The three groups were: mild stroke, moderate stroke, and age-matched control (no stroke). All participants performed the EFPT and stroke group participants were tested 6 months after the stroke event to allow for an even amount of healing time.

The EFPT is noticeably different from other performance-based measures because unlike the Kitchen Task Assessment (its closest relative), it records cues from experimenters that support patient performance. Support cues…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Master Case Study Baum C M Et

Words: 1301 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21878519

Healthcare Master Case Study

Baum, C.M., et al. (2008). eliability, Validity, and Clinical Utility of the Executive Function Performance Test: A Measure of Executive Function in a Sample of People With Stroke The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4); pg 446.

Study rationale. The research study is designed to assess the validity and reliability of a test for executive function in post-stroke occupational therapy patients. Clinical tests of executive function may not be good predictors of a patient's ability to function in day-to-day life. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) employs ordinary daily living skills in which the post-stroke patients are likely to have engaged in the past, and are reasonable target behaviors for adaptation to independent or supported living arrangements. The test is particularly valuable in that it offers a convenient test for executive function using real-world tasks.

esearch design. An experimental design is employed in this study.…… [Read More]

References

Baum, C.M., Connor, L.T., Morrison, T., Hahn, M., Dromerick, A.W., Edwards, D.F. (2008). Reliability, validity, and clinical utility of the executive function performance test: A measure of executive function in a sample of people with stroke, The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4), 446. Retrieved http://www.practicechangefellows.org / documents/Baum_et_al.pdf

Chaytor, N., & Schmitter-Edgecombe, M. (2003). The ecological validity of neuropsychological tests: A review of the literature on everyday cognitive skills. Neuropsychology Review, 13, 181 -- 197. Retrieved http://www.dissertations.wsu.edu/Dissertations/

Summer2004/n_chaytor_070604.pdf
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Warfarin vs Debagatrin

Words: 1986 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56680608

Efficacy and Safety of Dabigatran vs. Warfarin for Stroke

After more than five decades as the preferred anticoagulant worldwide, warfarin is being challenged by a new rival that doesn't require careful dosage monitoring. Pradaxa (dabigatran) was unanimously approved by the FDA on October 19, 2010 for treating atrial fibrillation (AF) patients, who are at an increased risk for suffering stroke and systemic embolisms (.S. Food and Drug Administration). Dabigatran acts by binding directly to thrombin. Warfarin (Coumadin) is an anticoagulant that functions by inhibiting the synthesis of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors (Lemos et al., 770-771). Variations in the levels of vitamin K in the diet can influence how effective a given dose of warfarin is for a patient, so appropriate therapeutic dosages are determined on an individual basis periodically through a standardized clotting test (international normalized ratio [INR]). Even though warfarin can reduce the risk of stroke in AF patients…… [Read More]

U.S. Food and Drug Administration. "FDA News Release: FDA approves Pradaxa to prevent stroke in people with atrial fibrillation." U.S. Food and Drug Administration, 19 Oct. 2010. Web. 22 Jan. 2011.

Schulman, Sam, Kearon, Clive, Kakkar, Ajay K., Mismetti, Patrick, Schellong, Sebastian, Eriksson, Hentry, Baanstra, David, Schnee, Janet, and Goldhaber, Samuel Z. "Dabigatran vs. warfarin in the treatment of acute venous thromboembolism." New England Journal of Medicine 361 (2009): 2342-2352. Web.

Wallentin, Lars, Yusuf, Salim, Ezekowitz, Michael D., Alings, Marco, Flather, Marcus, Franzosi, Maria Grazia, Pais, Prem, Dans, Antonio, Eikelboom, John, Oldgren, Jonas, Pogue, Janice, Reilly, Paul A., Yang, Sean, Connolly, and Stuart J., on behalf of the RE-LY investigators. "Efficacy and safety of dabigatran compared with warfarin at different levels of international normalized ratio control for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation: an analysis of the RE-LY trial." Lancet 376 (2010): 975-983. Web.
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Communication Swallowing Disorders

Words: 2077 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1415676

Swallowing Difficulty and Speech Difficulty on Quality of Life in Patients with PEG Tubes vs. Those on NGT Feeding Systems

Stroke can effect neurological functioning and can have an effect on the patient's ability to talk and swallow. This condition can lead to severe malnutrition A decision is often made to feed the patient using a tube feeding method. Many studies have been performed to measure the clinical outcomes of these procedures, but few have focused on the effects of the patient's quality of life after receiving these interventions. This study will measure the effects of having a PEG tube inserted on the patient's quality of life as it relates to their ability to communicate and swallow. Two research questions will be answered: "Does a PEG procedure have an effect on the patient's ability to communicate their wishes and improve there satisfaction with the quality of their life in regards…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Finucane Thomas E. MD., Colleen Christmas, MD., and Kathy Travis. (1999) Tube feeding in patients with advanced dementia. A review of the evidence. Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA)October 13 (282) [HIDDEN]

James A, Kapur K, Hawthorne AB.(1998) Long-term outcome of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding in patients with dysphagic stroke. Age Ageing (27):671-676.

Taylor, Paula, MD. (2001) Annals of Long-Term CareDecision Making in Long-Term Care: Feeding Tubes. Annals of Long-Term Care: Clinical Care and Aging. 9 (11) p. 21-26
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Executive Functions for People Who

Words: 854 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5257759

In order to avoid that for this study, reliability of the EFPT was measured through trained raters who rated participants. How they were rated by the EFPT and by the other raters were then compared.

7.Define validity. How was validity of the instruments assessed in this study?

