Teaching Experience Essays (Examples)

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Teacher Interview Synopsis This Project

Words: 779 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30441506

She says that even "ordinary" situations, as soon as mandatory state testing is emphasized, that testing process becomes less valuable because it often ends up measuring results that are more representative of test-taking preparation rather than they are representative of genuine learning and academic proficiency.

Tenure

The interview subject expressed intense frustration at the way that the tenure system in modern education undermines the system. She has encountered several different fellow teachers who were tenured but clearly no longer motivated or particularly interested in teaching except as a regular paycheck. Some of them simply do the minimum and never challenge their students. Other teachers have even been disciplined for serious conduct issues. However, those teachers are almost always retained and even when they are suspended or placed on modified administrative duty, they still receive their full salaries. According to the interview subject, the tenure system is much too protective of…… [Read More]

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Teaching That Play a Role

Words: 9261 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69308031



Multicultural education researchers and educators agree that preservice teachers' attitudes, beliefs, and understandings are important: foci in multicultural education coursework (Cochran-Smith, 1995; Grant & Secada, 1990; McDiarmid & Price, 1993; Pohan, 1996). Teacher attitudes and beliefs influence teaching behaviors, which affect student learning and behavior (Wiest, 1998)."

1996 study used 492 pre-service teachers to try and gauge the attitudes and beliefs among the group when it came to understanding diversity and cultural differences in students (Wiest, 1998).

A decade earlier leading education experts Hollingsworth was able to identify a method for helping students of teaching to challenge their convictions and apply them to their careers.

Many advocates of multicultural education suggest that field experiences be included in preparing teachers to work with diverse student populations (Pohan, 1996; Sleeter, 1995; Tellez, Hlebowitsh, Cohen, & Norwood, 1995). Sleeter (1995) describes some investigations, such as miniethnographies, that her students conduct: I regard extended…… [Read More]

ZEICHNER, K.M., & GRANT, C.A. (1981) Biography an social structure in the socialization of student teachers, Journal of Education for Teaching, 7, pp. 298-314.

Assessing the consistency between teachers' philosophies and educational goals.

Education; 9/22/1995; DeSpain, B.C.
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Experienced Inexperienced Teachers Differences Between Experienced and

Words: 787 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35018905

experienced inexperienced teachers.

Differences between Experienced and Inexperienced Teachers

One of the most obvious differences that may be mentioned between the inexperienced and the experienced teacher is the very issue of experience itself. Experience in the teaching profession implies a depth of knowledge and insight, as well as the development of intuitive methods of teaching that often cannot be obtained in any other way other than through the teaching process. However there are many other differences that can be noted between the experienced and the inexperienced teacher. The following discussion will include findings from research studies on this topic.

One of the differences mentioned in the literature between these two categories of teacher is that very often the experienced teacher develops a sense of potential and possible problems and contingencies that might occur in the teaching situation and process. This is evident from a study by Griffey and Housner (…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Griffey DC, Housner LD 1991, "Differences between experienced and inexperienced teachers' planning decisions, interactions, student engagement, and instructional climate," Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, vol. 62, no.2, pp. 196-204.

Housner LD and Griffey DC, 1985, "Teacher cognition: differences in planning and interactive decision making between experienced and inexperienced teachers," Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES), volume 56, no1, pp. 45-53.

Rice J. The Impact of Teacher Experience Examining the Evidence and Policy

Implications,2010, viewed 8 December 2010,
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Teacher Assessment

Words: 966 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17875213

Maranzo Domain

First Year Teaching Performance

Current Teaching Performance

Selection of Content

Selection of Instructional Strategies

Use of Assessment for Learning

Classroom Management

Student Motivation

Haberman Dimension

First Year Teaching Performance

Current Teaching Performance

Persistence

Protecting Learners and Learning

Application of Generalizations

Approach to At isk Students

Professional vs. Personal Orientation to Students

eaction to Burnout

Fallibility

My first year teaching experience was one that can be described as an adjustment period. No amount of education or student teaching could have prepared me for the challenges that I faced as a first year teacher. I felt very much like a student myself, during that first year as I attempted to absorb all the information that was presented to me by my peers, students and principal. While I failed quite often in this first year, I believe I also learned much as to how to adapt to new situations and build…… [Read More]

References

Marazano, R. (2012). Marzano School Leadership Evaluation Model. Marzano Research Lab, Feb 2012.
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Teacher it Is a Basic

Words: 889 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47250320

That incidence shocked my family and especially my father lost his emotional control. During those tumultuous times, my parents decided to part away and got divorced. It was double loss for me and suffering from depression, I decided to drop out of the college but my mother stood like a wall to support me and not to abort my studies. She encouraged me to continue my education with proper determination.

I completed my graduation in 1992. I was the first one in my family to graduate from a college. Yet, with all my hardship, the influence of the accidental death of my brother and subsequent divorce of my parents was deep, my GP was low and I had to overcome and improve. During all those times, my mother continually supported me as a great mentor in learning how to deal with difficult situations in one's life. I realize how important…… [Read More]

Along with my educational background, my personal situations have taught me a lot. Twenty years ago, while I was attending UC Berkeley, during my sophomore year, my youngest brother became a victim of gang-related crime and was murdered brutally. That incidence shocked my family and especially my father lost his emotional control. During those tumultuous times, my parents decided to part away and got divorced. It was double loss for me and suffering from depression, I decided to drop out of the college but my mother stood like a wall to support me and not to abort my studies. She encouraged me to continue my education with proper determination.

I completed my graduation in 1992. I was the first one in my family to graduate from a college. Yet, with all my hardship, the influence of the accidental death of my brother and subsequent divorce of my parents was deep, my GPA was low and I had to overcome and improve. During all those times, my mother continually supported me as a great mentor in learning how to deal with difficult situations in one's life. I realize how important it is for one to obtain a good guide and a mentor who will help him to learn how to make proper decisions. Without my mother's guidance, I might have wasted my educational career long ago. I noticed that her skills to handle the situation and encourage me towards pursuing my education was largely influenced and improved by her teaching experience and since then, I decided to be an educator myself too. She also had a desire for me to be a high school teacher and continue her legacy as a teacher. She herself was a vocational teacher's aide and taught ESL. She inspired me to continue my education and do my best to succeed in what I was doing. By observing the way my mother tried to keep my life on the right path, I realize that I also have some practical knowledge about how to manage students and to encourage them to pursue their career in progressive ways.

I lost my mother one year ago. After recuperating from the loss, I applied for Masters Degree in Education but I was not admitted. Perhaps I was not ready till then. I lost my sister during the Christmas of 2009 and I think even if I had been admitted for the Masters program in Education, I might not have been able to continue the program. Now when I have bounced back and recuperated from all losses I suffered in the recent past, I am willing to pursue this Masters program with utmost interest and dedication. I want to become a teacher which is my aim and this Masters program would be a great step to fulfilling my goal.
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Teacher Attitudes and Perceptions About Curriculum Innovation in Learning and Technology

Words: 22121 Length: 76 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4872492

Self-Efficacy: A Definition

Social Cognitive Theory

Triangulation Data analysis

Teacher Self-Efficacy

Problems for the researcher

Data Analysis and Related Literature review.

aseline Group

Gender Deviation

Age Deviation

Comparison of data with other literature in the field.

Everyday Integration

Efficacy, Self-esteem, Confidence and Experience

arriers to use

Integration paradigm.

Co-oping and Project design.

Organizational Climate

Teacher Integration Education.

Meta-evaluation of data and related literature.

Data Analysis and Comparison

Recommendation for Further Research

Data Review Report

Teacher efficacy in the classroom is facilitated by a number of different factors for different professions. However, in the case of the teaching classroom, and adapting to new technology, andura's belief that the environment and the person's attitude toward / interactions with the environment are reciprocally affective.

andura (1993) identified 4 specific ways that self-efficacy is formed:

Through cognitive experiences

Through motivational experiences

Their affective interactions with environment

Through selectional experiences and choices.

Cognitive Experiences

andura…… [Read More]

Bibliography of the literature dealing with teacher training in the uses of the computer in education. (ERIC No. ED 260-696)

Bushman, B. And Baumeister, R. (1998, July) Threatened Egotism, Narcissism, Self-Esteem, and Direct and Misplaced Aggression: Does Self-Love or Self-Hate Lead to Violence? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

Campus Computing Project. (1999). The continuing challenge of instructional integration and user support. Encino, CA: Retrieved November 21, 2003 from the World Wide Web:  http://www.campuscomputing.net/ 

Christensen, R. (2002, 22 June) Effects of technology integration education on the attitudes of teachers and students.Journal of Research on Technology in Education.

Clifford, M., Kim, A. McDonald, B. (1988 Fall) "Responses to Failure as Influenced by Task Attribution, Outcome Attribution, and Failure Tolerance." The Journal of Experimental Education. Volume 57, Number 1. Pages 19-35.
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Teaching in the Diverse Classroom

Words: 692 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76992253

California teachers meet the challenges of a classroom that is becoming increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse. The research will be based upon several proven strategies, including reflective practice, and incorporating the knowledge gained into practice.

Action research is described as "as a tool of curriculum development consisting of continuous feedback that targets specific problems in a particular school setting" (Ferraro). Mettetal adds that action research is undertaken in order to answer a specific practical problem, resulting in action. It is relevant to the specific site where it occurs, and results are shared with individuals who are directly affected by the research.

