Taming Of The Shrew Essays (Examples)

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Marriage in Taming Shakespeare and

Words: 1441 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42208678



PETRUCHIO: They shall go forward, Kate, at thy command.-- Obey the bride, you that attend on her./Go to the feast, revel and domineer,/Carouse full measure to her maidenhead,/Be mad and merry, or go hang yourselves;/but for my bonny Kate, she must with me./Nay, look not big, nor stamp, nor stare, nor fret, 230I will be master of what is mine own./She is my goods, my chattels, she is my house,/My household stuff, my field, my barn,/My horse, my ox, my ass, my any thing,/and here she stands, touch her whoever dare!

Shakespeare 175)

The quote gives great insight into the end note of a marriage created in haste, with the intentions of personal and familial gain and with the closing of the marriage as a "contract" including the exchange of large sums of money for the groom and his family. Petruchio, makes his deal, getting his bride (then leaving her…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. "The Taming of the Shrew." The Taming of the Shrew. Ed H.J. Oliver. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998. 89-232.

Oliver, H.J., ed. The Taming of the Shrew. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
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Learn Others Learning -- and

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46631593



The Merchant of Venice, though ostensibly a comedy, is one of the more serious plays in the comedic genre. The Taming of the Shrew is far more humorous and light hearted, but it is not without its lessons. The specific lessons vary greatly depending on one's interpretation of the play, especially in performance, but one key lesson that most of the female characters fail to learn is the advantage of working in tandem with their husband. Petruchio manages to win a substantial amount of money through his new wife Kate's quick obedience; she has learned through the course of the play to at least give the appearance of docility and subservience, which the other women lack -- they have failed to learn anything from her transformation, seeing no problems in themselves form the outset. This failure costs them some cold, hard, cash.

It is in Julius Caesar, however, that Shakespeare…… [Read More]

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Film Project Othello Modernized Shakespeare

Words: 2228 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 25205463

My story being done,

She gave me for my pains a world of sighs:

She swore, in faith, twas strange, 'twas passing strange,

Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful:

She wish'd she had not heard it, yet she wish'd

That heaven had made her such a man: she thank'd me,

And bade me, if I had a friend that loved her, should but teach him how to tell my story.

And that would woo her. Upon this hint I spake:

She loved me for the dangers I had pass'd,

And I loved her that she did pity them.

This only is the witchcraft I have used:

Here comes the lady; let her witness it.

Translation

Setting: The inside of the administrative building. Nighttime. Othello is wearing a suit, and is confronted by the school's president, 'Dr. B,' and several members of the administration in their pajamas.

John Othello: Look Dr. B,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. "Othello." MIT Classics Page. [2 Nov 2006] http://www-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/othello/othello.1.3.html
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Soliloquies When Characters Stop Being

Words: 4420 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78671282



Juliet herself, though ostensibly a virgin, is certainly not innocent in this regard; though certain strains of chauvinism have been purportedly found in this and others of his plays, Shakespeare certainly cannot be accused of granting males a monopoly on lust. In the shorter monologue that she delivers in the same scene, unaware of Romeo's presence, she famously asks, "hat's Montague? It is nor hand, nor foot, / nor arm, nor face, nor any other part / Belonging to a man" (Riverside 1114, II. ii. 40-2). She does not mention a mind, a spirit, or any other intangible qualities that might make her protestations of a deep, emotional love somewhat more believable, but instead focuses on the physical aspects of Romeo (including the suggestive "any other part belonging to a man") -- the true root of her desires.

It is not love, then, that causes these two teenagers to be…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Clemen, Wolfgang. A Commentary on Shakespeare's Richard III. New York: Routledge, 2005.

Evans, G. Blakemore and M. Tobin, eds. The Riverside Shakespeare. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2003.

Rose, Herbert. A Handbook of Greek Mythology. New York: Routledge, 2005.