In order to determine whether the instrument was valid, there was construct validity and criterion validity that had to be tested. Construct validity is requiring a test to be able to distinguish between people who have and who do not have a known trait. This was assessed by determining whether the EFPT was able to distinguish people based on their level of stroke. Criterion validity was determined by comparing the EFPT scores with a lot of scores that were established for these same patients on neuropsychological tests.

8.Summarize Table 1.

Table one offered demographic information as well as information regarding how well the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Baum et. al. (2008). Reliability, Validity, and Clinical Utility of the Executive Function Performance Test: A Measure of Executive Function in a Sample of People With Stroke

The American Journal of Occupational Therapy 62 (4), 446. Retrieved August 29, 2008 from Proquest.
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Transactional Analysis in Education Educational Transactional Analysis

Words: 2146 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44669063

Transactional Analysis in Education

Educational Transactional Analysis is the area for this case study example where the client is a school that is experiencing a rise in unruly delinquent behaviors. The purpose of the case study is to assist the school with finding ways to deal with the students that is conducive to changing their behaviors creating a learning environment. The study will also show how an TA in education can benefit educators in a teaching and learning setting . There are a number of reference books that show that this theory is beneficial to educators. For example Improve Behavior and aising Self-Esteem was one text that brought out advantages of TA in the classroom (Barrow, Newton, and Bradshaw, 2001). The experience will allow students and teachers to experience improved communication by providing tools and resources to bridge gaps (Barrow, Newton, and Bradshaw, 2001, 5). This is accomplished by using…… [Read More]

References

Berne, E. (1964). Games People Play. Grove Press.

Barrow, G., Bradshaw, E., Newton, T., (2001). Improve Behavior and Raising

Self-Esteem in the Classroom: London, Fulton.

Harding, A. (2004) 'Have I Got the Right hat On? Using TA to Deliver High
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People Help Themselves An Interdisciplinary

Words: 12988 Length: 47 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92004923

The study will also be important to those in the future, because scientists have not yet found ways to cure these chronic illnesses or correct some of these problems that are seen today, and therefore it stands to reason that there will be more people in the future who will have to face the same problems as those with chronic illnesses and traumatic injuries today.

Scope of the Study

The scope of the study is relatively large, simply because there has been a great deal written about chronic illness and injuries from the perspective of the physician and from the perspective of the patient. Both sides are important, although the focus here will remain largely on the patient perspective. Because there are so many people today that suffer from a chronic illness or traumatic injury, much study has been done about these individuals. Despite these studies, however, not a lot…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, B.L. (2002). Biobehavioral Outcomes Following Psychological Interventions for Cancer Patients. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 70(3), 590-610.

Brannon, L., & Fiest, J. (2004). Health Psychology: Vol.. An Introduction to Behavior and Health (Fifth ed.) Belmont CA: Thompson/Wadsworth.

DiMatteo, M. (2004). Social Support and Patient Adherence to Medical treatment: A Meta- analysis. Health Psychology, 23(2), 207-218.

Eitel, P., Hatchett, L., Friend, R., Griffin, K.W., & Wadhwa, N.K. (1995). Burden of Self-Care in Seriously Ill Patients Impact on Adjustment. Health Psychology, 14(5), 457-463.
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How Anger Affects the Brain and Body

Words: 718 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86883808

Anger and Its Effects

Anger is a very intense feeling, and can be characterized by a number of behaviors. These include grinding teeth, an increased heart rate, rising blood pressure, clenched fists, and other signs of aggravation or frustration (Hendricks, et al., 2013). Each person reacts to anger in a different way, and some of the manifestations of anger may not be outwardly apparent. ises in blood pressure and heart rate, for example, are not easily noticed by others, but they can still be very damaging to the person who is struggling with the anger itself (Hendricks, et al., 2013). People also get angry for a number of different reasons, and they may react in an angry manner when they feel hurt, threatened, frustrated, or disappointed (Hendricks, et al., 2013). This is a relatively natural reaction for the majority of people, but that does not mean it is healthy or…… [Read More]

References

Hendricks, L., Bore, S., Aslinia, D., & Morriss, G. (2013). The effects of anger on the brain and body. National Forum Journal of Counseling and Addiction, 2(1): 2-11.
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Paul Cezanne's Mont Sainte Victoire

Words: 343 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4538791



Now I will discuss the middle ground of the painting. The middle ground consists of a triangular shape and of the roadway leading back to the focal point. Together with the Roman Aqueduct, which resembles bridge, a triangular shape is forged. It leads the eye back to the mountain.

The background of the painting consists of the focal point - the luscious, golden hued mountain.

Paul Cezanne's Mont Sainte Victoire is an exceptional piece of work that has its roots in realistic landscape painting. At the same time, with Cezanne's masterful line work and heightened color effects, the painting comes across as something truly not of this world.

ibliography

Martin, David F., and Lee a. Jacobus. The Humanities Through the Arts. 7th ed. New York:

Lisa Moore, 2008.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Martin, David F., and Lee a. Jacobus. The Humanities Through the Arts. 7th ed. New York:

Lisa Moore, 2008. 26-27
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Patient Mr D Is a 74-Year-Old Male

Words: 1216 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27288674

Patient, Mr. D., is a 74-year-old male Caucasian, married and retired. Mr. D. complains of dizziness and weakness. Type-2 diabetes was diagnosed in 1994, hypertension in 2002, and arthritis in 2007. Mr. D. is currently taking 20mg Lipitor/daily; 81 mg Aspirin/daily; 333mg Calcium/daily; 5mg zinc/daily, and 500mg Vitamin C/3X day. He denies any drug or herbal use, and uses 650 mg of Tylenol for pain as needed. He has no known food allergies, does not use tobacco or illicit drugs, but has a family history of diabetes and heart disease with both mother and father. His general health acuity is strong (bowels, urinary, etc.), but has occasional slurred speech, weakness in right lower limb, syncope, vertigo, and vision fluctuations. Mr. D. reports that his wife complains he asks the same question repeatedly within a short time period.