The action research program proposed here will follow the model set forth by Ferraro. A senior teacher will take the role of the researcher and role model. As such, the senior teacher will hold monthly meetings with all student teachers. At these meetings the student teachers will report their…… [Read More]

References

Ferraro, Joan M. Reflective Practice and Professional Development. ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education Washington DC. ERIC Digest.

Mettetal, Gwynn. Comparison of Formal and Action Research Methods. Resources for Teacher-researchers, Information on local teacher-researcher initiatives. Research about Teaching and Learning. Division of Education, Indiana University South Bend. 19 October 2002. http://www.iusb.edu/~gmetteta/Research_about_Teaching_and.htm

Multicultural Pavillion Teacher's Corner. Teacher Action Research. Created and maintained by Dr. Paul Gorski. 19 October 2002. http://curry.edschool.virginia.edu/centers/multicultural/tar.html

Parsons, Sharon. Teacher Research. Access Excellence @ the National Health Museum, Classrooms of the 21st Century. 19 October 2002. http://www.accessexcellence.org/21st/TL/AR
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Teaching Recreational Staff About the Dangers of Heat Waves

Words: 1299 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7325444

Teaching Plan: eflection and Evaluation

Summary of teaching plan

The topic of the presentation and instruction is heatstroke and other heat related causes of death. The teaching presentation was provided to staff at a Parks and ecreation department in the community, and plans are being made to conduct the teaching presentation at church communities in preparation for their vacation Bible school activities, at adult / child care centers that often plan outings for their program participants, and at health centers at Universities who are in a position to encounter university students who are suffering from a heat-related threats to their health.

The heat wave that occurred in western Europe in the summer of 2003 is a case study in the relation of social structure and cultural practices and the impact of a natural disaster on public health (Kopp, et al., 2015). Heat waves are more lethal to the poor who…… [Read More]

References

Atherton, J.S. (2013). Learning and Teaching; Constructivism in learning. Retrieved from http://www.learningandteaching.info/learning/constructivism.htm

Kopp, R., Buzan, J., and Huber, M. (2015, June 6). The deadly combination of heat and humidity. Sunday Review: Opinion. The New York Times.
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Teaching as a Profession How

Words: 3493 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15591868

"Many of our current challenges are unprecedented," the president explained. "There are no standard remedies, or go-to fixes this time around. That is why we are going to need your help. e'll need young people like you to step up. e need your daring and your enthusiasm and your energy." I will continue to offer my enthusiasm and my energy -- and hopefully I will be daring enough to learn new skills and strategies for the betterment of my students and my community.

Critical Incidents in Education

Introduction:

Before I share specific school experiences I have had, I want to express my own perspective on teaching and education. I have always been very impressed by the thinking of John Dewey, who is considered the "Father of Public Education" in America, and also I've been influenced by the more contemporary strategies put forward by Albert Bandera, who is well-known for his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bandura, Albert. (1994). Self-efficacy. In V.S. Ramachaudran (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Human

Behavior, 4. New York: Academic Press, pp. 71-81

Dewey, John (2002). Waste in Education. In The School and Society (pp. 77-110).

Bristol, UK: Thoemmes Press.
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Teaching Adults Using Technology How

Words: 2272 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19724174

While commenting on the works of Baldwin & Ford, Detterman (Detterman & Sternberg, 1993) observed that the American enterprises were more likely to lose in case of teaching employers as they diverted lump sum of $100 billion annually to tutor employees. The loss is experienced because whatever is learned in an adult learning session is not practiced at the workplaces.

This problem is indicative of the dire need for combining knowledge with current practical work. The internships of doctors and people doing Ph. D serve as examples to show the link between learning and practical work (Lave & Wenger, 1991). The variations in practical applications and formal learning make it necessary that lifetime learners find out fresh strategies to tackle these variations. These variations comprise of the high work requirements that make the job training mandatory, unavoidable variation in an occupation, tech-literacy and the disparity created between the skilled and…… [Read More]

References

Detterman, D.K., & Sternberg, R.J. (1993). Transfer on trial: Intelligence, cognition, and instruction. Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing,.

Fischer, G. (1991). Supporting learning on demand with design environments. International Conference on the Learning Sciences, pp. 165-172.

Fischer, G. (1998c). Making learning a part of life-beyond the 'gift-wrapping' approach of technology. In P. Alheit & E. Kammler (Eds.), Lifelong learning and its impact on social and regional development. Donat Verlag, Bremen, pp. 435-462.

Gardner, H. (1991). The unschooled mind, New York: Basic Books.
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Teaching as a Profession the

Words: 1319 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61373408



As I began to realize that I was expecting less than they were capable of I realized that some of my preconceived notions about the teaching profession were coloring my viewpoint.

One example was the day a preschool student from the regular education class came to me and handed me a book that she wanted to read to me. I was surprised but let her open the book and begin reading. It reminded me not to assume the level of ability of any student as each student is an individual and develops at individual rates.

In observing the classrooms I found that problems can be dealt with by remaining flexible and keeping an open mind (Safer, 2003).

An example of this philosophy occurred when an autistic preschool student was included in the inclusion setting. "Tommy" did not respond to verbal cues nor was he a verbal child. The teacher made…… [Read More]

References

GRIESHABAER, SUSAN and CANNELLA, GAILE S. (EDS.) (2001). EMBRACING IDENTITIES in EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION: DIVERSITY and POSSIBILITIES. MIDWOOD; LB1139.23.E58.

SAFER, STEFFEN (2003). PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS to PRACTICALLY EVERY PROBLEM: THE EARLY CHILDHOOD TEACHER'S MANUAL. REDLEAF PRESS.

WOMG, HARRY K., WONGN, ROSEMARY T. (2004). FIRST DAYS of SCHOOL: HOW to BE an EFFECTIVE TEACHER. HARRY K. WONG PUBLICATIONS.

PELLETIER, CAROL MARRA (2003). STRATEGIES for SUCCESSFUL STUDENT TEACHING. REDLEAF PRESS.
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Teaching Disaster and Emergency Management

Words: 634 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26683171

Teaching Disaster and Emergency Management

The whole world has turned into a place where people encounter experiences with diverse forms of disaster. Most of the disasters are usually extremely complicated and strike unexpectedly in any region causing massive damages and loss of lives. The complexities accompanying the catastrophes require the existence of well-trained personnel oftentimes ready to deal with disasters as they occur before causing irreparable harm to people and property. In some regions, many people have lost lives and properties destroyed because of the slow response by the people dependable for handling the emergencies. This calls for the training of new and many people who provide quick and efficient response to the disasters whilst saving lives. Various regions and countries have taken up the initiative of training people expected to play a critical role in the management of disasters. There has been an argument whether teachers handling disaster management…… [Read More]

References

Alexander, D. (2000) "Scenario Methodology for Teaching Principles of Emergency

Management," Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 9(2): 89 -- 97

Neal, D.M. (2000). Developing Degree Programs in Disaster Management: Some Reflections

and Observations. International Journal of Mass Emergencies and Disasters 18(3): 417-
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Teaching Disadvantaged Adults There Are

Words: 1337 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5331319

As a result they are often excluded from the mainstream and from being productive members of society.

I feel that it is not only ethically and morally important to help these individuals but that it also makes economic and social sense to assist those who are disadvantaged to receive a better education and advance their potential in life.

I also believe that we should be careful to consider the fact that adult education is an area that requires a very different approach and involves different modes of understanding, as well as the use of appropriate techniques, when dealing with the various categories of disadvantaged adult. For example, in terms of those adults who are disadvantaged with regard to education backlogs, one has to realize that they often face a number of unique and specific problems; such as the fact that many will have families, children and work commitments, which make…… [Read More]

References

Moore, M.G., & Kearsley, G. (1996). Distance Education: A System's View.

Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Motivating Disadvantaged Adult Learners. Retrieved July 5, 2009 from http://ujop.cuni.cz/page/en/dalsi/presentations/MoDAL-basic%20idea.ppt.

Incidental teaching. Retrieved July 5, 2009 from Incidental Teaching.
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Teaching Theory Adult Teaching Theory

Words: 607 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12282376

This is the essence of Knowles' self-directed learning.

Question

The last sentence of Stephen Brookfield's Chapter on "Adult Learning: An Overview" states "To understand adult learning we need to know it's connections of learning in childhood and adolescence and to the formation during these periods of interpretive filters, cognitive frames and cultural values."

Brookfield's assertion is somewhat at odds with Knowles concept of the difference between child and adult learning, although it is developmental in nature. One possible way of reconciling the difference between Brookfield and Knowles is to propose a stage theory of learning that shows progression from childhood to adolescence to adulthood, incorporating different theorist's ideas about the relationship between learner and teacher at different developmental, emotional, and experiential stages.

Stage 1: Childhood. Child is eager to learn but not certain of how to go about it. Learns to please self 'in the moment' of experience, but without…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Smith, M.K. (2002) 'Malcolm Knowles, informal adult education, self-direction and anadragogy.' The encyclopedia of informal education, www.infed.org/thinkers/et-knowl.htm.
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Teaching I Am a Recent

Words: 332 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3095328



I am currently taking a teaching preparatory course that enables me to go to a local elementary school (K-1 center) three days a week where I work in a classroom with the teacher and her students. I am enjoying this experience a great deal. I believe that these small children are our nation's future. There's nothing that gives me greater joy than helping them build a solid foundation to succeed in the future. By teaching them the basics in reading, writing and math, I truly believe that I am making a difference in their lives.