Shakespeare, William. Richard the Third. In the Riverside Shakespeare.
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I Ching Principles in a Western Poem

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51153670

I Ching Principles in a Western Poem

The Taming of the hrew

Act IV. cene I.

Hall in PETRUCHIO' Country House.

Enter GRUMIO.

Gru. Fie, fie, on all tired jades, on all mad masters, and all foul ways! Was ever man so beaten? was ever man so rayed? was ever man so weary? I am sent before to make a fire, and they are coming after to warm them. Now, were not I a little pot and soon hot, my very lips might freeze to my teeth, my tongue to the roof of my mouth, my heart in my belly, ere I should come by a fire to thaw me; but I, with blowing the fire, shall warm myself; for, considering the weather, a taller man than I will take cold. Holla, ho! Curtis.

Enter CURTI.

Curt. Who is that calls so coldly?

Gru. A piece of ice: if thou…… [Read More]

Source: Craig, W.J., ed. "Taming of the Shrew." The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. London: Oxford University Press: 1914; Bartleby.com, 2000.

A www.bartleby.com/70/. Accessed March, 2003.

Imagery is the foundation of
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Ben Jonson Intertextualities The Influence

Words: 22973 Length: 80 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70168505

" James a.S. McPeek

further blames Jonson for this corruption: "No one can read this dainty song to Celia without feeling that Jonson is indecorous in putting it in the mouth of such a thoroughgoing scoundrel as Volpone."

Shelburne

asserts that the usual view of Jonson's use of the Catullan poem is distorted by an insufficient understanding of Catullus' carmina, which comes from critics' willingness to adhere to a conventional -- yet incorrect and incomplete -- reading of the love poem. hen Jonson created his adaptation of carmina 5, there was only one other complete translation in English of a poem by Catullus. That translation is believed to have been Sir Philip Sidney's rendering of poem 70 in Certain Sonnets, however, it was not published until 1598.

This means that Jonson's knowledge of the poem must have come from the Latin text printed in C. Val. Catulli, Albii, Tibulli, Sex.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alghieri, Dante Inferno. 1982. Trans. Allen Mandelbaum. New York: Bantam Dell, 2004.

Print.

Allen, Graham. Intertextuality. Routledge; First Edition, 2000. Print.

Baker, Christopher. & Harp, Richard. "Jonson' Volpone and Dante." Comparative
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Mary Pickford United Artist's Founder

Words: 2531 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79035283



The films Pickford brought to life as a producer later in her career were often nothing like those she starred in as an actress: For example, "in 1945, during the independent production boom at the end of orld ar II, she organized Comet Pictures to make medium-budget films with Ralph Cohn, the son of Columbia Pictures cofounder Jack Cohn. At Comet she produced probably her finest later film, the noir hit Sleep, My Love (1948)" as well as the broad, comedic-style films My Little Chickadee (1940) with .C. Films; Love Happy (1950), with the Marx Brothers comedy and (briefly) Marilyn Monroe and the war movie the Story of G.I. Joe (1945) (Aberdeen 2005).

Pickford defended the role of independent producers in 1934, in a speech that noted that for film to continue to remain relevant in the 20th centuries, it must be innovative and challenging, particularly given that radio and…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aberdeen, J.A. "Mary Pickford: The SIMPP Years." Hollywood Renegades. Reprinted by Cobblestone, 2005 on the web in excerpted form. May 4, 2010.

 http://www.cobbles.com/simpp_archive/mary-pickford_post-simpp.htm 

Dirks, Tim. "Film history of the 1920s." Film Site. AMC Movie Classics. May 4, 2010.

 http://www.filmsite.org/20sintro.html
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Printing Press and the Internet

Words: 6637 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64054291

)

"Sonnet 130" by Shakespeare and "Sonnet 23" by Louis Labe both talk about love, as so many sonnets do. Their respective techniques however, differentiate them from each other. Shakespeare uses a rhyme scheme that became known as Shakespearean rhyme scheme or English rhyme. He writes about love in a sarcastic manner though. He is mocking the traditional love poems and the usual expressive manner in which women are often compared to. It is ironic in a way because Shakespeare himself also uses the very techniques in his previous writing when he is writing from a man's point-of-view and describing a woman. But in this sonnet he uses the technique of mocking this exaggerated comparison. Usually women are compared to having skin as white as snow, however, in reality, Shakespeare points out, women don't really fit this description, "If snow be white, why then her breasts are dun."

Louis Labe…… [Read More]

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Wife of Bath it May

Words: 1113 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29126056

Her prologue is like a bold challenge to the knight in her company. She anticipates Shakespeare's Katerina in the Taming of the Shrew. Just as Katerina challenges Petruchio, so too does the ife of Bath appear to be challenging the only true man she has likely ever met: one who is in command of himself and thus able to command others. She is like the ermine in Leonardo's painting the Lady with the Ermine (1490). The ermine is a nasty, vicious animal that cannot be picked up and held -- and yet the lady in the portrait holds it with perfect composure. In other words, she has learned to control her passions. The ife of Bath has not done so: she promotes sensuality and lust and refuses to be harnessed. Only when the man finally submits to her will does she assume that she is happy. But a man in…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Blake, William. "Descriptive Catalogue: Sir Geffrey Chaucer and the Nine and twenty

Pilgrims on their journey to Canterbury." The Poetical Works. Bartleby. Web. 15 Nov 2012.

Chaucer, Geoffrey. The Canterbury Tales. UK: Wordsworth Poetry Library, 2002.

White, David Allen. "Chaucer's Canterbury Tales." Winona, MN: St. Thomas Aquinas
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Women in Beowulf and Canterbury

Words: 1119 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83286813

Seeing that he was miserable, she told him he could either have her loyal but ugly or beautiful and unfaithful (Chaucer pp). The knight leaves the decision up to her thus, giving the old hag exactly what she wanted, to be in control of her husband. This decision resulted in the old hag becoming beautiful and loyal (Chaucer pp).

omen are central to this tale from the beginning to the end. The knight is saved by the queen, then is sent on a quest to find what appeared to be an impossible answer to a riddle concerning women, and then is saved again at the last minute by another woman who, although wise, was ugly and undesirable. However, he proved true, loyal and obedient, and granted the hag the one thing she wished, control over her man. And in doing so, he received what he truly wanted which was a…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beowulf. Retrieved September 25, 2005 at http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/toc/modeng/public/AnoBeow.html

Chaucer, Geoffrey. "The Miller's Prologue and Tale; The Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale."

Retrieved September 25, 2005 at  http://www.librarius.com/cantales.htm 

Dockray-Miller, Mary. "The masculine queen of 'Beowulf.'" Women and Language. September 22, 1998. Retrieved September 24, 2005 from HighBeam Research Library Web site.
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Health Care Promotion in the Field of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71330655

health care promotion in the field of Canadian nursing. he author draws from several sources to describe the history of health care promotion in Canada and how it has changed over the years. here were nine sources used to complete this paper.

he field of health care in Canada is an ever evolving industry. Over the past few decades there have been significant changes in the method of delivery as well as the parameters of the job description (Mustard, 1991). Nurses used to be charged with changing bed pans and taking temperatures but the field has evolved to the point that nursing is a demanding and respected profession. oday, nurses work closely with physicians, nutritionists, patients and their families to coordinate and deliver the most optimum health care possible. In keeping with the new more broadly defined role that nurses play in the field of health care the promotion of…… [Read More]

The marked and significant differences in the various meanings ascribed to health promotion in professional literature provide evidence of the concept's evolution over the last half of the 20th century and testify both to the powerful influences of dominant ideologies and the invisibility of others (Rafael, 1999). The "new public health" marks a return to a conceptualization of health that is consistent with a nursing paradigm and thus potentially useful in supporting nursing health promotion practice (Rafael, 1999). While practitioners in the health care field have obviously always been involved in elements of what could broadly be termed "health promotion" the evidence and case material indicate the term "health promotion" is coming to be used in a more specialized way (Rafael, 1999)."

His judgment raises some important questions for nursing: What is health promotion (Rafael, 1999)? What is the "specialized way" into which it is evolving (Rafael, 1999)? What forces have been responsible for this evolution (Rafael, 1999)? And, how does that specialized way relate to nursing's legacy in health promotion and nurses' current conceptualization and practice of health promotion? The answers to these questions are important in order for nurses to reflect on their own conceptualization of health and the activities that promote it, as well as to understand the philosophical and political pressures that have brought about change in the way health promotion is being understood globally (Rafael, 1999). "

For the most part health promotion has always been viewed as the prevention of disease in the past. For many years it has been placed under the umbrella of disease prevention and control. Nurses promoted health by encouraging vaccinations, and providing
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Identity in Shakespeare Clearly One

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19395854



Most Elizabethans believed their self-identity was wrapped up in a cosmic paradigm of fate and destiny, and were somehow controlled by the stars and planets and had a power over the baser side of man -- tools of God, but with certain amounts of free will. Thus, a very central idea in Shakespeare is this central view that an individual's identity is set by God, the Planets, the Universe, the Gods, and Nature. But in contrast, the idea of free will for the individual -- or even a single utterance or decision, can change forever the destiny of the individual. A superb example of this is in Romeo and Juliet.

Fate and chance surround the identities of the major and minor characters in RJ almost from the opening scene. Because the audience already believed that their destiny was predetermined, they saw the characters as having very little choice in their…… [Read More]

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Romeo & Juliet the Most

Words: 972 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31789714

Juliet's speeches to the Friar after learning that she must marry Paris in a week's time indicate this as she lists the horrors she would rather endure: "bid me leap... / From off the battlements of any tower...lurk / here serpents are; chain me with roaring bears..." (Riverside 1130, IV.i. 77-80). She continues in much the same vein, and this is not her only moment of such emotional extremity. To see this as comedic, it must be remembered that Juliet is only twelve years old, and Romeo probably around fourteen, and although people married younger in those days it is ridiculous to assume that they could possibly have had the same emotional maturity as other of Shakespeare's heroes and heroines.

In Baz Luhrmann's 1997 film version of Romeo and Juliet, certain aspects of the storyline are also ridiculously overblown. Luhrmann does not attempt to approach comedy in the tragic moments…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dobson, Michael. "Shakespeare on the Page and on the Stage." The Cambridge

Companion to Shakespeare. New York: Cambridge University Press 2001.

Evans, G. Blakemore and M. Tobin, eds. The Riverside Shakespeare. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2003.

Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. In the Riverside Shakespeare.
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Midsummer Bottom's Up in a

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18382307



This is why Shakespeare included a character and plot of such low comedy in a play with such far-reaching and complex themes; in the end, all of the complexity boils down to a few very simple facts bout humanity. As Valerie Traub notes, "early modern England was a culture of contradictions, with official ideology often challenged by actual social practice," and Midsummer makes this exceedingly clear (131). Such contradictions necessarily lead to complications, as the central plot of the play (that of the lovers) clearly illustrates, and though these complications are comedic in their own way it is also hysterical watching someone who is unabashedly human -- and quite asinine in several senses because of it. His transformation is yet one more piece of honesty that Shakespeare includes in his commentary on humanity.

This aspect of both the character and the pay is captured brilliantly in Michael Hoffman's 1999 film…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Evans, G. Blakemore and M. Tobin, eds. The Riverside Shakespeare. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2003.

Shakespeare, William. A Midsummer Night's Dream. In the Riverside Shakespeare.

Traub, Valerie. "Gender and Sexuality in Shakespeare." The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare. New York: Cambridge University Press 2001