Areas for Focused Assessment- The combination of syncope, vertigo, vision, and memory issues…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Hypoglycemia. (2012). Web MD. Retrieved from:  http://symptoms.webmd.com/#./conditionView 

Ezzo, J., et.al. (2001). Is Massage useful in the Management of Diabetes? Diabetes Spectrum -- The American Diabetes Association. 14 (4): Retrieved from:  http://spectrum.diabetesjournals.org/content/14/4/218.full 

Madden, S., Loeb, S. (2009). An integrative literature review of lifestyle interventions for the prevention of diabetes mellitus. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 17(2), 2243-56.

Polin, B. (2011). Why Water Aerobics is Good Exercise. Diabetic Lifestyle. Retrieved from:  http://www.diabeticlifestyle.com/exercise/why-water-aerobics-good-exercise
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Grady Health

Words: 2045 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60039527

Strategic Planning

Financial Plan Explanation

Grady's budgeting is done on an incremental basis. What this means is that the budget for next year will be based on the budget for last year, with adjustments for inflation, for changes in the payer mix, for strategic changes relating to the service offering mix, and for new facilities in the system, as well as new capital expenses.

Grady uses a cost-benefit analysis, which takes the form of net present value, as part of its decision-making criteria for capital expenditures. Grady is in the midst of a capacity expansion. Karkaria (2013) notes that Grady has a $74 million expansion plan for downtown Atlanta which will enhance its system capacity with respect emergency care, in anticipation of a spike in demand relating to the ACA, and to meet existing demand in the market that is yet unfulfilled.

Grady has sought financing for this project, including…… [Read More]

References

Foreman, J. & Argenti, P. (2005). How corporate communications influences strategy implementation, reputation and the corporate brand: An exploratory qualitative study. Corporate Reputation Review. Vol. 8 (3) 246-264.

Grady 2013 Annual Report. Retrieved December 3, 2014 from  https://gradyhealthfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Grady-Health-System_2013-Annual-Report.pdf 

Grady. (2014). The Marcus Foundation awards Grady Health System $30 million for Emergency Department and Stroke Center expansion. PR Newswire. Retrieved December 3, 2014 from  http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-marcus-foundation-awards-grady-health-system-30-million-for-emergency-department-and-stroke-center-expansion-277449311.html 

Karkaria, U. (2013). Grady's $74m expansion includes upgrading ER. Atlanta Business Chronicle. Retrieved December 3, 2014 from http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/print-edition/2013/08/02/gradys-74m-expansion-includes.html?page=all
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Prevention of Obesity

Words: 3241 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94190461

Obesity in Los Angeles County

The United States, while being one of the most technologically developed countries in the world, is not a healthy nation. Typically, when we think of disease pandemics we think of things like Swine Flu, Ebola, Lyme disease, etc. However, in the 21st century, we have a new pandemic that affects our children, adults, and eventually the whole population. Because of a more sedentary lifestyle, a proclivity for fast food, a high-fat diet, and hundreds of sugary drinks, obesity is now statistically so rampant that it is having a serious effect on American's health. Almost every researcher, whether medical or academic, as well as the public health sector, agree that there are statistical links between what we ingest and the consequences to our overall health profile. Certainly, all we need to is walk down any grocery store aisle, open up most magazines and newspapers, or watch…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

About Health People. (2012, December 17). Retrieved from HealthyPeople.gov: http://healthypeople.gov/2020/about/default.aspx

Executive Order on Physical Fitness. (2010, June 22). Retrieved from The President's Council on Physical Fitness: http://www.fitness.gov/about/order/index.html

Overweight and Obesity, (2008) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Retrieved

from: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa / obesity / economic_consequences.htm
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African-American Female Obesity

Words: 1847 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26794483

Obesity is a serious social problem in America. The effects of obesity in childhood are well documented in both the social science literature and medical journals. During the last 30 years, the percentage of obese children between the ages of 6 and 11 has risen 200% while the percentage of obese children between 12 and 19 has tripled (CDC, Preventing Childhood Obesity, 2010). Obesity in the nited States has increased among all cohorts and ethnicities, spans across generations, and is not limited to income or educational levels. However, the incidence of obesity among African-American women is of particular concern given the prevalence and severity of the issue in America.

Public health issue

More than two-thirds of Americans are now obese or overweight (Ogden et al., 2010).

Rates of adult obesity now exceed 20% in 49 states and D.C and 25% in 40 states. By way of comparison, in 1991, rates…… [Read More]

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2011). Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Vital Signs: Prevalence, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension -- United States, 1999 -- 2002 and 2005 -- 2008

Ward, S., Gray, A., Paranjape, A. (2008). African-Americans' perceptions of physician attempts to address obesity in the primary care setting. The Journal of General Internal Medicine, 24(5), 579-584.

Coenen, K.R., Hasty, A.H. (2007). Obesity potentiates development of fatty liver and insulin resistance, but not atherosclerosis, in high-fat diet-fed agouti LDLR-deficient mice. Retrieved from:  http://ajpendo.physiology.org/content/293/2/E492.short
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Nursing Nutrition

Words: 821 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 37520558

Risk Factors for Mr. Jablonski

CHD: Mr. J is a classic case for a potential Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) patient. His history shows several risk factors, which can be divided into uncontrollable and controllable risk factors. The uncontrollable factors are his age (48 years old) -- older people are more susceptible to CHD, his sex (male) -- men are more likely to get CHD, and his family history. The controllable risk factors are his obesity, his smoking habit, lack of physical activity, high blood pressure, and his high LDL cholesterol.