Now, I am ready to take the necessary steps I need to follow to become certified to teach. I value your consideration of my application to your university. I assure you that my performance will exceed your expectations given my high desire to become a teacher and work with children.… [Read More]

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Teaching Style of Lecturing

Words: 1518 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85046647

Teaching Style of Lecturing

From the ancient Grecian sophists delivering rhetorical oratories to adoring throngs, to the staid scientists presenting analytical treatises to graduate students, vocalizing an organized lecture to a group of students has long been among the hallmarks of traditional educational delivery. The process of arranging complex subject matter within the relatively accessible framework of lecturing affords educators a number of distinct benefits, including the standardization of student exposure to learning material, the ability to customize lessons in accordance with the collective needs of a class, and the opportunity to inject creativity into dense and demanding instruction. Despite the historical reliance on lecturing to impart knowledge and skills to a wide audience, however, the modernization of educational communication which has occurred in conjunction with the digital age has exposed many of disadvantages inherent to the typical teacher-delivered lecture. The availability of online lecture series delivered directly from experts…… [Read More]

References

Coughlin, S. (2013, May 01). Jimmy wales: Boring university lectures 'are doomed'. BBC News. Retrieved from  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-22160988 

Exley, K., & Dennick, R. (2009). Giving a lecture: from presenting to teaching. (Vol. 10). Newy York, NY: Taylor & Francis.

Knight, J.K., & Wood, W.B. (2005). Teaching more by lecturing less. Cell Biology Education, 4(4), 298-310. Retrieved from  http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1305892/ 

Morrison, G.R., Ross, S.M., Kalman, H.K., & Kemp, J.E. (2011). Designing effective instruction. (6th ed). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
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Teaching in America

Words: 1619 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6928105

Teaching in America

Grant and Murray's Teaching in America: The Slow Revolution is a book with two faces. On one hand it is a book of history, covering the developments in education in general over the past century; here it is at times fascinating, at times tedious, but always informative. On the other hand, the book points to one overruling "Slow Revolution" which the authors describe as the solution to our nation's (and the world's) educational problems. While the former topic is simply a recounting of established history, the latter requires evidence and argument in support of the authors' claim; this evidence comes primarily from interviews with teachers. Hence, this book spans two realms of academia: as the researchers themselves state, "Our research is both sociological and historical" (8). This paper will investigate the credibility of the authors' latter claim, which is based on a rather isolated set of evidence,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Grant, G., and Murray, C.E. Teaching in America: The Slow Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard

UP, 1999.

Customer Reviews. 2003. Booksunderreview.com. 16 December 2003. http://authors.booksunderreview.com/G/Grant,_Gerald/

Harvard University Press/Teaching in America/Reviews. 2000. Harvard UP. 16 December 2003. http://www.hup.harvard.edu/reviews/GRATES_R.html
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Teaching Disadvantaged Adults

Words: 1047 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95234506

Teaching disadvantaged adults could be one of the biggest challenges that an educator could face. Adults are already set in their ways. Their brains have already developed to the point where very little will be reshaped and habits are already set in. Not only can this pose difficulty when trying to teach something new to adults, it becomes an even harder task when trying to teach something novel to disadvantaged adults. Situational factors such as poverty, lack of complete grasp of the English language, and cultural factors could come into play and both negatively and positively affect their ability to learn and be taught (Kerka, 2002). A key concept in teaching disadvantaged adults is in the methods and materials chosen to appropriately affect their learning. An educator needs to make sure that these things are appropriate to an adult given their disadvantaged situation and that whatever method is chosen will…… [Read More]

References:

Kerka, S. (2002). Teaching adults: Is it different? Educational Resources Information Center. 21(3): 32-33.

Kozma R. & Wagner. D. (2006). Reaching the most disadvatanged with ICT: What works? Education and Training Policy ICT and Learning. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Chapter 5: 97.

Lyn, T. & Ducklin, A. (1995). Further education colleges and educationally disadvantaged adults. Scottish Educational Review. 27(2): 154-164.
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Teaching Diversity in the Classroom in Recent

Words: 710 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45141781

Teaching Diversity in the Classroom

In recent decades it has become increasingly important that educators understand the importance of multicultural education. Given that society has become more pluralistic and diverse, there is a need for a curriculum that focuses on diversity. This research proposal recognizes that diversity can and should be taught, and proposes a methodology for doing so.

This project reviews the literature on teaching diversity. Achieving diversity in higher education involves a wide range of approaches. Teaching diversity includes the need to recruit and maintain a diverse student body, as well as faculty, and to provide instruction to a diverse group of students, provide an inclusive curriculum that reflects the contributions of non-Western and minority groups, and to teach so as to critically examine the humanities and the professions from perspectives of groups that have been marginalized.

The Center for Instructional Diversity in Research divides strategies for diversity…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Banks, J.A., Cookson, P., Gay, G., Hawley, W.D., Irvine, J.J., Nieto, S…Stephan, W.G. (2001). Diversity within unity: Essential principles for teaching and learning in a multicultural society. The Phi Delta Kappan, 83(3), 196-198, 200-203. Retrieved from:  http://www.jstor.org/stable/20440100 

Center for Instructional Diversity in Research. (2008). Inclusive teaching. University of Washington. Retrieved November 9, 2011 from: http://depts.washington.edu/cidrweb/inclusive/diversify.html

Center for Teaching. (2011). Diversity & inclusive teaching. Vanderbilt University. Retrieved November 9, 2011 from: http://cft.vanderbilt.edu/teaching-guides/interactions/diversity/

Davis, B.G. (1993). Tools for teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass
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Teaching Theory

Words: 1971 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34779895

Teaching Philosophy

Teaching is one of the most important, although also the most underrated, professions in the world. Teachers today prepare young people not only for their next level of schooling, but also for tertiary education and ultimately to become gainfully employed and contributing citizens themselves. The problem is that there are so many varying levels of education today, ranging from the extremely poor to the extremely excellent. One factor that plays a major role in how well teachers are able to present materials in the classroom is the education they receive themselves. Although the quality of teacher education depends on several factors, one major argument revolves around whether they should be exposed to unproven theory or not. On the one hand, the argument may be that exposing them to unproven theory may only detract from the central purpose of their education, which is to provide them with the tools…… [Read More]

References

Chye, T.E. (2008, Jul.) Learning to Teach, Teaching to Learn: A handbook for NUS teachers. Retrieved from: http://www.cdtl.nus.edu.sg/handbook/home/foreword.htm

The Critical Thinking Community (2013). The Role of Questions in Teaching, Thinking and Learning. Retrieved from: http://www.criticalthinking.org/pages/the-role-of-questions-in-teaching-thinking-and-learning/524

National Assessment and Accreditation Council (NAAC) (2007, Jul.) Quality Indicators for Teacher Education. Retrieved from: http://www.col.org/SiteCollectionDocuments/PUB_QITE.pdf

Porter-Magee, K. (2013, Feb. 8). Common Core v. The false promise of leveled literacy programs. Common Core Watch. Retrieved from: http://edexcellence.net/commentary/education-gadfly-daily/common-core-watch/2013/common-core-v-the-false-promise-of-leveled-literacy-programs.html
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Teaching Phil Teachers Provide the

Words: 608 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79022920

While each student will respond to school and education differently, all can discover their personal aptitudes in academics, athletics, or the arts. School also provides key socialization functions that helps students learn and grow. As a teacher it is my responsibility to understand the process of socialization and social development in my students. As students become more aware of their personal power, they can apply what they learn in school to outward expressions such as community service, creative endeavors, or athletic performance.

Teachers learn as much from their students as our students learn from us. Students challenge us, and encourage us to change and grow just as they do. By keeping up-to-date on my profession, and the subject matters that I teach, I can provide my students with the best quality education. Incorporating current events and popular culture into my lessons will help students understand how education has a direct…… [Read More]

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Teaching Special Education Students in the Classroom

Words: 1246 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12819085

Teaching Special Education Students

In the classroom, teachers are primarily responsible for ensuring that special education students are provided with equal opportunities for education. While instructors should not lower academic standards in the classroom, they should make every effort to make reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. y making simple adjustments, such as allowing students to record lectures or changing the format of a test, teachers can make sure that special education students do not have academic or social disadvantages.

Setting up the Classroom

In the classroom, simple changes can make a great difference for special education students. For example, by arranging desks in a manner where each student has his own personal space, as opposed to sitting in groups, special education students have less chances of being distracted.

There should be various centers in the class that provide a space for students to go when they are finished with…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Klinger, J., & Vaughn, S. (1999). Students' perceptions of instruction in inclusion classrooms: Implications for students with learning disabilities. Exceptional Children.

Polloway, E., Bursuck, W., Jayanthi, M., Epstein, M., & Nelson, J. (1996). Treatment acceptability: Determining appropriate interventions within inclusive classrooms. Intervention In School and Clinic.