Hypertension: The risk factors for Mr. J are his age, gender, obesity, excessive salt intake, and his inactive lifestyle.

The risk factors described as 'controllable' can be mitigated by dietary control and medication. If his condition remains untreated Mr. J is a potential candidate for a severe heart disease and possible stroke.

Dietary Plan

In order to lower his high…… [Read More]

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Shin Splints From Ecs Conditions

Words: 4210 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40062881



Practical esearch Finding Implementation and Experimentation Stage -- Phase I

The experimenter did not set out to determine specifically which of the various contributing factors (or combinations of factors) identified by the empirical research of medial tibial stress syndrome was most responsible for the experimenter's symptoms. However, since the initial attempts to resolve the symptoms incorporated changes to all of the external variables except a change in running surface, the experimenter immediately sought a softer running surface and temporarily abandoned running on any hard surface that magnified instead of minimized the physiological trauma associated with running on harder surfaces.

Because the empirical research also implicated poor running stride mechanics and excessive vertical elevation, the experimenter devoted considerable attention to making the following specific changes to the running stride: (1) shorter strides to minimize travel of the body while neither foot is in contact with the running surface; (2) conscious attempts…… [Read More]

References

AOS. (2007). Shin Splints. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Retrieved October 20, 2009, from:  http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00407 .

Braver, R. "How to Test and Treat Exertional Compartment Syndrome: Why the ECS

Diagnosis Is Often Missed" Podiatry Today; Vol. 15 (May 1, 2002). Retrieved

October 20, 2009, from: http://www.podiatrytoday.com/article/382
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Organization Assessment Good Shepherd Medical

Words: 1323 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8650987



For example, because different etiologies require corresponding therapeutic designs and mechanisms (Spector, 2000; Steefel, 2002), specific support group makeup must consider the need to develop different strategies and methodologies for the following types of patients at a minimum if support groups are to provide equal benefit to all patients:

Elderly Patients and Lifelong Laborers - This group typically presents with psychological issues in the realm of a direct link between their sense of purpose and self-worth and their ability to continue to function productively in their community. Their need for acute medical and ancillary services, particularly in the Longview/East Texas community are often precipitated by chronic physical deterioration from a lifetime of relatively hard labor. Therefore, support group rehabilitation services must address the issues of self-esteem as a function of vocational productivity and lifestyle changes necessitated by medical conditions.

Prime-of-Life Victims of Traumatic Injury - This group typically presents with…… [Read More]

References

Clark, C., Robinson, T. (2000). "Multiculturalism as a Concept in Nursing" Journal of the Black Nurses Association, 11(2), 39-43.

Spector, R. (2000). Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness (5th ed.). New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Stanhope, M., Lancaster, J. (2004). Community and Public Health Nursing (6th ed.)

St. Louis: Mosby.
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Applying to Doctor of Pharmacy

Words: 598 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62111865

I was also inspired by the communication skills and dedication pharmacists showed in making my aunt's course of treatment comprehensible, so my aunt understood why she was taking certain medications, the possible side effects that she should be aware of, and also of possible drug interactions. The pharmacists involved my aunt's nurses and family in their interactions with my aunt, and I began to envision myself in a similar role, combining chemistry with communication, compassion, and caring.

The future of pharmacy, in a world where medication's side effects and interactions are often dangerous, and treatment schedules because of drug interactions can be quite complex, requires pharmacists who are caregivers and teachers, not mere dispensers of prescriptions. A pharmacist is part of a patient's plan of care, right along with the patient's doctors and nurses. The sick, confused, and elderly, depend upon their pharmacist to ensure that their prescriptions are correct,…… [Read More]

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Gerontological & Griatric Nursing Nursing Paper-Gerontological &

Words: 1693 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9956260

GEONTOLOGICAL & GIATIC NUSING

Nursing Paper-Gerontological & Griatric Nursing

End of Life Issues and the Elderly

(2) "Identify and discuss the role of the nurse in providing family centred care to an elderly client who is palliative and living at home with his/her spouse or another family member."

Palliative care is an approach to provide a coordinated medical, nursing, and allied health service to address the patient's physical, social emotional and spiritual needs for people with progressive incurable illness. Palliative care seeks to deliver allied health service within the environment of person's choice to improve quality of life for both an ill person and the family or friends. In the United States, Europe and other part of the world, number of people reaching the advanced age and having the need of specialities for the management of pain control continues to increase. (oyal College of Nursing, 2004).

Meanwhile, a nurse plays…… [Read More]

References

Bliwise, D.L. Bliwise, N.G. Partinen, M. et al.(1988). Sleep Apnea and Mortality in an Aged Cohort. Am J. Public Health.78:544-547.

Bruce, S.D. & Hendrix, C.C. (2006). Palliative Sedation in End-of-Life Care: The Role of The Nurse in Palliative Sedation. Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing.8(6):320-327.

Canadian Nurses Association (2008). Providing Nursing Care at the End of Life. Ottawa Canada.

Davies, E. & Higginson, I.J. (2004). Better Palliative Care for Older People. World Health Organization.
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Reason I Selected the University of Alabama

Words: 1061 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16597639

reason I selected the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing for graduate studies in nursing is because I ultimately seek to become a leader in the field of nursing, and there are several facets of this institution that legitimize its "vision to sustain nursing leadership worldwide." In particular, I was attracted to the synthesis of different disciplines and areas of erudition that the UAB School of Nursing emphasizes as part of its graduate education in this field, which include various aspects of management, economics, information technology, marketing and consultation to equip graduates with the necessary skills to perform as leaders within this profession.

It is increasingly necessary for nurses in advanced positions to utilize evidence-based practices as part of their means to fulfilling their responsibilities. The UAB School of Nursing, with its research center providing funded opportunities to counter some of the most pressing health care issues in…… [Read More]

References

Egenes, K.J. (2012). The nursing shortage in the U.S.: a historical perspective. Chart. 110(4), 18-22.

Harper, D.C. (No date). About our school. www.uab.edu. Retrieved from  http://www.uab.edu/nursing/home/about 

Marelli, T.M. (2013). The good, the bad and the ugly in the changing healthcare landscape: the role of nurse practitioners in meeting increasing demand for primary care (the good), CMS and contractor oversight of home health agencies (the bad), and the sad demise of the Medicaid hospice benefit in Louisiana (the ugly). Home Health Care Nurse. 31(3), 121-123.

UAB Nursing. (2013). Nurse practitioner family primary care. www.uab.edu. Retrieved from  http://www.uab.edu/nursing/home/images/stories/info_sa/MSN_Flyer_NP_Family.pdf
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People Die Each Year of Cardiac Related

Words: 1615 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41112606

People die each year of cardiac related health problems. Some die of heart attacks and others of congestive heart failure and so forth. This research proposal highlights five peer reviewed journal articles that show how to improve, step-by-step, the infrastructure of a hospital cardiac program. Quantitative data from the studies along with in-hospital data will reveal the need for quality improvement as well as how successful certain methods are when implemented among specific populations. Information was gathered through the search engine Google Scholar and PubMed. All articles are less than four years old and reveal ways to not just improve the safety and care of patient's but also how to improve surgical outcomes and enhance IT infrastructure, all of which are essential to running a great hospital cardiac program.

Introduction

Several patients in (Hospital Name) have come in complaining of cardiac related health problems. Some have had issues with cardiothoracic…… [Read More]

References

Elliott, M.J. (2012). The role of information in ensuring quality and patient safety. Progress in Pediatric Cardiology, 33(1), 5-10. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1058981311000853

Grace, S.L., Poirier, P., Norris, C.M., Oakes, G.H., Somanader, D.S., & Suskin, N. (2014). Pan-Canadian Development of Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention Quality Indicators Endorsed by the Canadian Association of Cardiac Rehabilitation. Canadian Journal of Cardiology, 30(8), 945-948. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0828282X14002335

Guillamondegui, O.D., Gunter, O.L., Hines, L., Martin, B.J., Gibson, W., Clarke, C., Cecil, W.T. (2012). Using the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program and the Tennessee Surgical Quality Collaborative to Improve Surgical Outcomes. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 214(4), 709-714. Retrieved from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1072751511013287

IEEE Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training, & IEEE Computer Society. (2011). Educating software engineers of the future: Software quality research through problem-based learning. In CSEE&T 2011: Proceedings (pp. 91-100). Los Alamitos, California: IEEE.
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Customer Services it Takes Examples

Words: 3631 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16884780

The employees should be firmly committed to the firm, they are the face of a firm (also its eyes and ears). The staff focus should be involved in the process management, also their measurement and knowledge as well as initial contact with customers, all contribute to the performance of the organization.

Firms need to provide results on a consistent basis, be innovative and should respond quickly to any changes in environment for giving exceptional results and satisfying customers. Further in continuous improvement, aspects such as redesign of processes or services, upgraded technology systems, proper paperwork should be focused upon. Continuous improvement requires all firms' members to look for opportunities to improve. Overall, the continuous improvement process involves customers, leadership, employees and quality. It is the customers who determine if the firm is providing quality. They are the judges of it. The leadership is useful for setting direction of the firm.…… [Read More]

References

Brown, S.A. (1998). Breakthrough Customer Service. Toronto: John Wiley & Sons.

Buttle, F. (2004). Customer Relationship Management. Amsterdam: Elsevier Butterworth-Heinemann.

Els, W. (2003). Winning at Service. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons.

Horrell, E. (2006). The Kindness Revolution. New York: AMACOM.
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Personal Statement for the Past

Words: 622 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57901974



My career path solidified in front of me, I have maintained this focus since the end of my studies. I believe that the more I am exposed to this career, the better I will become. To that end, I still watch the speech pathologists at the daycare. Their work was the inspiration for me to seriously pursue this career path and it continues to inspire me. I study their techniques, their frustrations and their successes, knowing that one day I will be right there with them.

I am also currently working with the developmentally disabled for an organization called Ohel/Bais Ezra, and have done so for the past four years. To me, this is the most rewarding type of challenge imaginable. I derive an enormous sense of joy and satisfaction from helping others overcome difficulties.