Brattlan, Lee. (2002) Brief Reference of Student Disabilities:...with Strategies for the Classroom.
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Teaching Students With Mental Retardation

Words: 546 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64023975



Because of the lack of clarity and certainty regarding mental retardation or intellectual disability, the effect of having students with this issue in a classroom can be somewhat more chaotic than with other developmental disorders, where specific modes of instruction have been developed. It can be difficult to predict what a student with mental retardation might be stimulated by, and there are certain areas where individual students might simply have no interest. This can make it incredibly hard to involve them in classroom activities even when special accommodations and attempts are made. Students with mental retardation are not especially disruptive, and do not tend to make learning difficult for others, but this actually runs a greater risk of their going ignored as the classroom's education develops and progresses. For this reason, specific and repeated attempts to engage students with mental retardation in every aspect of the classroom and its activities…… [Read More]

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Teaching Can at Risk Student

Words: 2866 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65369102



Description of Learning:

Educational institutions are teaching subjects for a digital future but it is from a superficial manner however students need a deeper knowledge of it as a curriculum. When teaching students about math, it should be integrated in all subjects they are learning by being motivated by educators (Singhal, 1997). As shown in the examined scenario planning with an elementary school, it is apparent things became better for the students as far as the educational resources, and environment, which ultimately affects the learning process. Educational institutions must engage partnerships with other schools around the world. By providing student exchanges they will produce world class students, the internet is facilitating the process of globalization and providing virtual interaction with others. As it is shown in schools, technology is the key to change the educational environment and resources. The internet is encouraging students to engage in meaningful cross cultural dialogue…… [Read More]

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Teaching Today An Introduction to

Words: 5989 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1189588

There are some papers that are to be released and referred to by her in the above article. In the first of those papers, the belief is that the present result of the aptitude tests of the teachers today is the same as was the case a generation earlier, but the best among them are not likely to become teachers. In the second paper, the result shows that the women from the best colleges are not continuing to be teachers as the pay received by them as teachers is low, and not due to the attraction of higher pay in other occupations. On the level it can be assumed that if the salary of teachers were better, a lot of the best students would still be going into teaching.

According to the columnist, "Teachers aren't exactly getting worse. They're getting more consistently mediocre." She ends her own article by saying…… [Read More]

References

Ave, Melanie. Educators want more Mr.'s in their classrooms. St. Petersburg Times. 14 November, 2004. Retrieved at  http://www.sptimes.com/2004/11/14/Tampabay/Educators_want_more_M.shtml . Accessed on 27 May, 2005

Bhat, Sanjay. Schools struggle to reduce high teacher turnover. 3 January, 2005. The Seattle Times. Retrieved at http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2002138717_turnover03m.html. Accessed on 28 May, 2005

Direct Instruction: Is it the Most Effective Science Teaching Strategy? 15 December, 2004. NSTA Web News Digest. Retrieved at http://www.nsta.org/main/news/stories/education_story.php?news_story_ID=50045Accessed on 28 May, 2005

Errickson, Tiffany. Mentoring teachers. September 21, 2004. Retrieved at http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,595092712,00.html. Accessed on 27 May, 2005
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Teaching Techniques to Motivate Students

Words: 4053 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44686984

(Fletcher & Crochiere, 2004)

Motivation to Learn

Motivation to learn can be defined as the degree of cognitive effort invested to achieve educational goals (Li, 2003). It can also be understood as the degree of "seriousness" with which a student attempts to address the commitments and targets school with the purpose of: a) master the knowledge and skills rather than and get away with doing the minimum, b) clearly verify the status of their knowledge rather than try to complete the task independently of being sure that they actually learned something (MacIntyre, 2002).

Marshall (2001) have proposed to distinguish two types of motivation to learn, one that manifests itself as a personality trait and one that manifests itself as a state. In the first sense, the concept refers to a general provision that allows a student to perceive learning as an inherently valuable and satisfactory and therefore to engage in…… [Read More]

References

Barbetta, P., Norona, K. & Bicard, D. (2005). Classroom behavior management: A dozen common mistakes and what to do instead. Preventing School Failures. Vol. 49, Issue 3, p 11-19.

Bear, G.G. (2008). Best practices in classroom discipline. In Thomas, A. & Grimes, J. (Eds.), Best Practices in School Psychology V (1403-1420). Bethesda, MD: National Association of School Psychologists

Bear, G.G., Cavalier, A., & Manning, M. (2005). Developing self-discipline and preventing and correcting misbehavior. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Fletcher, L., & Crochiere, N. (2004). How to Design and Deliver Speeches (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
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Teaching Philosophies Adult Education Has

Words: 1569 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11834969

This type of education has worked best within societies that contain large amounts of oppressive practices, where the oppressed need to learn some autonomy. More developed countries however tend to favor the more traditional types of education (Werner, 2000).

Conclusion

It is important to assess the specific needs of one's own educational environment. Some environments, as seen above, would benefit more from the behaviorist philosophy than from the humanist philosophy, and vice versa. It is therefore important to establish an initial focus, determine goals, and assess student needs. When there is for example a need for strongly skill-centered learning, such as a computer-skills course, this would benefit little from a behaviorist methodology. When the course is however more flexible and artistic, it might be better to focus on students' individual needs and concerns. In order to find what would work best in a specific classroom therefore, once should assess needs…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bullen, Mark. (2004) "Andragogy and University Distance Education." University of British Columbia. http://www2.cstudies.ubc.ca/~bullen/bullen1.html

Kett, J.F. (1994) the Pursuit of Knowledge Under Difficulties. From self-improvement to adult education in America, 1750-1990, Stanford, Ca.: Stanford University Press.

Merriam, S.B. And Caffarella, R.S. (1991) Learning in Adulthood. A comprehensive guide, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Smith, M.K. (2002) 'Malcolm Knowles, informal adult education, self-direction and anadragogy', the encyclopedia of informal education, www.infed.org/thinkers/et-knowl.htm.Last updated: January 30, 2005
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Teacher Workshop Teacher's Workshop Is

Words: 1333 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63384252

S. Department of Education presented a five-year grant to University esearch Co's - UC Center for Human Services to work in collaboration with McDaniel College. The project is intended to act as a source to McDaniel to expand and execute a high quality bilingual education/ESL teacher-training program. By this project, CHS/McDaniel will offer various professional development openings to public school teachers and administrators, including workshops, graduate courses in bilingual education, field experiences, and a rigorous summer training institute. (Bilingual Education: Training for All Teachers)

The language immersion programs that are now provided in the United States came from Canada. They wanted their English-speaking population to learn French. Canadians realized English-speaking students were not getting adequate French to get minimum grades in school and to get jobs in French speaking areas of Canada. In 1975, Canada's first French immersion program began and by 1980 this program was launched in the United…… [Read More]

References

Bilingual Education: Training for All Teachers" Retrieved at http://www.urc-chs.com/services/education/bilingualeducation.html. Accessed on 20 March 2005

Canales, JoAnn; Ruiz-Escalante; Jose Agustin. "A Pedagogical Framework for Bilingual Education Teacher Preparation Programs" Proceedings of the Third National Research Symposium on Limited English Proficient Student Issues: Focus on Middle and High School Issues. Retrieved at http://www.ncela.gwu.edu/pubs/symposia/third/canales.htm. Accessed on 20 March 2005

Cargas, Rachel; Ryan, Tricia. (May 7, 2002) "Bilingual Education" Rachel Cargas's Online Research Portfolio. Retrieved at http://tiger.towson.edu/users/rcarga1/researchpaper.htm#BilingualeducationoriginatinginCanadaAccessed on 20 March 2005

Krashen, Stephen. (August 22, 2000) "Bilingual Education Wasn't a Cure" New York Times. Retrieved at http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/JWCRAWFORD/klet4.htm. Accessed on 20 March 2005
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Teaching a Special Education Assistant Is Classified

Words: 558 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7333328

Teaching

A special education assistant is classified as a teaching assistant in the British Columbia educational system. The definition of a teaching assistant, according to the Make a Future: Careers in BC Education Web site, is someone who provides general assistance to support teachers, students, and/or school programs (Make a Future: Careers in BC Education, 2012). In addition to the desired post of special education assistant, other teaching assistant positions include general teacher assistants, Supervision Aides, Food Program Aides, Library Aides, Science Aides, Multicultural Support Worker, Youth Care Worker, Aboriginal Support Worker, and Community School Assistants. For each of these teaching assistant positions, including special education teaching, a high school graduation is required.

The specific qualifications necessary for a special education assistant includes include certificates or diplomas from recognized college programs such as Classroom and Community Support Worker Program, Special Education Assistant Certificate, and Special Needs Worker Program (Make a…… [Read More]

References

Abbotsford School District. Website retrieved:  http://hr.sd34.bc.ca/careers 

"Abbotsford: School District 34." Retrieved online: http://www.makeafuture.ca/bc-school-districts/regions/fraser-valley/34-abbotsford/

Make a Future: Careers in BC Education (2012). Retrieved online: http://www.makeafuture.ca/career-resources/overview/support-staff/special-education-and-teacher-assistants/
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Teacher Stress Real Crisis in the Classroom

Words: 455 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26797241

Teacher Stress

eal Crisis in the Classroom: Where Have All the Teachers Gone?"

The article "The eal Crisis in the Classroom: Where have all the teachers gone?" By William . Ogden, discusses the problematic circumstance of teachers leaving schools more quickly than schools are able to replace them. Ogden argues that a majority of students simply aren't willing to "wade through" complex field exams, coursework and certification programs. Part of the literature analysis begins by pointing out that educational facilities are subject to far too much scrutiny from outside organizations.

From a beneficial perspective the article does point out the crisis that is obviously plaguing educational facilities: a shortage of teachers. Also pointed out is the notion that professionals are poorly compensated. In this case the literature review provides too much "fluff." The article talks about songs in the 1960s, "Where have all the flowers gone" seemingly veering focus away…… [Read More]

References

Arends, Richard I.; Castle, Sharon. "Faculty Supply and Demand in Education." Journal of Teacher Education, Vol. 54, 2003

Foshay, Arthur W.; Leavitt, Howard B. "Issues and Problems in Teacher Education: An International Handbook." Greenwood Press, Westport: 1992.

Sindelar, P.T., Buck, G.H., Carpenter, S., & Watanable, A.K. (1993). "Supply and demand in leadership personnel in special education: A follow-up study with analysis of failed searches." Teacher Education and Special Education, 16 (3), 240-248.

Smith, D.D., & Pierce, T.B. (1995). "The state of special education leadership training and college and university faculty: What we know and what we don't." Teacher Education and Special Education, 18, 156-165.
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Teacher Behavior and Class Culture

Words: 1474 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 647613

Teacher Behavior/Class Culture

Avoiding Seeking Help in the Classroom: Who and Why?" appeared in the Educational Psychology Review in 2001. The article, by Allison Ryan, Paul Pintrich, and Carol Midgley, is mainly a literature review in the interrelated areas of achievement goal theory, social-goal orientation, and classroom dynamics and how these things impact the decision to seek academic help. The researchers investigated the causes of help avoidance, which has been found to increase during early adolescence (p.94). Therefore, the population in question is early adolescents, although the researchers to include references to studies that deal with other student populations. The article is well-written, well-organized, and clear. Help-seeking is the main focus of the paper, and is described by the authors as "an important self-regulatory strategy that contributes to student learning," (93). As help-seeking directly relates to actual student performance, the current research is important and can help educators understand and…… [Read More]

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Teacher Unions a Very Controversial

Words: 4400 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68900940

Since smaller class size has been shown to positively affect student learning, at least in the early grades, one might also infer that this affects teachers' work positively. Further, researchers have found a positive relationship between collective bargaining and increased preparation time for teachers, which many educators believe is essential for good teaching and collaborative work among colleagues within a school.

Collective Bargaining, Unions and Teacher/Educational Quality

In a March 1999 study of Texas Schools, teacher salaries were shown to have a modest impact on teacher mobility and upon student performance. The authors of the study found that teacher mobility was more affected by the characteristics of the students, including income, achievement and race.

Salaries are also more weakly related to performance on teacher certification tests. This appears to be relevant only in districts where there are high levels of hiring (ibid., 30). The study found that certification tests were…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Driscoll, D., Halcoussis, D., & Svorny, S. (2003). School district size and student performance. Economics of Education Review, 22, 193 -- 201.

Farber, H.S. (2006). "Union membership in the United States: the divergence between the public and private sectors." In J. Hannaway & A.J. Rotherham (Eds.), Collective Bargaining in Education: Negotiating Change in Today's Schools (pp. 27-51). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Educational Pub Group.

Hanushek, E.A., Kain, J.F., & Rivkin, S.G. (1999). Do higher salaries buy better teachers?. In American Economic Association (pp. 1-51). New York, NY: American Economic Association.

Hess, F.M. And Kelly, A.P. (2006). "Scapegoats, albatross or what? The status quo in teacher collective bargaining." In J. Hannaway & A.J. Rotherham (Eds.), Collective Bargaining in Education: Negotiating Change in Today's Schools (pp. 53-61 ). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Educational Pub Group.
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Teaching Impression and Reality

Words: 1992 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40801081

Teaching Impression and eality

Out of all things I expected myself to do, teaching was probably the least of my expectations. However, things unraveled and led me to get a job at ICCD School.

Prior to this job, I had no experience as a teacher at any level. However, I had been raised by two parents in the field of education, both of whom would always come home with their share of amazing stories that I enjoyed hearing. I also got an ample amount of opportunities observing my parents at their work place, during breaks, when they would be busy with enrichment programs and would bring me along so that I would be able to spend quality time with them. Although I can't say I spent a lot of time bonding with them during their working hours, I can doubtlessly say I got to learn a lot from those trips.…… [Read More]

References:

Magolda, M.B. (2000). Teaching to promote intellectual maturity. Jaussy Bass Publishers.

Orfalea, P. (2008). An eye for opportunity . Perspectives on Language and Literacy, 34(3), 46

Reid, G. (2003). Dyslexia a practitioner's handbook. Moray House School of Education University of Edinburgh

Slavin, R.E. (2001). Effective programs for latino students in elementary and middle schools . Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Teacher's Aid What Is a

Words: 2319 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35480538

If a religion forbids dancing, those children should not have to learn a new dance, even though it might be a lot of fun for others. In other religions, any kind of image is forbidden. These children should not be served cookies that have, for instance, a jack-o-lantern or the country's flag on it.

At the same time, such a day can help students learn about each others' cultures. In those cases, parents who belong to those cultures might organize the activities. For instance, if there are Jewish children in the school, parents might make latkes with applesauce or have an activity that explains the significance of a Jewish holiday. Ethnic minorities might set up an activity that demonstrates something important about their culture and history. "Under Eights" can be a learning experience as well as a lot of fun.

13. You are a teachers' aide. Discuss with a teacher…… [Read More]

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Teacher Interview Reflection Two of

Words: 836 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80812878



If I had been in the instructor's position, I fear that I would not have handled the disciplinary issues quite as well, as I had not thought of all of the considerations mentioned by the instructor during the interview, especially the issue of the disruptive students' right and need to be educated and grow. An aide would have been of assistance in these scenarios, as they could remove the student from the public setting while going over rules and restoring discipline, but this is secondary to a proper consideration of the issues. I might have dropped different items from the week's curriculum, as well, but these changes would have been minor and largely unimportant. As far as moving ahead with tasks, I would have done just what the instructor did.

The rationales along which the above decision would have been-based is simply that these approaches appear to be the best…… [Read More]

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Teacher Training for Inclusiveness in

Words: 3343 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40953583

1 million today, Smith explains. About 79% of ESL students have Spanish as their native language, and hence, Smith insists, "there is an urgent need for as many teachers as possible to be skilled in and passionate about working with ESL students" (Smith, 2008, p. 5).

The mentor (an ESL specialist) needs to apply "professional knowledge to actual practice" when working with another teacher, Smith explains. There are two components to Smith's mentoring suggestions: a) the ESL specialist shares his or her "best of ideas"; and b) but by mentoring, the ESL specialist is "supporting the professional and personal growth of the teacher" (Smith, 6). Smith breaks down her mentoring program ideas into six conversations, or specific aspects, of how to relate to ESL students. This mentoring is for new teachers, who need to be submerged in diversity and inclusion quickly, and for existing teachers, that have perhaps avoided becoming…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Conroy, Paula Werner, Rude, Harvey, and Phillips, Jacqueline S. (2006). Rural Challenges to Educating English Language learners with Visual Impairments. Rural Special Education

Quarterly, 25(4), 16-24.

Duncan, Arne. (2011). Preparing Students with Disabilities for Success: Secretary Duncan's

Remarks to the American Association for People with Disabilities. U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved June 28, 2011, from  http://www.ed.gov .
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Teaching Communication Skills for Students With Autism

Words: 6440 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69966135

Teaching Communication Skills for Students With Autism

The conditions for diagnosis for autism that are presently prevalent within the U.S. are those mentioned in the American Psychiatric Association, Diagnostic and Statistic Manual for Mental Disorders," Fourth Edition, which is generally pinpointed as 'DSM-IV." Autism is taken into account by the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual (4th Ed, DSM-IV, American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as an existent development disorder (PDD) that is impacted by abnormal or impaired development in social cooperation and speech combined with a constrained array of actions and individual wishes. (Gresham et el, 1999).

Autism is termed as an impotent syndrome marked chiefly by important difficulty in the evolution of speech and social functioning. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) envisages a vast definition of autism that is comprehensive of associated impotencies like Asperger Syndrome, ett's Syndrome, and Pervasive Developmental Disorder. Autism and ASD are identifications portraying students with a vast array…… [Read More]

References

Biklen D. (1990) Communication abound: autism and praxis. Harvard Educational Review; 60:291-314

Biklen D, Morton M, Gold D, Berrigan C, Swaminathan S. (1992) Facilitated communication: implications for individuals with autism. Top Lang Disord; 12:1-28.

Biklen D. (1993) Facilitated communication. Harvard Mental Health Newsletter; 10:5-7

Bondy, A. And Frost, L. (1994). The Picture Exchange Communication System. Focus on Autistic Behavior 9, 1-19.
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Teacher's Attitudes on Pay for

Words: 1318 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6577702

In other fields, going the extra mile, investing extra weekend or evening time, or providing exemplary presentations and materials usually results in some form of bonus. In teaching, however, much of this is expected -- before and after school tutoring, evening performances, weekend events, out-of-pocket expenses for supplies and materials not covered in the budget (See: Johnson, 2004).

Thus, while still presenting the overall debate from the public administration, governmental, and even sociological (parental, community) views, the proposed study will focus on specific views and attitudes that teachers' hold towards a pay for performance concept. The study will examine current and proposed legislation adopting such a compensation package, as well as a qualitative evaluation of the efficacy of such programs within the 21st century educational climate. The study will quantitatively analyze the data based on demographic and psychographic indicators such as age, gender, ethnicity, teaching level, education level, length of…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Special Ed Groups Try to Shape Pay-for-Performance Movement. (June 2010). Special

Education Report. 36 (2): 2.

Adams, S., Heywood, J., and Rothstein, R. (2009). Teachers, Performance Pay, and Accountability. EPI Books. Cited in:

http://www.epi.org/publications/entry/books-teachers_performance_pay_and_accountability/
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Teaching a 2002 Study of

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65012326

141).

Even the most idealistic young teacher will quickly realize that while the dog did not eat the student's homework, something stopped the student from completing the assignment. eality will seep in, and the teacher will have to adapt to that reality. Existentialism may assist the good teacher in that adaptation process. The teacher that assimilates existentialism into the classroom can help the students understand that they must take responsibility for their own actions, their own deeds, and the homework or project that was (or was not) completed is solely due to their own efforts or lack thereof. The student that learns (and the teacher that teaches) the truths of distractions will both be rewarded accordingly. Distractions can be the cause of anger, anxiety, despair and boredom and if the unlucky student falls victim to those distractions or the underlying emotions brought on by those distractions, then more than just…… [Read More]

References

Esi, M. (2010) Promoting the human values beyond prejudice and stereotypes, Petroleum-Gas University of Ploiesti Bulletin Educational Sciences Series, Vol. 62, Issue 1A, pp. 140-146

Moore, A.; Edwards, G.; Halpin, D.; George, R.; (2002) Compliance, resistence and pragmatism; the reconstruction of schoolteacher identities in a period of intensive educational reform, British Educational Research Journal, Vol. 28, Issue 4, pp. 551-565
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Teacher Leader's Is an Individual Teacher or

Words: 838 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83863058

Teacher leader(s) is an individual teacher or a group of teachers who can influence their fellow teachers, the principal and other members of the communities of the school so as to improve learning and teaching practices. The aim of teacher leaders is the increase of student learning as well their achievement. Teacher leaders are therefore facilitators within the school and are important elements when it comes to the spread and strengthening of reforms and improvements in schools. The definition of teacher leadership gives it value as well as making it realistic and an accelerated process of progress towards development of leaders in the community (WETA Washington DC, 2013).

Individual capabilities

There are various individual capabilities that enable a person to be a good leader in an organization. Team leadership ability is one of the capabilities I possess as a teacher. This means that I can drive students and my colleagues…… [Read More]

References

Harrison, C. & Killion, J. (2007). Ten Roles for Teacher leaders. Retrieved March 21, 2013 from  http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept07/vol65/num01/Ten-Roles-for-Teacher-Leaders.aspx 

Sorrells, S., & Patterson, S. (2008). Types of Change. The Linked Business Models. Retrieved March 21, 2013, from  http://www.westbrookstevens.com/Types_of_Change.htm 

WETA, Washington DC.(2013).What Does Research tell us About Teacher Leadership? Retrieved March 21, 2013 from http://www.readingrockets.org/article/24932/
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Teacher Portfolios as of Yet

Words: 582 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82975421

This is the chance for the teacher to shine, to share his or her core ethics and values.

5. Sample lesson plans and/or curricula, for each subject area the teacher specializes in.

6. Samples of student work, as varied as possible and as up-to-date as possible.

7. Multimedia content, if applicable.

8. Links to other portfolios, educational websites, photologues, or any other relevant Web site.

The format for a teacher's e-portfolio varies. Some degree of flexibility is needed to allow educators the opportunity to imbue their portfolios with personal flair. Therefore, the format can vary as long as the checklist items are complete. At the same time, electronic portfolios should become more consistent to allow easy access to potential viewers. If all portfolios are different, readers have a hard time navigating them. Therefore, the educational portfolio should at least have the same section headers, arranged in the same order. Color,…… [Read More]

References

Abrenica, Y. (nd). Electronic portfolios. Retrieved May 12, 2008 at http://edweb.sdsu.edu/courses/edtec596r/students/Abrenica/Abrenica.html

Barrett, Helen. (2008). Dr. Helen Barret's Electronic Portfolios. Retrieved May 12, 2008 at  http://electronicportfolios.org/ 

Spencer, L. (2004). Creating an electronic portfolio. Retrieved May 12, 2008 at http://cte.jhu.edu/techacademy/fellows/Spencer/webquest/lasindex.html
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Teaching Thoughts Non-Commissioned Officer Works Under the

Words: 623 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22729329

Teaching Thoughts

Non-commissioned officer works under the authority of a commissioned officer in the military, but technically, they do not have any command. With time, non-commissioned officers rise to higher positions of nominal powers depending on how military is organized. They act as liaisons between highly ranked officers and the regular officers of the military. With this, they play an important role in the army and act as a military backbone. Teachers (class leaders) are chosen from the group of the same academia by non-commissioners of the same class, who in turn learn and perfect their skills as they teach the rest. Training while performing duties in the army takes place simultaneously for non-commissioned officers. They carry increasing levels of responsibilities in the army and demand greater levels of respect and deference. While under training, several teaching aids should be put into consideration. First, teaching of non-commissioned officers should be…… [Read More]

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Teaching - Grant Application Educational

Words: 518 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49947542



In addition to utilizing the ELMO system as a lesson presentation tool, we intend to incorporate it as a motivational device, such as by rewarding both improvement and superior performance with the opportunity to have their work presented to the class.

Including the ELMO system in our Accelerated Reading Program and Florida Reading Initiative present additional avenues for more extensive incorporation of the equipment.

4. Proposed Evaluation of Objectives:

The proposed evaluation objectives consists of conducting comprehensive objective reading skills diagnoses before the introduction of the ELMO system into the classroom environment. A subsequent series of objective diagnostic evaluation will provide a method of measuring the beneficial effect of incorporating the ELMO system into the lesson plan.

Similarly, analysis and comparison of standardized achievement tests results will provide a direct measurement of the success of this initiative at achieving the educational goals that the system is intended to accomplish.

5.…… [Read More]

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Teaching -- Piaget Teaching Through

Words: 913 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34085734

Children in this stage lack conceptions of size, volume, and mass so teaching a child about something like portion sizes of food in a discussion of nutrition would be ineffectual at this stage.

Concrete Operational Stage (ages 7-11)

During this stage, children can understand the concept of multiple stages or aspects of a problem, the concept of transferable size and volume, and also reversibility of things like numbers or steps of an action. A child at this stage can understand, for example, that a large plate of fries and a small plate of fries have the same amount of food, even though the portion looks smaller on the large plate. Also, the child at this stage is no longer egocentric. The child can understand that he or she must undergo a difficult treatment, even though it hurts, because the family wants the child to get well, or that he or…… [Read More]

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Teaching if I Had the Opportunity to

Words: 749 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30339081

Teaching

If I had the opportunity to teach a skill to someone else, I would show how to conduct fundraising campaigns for a worthy nonprofit organization. Once a leader in a nonprofit group has the skills and the experience he or she could use those skills to help raised needed funds.

We would start with some basic fundamentals. A nonprofit group should be incorporated so that donations people and businesses make can be tax-deductible. There are groups representing the American Bar Association in nearly every city in America and they offer a half hour free consultation to nonprofits. This is a good starting point for a group, to achieve the ranking of a 501(c)3, a federally licensed nonprofit corporation.

Benefit Concert

There are many ways to raise funds other than just asking for handouts or sponsoring a bake sale. A good starting point is to plan a community benefit concert.…… [Read More]

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Teaching I Believe Is a Vocation That

Words: 879 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10665846

Teaching, I believe, is a vocation that should be pursued by those who can help students to not just master required subject matter but develop skills for critical thinking, so that, they in turn, will be able to contribute to and further build on the accumulated body of knowledge in their chosen fields. To successfully achieve the aforesaid objective requires personal commitment; mastery of the subject being taught; originality and creativity; and the ability to make students relate to the subject matter.

Given my own views on 'teaching,' I was naturally pleased to find that the objectives of my course had been carefully structured and defined to meet precisely the above-mentioned requisites. This has been particularly meaningful for me as both a student today, and hopefully, as a teacher of high schools students tomorrow.

The personal importance of successfully achieving the stated goals of the English program led to my…… [Read More]

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Teaching BSN Program ADN Level a Graduate

Words: 644 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77326240

teaching BSN program ADN level a graduate level nurse. Prepare online te

The topic for the online teaching session covered in this document is Evidence-Based Nursing: Transforming Clinical Practice. This is a prudent topic for individuals looking to pursue a Bachelor's of Science Degree in Nursing or an Associate Degree in Nursing, since in either case individuals will be looking to compete in a workplace environment that is increasingly looking to augment traditional techniques with evidence-based ones (Matthew and Aktan, 2014, p. 1). As the title of this topic suggests, evidence-based practices have the potential to actually revolutionize the way clinical practice is performed.

I would deliver the didactic content for this course in two different ways. The first would be via pre-recorded, online lectures. These lectures would be pre-recorded so that students could access them at their leisure (whether in the evening, daytime, or in the wee hours of…… [Read More]

References

Matthew, L., Aktan, N.M. (2014). Nursing Student Attitudes Towards Statistics. Journal of Nursing Education. 25: 1-5.

Wijenayake, E., Hookey, C. (2014). Establishing an improving group care in hospice: translating research into practice. BMJ Support Palliat Care. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24645014
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Experiencing the Sacred

Words: 793 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40950973

Experiencing the Sacred

Compare St. Teresa's experience of the spiritual marriage with both Muhammad's Night Journey and the Buddha's Enlightenment. The focus should clearly identify similarities and differences.

Teresa of Avila, Muhammad, and the Shakyamuni Buddha all had intense spiritual experiences. Their experience can all be classified as numinous and ecstatic, because they each surrendered their physical selves to experience union with a spiritual dimension. They were each subsumed by their spiritual experiences, imparting either fear or joy. Moreover, each of these individuals made a great impact on religious, philosophical, and spiritual teachings.

There are some distinct differences between these three figures, though. The obvious differences are cultural, geographic, and temporal. St. Teresa of Avila is the most modern of the three figures. She lived during the 16th century in Spain, and her upbringing was steeped in Catholicism. Muhammad lived during the 7th century CE, nearly a thousand years prior…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kessler, Gary. "Experiencing the Sacred." 2008.

Pojman, Louis. "The Argument from Religious Experience." Chapter 5 in Philosophy of Religion.
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Teacher Performance Assessment

Words: 5549 Length: 17 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89356313

Teacher Performance Assessment

Lesson Title: Science

Central Focus of Lessons: What science is all about

State Standard(s) Addressed: 7th Grade on science, science methodology and famous scientists.

Lesson Objectives and Language Demands

• Content/Skill Objectives:

Students should state the definition of science

Students should discuss the various science methodologies

Students should name and discuss various prominent scientists

Students should be able to identify the application of science in day to day life

Language Demands: students are required to define and describe what science is. They should also be able to use this understanding of science to apply scientific knowledge.

Use scientific terms and language both in spoken and written presentations of scientific information.

• Key Vocabulary:

Science, scientists, famous scientists, scientific methods

esources and Materials

• esources: class text-books, handouts, charts etc.

• Materials: worksheets, games, projector, Smartboard, paper, pencils, art supplies, cards, post- its, etc.)

NOTE: Attach and/or embed…… [Read More]

References

Edelson Daniel (2001). Learning-for-use: A framework for the design of technology-supported inquiry activities. Journal of Research in Science Teaching. Volume 38, Issue 3. Pages 355 -- 385.

Pappas Christoforos (2014). Instructional Design Models and Theories: Inquiry-based Learning Model.  https://elearningindustry.com/inquiry-based-learning-model
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Teaching Historical Events with Students with Disabilities

Words: 2525 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21142833

Teaching Historical Events to Student With Disabilities

Our perspective of the concept of the passing of time and our place in the history of the world is important to us towards our growth and evolution. Lacking a sense of time and space, one is prone to be disconnected with the universe. While it can be frightening to be trapped in a moment in time and not be cognizant of the position in space you occupy, it is the experience people classified to have Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties (PMLD) go through (Tony Jones, 2013). Adolescents who have learning disabilities (LD) face a number of challenges with the strict application of Common Core State Standards for literacy when considering subjects such as social studies and history. Besides the challenges they have with reading, students with LD are required to take part in reasoning and thinking at a high level. For teachers…… [Read More]

References

Candy Bear, & Cheryl Mason Bolick. (2013). Teaching Social Studies in Middle and Secondary Schools. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill: Pearson.

Carole Boudreau, Anne Rodrigue, Veronique Parent, Julie Myre-Bisaillon, & Annick Tremblay-Bouchard. (2014). Teaching History to High School Students with LDs: Pedagogical Considerations & Strategies. LD School.

Janis A. Bulgren, Patricia Sampson Graner, & Donald D. Deshler. (2013). Literacy Challenges and Opportunities for Students with Learning Disabilities in Social Studies and History. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 17-27.

Tony Jones. (2013). History for Individuals Experiencing Profound and Multiple Learning Difficulties. Nottinghamshire: Talksense.
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Teaching Tolerance According to Sara

Words: 940 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15249200

Therefore, Bullard links parenting and disciplinary styles to the cultivation of tolerance. The author points out that "children who are punished harshly or inconsistently, or who are frequently threatened with punishment, are prevented from developing the internal controls they need to discipline themselves," (156). Children who are raised in supportive environments will generally tend to support their peers and those who they meet through their entire lives.

Toward the end of Teaching Tolerance, the author includes a variety of exercises and activities parents can do with their children. For example, Bullard advises parents to cultivate self-awareness through drawings, collages, and dance. She offers other educational arts and crafts projects like designing a family tree. Educators can apply these lessons to their school curricula. Teachers don't need to be or act as psychologists to encourage self-awareness in their classrooms. Moreover, teachers can use Bullard's book as a guideline on how to…… [Read More]

Nevertheless, Teaching Tolerance should be required reading for early childhood educators. Ignoring the problem of prejudice will only make matters worse, condoning behavior that should be unacceptable. It is up to parents and teachers to first be aware of how adults pass on their prejudices to other people and second, to impart tolerance to their students and children. For instance, showing respect for children by paying attention to them, allowing them to express themselves fully without criticism. "We demonstrate respect for out children's individuality when we allow them to dress the way they feel comfortable, to eat the foods they like, to listen to the music of their choice. Through respect, we give them the freedom to discover who they are, and help them become people who will foster the same freedom in others," (93). Although Bullard directs her book for an audience of parents, her book applies equally to teachers. One of the keys to teaching tolerance is to "help our children see the connections between these principles and everyday events," something that teachers can be in the unique position to do (Bullard 112). Teaching tolerance, according to Bullard, is not about paying lip service through politically correct language, which can all but gloss over deeply-rooted biases. Rather, we can teach tolerance by embodying acceptance and respect and continually teaching those values to children.

Teaching Tolerance

Bullard, Sara. Teaching Tolerance: Raising Open-Minded, Empathetic Children. New York: Doubleday, 1996.
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Teaching Theories and an Ethical

Words: 3329 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18369149

Unfortunately, most quantitative studies lack external validity in the research design to allow for general conclusions.

Teaching Theories and Nursing

It was Nightingale that recognized the potential of combining sound logical reflection and empirical research in the development of scientific knowledge that lead to evidence-based practices of today. She saw the need to only classify one's illness by the best possible available knowledge but to also collect patient information in the form of survey. Nightingale's work was also groundbreaking as it was the first to integrate such ideas into one method. She understood how factors such as housing and nutrition could have a direct influence on the patient's health and prognosis (McDonald, 2001, p. 68). Still many researchers to come would look at her work as primitive, inconclusive and one-sided. They would see how such details act as an extension of evidence and the attention paid to details as research…… [Read More]

References

Ackermans, W. & Lohnes, P. (1981). Research methods for nurses. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Allen, K. (2005 Aug.). Online Learning: constructivism and conversation as an approach to learning. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 42, 247-256.

Bigge, M.L., & Shremis, S.S. (1999). Learning Theories for teachers. New York: Addison- Wesley Longman.

Bilyeu, S.M. (2005 April 1). When families complicate patient care: a case study with guidelines for approaching ethical dilemmas. MedSurg Nursing, 6.
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Teaching Philosophy I'm Assuming That

Words: 659 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23221594

I believe that students who are capable of 'learning to learn' are much more capable as professionals, in whatever field they aspire to, but especially nursing. It is important for these students to understand the importance of continuing to learn and applying the knowledge they gain through learning to other situations. As Gagne espoused a progression of intellectual knowledge in a step-by-step process, I too would require the same type of process from my students. Beginning with the most fundemental nursing requirements and standards and adding to that each day in my classroom would assist my students in gaining the necessary knowledge they will need to succeed in the nursing community. Progression allows for a simple method of adding incrementally to their knowledge.

As I stated in the opening paragraph, my teaching philosophy will likely be very different in the future; that is because I will be using the same…… [Read More]

References

Basi, S.; (2011) Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of service-learning through a school-based community project, Nursing Education Perspectives, Vol. 32, Issue 3, pp. 162 -- 167

Lillibridge, J.; (2007) Using clinic nurses as precptors to teach leadership and management to senior nursing students: A qualitative descriptive study, Nurse Education in Practice, Vol. 7, pp. 44-52
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Teaching in Multi-Ethnic Classrooms Experts

Words: 1681 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13697967

This instructor has learned to proactively educate his Navajo students about the need to reveal certain information they normally keep among themselves, such as burial grounds, because federal law now protects them from violation -- but only if their location is known. What this suggests to me is that I may simply have to accept that some cultural distinctions may be important to my Native American students and that it may not be part of their culture to explain it to me. If an issue is important then it may be up to me to explain why something is important in the school's culture so the child can be more successful, but without suggesting that the school culture is better or superior.

Finally, I think it will be important to incorporate literature from the cultures of minority students, recognizing that it isn't enough that the story be "Hispanic." A story…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allison, Sherry R., and Vining, Christine Begay. 1999. "Native American Culture and Language." Bilingual Review, p. 193.

Amselle, Jorge. 1997. "Adios, Bilingual Ed." Policy Review Vol. 86, pp. 52+.

Araoe, Lisa, and Nelson, J. Ron. 2000. "A Comparative Analysis of Teachers', Caucasian Parents' and Hispanic Parents' Views of Problematic School Survival Behaviors." Education & Treatment of Children 23:3.

Bardwell, Tracey; McMahon, Rebecca, and Saunders, DeLaura. 1996. "Increasing Young Children's Cultural Awareness with American Indian Literature." Childhood Education 73:2, pp. 105+.
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Teacher Retirement Navigating the New

Words: 1713 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 81931003

Hernando County, Florida, is the site of one such success story; though the union asked for a raise in recent contract negotiations, it did not insist on one, instead accepting an increase in healthcare benefit payments to offset Blue Cross/Blue Shield's premium hike of fourteen percent (Marrero 2009). Though no one emerged from the deal exactly ecstatic about the situation, there was a sense of realism and pragmatism that has been notably lacking in the loud and vociferous insistences of both teachers' unions and administrative offices in many other districts and at other institutions (Marrero 2009).

Conclusion

t is still abysmal and largely unacceptable that educational districts and institutions entered into contracts that they were unable to uphold. t is equally unacceptable that a growing number of educators facing retirement, or already retired, are unable to receive the pension payments and/or healthcare benefits upon which they depend. The situation is…… [Read More]

In some districts, however, the teachers' unions and the district administrators are working more closely with each other, and with an understanding of economic realities, in ways that allow the districts to reduce costs while still providing valuable and necessary benefits to its teachers. Hernando County, Florida, is the site of one such success story; though the union asked for a raise in recent contract negotiations, it did not insist on one, instead accepting an increase in healthcare benefit payments to offset Blue Cross/Blue Shield's premium hike of fourteen percent (Marrero 2009). Though no one emerged from the deal exactly ecstatic about the situation, there was a sense of realism and pragmatism that has been notably lacking in the loud and vociferous insistences of both teachers' unions and administrative offices in many other districts and at other institutions (Marrero 2009).

Conclusion

It is still abysmal and largely unacceptable that educational districts and institutions entered into contracts that they were unable to uphold. It is equally unacceptable that a growing number of educators facing retirement, or already retired, are unable to receive the pension payments and/or healthcare benefits upon which they depend. The situation is here, however, and no amount of unacceptability is going to change that. more schools, teachers, unions, and administrators should take the Hernando County example to heart, and realize that they must deal with the financial mess that they have been handed. Through compromise and a willingness to see the practical realities of the situation, true security can be created.
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Teacher Intervention in School How

Words: 2517 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54896337



Now, teachers are complaining that they feel abused and harassed with the young students.

The students tend to become abusive. They do not respect the teachers. They swear and shout at the teachers. They throw things at the teachers and in some instances, the students physically assault the teachers.

This is the reason why most teachers feel threatened and would want to resign from their works.

Thus, without the corporal punishment, the students do not learn the real value of discipline and they do not maintain proper conduct. The students who did not receive any corporal punishment when they were still on their younger years tend to have deviant behaviors as they grow older.

Meanwhile, there are also studies which have proven that corporal punishment offers nothing but negative effects to both the psychological and emotional aspects of a child. Some of the proven negative impacts of corporal punishment are:…… [Read More]

Reference List

Curry, Lisa M. Effective Teaching through High Expectation and Class Management. 2000. USA Gymnastics. http://www.usa-dymnastics.org/publications/technique/2000/4/effective-teaching.html

Effective Instructional Strategies. http://www.flstw.fsu.edu/integrate/efins.html

Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew. 2004. "The effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior in children." Social Work Research

Lombardo, Lucien X. And Polonko, Karen A. 2000. "Comparative Analysis of the Corporal Punishment of Children: An Exploration of Human Rights and U.S. Law," International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice. Vol. 29, No.2, Fall 2005 pp. 173
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Teaching Students About the Eucharist

Words: 1402 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75458368

" Communicants are also required to fast in preparation to receive Communion. Currently, this requirement is a fast of one hour prior to Communion of all food and drink other than water and medication. A longer fast of at least three hours, or from midnight, is preferred. Understanding the seriousness of these guidelines helps instill respect for taking Communion in students. This helps students understand that this isn't something that they just do at Mass without thought. Instead, they must prepare themselves physically and spiritually.

Lastly, students should be taught why Communion is taken so frequently. The Eucharist facilitates a union between Man and Christ. Through this lesson, students learn that Communion is a spiritually nourishing event, while also obeying the Lord's instructions to eat and drink His Body and Blood. Each time a communicant takes part in Holy Communion, this brings an increased level of sanctifying grace to their…… [Read More]

References

Eisner, E. (1985). The educational imagination: On the design and evaluation of school programs (pp. 87-97). New York: Macmillan.

Peffley, Fr. (No date). The Catholic Church's teaching on the Eucharist. Retrieved October 22, 2010, from http://transporter.com/FatherPeffley/Spirituality/TeachEucharist.html.

Ryan, M. (2006). "Catholic traditions and the classroom religious education program." In Religious education in Catholic schools. (pp.169-196) Melbourne: David Lovell Press.

Rymartz, R. (2007). "At the coalface: Teaching about Jesus." Journal of Religious Education 55 (1) pp. 12-16.
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Teaching Leadership Frameworks in Action

Words: 1383 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31039988



One example of this flaw is found in the third force in Sergiovanni's model, the educational force, which is associated with gathering and analyzing specialized knowledge applicable to education (Victoria Department of Education 2007). At the private senior school where I am employed, certain school leaders have certainly mastered the educational force and have amassed a wide range of specialized educational knowledge, but their inability to interact effectively with their colleagues in the school has rendered this knowledge largely useless. In fact, the interpersonal difficulties that these leaders have in dealing with others have led to a certain level of resentment regarding such information as it has become attached to hostile personalities.

Yet despite this apparent flaw of Sergiovanni's hierarchy, the actual identification and separation of the forces in his Model of ransformational Leadership still holds up to examination. hese first three forces taken separately paint a nearly complete picture…… [Read More]

The symbolic force in Sergiovanni's leadership framework is the aspect of leadership that involves providing an example to other members of the learning institution in regards to making this type of differentiation (Victoria DOE 2007). Particular behaviors that exhibit this force include clearly reflecting goals and priorities through action -- basically "leading by example" -- and making "explicit reference to school goals when decisions are being made about changes within the school" (Victoria DOE 2007). Sergiovanni's separation of this aspect of leadership makes total sense; the symbolic elements of a leadership role do not involve any direct practical action that is immediately relevant to educational situations, but instead helps both the leader and those under her or his leadership to prioritize their practical decisions.

The fifth and final leadership force that Sergiovanni identifies, and the one that appears at the pinnacle of his pyramid, is the aspect of cultural leadership which makes a sort of "high priest" out of the leader (Sergiovanni 1984). This is where the hierarchy defined by Sergiovanni truly makes sense; just as the symbolic level of leadership is meant to differentiate and prioritize the other leadership aspects according to the various goals of the school/learning institution, the higher level of cultural leadership's aim is "leading the school community by defining, strengthening, and articulating values and beliefs that give the school identity over time" (Victoria DOE 2007). That is, the effective cultural leader will consistently define goals (i.e. The aims of the symbolic aspect of leadership) that in turn reflect the aims of each of the lower three leadership forces. My particular place of employment has been decidedly lacking in cultural leadership, but this in no way subtracts from the validity of Sergiovanni's Model of Transformational Leadership. Rather, the noticeable absence of effective long-term and consistent leadership in my school can be seen as the direct result of failings in the symbolic and cultural leadership forces at work (or not at work) in the private senior school.

Part of the problem with the differentiation of leadership roles in theoretical frameworks is the subsequent attempt to fragment leadership in practical situations by placing certain leaders in charge of different aspects of the school. Though this can be effective and even necessary to a degree in many situations, my experience has shown that Sergiovanni's insistence that the separability of these leadership aspects is theoretical only, and cannot be effective in real world situations.
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Education and the Teacher-Learner Relationship From a

Words: 2523 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87176749

education and the teacher-learner relationship from a Christian-informed philosophical perspective. It begins with an explanation of the author's personal worldview, and then explores the various philosophical schools of education. Combining the two, the author explains how they have helped shape the author's approach to education. ather than relying on a single educational philosophy, the author intends to combine multiple philosophies in the classroom environment.

Describing the purpose of education is an interesting prospect because education is a cultural construct, and, as a result, what constitutes an education is dependent upon the surrounding culture. In a broad sense, an education is the instruction and learning that a person receives, in both formal and informal environments, which is aimed at preparing that person to live as an adult within the surrounding culture. When one views education as a means of adapting the individual to adult life in his or her own culture,…… [Read More]

References

Brekelmans, M., Wubbels, Th., & Brok, P. den. (2002). Teacher experience and the teacher-

student relationship in the classroom environment. In S.C. Goh & M.S. Khine (Eds.),

Studies in educational learning environments: an international perspective

(pp.73-99). Singapore: World Scientific.