Now, my goal is to continue my studies in Speech Language Pathology. This is the…… [Read More]

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Public Awareness and Human Diseases

Words: 2069 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71634531



A way to better distribute the information that is being taught in the classrooms is also through the community so that the changes are also effecting the parents to the students, as a change on their part as well would be helpful in the battle against obesity. It would be useful to initially target pamphlets, an informational booth or table at grocery stores, where the foundation of the problem lies. It would be effective if information is given before families go grocery shopping so they are more conscious of the items that they are purchasing. Furthermore, information should also be initially presented on TVs, in newspapers and magazines and other mediums that would likely be used in the more low-key and sedentary setting in order to galvanize individuals to get outside. Once outside, in order to sustain the physical activity, it would be nice to have water and juice at…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Ahuja, Gitika, & Salahi, Lara. (11, February 2010). School nutrition program takes up obesity fight. Retrieved from  http://abcnews.go.com/GMA/OnCall/school-nutrition-program-takes-obesity-fight/story?id=9802468 

CausesofChildhoodObesity.org, Initials. (2010). Causes of childhood obesity. Retrieved from  http://causesofchildhoodobesity.org/ 

Facts about obesity in the United States. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/pdf/facts_about_obesity_in_the_united_states.pdf

Mayo Clinic Staff, Initials. (2011, May 06). Risk factors. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/obesity/DS00314/DSECTION=risk-factors
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Ecmo an Overview of Extracorporeal

Words: 820 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88968508

ECMO requires constant monitoring and assessment in order to maintain proper oxygen saturation levels, blood pressure, and circulatory activity (Schuerer et al. 2008; Mielck & Quintel 2005).

Institutional experience and multidisciplinary focus are both of extreme importance in determining patient outcome following ECMO, as technological innovations and the high-risk of the procedure make an ongoing knowledge base and expertise level a major determiner of outcome (Schuerer et al. 2008). As serious complications including infection, instability of oxygenation, thrombosis, and volume requirements can all occur, patients should be treated in a manner comparable to an acute stroke response -- increased risk for disrupted blood flow is a definite result of an ECMO procedure (Yang 2011). ECMO can only last a few days, and decreased fluid requirements and increased pulmonary function are both indicators that the weaning process should begin (Yang 2011). Mortality rates for ECMO vary significantly depending on the specific…… [Read More]

References

Mielck, F. & Quintel, M. (2005). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Current Opinion n Critical Care 11(1): 87-93.

Schuerer, D., Kolovos, N., Boyd, K. & Coopersmith, C. (2008). Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Current Clinical Practice, Coding, and Reimbursement. Chest 134(1): 179-84.

Yang, E. (2011). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In Fundamentals of Pediatric Surgery, P. Mattei, editor. New York: Springer.
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Community Health Oklahoma Modern Healthcare

Words: 3003 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68725313

The subject is now part of a national political task force, with the goal of eliminating the problem within one generation (Ferran, 2010).

Formally, teen pregnancy is based on a woman who will not reach her 20th birthday by the expected birth of her first child. This definition does not assume marriage, nor if the woman is legally an adult (depending on the country). The idea of marriage and birthing age has, of course, changed based on societal and cultural issues. At one time, when the lifespan was 40, it made sense for a girl to begin her childbearing years as soon as she was able, usually around 12-13. In contemporary U.S. culture, however, the amount of information and professional data that is needed to become a well-rounded citizen is so high that we usually gauge 18 as the very minimum age to begin to have the resources and/or acumen…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Key Health Data About Oklahoma. (2011). Trust for America's Health. Retrieved from:

 http://healthyamericans.org/states/?stateid=OK 

Linking Teen Pregnancy Prevention to Other Critical Social Issues. (2010, March). Retrieved from the Namtional Campaign: http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/why-it-matters/pdf/introduction.pdf

Oklahoma at a Glance. (2011). Oklahoma Department of Commerce. Retrieved from:
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Rock Decided to Meet Lucas

Words: 3404 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89041313



Miami was where it all happened. I dated then. I guess you could say I had a life. Back then, if I were to be living under any rock, it had to be a very beautiful one, such as limestone, the kind of limestone that grew in small crevices on the road leading up to my grandfather's home on the island. I felt then that Prince Charming would come, eventually and when he did he wasn't going anywhere. After all, I am amazing; he must just not have received the memo quite yet. All of this was in the past and the time was now. I had been through enough doubt and feeling that I was some creature living under a rock. I was going to meet him and this situation would be resolved. Tonight was my coming out from under the rock.

Lucas. His name is Lucas Walker. We…… [Read More]

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Rdrn Tobacco and Its Subsequent

Words: 1733 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95572919



Sample Questionnaire:

The Topic Company: DN.

Interviewed:

Questionnaire:

1) Does the organization treat management and leadership as one in the same? YES or NO

2) Does the organization rely heavily on employee training and development? YES or NO

3) Does the program use employee feedback at the lowest levels in its overall decision making process? YES or NO

4) Do you believe all stakeholders are aware of the organizations goals and objectives and are willing to work towards the achievement of those goals? YES or NO

5) in your opinion is the organization structured in a way that inhibits innovation? YES or NO

6) Are there any other aspects that you believe should be improved within the organization? If so, how?

eferences:

1) Bulmer, M. And Warwick, D. (1993). Social research in developing countries: surveys and censuses in the Third World. London: outledge.

2) Ebbutt, D. (1998). Evaluation of projects…… [Read More]

References:

1) Bulmer, M. And Warwick, D. (1993). Social research in developing countries: surveys and censuses in the Third World. London: Routledge.

2) Ebbutt, D. (1998). Evaluation of projects in the developing world: some cultural and methodological issues. International Journal of Educational Development, 18, pp. 415-424.

3) Potter, C. (2006). Program Evaluation. In M. Terre Blanche, K. Durrheim & D. Painter (Eds.), Research in practice: Applied methods for the social sciences (2nd ed.) (pp. 410-428). Cape Town: UCT Press.

4) Potter, C. (2006). "Psychology and the art of program evaluation." South African journal of psychology 36 (1):
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Alcohol Abuse Is a Condition That Is

Words: 1599 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7534028

Alcohol abuse is a condition that is characterized by a pattern of excessive drinking in spite of negative effects resulting from the use of alcohol on an individual's occupational, legal, educational, medical, and/or social life. Alcoholism results from this destructive pattern of alcohol abuse after a period of time and includes a number of other symptoms including: increased tolerance to alcohol over time; alcohol withdrawal; a pattern of using more alcohol and/or use for a longer time than planned; destructive patterns health, social, and occupational functioning as a result of alcohol use; and failed attempts at reducing its use (APA, 2000). Alcoholism is also known as alcohol dependence or alcohol addiction as the terms are used interchangeably in the medical and treatment literature. These terms describe a destructive pattern of chronic alcohol use that results in the development of tolerance to alcohol, needing more alcohol to achieve the same effects…… [Read More]

References

American Psychiatric Association (APA, 2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th Ed.). Arlington, VA: Author.

Boorse, C. (1997). A rebuttal on health. In J.F Humber and R.F. Almeder (Eds.), What is disease? Totowa: Humana Press.

CDC (Centers for Disease Control, 2001) Chronic disease prevention: about chronic disease [Online]. Available: Internet:  http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/about.htm .

Dick, D.M. And Bierut, L.J. (2006). The genetics of alcohol dependency. Current Psychiatric Reports, 8, 151-157.
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Diabetes According to America Diabetes

Words: 678 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73144084

The high levels of blood glucose lead to the production of insulin therefore patients have excessive production of insulin. There is insulin resistance and hence body cells do not respond in an appropriate way in the presence of insulin (Mealey, 2010).

The main difference between diabetes insipidus, and diabetes mellitus, is that in diabetes mellitus insulin resistance is referred to being "post-receptor." This implies that the problem lies with the cells which respond to insulin as opposed to there being a problem in the production of insulin. The onset of diabetes mellitus is slow and the disorder might go undiagnosed for a very long period of time. Diabetes insipidus has an abrupt onset and it might be diagnosed at any age.

Factors affecting diagnosis and treatment prescription of diabetes

There are various factors that might affect the diagnosis and treatment of these two types of diabetes.one of these factors is…… [Read More]

References

Mealey, B.L. (2010).Diabetes Pathophysiology. Retrieved July 29, 2013 from  http://www.health.am/db/diabetes-pathophysiology/ 

MediLexicon International Ltd.(2013). All about Diabetes. Retrieved July 29, 2013 from http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/info/diabetes/
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Comparing Sun Tzu With Other Military Greats

Words: 1055 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12365252

Sun Tzu and Military Classics

Sun Tzu believed in freedom of action, mobility, surprise, deception and indirect attacks rather than frontal assaults. His method was always to "entice the enemy, to unbalance him, and to create a situation favorable for a decisive counter-stroke," while avoiding sieges and prolonged wars of attrition (Harvey, 2008, p. xlii). This was the opposite type of strategy from the commanders of the First World War or the American Civil War, who hurled masses of men against powerful defensive positions and inflicted mass casualties on their armies for no real purpose. Basil Liddell Hart, who was "horrified by the waste" of World War I, agreed with Sun Tzu that the indirect approach was superior, particularly using the mobility that tanks and air power provided (Harvey, p. xxxv). Most of the great commanders of history, like George Washington, Bernard Montgomery, Douglas MacArthur and George Patton have followed…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Harvey, R. (2008). Maverick Military Leaders: The Extraordinary Battles of Washington, Nelson, Patton, Rommel, and Others. New York: Skyhorse Pub Co Inc.

Sun Tzu. The Art of War. History.com  http://www.history.com/topics/the-art-of-war
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Healthcare Quality Management Pdca Modeling in Healthcare

Words: 1458 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41430170

Healthcare Quality Management

PDCA Modeling in Healthcare

Psychiatric emergencies in medical settings may be particularly challenging since the staff does not encounter them frequently and may not have experience dealing with behavioral crisis intervention. The purpose of this exercise is to help staff improve understanding and coping with nonmedical emergencies that occur in medical settings using the PDCA cycle.

X is a 41-year-old male admitted to a medical unit with a diagnosis of possible stroke. The patient is ambulatory, 5'10," and 350 lbs. Mr. X presented to the emergency department the day before after apparently losing consciousness at home. The initial CAT scan of his head was negative. It is suspected that Mr. X may be an IV drug user since his urine toxicology screening came back positive for opiates. The medical staff thinks that Mr. X had a seizure prior to admission, but he has shown no abnormal signs…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bennet, L., & Slavin, L. (2009, April 3). What Every Health Care Manager Needs to Know. Retrieved from Continous Quality Improvement: http://www.cwru.edu/med/epidbio/mphp439/CQI.htm

i Six Sigma. (N.d.). Focus - PDCA. Retrieved from I Six Sigma:  http://www.isixsigma.com/dictionary/focus-pdca/ 

Pestka, E., Hatterberg, D., Larson, L., Zwygart, L., Cox, A., & Cox, D. (2012). Enhancing Safety in Behavioral Emergency Situations. Medsurg Nursing, 335-341.
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Communication Cues

Words: 725 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85576325

nonverbal behavior has James made?

From the case study provided, there are various mistakes of James' own nonverbal behavior. Nonverbal behaviors such as emotions, attitudes and personality traits come clear from his conversation with Bob Croze. For instance, when Bob tells James that he was late and therefore he had already placed an order with one of James' competitors, James conveys his attitudes and expresses his emotions by increasing his voice in speed and pitch as well as, rising up ready to leave. This shows that James was not happy with Bob since he had placed an order with his competitor.

Cite at least 3 examples, explaining James' nonverbal behaviors and the messages they sent.

Expressing emotion (For example, James not happy with Bob, and so increases his voice in speed and pitch)

Conveying attitudes (For example, crossing arms and legs while talking to Bob)

Demonstrating personality traits (For example,…… [Read More]

References

Cherry, K. (2014). Types of Nonverbal Communication. Major Nonverbal Beahviors. Retrieved July 20, 2014, from http://psychology.about.com/od/nonverbalcommunication/a/nonverbaltypes.htmFind a website by URL or keyword...

Hallett, T. (2014). Body Language: Understanding Non-Verbal Communication. Body Language. Retrieved July 20, 2014, from http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/Body_Language.htm
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Special Interest Hobby Swimming Is the Only

Words: 1485 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36869562

Special Interest

Hobby: Swimming

Swimming is the only activity that I enjoy doing so much. This is because it involves the whole of my body yet at the same time it relaxes my nerves (Gifford 17). It is a sport that has come a long way from its inception. There are no chronological recordings of discovery of when the sport. Therefore, it is one among the few sports that has been in existence for the longest time possible. Swimming in sports and recreational activities, is the forward motion of the body in water by a combination of legs and arms motions and the natural floating of the body on water. It is a tremendously enjoyable recreational activity.

The archaeological evidences and other sources show that swimming had been in practice since 2500 BC. The practice of swimming started in Egypt and later spread through Assyria, Greece and the Roman empires…… [Read More]

Works cited

Montgomery, Jim, and Mo Chambers. Mastering Swimming. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics,

2009. Print.

Wiltse, Jeff. Contested Waters: A Social History of Swimming Pools in America. Chapel Hill:

University of North Carolina Press, 2007. Internet resource.
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Improved Screening Tool for Mild Cognitive Impairment

Words: 2086 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47056962

As expected, NIHSS scores indicated mild stroke severity, while the FIM scores suggested moderate motor deficits. A comparison of the demographic variables for the patients that met the inclusion criteria with those that did not, revealed no significant differences except in terms of stroke severity, laterality, and comprehension impairment.

The results of the cognitive evaluations (MMSE vs. MoCA, r = .79, p < .001; MMSE vs. cFIM, r = .56, p < .000; MoCA vs. cFIM, r = .67, p < .000) revealed good agreement between the three instruments (Toglia et al., 2011) and mirrored the results of Stewart et al. (2012). A comparison of the mean scores for MMSE and MoCA, however, revealed a significant difference (24.4 vs. 17.8, respectively, p < .001) in terms of sensitivity to subtle changes in cognition. This finding supports the conclusion that the MoCA may be more sensitive to MCI than the MMSE.…… [Read More]

References

AHRQ. (2013). Assessing cognitive functioning. in: Evidence-based geriatric nursing protocols for best practice. Retrieved 3 Apr. 2014 from  http://www.guideline.gov/content.aspx?id=43917 .

Alzheimer's Association. (2012). Mild cognitive impairment. Retrieved 3 Apr. 2014 from  http://www.alz.org/dementia/downloads/topicsheet_mci.pdf .

Alzheimer's Association. (2013). 2013 Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 9(2), 1-69. Retrieved 3 Apr. 2014 from  http://www.alz.org/downloads/facts_figures_2013.pdf .

Aslam, S., Georgiev, H., Mehta, K., & Kumar, a. (2012). Matching research design to clinical research questions. Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 33(1), 49-53.
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Female Gender Disparities in Cardiovascular

Words: 2805 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36678633

Gender variation in clinical decision-making was measured, including (1) the number, types, and certainty levels of diagnoses considered and (2) how diagnoses vary according to patient characteristics, when patients have identical symptoms of CHD (Maserejian et al., 2009).

This was a factorial experiment presenting videotaped CHD symptoms, systematically altering patient gender, age, socioeconomic status (SES) and race, and physician gender and level of experience. The primary end point was physicians' most certain diagnosis. The results: Physicians (n=128) mentioned five diagnoses on average, most commonly heart, gastrointestinal, and mental health conditions. Physicians were significantly less certain of the underlying cause of symptoms among female patients regardless of age, but only among middle-aged women were they significantly less certain of the CHD diagnosis. Among middle-aged women, 31.3% received a mental health condition as the most certain diagnosis, compared with 15.6% of their male counterparts. An interaction effect showed that females with high…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chou, Anne F., Sarah Hudson Scholle, Carol S. Weisman, Arlene S. Bierman, Rosaly

Correa-de-Araujo, & Lori Mosca (2007). "Gender Disparities in the Quality of Cardiovascular Disease Care in Private Managed Care Plans." In Women's Health

Issues 17: 120 -- 130.

DeVon, H., Ryan, C.J., Ochs, a.L., & Shapiro, M. (2008). "Symptoms Across the Continuum of Acute Coronary Syndromes: Differences Between Women and Men." In Am J. Crit Care 17:14-24.
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Diabetes Case Study

Words: 1599 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98697834

Mrs. X.

elationship of high cholesterol levels to the development of cardiovascular disease

Diabetes, heart disease, and high cholesterol are all strongly correlated. Even when diabetes is being well-managed, the patient's risks factors increase for comorbidity with these disorders. "High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles" (Cardiovascular disease and diabetes, 2014, AHA). Also, in the case of Ms. X, because of her uncontrolled diabetes, her risk for high cholesterol is higher than average even in the absence of obesity and inactivity. "This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia…… [Read More]

References

Burden, M. (2003). Diabetes: Treatment and complications. Nursing Times, 99(2) 30/

Retrieved from:

 http://www.nursingtimes.net/nursing-practice/clinical-zones/diabetes/diabetes-treatment-and-complications-the-nurses-role/205780.article 

Cardiovascular disease and diabetes. (2012). American Heart Association. Retrieved from: