Therapy Program Essays (Examples)

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Therapies Alternative Theoretical Approaches to

Words: 1120 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94944450

The benefits of including family in therapy sessions extend far beyond addressing the parents' concerns in this situation, however, and can help to identify underlying problems that led to osa's drug abuse and potentially provide more highly effective long-term solutions to these issues.

Adolescent females were the subject of one study that specifically examined the efficacy of family systems therapy interventions in cases of anorexia nervosa, and the efficacy of this approach compared quite favorable to other therapy techniques (Eisler et al. 2005). Especially noticeable in this study was an increased expression of emotion by all family members, leading to greater openness and a greater ability and willingness to share problems and support each other (Eisler et al. 2005). This effect would likely be highly beneficial to osa and her family as well, as there is almost certainly an underlying stressor that led to osa's drug abuse and overall decline…… [Read More]

References

Cornelius-Whit, J. (2007). "Learner-Centered Teacher-Student Relationships Are Effective: A Meta-Analysis." Review of educational research 77(1), pp. 113-43.

Eisler, I.; Dare, C.; Hodes, M.; Russel, G.; Dodge, E. & LeGrange, D. (2005). "Family Therapy for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa: The Results of a Controlled Comparison of Two Family Interventions." Focus 3, pp. 629-40.

Frelberg, H. & Lamb, S. (2009). "Dimensions of Person-Centered Classroom Management." Theory into practice 48(2), pp. 99-105.

Ready, D.; Gerardi, R.; Backscheider, A.; Mascaro, N. & Rothbaum, B. (2010). "Comparing Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy to Present-Centered Therapy with 11 U.S. Vietnam Veterans with PTSD." Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking 13(1), pp. 49-54.
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Radiation Therapy Medical Dissymmetry My Program

Words: 329 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62516865

My education consists of a Bachelors degree in Radiological Science, I also maintain a high grade point average (gpa), and pride myself on the care given to my study and work history.

Although I already have a bachelors degree in the field of radiology, that is not enough. I wish to obtain a higher understanding of the subject matter, addition hands on experience, and the opportunity to use all the resources that will be afforded to me by continuing education to a higher level. I realize the need to continue in education if I want to work in the medical field working more extensively within the realm of radiology. Thank you in advance for the opportunity to express my desire in the field of radiology and what I hope to do upon being given the opportunity to continue at the graduate level.… [Read More]

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Glbt Substance Abuse Therapies the

Words: 3295 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76452211

Indeed, the lack of "recognition and protection" by schools in general contributes to the "critically high level of suicide" among this community of minority students (146).

Surely alert, competent, contemporarily up-to-date school counselors understand that they have the "daunting but imperative obligation to become social activists for gay, lesbian, and bisexual students" since these students are the most "stigmatized members of school environs," Stone continues. There is no doubt that certain legal and ethical issues come in the way of school counselors' being free to help LGBT adolescents with their difficult decisions.

It is a "complex landscape" for counselors indeed, and they need to use caution in discussing birth control, abortion, drug abuse and more with straight and gay / lesbian students; moreover, since parents have the ultimate authority when it comes to counseling their children on important matters (the U.S. Supreme Court has affirmed that fact in several cases),…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cabaj, Robert Paul, and Smith, Mickey. (2008). Overview of Treatment Approaches, Modalities,

and Issues of Accessibility in the Continuum of Care. Center for Substance Abuse

Treatment. Retrieved August 27, 2011, from  http://www.samhsa.gov .

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment. (2008). A Provider's Introduction to Substance Abuse
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Cognitive Stimulation Therapy for Early Stages of

Words: 2424 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98066769

Cognitive Stimulation Therapy for Early Stages of Dementia

With an aging population, issues related to cognitive abilities and impairment, including dementia, are increasing in relevance to public health officials. Being able to delay the negative results of dementia can contribute to increased quality of life for a number of aging individuals and their families. At present, many health care professionals view dementia as a condition that will deteriorate over time and do not view it as something that can be effectively stalled or reversed (Hodges & Graham, 1999). Many of the programs available for individuals dealing with cognitive deterioration or dementia are designed to provide for their safety and contentedness, but do not focus much on improving or maintaining cognitive abilities. Furthermore, the emphasis of many day programs is on providing a safe place for individuals so that their caregivers can have the much-needed respite in their care routines. Caregivers…… [Read More]

References

Banks, M.R., & Banks, W.A. (2002). The effects of animal-assisted therapy on loneliness in an elderly population in long-term care facilities. The Journals of Gerontology: Series A, 57(7), M428-M432.

Barker, S. & Dawson, K.S. (1998). The effects of animal-assisted therapy on anxiety ratings of hospitalized psychiatric patients. Psychiatric Services, 49, 797-801.

Breuil, V., De Rotrou, J., Forette, F., et al. (1994). Cognitive stimulation of patients with dementia: preliminary results. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 9, 211-217.

Cochran, S.D., Mays, V.M., Bown, D., Gage, S., Bybee, D., Roberts, S.J, Goldstein, R.S., Robinson, A., Rankow, E.J., & White, J. (2001). Cancer-related risk indicators and preventative screening behaviours among lesbian and bisexual women. American Journal of Public Health, 91(4), 591-597.
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Animal Assisted Therapy Animals When

Words: 2537 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31991308

69). Petting a dog lowered blood pressure and respiratory rate -- even if the dog was somebody else's. Pet owners that have heart surgery recover faster and stand a better chance of full recovery. Touching a warm furry animal gives them relief.

Moreover, pet ownership is a predictor of survival after hospitalization for any serious illness (Gunter & Furnham, 1999).

Demello (1999) found that the "mere presence of an animal" could lower blood pressure and that the effect persisted even after the animal was gone. Visual contact with an animal, although it helped, was not as good as touching. Heart rates decreased significantly in a three-minute period of physical contact with the animal (Demello, 1999).

A story in Time magazine (2001) tells how a brain-injured man needed help to get back his sense of balance. Ginger, an Australian shepherd, liked to fetch, so physical therapy for this man was to…… [Read More]

References

Brodie, S., Biley, F.C., and Shewring, M. (2002). An exploration of the potential risks associated with using pet therapy in healthcare settings. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 11 (4), 444-456.

Demello, L. (1999). The effect of the presence of a companion-animal on physiological changes following the termination of cognitive stressors. Psychology & Health, 14 (5), 859.

Gunter, B. And Furnham, a. (1999). Are pets good for our physical well-being? In Pets and People: The Psychology of Pet Ownership, Chapter 5, 6. London: Wherr Publishing, 66-81/

Hooker, S.D., Freeman, L.H., and Stewart, P. (2002). Pet therapy research: A historical review. Holistic Nursing Practice, 16 (5), 17-23.
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Cardiac Therapy for Men With

Words: 1858 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82677213

This is due in part to the fact that the researchers listened to the responses of the patients (which were recorded) only after they had used bracketing techniques to identify their own biases and opinions that might cause them difficulty. This was important, because many people have preconceived ideas about why someone would be in a cardiac therapy program. By analyzing the data this way, the researchers could remain true to the research question that they wanted to answer and ensure that their own biases did not get in the way of the true qualitative method.

There are both strengths and limitations to a study such as this one. The first strength is the qualitative method itself, which is far more appropriate for this type of study than the quantitative method would have been. The second strength is the use of bracketing by the researchers to shield the data that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baird, KK & Pierce, LL (2001). Adherence to cardiac therapy for men with coronary artery disease. Rehabilitation Nursing, 26(6): 233-239.

Neonatal.peds.washington.edu. (2000). Retrieved 15 August 2005 at http://neonatal.

A peds.washington.edu/NICU-WEB/pphn.stm.

Spencer, E., Mills, A., Rorty, M., and Werhane, P. 1999. Organization Ethics for Health Care. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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Limited Therapy Effects of Managed

Words: 978 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20624228



Gervaise et. al, (1999) point out that increasingly financial reimbursement restrictions from managed care agencies play a critical role "in the quality of patient care" (1). According to the researchers, "complicated contractual arrangements among multiple providers obstruct rather than facilitate provisions for continuity of patient care" (Gervaise, et. al, 1).

New Advances In Modern Care - Addressing Time Limited Therapy

In the short- and long-term it is likely that limits on therapy will remain. Thus new treatment models must be developed to ensure adequate care. New requirements and restrictions placed by managed care organizations necessitate change in the health care field. Much of the research available supports more training for psychologists so they learn techniques for succeeding using group therapy practices (Drotos, 1997; Kent, 2000; Joseph, 1997). Group oriented approaches enable successful time limited treatments and cost effective services that health maintenance organizations are more likely to support.

There is…… [Read More]

References

Ackley D.C. (1997). Breaking free of managed care. New York: Guilford.

Bistline, J.L, Sheridan, S., & Winegar, N. (1992). "Implementing a group therapy program in a managed care setting: Combining cost effectiveness and quality care." The Journal of Contemporary Human Services, 73(1): 30.

Drotos J.C. (1997). "Upheavals in the land of the giants." Behavioral Health

Management, 17 (8), 39-40.
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Immune Boosting Therapies for RA Patients

Words: 2111 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23041738

Therapies/Treatments That Can Be Done to Help the Immune System of a Patient 18-55 Diagnosed With Rheumatoid Arthritis

THERAPIES/TREATENTS TO HELP THE IUNE SYSTE OF An 18-55 PATIENT DIAGNOSED WITH RHEUATOID ARTHRITIS

Therapies/treatments that can be done to help the immune system of a patient 18-55 diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

Annotated Bibliography

Cem Gabay, A, et al. (2013). Tocilizumab onotherapy vs. Adalimumab onotherapy for the Treatment Of Rheumatoid Arthritis (ADACTA): A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Phase 4 Trial.

Using a randomized population involving double-blind, Phase 4 superiority and parallel-group, the study used 76 centers found in different countries including the U.S. The patients used were above 18 years and suffering from Rheumatoid Arthritis for the last six months and above. The patients were supposed to have shown intolerance to methotrexate or were not appropriate for a continuation of the treatment using this method. With the random assignment of 1:1, the…… [Read More]

Michael Schiff, Michael E. Weinblatt, Robert Valente, Desiree van der Heijde, Gustavo Citera, Ayanbola Elegbe, Michael Maldonado, Roy Fleischmann. (2013). Head-to-head comparison of subcutaneous abatacept versus adalimumab for rheumatoid arthritis: two- year efficacy and safety findings from AMPLE trial. Clinical and epidemiological research Journal. 2013-203843v1, Ann Rheum Dis doi:10.1136/annrheumdis-2013- 203843

Ritika Khandpur1, Carmelo Carmona-Rivera1, Anuradha Vivekanandan-Giri, Alison Gizinski1, Srilakshmi Yalavarthi, Jason S. Knight, Sean Friday, Sam Li, Rajiv M. Patel, Venkataraman Subramanian, Paul Thompson, Pojen Chen, David A. Fox1, Subramaniam Pennathur and Mariana J. Kaplan. (2013). NETs Are a Source of Citrullinated Autoantigens and Stimulate Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Science Translational Medicine Journal, Vol. 5, Issue 178, pp. 178ra40, DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3005580

Scott, D. L. (2012). Biologics-Based Therapy for the Treatment of Rheumatoid arthritis. Clinical Pharmacology & Therapeutics Journal, Vol. 91 No.1 January 2012. doi:10.1038/clpt.2011.278
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Marriage Preparation Programs the Objective

Words: 1647 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85518934

(PREP Inc. 2012)

ibliography

Allen, W. (1997). Replication of five types of married couples based on ENRICH. Unpublished dissertation. University of Minnesota. St. Paul, Minnesota.

rowning, DS (2003) Marriage and Modernization: How Globalization Threatens Marriage and What to do About it. Wm. . Eerdmans Publishing, 2003

Duvall, E.M. (1971). Family development, 4th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Co.

Fournier, D.G., & Olson, DH (1986). Programs for premarital and newlywed couples. In R.F.Levant (Ed.), Psychoeducational approaches to family therapy and counseling (pp. 194-231).New York: Springer.

Fournier, D.G., Springer, J. & Olson, DH (2010). Conflict and commitment in seven stages of premarital and marital relations. Unpublished manuscript, Dept. Of Family Social Science, University of Minnesota, St. Paul.

Fowers, .J., Montel, K.H., & Olson, DH (1996). Predictive validity of types of premarital coupes based on PREPARE. Journal of Marriage and Family Therapy, 22, 1, 103-119.

Fowers, .J. & Olson, DH (1992). Four types of premarital…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Allen, W. (1997). Replication of five types of married couples based on ENRICH. Unpublished dissertation. University of Minnesota. St. Paul, Minnesota.

Browning, DS (2003) Marriage and Modernization: How Globalization Threatens Marriage and What to do About it. Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2003

Duvall, E.M. (1971). Family development, 4th ed. Philadelphia: Lippincott Co.

Fournier, D.G., & Olson, DH (1986). Programs for premarital and newlywed couples. In R.F.Levant (Ed.), Psychoeducational approaches to family therapy and counseling (pp. 194-231).New York: Springer.
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Gender-Specific Therapy for Women Prisoners Research Question

Words: 3099 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52728944

Gender-Specific Therapy for Women Prisoners

ESEACH QUESTION AND JUSTIFICATION

On average, women make up about 7% of the total federal and state incarcerated population in the United States. This has increased since the 1980s due to stricter and more severe laws that focus on recreational drug use, a lack of community programs, and fewer treatment centers available for outpatients (Zaitow and Thomas, eds., 2003). According to the National Women's Law Centers, women prisoners report a higher than statistically normal history of domestic violence in their immediate past, and the fastest growing prison population with a disproportionate number of non-Whites forming over 60% of the population. In fact, over 30% of women in prison are serving sentences for murder involving a spouse or partner. The incarceration of women presents far different cultural and sociological issues than those of men -- issues with children, family, sexual politics and more (NWLC, 2012).

The…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Ethical Research Guidelines. (2012). Marketing Research Association. Retrieved from:  http://www.marketingresearch.org/ 

National Women's Law Center. (2012). retrieved from: http://www.nwlc.org/our-issues

Total U.S. Correctional Population. (2010, December 11). Retrieved from Office of Justice Programs: http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/index.cfm?ty=tp&tid=11

Women in the Criminal Justice System. (2012). The Sentencing Project. Retrieved from:
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Trend in Occupational Therapy

Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26623002

Occupational Therapy

The medical field is constantly undergoing significant changes in response to the changing health and social needs of Canadians, as well as health care delivery systems. Occupational therapy is an integral part of this process, as it has expanded from traditional hospital settings to home and community care.

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists identifies some of the existing trends as affecting occupational therapy:

• an aging population

• increased awareness of the needs of people with disabilities

• higher survival rates from accidents and injuries

• increased emphasis on health promotion and prevention to keep health care costs down

• higher incidence of mental health and family problems

• changes in work conditions such as job stress and early retirement

• a more informed public regarding health and health concerns

In my opinion one of rapidly evolving trends in occupational therapy in Ontario is its increasing role in…… [Read More]

References

Ontario Long-Term Care Association. (2011). Elements of an effective innovation strategy for long-term care in Ontario. The Conference Board of Canada. Web. http://www.oltca.com/Library/march11_cboc_report.pdf
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Cardiovascular Program 60-Year-Old Walk-A-Thon Training

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58189815



Walking: Slow down your walking to a regular pace for 5 minutes.

If needed utilize heat or ice therapy to knees after walk.

Friday

Stretching: Sit down on the floor and reach for your toes. Hold this position for 1 minute and do not bounce. Next, sit with your legs crisscrossed, place your arms out to the sides and rotate your center slowly from side to side. Finally, stand up and face the wall. Slow begin walking your feet away from the wall until you feel a stretch in your calves.

Walking: Walk at a regular pace for 5 minutes.

Increase your pace for 8 minutes.

Frequency: Once per day

Intensity: Your heart rate should be at 80 bpm during the fast-paced walking. If you find that it is becoming hard to breath, then slow down to a normal pace until your breathing is back under control.

Walking: Slow down…… [Read More]

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Animal Assisted Therapy Within Society Is it Helpful to Those Who Seek Its Services

Words: 2596 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80753384

Society Feels About Animals

As a first order primate, humans have a natural affinity with animals of all types that has contributed to their mutual relationships throughout history. In fact, animals of different types have been since the time of the ancient Greeks to improve the emotional and functional status of humans (Mccauley, 2006, p. 358). Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has grown in popularity in recent years based on its proven efficacy in treating a wide range of healthcare and mental health conditions. Although dogs and cats are most commonly used in AAT settings, horses, rabbits and even fish can also be used. For instance, according to Macauley, "The use of animals ranges from companion animals that provide camaraderie and emotional support to assistance animals that provide direct physical-functional support to therapy animals that aid with the habilitation-rehabilitation in physical, occupational, speech-language, and recreation therapy" (2006, p. 358). Moreover, some researchers…… [Read More]

References

Becker, D. (2013, August 26). "Four-Legged Therapy for Military Veterans with PTSD."

Healthy Pets. [online] available: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets / archive/2013/0.

Bleich, A. (2004, October 1). "Mental Disability." The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related

Sciences, 41(4), 235-237.
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Individualized Education Program - Shawn

Words: 3679 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73585361

He seems to be curious about what kind of options he has in life. He sees his sister enjoying herself very much in her studies and relationships developed at the conservatory and he wants some of those same things for himself. Shawn has shown somewhat of an increased interest in learning to socialize because of his growing interest in girls and romantic relationships. He wants to be evaluated in so far as he has interest in how his social skills and social intelligence stand up to his peers.

Shawn has accepted that he will be evaluated periodically. He does not show overt resistance to his evaluation, and he does not show overt excitement about it, either. He was mostly cooperative with the evaluation team. He expressed that he did not think many of his classmates liked him or even knew who he was. He mentioned that he recently became interested…… [Read More]

Resources for the family regarding dietary/nutritional changes and pharmaceutical solutions regarding his ADD & ODD

Annual Goals and Benchmarks:

Area: Social Skills

Annual Goal: By the end of the school year, Jason will greet three specific peers (Charlie, Melissa, & Allan) at least twice per day with unprompted eye contact and unprompted one word greetings, such as, "Hi Charlie," "Hello Melissa," "What's up Allan."

Benchmark
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Substance Abuse Treatment Program for

Words: 2284 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86961027



During the assessment the participant will be asked to disclose how often and how many incidences of substance abuse he or she has participated in during the last week. He or she will also be asked to disclose what substances have been used in that time frame.

In addition the participant will participate in an interview in which he or she will provide a life history and a description of when they first began using and why and how much they currently spend on drugs or alcohol.

One element of the assessment will be specifically to ascertain what type of support system the participant has at home and at work if he or she holds a job.

When the assessment is completed the counselor will make a recommendation for treatment depending on the assessment outcome.

The recommendation will be for inpatient, intensive outpatient or low outpatient services depending on the…… [Read More]

References

Evaluating substance abuse treatment process models: I. changes on proximal outcome variables during 12-step and cognitive-behavioral treatment.

From: Journal of Studies on Alcohol | Date: July 1, 1998 | Author: Moos, Rudolf H. | More results for: substance abuse treatment

Predictors of participation in aftercare sessions and self-help groups following completion of intensive outpatient treatment for substance abuse.

From: Journal of Studies on Alcohol | Date: March 1, 1998 | Author: O'Brien, Charles P. | More results for: substance abuse treatment
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History of Occupational Therapy 1950-1960

Words: 902 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31110152

History Of Occupational Therapy

Frame 1 - Introduction

Occupational therapy is an essential part of the recovery process. It allows the person to engage in meaningful activity that adds structure and purpose to their daily routine. Occupational therapy is now considered an essential part of the treatment process for those with long-term, or severe injuries. The role of the occupational therapist is to help the person we turn to a life where they can be independent and are in there and living, regardless of their condition. Occupational therapy helps a person to adjust to the changes in their lives as result of a severe illness or injury. This presentation will explore the history of occupational therapy with a focus on the changes in paradigm that took place during the 1950s and 1960s.

Frame 2 - Occupational therapy was first conceived in the early part of the 1900s. It was originally…… [Read More]

References

American Occupational Therapy Associaton. (2010). Occupational Therapist. Health Care

Careers Directory 2009-2010. Retrieved from 0 http://www.ama-assn.org/ama1/pub/upload/mm/40/tr01-occup-ther.pdf

Essentials of an acceptable school of occupational therapy. (1950). American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 4, 126-128.

Kearney, P. (2004). The Influence of Competing Paradigms on Occupational Therapy Education:
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Reality Therapy it Was During

Words: 3568 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60708715

Perceptions are generally based on the present, and therefore, the need to explore the past by delving into it in great detail becomes totally unnecessary. Glasser felt that even if the person exhibited bizarre and extremely strange types of behavior at a particular time, it was because of an innate reason of trying and attempting to find the best solution in order to meet the person's needs at that particular time in his life, and therefore, it was logical and sane to him, if not to others who would sometimes label him as strange or insane. (the Use of eality Therapy in Guidance in second Level Schools) delinquent would make choices based on the best way to meet his basic needs at that time, and therefore, must not be criticized. This, in essence formed the theory of eality Therapy of William Glasser, wherein the concept of 'Choice Theory' was emphasized…… [Read More]

References

Hazelden, Paul. "Reality Therapy" Retrieved at  http://www.hazelden.org.uk/gr01/art_gr003_reality_therapy.htm . Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Historic Overview of Psychiatric Care" Retrieved at http://www.jcjc.cc.ms.us/faculty/adn/jmcmillan/psychcl1.html. Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Lennon, Brian. "From Reality Therapy to Reality Therapy in Action" Retrieved at http://www.socc.ie/~wgii/articlebl.htm. Accessed on 30 November, 2004

Lennon, Brian. "The Use of Reality Therapy in Guidance in second Level Schools" Retrieved at  http://www.ncge.ie/handbook_docs/Section1/Reality_Therapy_Guide_Sch.doc . Accessed on 30 November, 2004
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Impact of meditation on addiction therapy

Words: 1104 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31783494

A synthesis of what the studies reveal about the current state of knowledge on the question developed

The mindfulness meditation theory appears to have the potential to treat addictive disorder patients. Zgierska and coworkers (2009) state that such models seem to be safe if implemented within the context of clinical studies. One can find considerable methodological shortcomings in a majority of existing works on the subject. Further, which addiction-diagnosed individuals may derive maximum benefits out of mindfulness meditation isn’t clear. But, of late, related initiatives and practices in the role of complementary clinical aids for treating multiple physical and psychological ailments have grown in popularity. MBCT (mindfulness-based cognitive therapy) and MBSR (mindfulness-based stress reduction) as clinical initiatives have specifically been analyzed, with a sound evidential pool recording their efficacy. Integration of the latter initiative’s aspects and cognitive behavioral therapy and cognitive psychology strategies resulted in the former’s creation. At first,…… [Read More]

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Regenerative Therapies Though the Media

Words: 1403 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59992766

Risky behaviors like smoking or drug use could increase because of these assumptions, creating greater burdens of healthcare costs and other social and medical issues. The good that these therapies lead to is thus somewhat tempered by the bad they may encourage.

Other Applications of Regenerative Therapies

Regenerative therapies do not solely consist of age-reversing and life-saving applications. An examination of some other real and imagined uses to which these therapies can be put reveals the true breadth of these therapies' power and scope in everyday life. In the field of dentistry, where artificial implants have become increasingly sophisticated and well-integrated with the natural body, "the therapeutic potential of platelets in promoting and accelerating tissue regeneration" has led to a new trajectory in oral implantology because it allows for the growth of the body's own tissue at a faster rate that incorporates more completely and more efficiently with dental implants…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cytomedix. Autologel System, 2009. Accessed 20 October 2010.  http://www.cytomedix.com/ 

Fugazzotto, Paul. Implant and Regenerative Therapy in Dentistry: A Guide to Decision Making. Ames, IA: Wiley Blackwell, 2009.

Isaac, James (dir.). Jason X. New Line Cinema, 2002. Film.

Longevity Meme. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, 2010. Accessed 20 October 2010. http://www.longevitymeme.org/topics/stem_cells_and_regenerative_medicine.cfm
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Role of Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment

Words: 2560 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94718984

ole of Antibiotic Therapy in the Treatment of Periodontal Disease?

The objective of this work is to examine the role of antibiotic therapy in the treatment of periodontal disease. Also examined will be the delivery system, the type of antibiotics and efficacy as an adjunct to mechanical therapy in the management of periodontal disease. Toward this end, this work will examine the literature in this area of study including literature located in professional and academic journal and publications.

Sub-Antimicrobial Dose Doxycycline

The work of Preshaw, et al. (2005) entitled "Long-Term Treatment with Sub-Antimicrobial Dose Doxycycline Has No Antibacterial Effect on Intestinal Flora" reports a study that sought to determine if a nine-month regimen of subantimicrobial doxycycline (20 mg. bid) had an effect on either the intestinal or the vaginal microflora. The study involved 69 individuals with periodontal disease who were randomized to receive drug or placebo control for a nine-month…… [Read More]

References

American Academy of Periodontology. (2000) Parameter on "refractory" periodontitis. J Periodontol 2000;71:859-860.

Andrian E, Grenier D, Rouabhia M. (2004) In vitro models of tissue penetration and destruction by Porphyromonas gingivalis. Infect Immun. 2004;72: 4689 -- 98.

Chen C, Slots J. (1993) The current status and future prospects of altering the pathogenic microflora of periodontal disease. Curr Opin Periodontol 1993;71-77.

Chen C, Slots J. (2000) Microbiological tests for Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Periodontol 2000-1999;20:53-64.
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

Words: 969 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86708159

Cognitive ehavioral Therapy

In comparison with many different types of treatments that are available cognitive behavioral therapy (CT) has been used as a way to address a host of anxiety and depression disorders without the use of prescription medication. This is because; this approach is based on the fact that health care professionals are treating someone by: looking at how their thoughts are influencing the way that they are interacting with others. To fully understand the effectiveness of this kind of treatment requires examining the use of CT to deal with: a variety of issues / disorders, discussing the implications for treatment planning, understanding what aspects should be implemented when conducting a treatment program and the different ways that you can ensure that the therapy is useful at dealing with the objectives for each patient. Once this takes place, it will provide specific insights about the underlying effectiveness of CT…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Burns, D. (1980). Feeling Good. New York, NY: Avon Books.

Glossoff, H. (2005). Article 2. ACA Code of Ethics.

Robbins, A. (1991). Awaken the Giant Within. New York, NY: Simon and Schuster.

Wilson, R. (2010). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Dummies. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
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School-Based Mental Health Program on

Words: 8166 Length: 25 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67429057

This is discussed at length by Fusick and ordeau (2004) "...school-based counselors need to be aware of the disturbing inequities that exist in predominantly Afro-American urban school districts, where nearly 40% of Afro-American students attend school in the United States" (Fusick and ordeau, 2004) This again places emphasis on the need for mental health programs in these areas of concern. This is also related to findings from a study by McDavis et al. (1995) Counseling African-Americans, which refers to research that stresses the "...widening achievement gap between Afro-American and Euro-American students." (McDavis, et al. 1995)

An important study Laura a. Nabors, Evaluation of Outcomes for Adolescents Receiving School-ased Mental Health Services (2002) refers to the particular issue and problems experience at inner-city schools. The author states that, "School mental health (SMH) programs are an important setting for providing mental health services to adolescents, especially urban youth who typically face in-…… [Read More]

Bibliography.aspx www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308

Smith, P.B., Buzi, R.S., & Weinman, M.L. (2001). Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic. Adolescence, 36(142), 323. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001042308 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622

Stern, S.B., Smith, C.A., & Jang, S.J. (1999). Urban Families and Adolescent Mental Health. Social Work Research, 23(1), 15. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5001243622 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228

Sternberg, R.J., & Dennis, M.J. (1997). Elaborating Cognitive Psychology through Linkages to Psychology as a Helping Profession. Teaching of Psychology, 24(3), 246-249. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77001228 www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383

Stock, M.R., Morse, E.V., Simon, P.M., Zeanah, P.D., Pratt, J.M., & Sterne, S. (1997). Barriers to School-Based Health Care Programs. Health and Social Work, 22(4), 274+. Retrieved December 9, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000581383
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Vision Therapy on Children's Reading

Words: 4751 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73045955

81). Ambrose and Corn (1997) further define "functional vision" as vision that can be used to derive input for planning and performing tasks; the extent to which one uses his or her available vision is referred to as "visual efficiency."

eading Skills. According to Carver (2002), "reading usually means to attempt to comprehend language in the form of printed words"; therefore, for the purposes of this study, the term "reading skills" will refer to an individual's ability to comprehend language in the form of printed words.

Chapter Summary

This chapter provided an introduction to the study, including the background and a statement of the problem of vision impairment on students' academic performance; a discussion of the purpose and significance of the study was followed by a description of the research questions that will guide the research process. An assessment of the study's limitations and delimitations was followed by a delineation…… [Read More]

References

Ambrose, G.V. & Corn, a.L. (1997). Impact of Low Vision on Orientation: an Exploratory Study. RE:view, 29(2), 81.

Balota, D.A., D'Arcais, G.B. & Rayner, K. (Eds.). (1990). Comprehension processes in reading. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Becker, C.A. (1980). Semantic context effects in visual word recognition. An analysis of semantic strategies. Memory & Cognition, 8, 493-512.

Blachman, B.A. (1997). Foundations of reading acquisition and dyslexia: Implications for early intervention. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
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Prevention Programs

Words: 1160 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42904281

According to Greenwood (2008), researchers have recognized 12 "established" delinquency-prevention programs that have shown remarkable improvement in their participants. They also identified an additional 20-30 that demonstrated promise. Shifting towards evidence-based practices derived from information gathered from successful programs can help increase the likelihood of success in other programs through implementation of effective standardized practice. Evidence from school-based programs show remarkable prevention in many areas. "Successful school-based programs can prevent drug use, delinquency, anti-social behavior, and early school drop-out" (Greenwood, 2008, pp. 185).

Greenwood also highlights community-based programs, much like school-based programs, can deter first-time delinquents from added happenstances with the justice system by providing skill development and personal development. As evidence suggests, the most effective community programs stress family communications and provide services and incentive to the adults who oversee and instruct the child. Much like St. Leo University, whose core beliefs include acquiring and learning skills, interconnectedness, and…… [Read More]

References

Borduin, C.M., Mann, B.J., Cone, L.T., Henggeler, S.W., & Al, E. (1995). Multisystemic treatment of serious juvenile offenders: Long-term prevention of criminality and violence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 63(4), 569-578.

Connor, D.F., Saxena, K., Ferziger, R., Daniolos, P.T., Chang, K.D., Carlson, G.A., et al. (2006). Juvenile maladaptive aggression: a Review of Prevention, Treatment, and Service Configuration and a Proposed Research Agenda. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 67(05), 808-820.

Greenwood, P. (2008). Prevention and Intervention Programs for Juvenile Offenders. The Future of Children, 18(2), 185-210.
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Cap Community Action Programs Are

Words: 970 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73963271

For many, this is program of last resort. The author explains that To be admitted, clients must also have a substance abuse problem and a history of unsuccessful completion of other programs (Program Procedures Manual 1993). Therefore, all of the program's clients have received services in various inpatient and outpatient mental health units and clinics in the past, where the primary focus was on their psychiatric disorders. Only 17% have received services in substance abuse programs for the general population, and only 3% have been in other MICA programs (Freeman 2001).

Another community-based program is designed specifically for the treatment of young adults at an outpatient facility. In their study Easton et al., (2003) describes a large community based out patient facility in New Haven, Connecticut (the name of the facility is not given). The study evaluated 434 participants who were divided into two groups; young adults (18-25) and older…… [Read More]

References

Andersen, M., Paliwoda, J., Kaczynski, R., Schoener, E., Harris, C., Madeja, C., et al. (2003). Integrating Medical and Substance Abuse Treatment for Addicts Living with HIV / AIDS: Evidence-Based Nursing Practice Model. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 29(4), 847+.

Easton, C., Sinha, R., & Kemp, K. (2003). Substance Abuse Treatment Characteristics of Probation-Referred Young Adults in a Community-Based Outpatient Program. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, 29(3), 585+.

Freeman, E.M. (2001). Substance Abuse Intervention, Prevention, Rehabilitation, and Systems Change Strategies: Helping Individuals, Families, and Groups to Empower Themselves. New York: Columbia University Press.

Michigan Department of Community Health HIV / AIDS Surveillance Section (MDCH) Quarterly HIV / AIDS Analysis, January 1, 2003. State of Michigan Department of Health: Lansing, MI, 2003.
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Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Program a Critical Component

Words: 473 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46645766

Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner Program

A critical component of nursing is treating a patient's psychological as well as physical needs. I have seen this again and again in my work for an intensive care unit. Every day, more and more patients who are HIV positive come through our doors. HIV can take a tremendous psychological as well as physical toll upon the individual. Additionally, although HIV and AIDS can be contained, the drug regime prescribed must be carefully followed. For patients with ambivalence, shame or guilt about their illness, they may unconsciously sabotage themselves; for patients with deep and entrenched mental health problems outside of their HIV status, following a recommended program of drug therapy and counseling can be even more arduous.

Of course, the failures of HIV treatment are not the patient's 'fault.' There is also the problem of providers who themselves are ill-equipped to deal with the psychological challenges…… [Read More]

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Criminal Justice Bootcamp Programs for

Words: 5841 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21697054

The sources provided background and reviews of published literature: Holmstrom (1996); Marcus-Mendoza (1995); and Osler (1991). Finally, three reports took on a narrower focus in investigating boot camps: Clark and Kellam (2001); Mueller (1996); and Souryal, Layton & MacKenzie (1994).

Burns and Vito (1995) examined the effectiveness of Alabama boot camps. In Alabama, overcrowded prisons brought on interest at the state level for prison boot camps. State prison boot camps incorporated marching, discipline, physical training, work, classes, and drug and alcohol abuse treatment in three phases. In the first phase, inmates confront their crime and take responsibility for it, ridding themselves of excuses. In the second phase, inmates focus on "self-discovery" by learning about themselves, goal planning, and improving themselves for future release. In the third phase, pre-release, inmates focus on problem solving as the key to their own future success as a lawful citizen upon release. Entry and participation…… [Read More]

References

Ashcroft, J., Daniels, D.J., & Hart, S.V. (2003, June). Correctional boot camps: Lessons from a decade of research. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Justice: National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs.

Burns, J.C., & Vito, G.F. (1995, March). An impact analysis of the Alabama boot camp program. Federal Probation, 59(1), 63-67.

Burton Jr., V.S., & Marquart, J.W. (1993, September). A study of attitudinal change among boot camp participants. Federal Probation, 57(3), 46-52.

Christenberry, N.J., Burns, J.L., & Dickinson, G.B. (1994, September). Gains in educational achievement by inmates during the Arkansas Prison Boot Camp program. Journal of Correvtional Education, 45(3), 128-132.
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Faith-Based Reentry Programs Corrections Faith-Based Initiatives Legal

Words: 1429 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34535637

Faith-Based eentry Programs

Corrections

Faith-based initiatives:

Legal and logistical challenges in corrections

The separation of church and state is codified in the First Amendment. State support of faith-based organizations designed to reduce recidivism rates was permitted when President George W. Bush signed the Second Chance Act in 2007. The Second Change Act allowed federal funds to be used for reentry programs, including faith-based reentry programs. As expected, the legislation could theoretically pose some First Amendment issues given that it involves federal support for programs run by religious institutions, but given that members of the clergy are already a presence in most prisons, there has been muted debate on the topic. When evaluating the utility of such programs two central questions may be asked: do such reentry programs 'work' and if so, is the faith-based component sufficiently necessary to justify the potential blurring of the line between church and state, as…… [Read More]

References

Gramlich, J. (2008). States want Second Chance Act funded. Stateline. Retrieved from:

PEW Charitable Trust.

http://www.pewstates.org/projects/stateline/headlines/states-want-second-chance-act-funded-85899387016

Muhlhausen, D. (2010). The Second Chance Act: more evaluations of effectiveness needed.
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Pre-K Program Evaluation Using Logic Model

Words: 1788 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71740289

Public Program Quality Evaluation

Overview of the Program and the Program ationale

In 2011, approximately 23% of all children in the United States were children of immigrants. Many of these children have come from countries where the educational systems have not prepared them with competitive skills that will support a good standard of living. Various policies to address this issue have been proposed. Of the feasible options, the policy most likely to achieve popular approval is the provision of preschool education to all low-immigrant children. In part, the basis for this support is the historical national approval of programs such as Head Start. ecently, the nation has seen an upswing in state-funded pre-K programs that focus on preparing low-income 4-year-old children for kindergarten and elementary school. Head Start programs continue in a parallel manner, and necessarily so, as only a handful of states offer pubic school-based pre-K programs to all…… [Read More]

References

Haskins, R. & Tienda, M. (2011). The future of immigrant children. The Future of Children. Princeton University and the Brookings Institution.

Lawrence L. Martin, L.L. & Kettner, P.M. (1996). Measuring the performance of human service programs. Sage Publications.

Neuman, W.L. (2012). Basics of social research: qualitative and quantitative approaches (3rd ed.).

Puma, M. Bell, S., Cook, R., & Heid, C. (2010, January). Head Start Impact Study Final Report, Executive Summary. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families. Washington, DC.
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Gang Prevention Program Gangs Contain

Words: 5590 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 76787344



George Knox, director of the National Gang Crime esearch Center, teaches law enforcement officers how to search WebPages to pick up on gang member's lingo, territories, and rivalries. He also asserts it is crucial for officers to learn how to "read between the lines" when searching gang members' WebPages. Time on the Web, similar to time on the streets, gives gang investigators the ability to read the hieroglyphics of wall graffiti, and understand Web clues. In addition, "gang identifiers, such as tattoos, graffiti tags, colors and clothing often are embedded in each site" (Gutierrez, 2006, ¶ 27). According to Gutierrez, by studying gang blogs for several hours, one can pick up on subtle word choices, which the gang members consider to be almost holy words. Knox contends that some gangs use the Internet to recruit new members.

Other Efforts to Deal with Gangs

Suppression techniques may be one of the…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

ARISE as a gang prevention program. (2007). ARISE Foundation. Retrieved November 6, 2009

from http://www.ariselife-skills.org/Home/Gangs.aspx ARISE foundation. (2009). Retrieved November 6, 2009 from http://www.ariselife-skills.org/Home/Home.aspx

ARISE life-management skills program. A five-year evaluation. (N.d.). University of Miami.

Retrieved November 10, 2009 from http://www.ariselifeskills.org/docs/pdf/5yearevalexecsummary.pdf
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Eligibility Rules and Agency Program Policy the Medicaid

Words: 895 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69525794

Eligibility ules and Agency/Program Policy

The Medicaid Program

Medicaid is a federal assistance program that is administrated at the federal level by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and at the state level by the corresponding state agencies of the individual states. It is a program designed to assist needy individuals with medical expenses. Medicaid eligibility is quite strict and is an example of eligibility by rule and regulation as well as by means testing (Chambers & Wedel, 2005).

The program provides coverage for all of the following healthcare services for program beneficiaries: Inpatient hospital services, Outpatient hospital services, Laboratory and X-ray services including radiation therapy, Physician's services, Podiatric services, Naturopathic services, Vision care, Family planning services, Home health services, Certain chiropractic services, Health clinic services, Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT), Dental services, including orthodontia services, Maternity clinic services, Ambulatory surgical center facility services, Emergency hospital…… [Read More]

References

CMS. (2010). U.S. Department of Health and Human Services -- Centers for Medicare

and Medicaid Services. Overview: Medicaid Eligibility. Retrieved April 11, 2011

from: http://www.cms.gov/MedicaidEligibility/

Chambers, D.E. And Wedel, K.R. (2005). Social Policy and Social Programs: A Method
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Modern Marriage Preparation Program

Words: 1756 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77761795

Marriage

Over the past 50 -- 60 years, the divorce rate in the United States has risen dramatically. Marriage was viewed differently in previous generations, and was generally considered an institution between one man and one woman. In today's modern culture, the lines between what is acceptable in a union between two entities is much more blurred than it was in earlier years. There is a movement to accept marriage as it was previously defined as too old-fashioned. Accordingly, there is a larger percentage of individuals who divorce after marriage, or who oftentimes do not marry at all, preferring instead to cohabitate one with another. Such a scenario seems to be based on a lack of overall commitment to the relationship, and this same lack of commitment affects married couples as well.

One recent study determined that in the 1950's happy marriages were the result of marrying someone with similar…… [Read More]

References

Amato, P.R., & DeBoer, D. (2001). The transmission of marital instability across generations:Relationship skills or commitment to marriage? Journal of Marriage and the Family, Vol. 63, pp. 1038 -- 1051

Bennett, J. & Ellison, J.; (2010) I don't, Newsweek, Vol. 155, Issue 25, pp. 42 -- 45

Bowen, M, Dr.; (2011) Bowen theory, accessed on December 21, 2011 at http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/theory.html

Burgoyne, C.B.; Reibstein, J.; Edmunds, A.M.; Routh, D.A.; (2010) Marital commitment, money and marriage preparation: What changes after the wedding?, Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 20, Issue 5, pp. 390 -- 403
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Leadership Programs Leadership Has Always

Words: 829 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62535068

Just this past April I was promoted to Head of the Standard and Criteria Development Office for the Department of Health and Medical Services (DOHMS) in xxx (location?

). In this capacity, I am expected to ably handle a variety of responsibilities including: Overseeing all aspects of standards development activities and quality activities in the Licensing and Specifications Department with all the private healthcare facilities in the area; leading and supporting the development of standards and criteria related to the healthcare practice; contributing to the development and on going review of DOHMS standards strategy and offering advice about current clinical practices, quality, safety, and service development; and keeping abreast of standard requirements and evidence and effectively communicating these to a variety of concerned individuals.

The reason for this promotion to the Head of the Standard and Criteria Development Office was because of my previous success as the Head of the…… [Read More]

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Operation Smile Programs Overview Operation Smile Program

Words: 667 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92021147

Operation Smile Programs Overview

Operation Smile Program Overview

Operation Smile Overview

Operation Smile Program Overview

Operation Smile Program Overview

Cleft palate and cleft lip are among the most common birth defects occurring today (NIDC, 2011). Together, these conditions occur in 0.17% of all births in the United States and between 2004 and 2006 represented 7,088 cases annually. The lifetime healthcare burden of these birth defects in the U.S. is close to $700 million.

Cleft lip/palate represents the failure of tissues to join during fetal development, which can lead to nursing, feeding, and speech problems (MedlinePlus, 2012). As a result, 10% of these children will die within the first year of life (Kraft, 2011). The social stigma associated with the birth defect is also substantial, contributing to the high mortality rate and lifelong social isolation. Children in poverty-stricken areas of the world are particularly vulnerable because they lack access to health…… [Read More]

References

Kraft, Jessica. (2011). Operation Smile Backgrounder. OperationSmile.org. Retrieved 5 Jun. 2012 from http://www.operationsmile.org/downloadables/news-events/publications/operation-smile-backgrounder.pdf.

MedlinePlus. (2012). Cleft lip and palate repair. NLM.NIH.gov. Retrieved 5 Jun. 2012 from http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002979.htm.

NIDCR (National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research). (2011). Prevalence (number of cases) of cleft lip and cleft palate. NICDR.NIH.gov. Retrieved 5 Jun. 2012 from http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/DataStatistics/FindDataByTopic/CraniofacialBirthDefects/PrevalenceCleft+LipCleftPalate.htm.
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Saint Leo University Master Social Work Program

Words: 1287 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82381583

Education is one of the most important tools one can use to change their lives. It is an efficient and fast way to initiate change since making progress often begins with one knowing more. As the population of the world increases, the demand for education is also increasing. The growing demand for education has led to several educational facilities being started all over the world. The level of access to education the world's population has right now is unparalleled in history. Save for financial constraints, there aren't many insurmountable barriers that people have to deal with to get access to an education. Nonetheless, some schools' curriculums do not meet the required standards set by educational authorities. Students graduating from such an institution may not be well equipped to deliver value in the market place. This is why it is very important to join a reputable institution with a solid track…… [Read More]

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Client Centeredness and Therapy

Words: 711 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3774711

Client Centered Therapy

Person-centered therapists have successfully worked with numerous clients, having problems of biogenic, socio-genic and psychogenic origins. The link common to these is the necessity for understanding clients' correlation with the self-destructive attitude, ailment, or issue; working in collaboration with clients in growth and self-healing; and trusting that clients possess resources for confronting the challenges faced. Despite client-centered treatment being stereotyped as only applicable to "moderate" cases, many client-centered specialists and researchers have attested to this approach's effectiveness and extent in helping clients afflicted with severe mental ailments (Wedding & Corsini, 2013).

Though person-centered therapy assumes a non-diagnostic stance, therapists work to aid persons diagnosed as psychotic, bulimic, panic-disordered, developmentally-disabled, etc. By others, in addition to individuals who merely look to experience personal growth. The assumption that client-centered therapy applies to everybody, irrespective of their psychological ailment, is grounded on the idea that there is more to an…… [Read More]

References

Wedding, D., Corsini, R. (2013). Chapter 4 Client Centered Therapy. In Current Psychotherapies (10th ed., p. 656). Cengage Learning.
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Analyzing and Understanding Concepts of Group Therapy

Words: 3010 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20603516

Group Therapy

Self-cutting

Factors that augment risks of self-cutting

Treatment of Self-Cutting

Group Therapy

Aims of Group Therapy

Aspects of Group Therapy

The aim of this research is to investigate and identify opinions regarding vital elements for successful group therapy and to suggest the distinguished elements as guiding principles for future group counselling guidelines, theoretical as well as program development. Therapists are to recognize the essential factors of group therapy, which contribute to positive therapeutic results. The important elements of group therapy established by the board of professionals shall be suggested as guiding principles for future group therapy, theoretical and program development (Edwards, 2001).

Introduction

Group therapy is a type of psychotherapy whereby one or more therapists attend to a tiny group of patients together as a group. It entails one or more psychologists that head a group of approximately five to fifteen clients. In the same milieu, group counselling…… [Read More]

References

Conyne, R. K. (Ed.). (2011). The Oxford handbook of group counselling. Oxford University Press.

Edwards, S. A. (2001). The essential elements of multi-family group therapy: A Delphi study.

Fehr, S. S. (Ed.). (2012). 101 interventions in group therapy. Routledge.

Glass, S. D. (2010). The practical handbook of group counselling. Bloomington, Ind.: Trafford Publishing
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Parenting Program for Women and

Words: 41621 Length: 150 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12171638

There are many of these individuals, and it is time that this is changed.

Parents often look away from these kinds of problems, or they spend their time in denial of the issue because they feel that their child will not be harmed by parental involvement with drugs or alcohol. Some parents have parents that were/are addicts themselves, and some are so busy with their lives that they do not actually realize that their child has any kind of problem with the lifestyle of the parent until it becomes so severe that it cannot be overlooked, or until it is brought to their attention by police, the school, or someone else that has seen it first hand. Parents are not the only ones that overlook this issue, though.

Sometimes siblings and friends also see problems that they ignore, do not understand, or do not talk to anyone about, and the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Aleman-Padilla, L. 2002. Babies First gets last word on infant care Hundreds recognize groups contribution at fourth annual event. The Fresno Bee.

Anderson, D. 2004. Funding cuts impact health services. Precinct Reporter.

Anderson, S.A. (2000). How parental involvement makes a difference in reading achievement. Reading Improvement.

Baker, P.L. (2000). I didn't know: discoveries and identity transformation of women addicts in treatment. Journal of Drug Issues, 30, 863-881.
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Cognitive-Based Therapy

Words: 1383 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4291134

CBT

The always developing field of psychology and the tools used to develop this science, have provided many patients with much need relief. The constant evolution of the mind requires that clinical practices within mental health treatments also evolve and grow with the human race. The purpose of this essay is to discus Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), as a useful method of treating mental and psychological issues.

First CBT will be discussed in general, and useful ideas presented about the approach will be introduced. A practical example of this therapy will also be highlighted to contextualize the information. Next, this essay will address CBT can be used specifically for the treatment for depression and the issues associated with that idea. Finally, this essay will address how computerized CBT software programs are assisting in treating these types of issues.

CBT

Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) is simply a form of psychotherapy that…… [Read More]

References

Barlow, DH, Gorman, J.M., Shear, M.K., & Woods, S.W. (2000). Cognitive-behavioral therapy, imipramine, or their combination for panic disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Jama, 283(19), 2529-2536.

Boyes, A. (2012). Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Techniques That Work. Psychology Today, 6 Dec 2012. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-practice/201212/cognitive-behavioral-therapy-techniques-work

Dobson, K.S. (Ed.). (2009). Handbook of cognitive-behavioral therapies. Guilford Press.

Martin, B. (2007). In-Depth: Cognitive Behavior Therapy. Psych Central. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/lib/in-depth-cognitive-behavioral-therapy/000907
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Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

Words: 2062 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19929272

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or (CBT) is currently the popular method to provide therapy to the client with weight control maladies. CBT is ostensibly necessary to assist binge eaters and those whom suffer from tendencies to bulimic episodes. According to Brody (2007), "Most popular at the moment is cognitive-behavioral therapy, with or without medication. Since binge eaters have highly irregular eating habits, the behavioral aspect introduces structure to their eating behavior: regular meals, including breakfast, and an afternoon snack if needed." (Brody, 2007)

apoport, Clark, & Wardle further ascribe CBT as a comprehensive methodology to address the psychological, not neurological, deficiencies with regard to how the client addresses their weight problem. According to apoport, Clark & Wardle (2000), "Cognitive -- behavioural treatment (CBT) for obesity also focuses on weight loss, but incorporates psychological strategies to promote lifestyle change. ecent reviews show that CBT programmes achieve weight losses…… [Read More]

Reference

Brody, J.E. (2007, Feb 20). Out of control: A true story of binge eating. New York Times, pp. F.7-F.7. Retrieved from  http://search.proquest.com/docview/433509755?accountid=13044 

Marchesini, G., Natale, S., Chierici, S., Manini, R., Besteghi, L., Domizio, S.D., . . . . (2002). Effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on health-related quality of life in obese subjects with and without binge eating disorder.International Journal of Obesity, 26(9), 1261-1261-1267. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0802073

Mefferd, K., Nichols, J.F., Pakiz, B., & Rock, C.L. (2007). A cognitive behavioral therapy intervention to promote weight loss improves body composition and blood lipid profiles among overweight breast cancer survivors.Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 104(2), 145-145-52. doi:10.1007/s10549-006-9410-x

Rapoport, L., Clark, M., & Wardle, J. (2000). Evaluation of a modified cognitive-behavioural programme for weight management. The Journal of Investigative Dermatology, 24(12), 1726-1726-1737. doi:10.1038/sj.ijo.0801465
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Counseling Program for Adult Prisoners

Words: 941 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14580413

Drug Treatment of Counseling Program

The District of Columbia has decided to implement a drug treatment program or a counseling program for adults incarcerated in jail. The decision is influenced by the need to enhance rehabilitation services that the district provides to its adult prisoners. Moreover, the District of Columbia has decided to implement such as program in order to help lessen the recidivism rates among adults upon release from incarceration facilities. However, the implementation of this program requires conducting an extensive research on the effectiveness of such a program in order to enhance its overall success. Conducting an extensive research will help in assessing the effectiveness of the program prior to implementation and ensure best practices are adopted in designing the program. This paper provides a research proposal for measuring the effectiveness of the drug treatment program to be implemented in the district.

esearch Question

The research question that…… [Read More]

References

Office of Research Integrity. (n.d.). Research Design -- Experimental Studies. Retrieved from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services website: http://ori.hhs.gov/education/products/sdsu/res_des2.htm

White, M. (2007). Maps of narrative practice. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.
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Evaluating a Health Program

Words: 1732 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94620351

Alzheimer’s Intervention Evaluation
Introduction
This paper provides a basic evaluation plan for evaluating a health program for elderly patients with Alzheimer’s. The health program focuses on designing and implementing an open space concept for the patient, having a social worker regularly meet with the patient and loved one or caretakers to ensure support, having family therapy sessions available for loved ones acting as caretakers if they should want it and providing a falls prevention initiative through training in an exercise routine to strengthen the balance and agility of the elderly person—all of which are considered vital aspects to improving the health status of an elderly person with Alzheimer’s (Canning et al., 2015; Hoof, Kort, Van Warde & Blom, 2010; Rubin, 2011). The overall question an intervention evaluation asks is: Was the intervention implemented as planned? (Harris, 2010). The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation plan for the…… [Read More]

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Ethical Codes or Programs 1

Words: 2508 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33282034



Another main factor that has also been mentioned above is the factor of Personal Development that is held highly important at Saint Leo University. The administration and education board at the university feels that it is essential for every educational institution to have the kind of educational setup that will promote the progress of every individual's mental, physical and spiritual being in an appropriate and composed way (ALA/ACL, 2008).

esponsible Stewardship is another important factor in the educational setup of the university as the administration feels that an individual's capability and service spectrum can not be fully utilized without his or her ability to truly use the resources available to him or her. The administration feels that they, as an institution, can use all the resources available to them and their students towards not only developing their university but also their community as well as the neighboring communities (ALA/ACL, 2008).…… [Read More]

References

ALA/ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. 2008. Accessed at http://www.ala.org/ala/acrl/acrlstandards/informationliteracycompetency.htm

Andberg, M., M. Caught in the Middle: Ethical/Legal Mandates and Test Security. Symposium: Recent Developments in Psychological Testing - Update for Assessment Professionals. American Psychological Association Convention; Honolulu, Hawaii. Marcia Andberg Associates LLC, 2004.

American Psychological Association (APA). Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. American Psychological Association, Inc. December 2002; 57, 12

Dr. Kirk, a.F. The State of Saint Leo University. President of Saint Leo University Community Day. 2006. Accessed from https://www.saintleo.edu/resources/docs/intranet/commday_aug2006_kirkspch.pdf
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Intervention & Addiction Therapy Theory

Words: 3133 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96162245

.

The two hypothetical systems working on an individual's brain during the experience of addiction are complementary within and between system changes. The first counteradaptation results in a decrease in the transmission of dopamine and serotonin release during withdrawal phases of the cycle (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively, dopamine and serotonin transmission is artificially increased beyond the normative range during drug use, then virtually stopped once the drug has left the body. This intensifies not only the "come down" feeling but also the preoccupation anxieties associated with substance abuse as well as the existing emotional, environmental, or social vulnerability which lead to the initial lapse. Sensitization is the component of addiction which compels an individual to continually seek greater quantities of the substance (obinson & Berridge 2001). Effectively once the brain has been exposed to a chemical which alters neural transmission, the body attempts to return to a homeostatic state.…… [Read More]

References

1. Nesse, R. (1994). An evolutionary perspective on substance abuse. Ethology and Sociobiology, 15, 339- 348.

2. Robinson, T, & Berridge, K. (2001). Mechanisms of action of addictive stimuli incentive- sensitization and addiction. Addiction, 96, 103- 114.

3. Koob, G., & Le Moal, M. (1997). Drug abuse: Hedonic homeostatic dysregulation. Science, 278, 52- 58.

4. Brown, J.M., & Miller, W.R. (1993). Impact of motivational interviewing on participation and outcome in residential alcoholism treatment. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors,7, 211-218.
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Solution

Words: 1140 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14881754

It also relaxes them and helps build rapport, and it can give you ideas to use for treatment...Everybody has natural resources that can be utilised. These might be events...or talk about friends or family...The idea behind accessing resources is that it gives you something to work with that you can use to help the client to achieve their goal...Even negative beliefs and opinions can be utilised as resources. (p. 451)

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy also works with negative aspects of the client's life as a way to increase the positive aspects of his or her life. Cognitive behavioral therapy is a more established therapy than in solution-based therapy, although the two are conceptually twinned. The major goal of cognitive behavioral therapy is to solve difficulties that arise in the client's life as the result of the presence of behaviors and cognitions (that is, thoughts) along with emotions that are dysfunctional (Albano…… [Read More]

References

Jones, D. (2008). Becoming a brief therapist: Special edition. London: Lulu Enterprises.

McCullough, J.P. (2003). Treatment for chronic depression: Cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy. London: Guilford Press.

Miller, S.D., Hubble, M.A., Duncan, B.L. (1996). Handbook of solution-focused brief therapy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

O'Connell, B. (1998). Solution focused therapy. Los Angeles: Sage.
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Reality Therapy Is a Practical

Words: 3066 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70909525

The therapist, who withholds judgment and criticism, ceases to be perceived in the mind of the prisoner like an adjunct of the guard or police, but as a facilitator of positive changes in the lives of the prisoners (p. 102).

Correctional practitioners often speak of "getting back to basics." eality Therapy and Choice Theory, which is an excellent tool for either classroom or self-study, is about just that. In the mid-1970s as a young juvenile correctional officer, I was trained in reality therapy as it was the cornerstone of treatment at the New Mexico Girls School. Since that time, many new approaches have been implemented, but if one closely examines all the "innovative juvenile treatment approaches," reality therapy is a basic component of each, and to this day, is the cornerstone of the most effective methods of working with youths. This process teaches youths to stop placing blame on others…… [Read More]

References

http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27985548

Brown, N.W. (1996). Expressive Processes in Group Counseling: Theory and Practice. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=27985548 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002544140

Clark, K. (2003). Bringing Back Compassion, Counseling and Mental Health: Featured Presenter Dr. William Glasser Discusses Choice Theory, the New Reality Therapy with Annals. Annals of the American Psychotherapy Association, 6(2), 11+. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5002544140 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104722137

Hardcastle, D.A., Powers, P.R., & Wenocur, S. (2004). Community Practice: Theories and Skills for Social Workers. New York: Oxford University Press. Retrieved December 10, 2008, from Questia database: http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=104722138 http://www.questiaschool.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5007703291
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Methods for Couples and Family Therapy

Words: 2219 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51024945

family counseling requires a broad and diverse set of tools and techniques. Those tools and techniques should be adaptable to suit the needs of each family, individuals within that family, and also the contextual or environmental variables that impact families. Using a wide range of exercises and interventions, therapists can provide effective and evidence-based practice, as well as offer ongoing assessments and maintenance.

Techniques and exercises that may be particularly useful for families and couples include the oyal Flush exercise for families with young children, the family-based school interventions for children with behavioral or academic performance problems, and the "altering the abyss" exercise for couples. Each of these exercises is rooted in fundamental family practice theory, and each can also yield measurable outcomes that improve the efficacy of the treatment.

oyal Flush

The "royal flush" technique is named as such because it uses picture cards, similar to those used in…… [Read More]

References

American Psychological Association (2015). Managing stress for a healthy family. Retrieved online: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/managing-stress.aspx

Brimhall, A.S. & Gardner, B.C. (n.d.). Altering the abyss.

Friedman, B.D. & Allen, K.N. (n.d.). Systems theory. Retrieved online: http://www.sagepub.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/32947_Chapter1.pdf

Gergen, K.J. (1985). The social constructionist movement in modern psychology. American Psychologist 40(3): 266-275.
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Alternate Practice Therapy Experiment the Truant Individual

Words: 2370 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58543155

Alternate Practice Therapy Experiment

The truant individual also tends to manifest through dangerous behaviors and travel a path of extremity with sad endings and wasted lives. This chapter will serve to review literature that speaks to and of the problem of the truancy that is so highlighted in schools at the top of the 21st century. Extremely a progressive problem that is firmly within the very root of belief, thought and process as the truant has through reactionary events and then formation of environment. Then there were those who made a difference in the very experientially gained concepts or expressions of purpose.

The students love her and called her their teacher with red hair. Mrs. lack, the teacher who loved to read and then you follow. Those teachers who are of the teaching essence as so to captivate the child's mind are often barred from governance within the educational practice…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

Kitching, Ruth "Violence, Truancy and School Exclusion in France and Britain Chameleon Press ISBN 0 9540118 0-5 [Online] available at: "http:/ / www.francobritishcouncil.org.uk.

Baker, M. et al. (2001) "Truancy Reduction: Keeping Students in School" Online] available at: http://www.ncjrs.org/html / jjdp/jjbul2001_9_1/contents.html

"Truancy Reduction Program: Working to Improve School Attendance, Increase Academic Performance, and strengthen families" KCSOS School-Community Partnerships [Online] at: http://kcsos.kern.org/schcom/trp#

Best Practice Number Eight: Reducing Crime and Supporting Education through a Comprehensive Truancy Reduction Strategy: [Online] available at: http://kcsos.kern.org/schcom/trp
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Personal Statement - Biology Program I First

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7149899

Personal Statement - Biology Program

I first experienced working in healthcare at the XYZ Home, a nursing community in my hometown of XYZ City, XYZ State.

From 19##-19##, while still in high school, I worked as a volunteer with elderly residents. During those two years, I helped organize social activities for the seniors. I assisted with feeding duties and helped the residents get involved in physical activities, such as stretching limbs or a simple walk around the garden.

The best part of the job, however, was being a valued part of lives. In addition to the official duties, I often read to some of the older. A tall, proud, World War II veteran regaled me with tales of fighting in Normandy. Elizabeth, a sweet, frail-looking grandmother even tried to teach me how to crochet.

I have always found great fulfillment in healthcare and in being part of people's recoveries. For…… [Read More]

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Statistics for Counseling and Program Evaluation

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77578855

Turner, Jarrod S. & David J. Leach. (2010). Experimental evaluation of behavioral activation treatment of anxiety (BATA) in three older adults. International Journal of Behavioral

Consultation and Therapy. 6 (4). Retrieved July 10, 2011 at http://www.baojournal.com/IJBCT/IJBCT-VOL-6/IJBCT-6-4.pdf

The 2010 article "Experimental evaluation of behavioral activation treatment of anxiety (BATA) in three older adults" from the International Journal of Behavioral Consultation and Therapy by Jarrod S. Turner & David J. Leach examines the use of behavioral activation treatment (BATA) in adults using a statistical analysis of self-monitored depression and anxiety scales. The experiment was conducted in an ABC research design format to evaluate a behavioral activation treatment on the reported anxiety levels of each participant. "The A phase was baseline; B. phase was treatment; and C. phase was maintenance/follow-up" (Turner & Leach 2010: 375). Statistically speaking, A, or the baseline phase, was used a 'control' measure for the experimental and follow-up phases.…… [Read More]

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Chaney Allen Cognitive Behavioral Therapies

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23058273

Chaney Allen Cognitive-Behavior Therapies

One approach that has gained a great deal of attention, particularly in the treatment of substance abuse, is cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Originating with classical conditioning and operant learning, combined with social learning theory and the role of cognitive experiences in determining behavior, CBT merges into a model that assumes most psychological and psycho-social problems derive from a fault coping or thinking process. There are, of course, any number of observable and latent factors that contribute to substance abuse, most early non-cognitive therapies focusing then on only the observable dynamics. Over time, however, research and mediation models have shown that CBT represents more of an integration of principles derived from both behavioral and cognitive theories, and allows for the treatment of a broader range of issues through social learning, cultural framing, and the appraisals, self-efficacy expectations, and individual attributions (an individual's explanation of why an event occurred)…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Chaney Allen Women's Continuum of Care. (2011). The Crossroads Center. Cited in:

http://www.thecrossroadscenter.com/Chaney%20Allen%20Women's%20Continuum%20of%20Care.htm

Allen, C. And Mayfield, E. (1976). I'm Black and I'm Sober. Center City, MN:

Hazelden Press.
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Employment Programs for Combat Vets

Words: 982 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39097856

Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) program touts the fact that the organization seeks to provide meaningful and successful careers for all veterans (United States, 2015). VETS seems to be much more than just a program, however, providing a number and variety of different resources for any veteran interested in obtaining, and keeping, gainful employment. The organization's mission statement describes opportunities that will prepare the veteran for obtaining meaningful careers, maximizing employment, and protecting veteran's rights in the workforce.

The number of veterans since 2001 that have been provided information or been counseled by the VETS program has totaled "more than one million individuals through briefings or individual technical assistance" (United States, 2015). That number averages more than 75,000 veterans per year benefiting from what the program has to offer. Due to the travesties of war and combat, many of these veterans are suffering from debilitating injuries, both physical and…… [Read More]

References

Larson, G.E. & Norman, S.B.; (2014) Prospective prediction of functional difficulties among recently separated veterans, Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development, 51(3) 415-427

Leddy, M.; Stefanovics E. & Rosenheck, R.; (2014) Health and well-being of homeless veterans participating in transitional and supported employment: Six-month outcomes, Journal of Rehabilitation Research and Development, 51(1) 161-174

NVTAC (2014) Overview, accessed at  http://bbi.syr.edu/projects/National_Veterans_Technical_Assistance_Center/index.html , on February 24, 2015

Ottomanelli, L.; Barnett, S.D. & Goetz, L.L.; (2013) A prospective examination of the impact of a supported employment on health-related quality of life, handicap and disability among veterans with SCI, Quality of Life Research, 22(8) 2133-2141
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Eap Employee Assistance Programs Eaps

Words: 1314 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7275217

However, in most instances, "agencies do not use the EAP as the office responsible for taking incident reports on workplace violence. Agencies give the following reasons: Because confidentiality requirements prohibit EAP counselors from disclosing information, putting a counselor in the position of informing the other members of the intervention team about the report could lead to serious misunderstandings among agency employees and harm the credibility of the EAP. It sometimes takes years to build the EAP into a viable program trusted by employees to keep any contacts confidential and the dual role could diminish this viability" (III. 4 EAP Consideration, 2009, OPM).

The message the EAP strives to communicate to employees can best be summed up in some EAP posters created as part of its prevention program: "Reach out: e can help," reads one. Another advises: "Talk or walk it out." These types of poster campaigns and brochures, although they…… [Read More]

Works Cited

EAP and workplace prevention posters. (2009). Office of Personnel Management. Retrieved February 6, 2009 at  http://www.eaposters.com/Posters_wpviolence.htm 

Part III: Section 4 -- Employee assistance program consideration. (2009). Office of Personnel

Management (OPM). Retrieved February 6, 2009 at http://www.opm.gov/Employment_and_Benefits/WorkLife/OfficialDocuments/handbooksguides/workplaceviolence/p3-s4.asp

Workplace violence. (2009). The USDA Handbook on Workplace Violence Prevention and Response. Retrieved February 6, 2009 at http://www.usda.gov/news/pubs/violence/wpv.htm
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Use of Naturopathic Practice Interventions and Therapy

Words: 2761 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19204539

Complementary and Alternative Medicines (CAM) Systems

Complementary and alternative medicine systems are health care approaches that are characterized by a history of use or origins that are external to mainstream medicine or health care practices. These health care systems or approaches have lasted for centuries since different kinds of complementary and alternative medicines have been reported. According to the World Health Organization, different types of complementary and alternative medicines have acted as the basic health practice in developing countries and are increasingly used in countries with predominant conventional medicine (Kramlich, 2014, p.50). CAM therapies have become common in the recent past and are used for treating various conditions including chronic pain conditions. Actually, several CAM therapies and practice interventions such as acupuncture and massage therapy are increasingly used in chronic pain management.

Naturopathic Medicine

Naturopathic medicine, which is also known as naturopathy or alternative medicine, is a term that is…… [Read More]

References

"History of Naturopathic Medicine." (n.d.). North Carolina Association of Naturopathic Physicians. Retrieved August 17, 2015, from http://ncanp.com/about-ncanp/history-of-naturopathic-medicine/

Kramlich, D. (2014, December). Introduction to Complementary, Alternative, and Traditional Therapies. Critical Care Nurse, 34(6), 50-56.

Pongparadee et. al. (2012, August). Current Considerations for the Management of Musculoskeletal Pain in Asian Countries: A Special Focus on Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors and Non-steroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs. International Journal of Rheumatic Diseases,15(4), 341-347.

Schulenburg, J. (2015). Considerations for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Interventions for Pain. AORN Journal, 101(3), 319-326.
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How Berg Uses the Miracle Question in Therapy

Words: 1623 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54082392

Solution-Focused Therapy: AIDS and Dying Well

Pattern of Questioning

The pattern of questioning that Berg uses in "Dying Well" begins with effective questioning technique. Berg asks Tanya what she hopes or wants to accomplish before death. It is Tanya's response that she wants to confront her past -- so that she can go home and say goodbye to her mother. Her goal is to "get rid of" the past issues that are keeping her from going home -- namely, the abuse she suffered at the hands of her brothers and father (Berg, 2012). She feels that by confronting this issue she can avoid having a bad encounter with her family if she goes home.

Berg asks Tanya, "What difference will it make?" if she confronts this issue and "gets rid of" the problem she is having about her feelings of hate for her brothers and father. Tanya talks through this…… [Read More]

References

Berg, I. K. (2012, October 4). Dying well. Milwaukee, WI [Video File].

 http://www.viddler.com/v/c5249886?secret=64169979 

Gerhart, D. R.(2014) Mastering competencies in family therapy Belmont, CA: Brooks-

Cole, Cengage Learning.
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Difficulty of Giving Therapy to OCD Patients

Words: 604 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45733320

Difficulty of Treating Anxiety Disorders

Anxiety disorders are difficult to treat for a multitude of reasons; first, there is no 100% proven-to-be-effective method of therapy that acts as a one-size-fits-all treatment for patient. Behavioral therapy is used by some therapists; others utilize medical therapy, such as Zoloft, Paxil or other prescriptions. Psychosurgery is also an option for patients who do not respond well to either treatments, but such surgery requires literally burning part of the brain and is noted as only having a 50% success rate (Psych Guides, 2015). The bottom line is that anxiety disorders are a complicated manifestation of an underlying issue within the human psyche for which medical science only has a limited understanding.

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is one of the most difficult to treat primarily because it requires a strong and durable commitment to transformative behavior therapy such as cognitive behavior therapy. In cases where patients…… [Read More]

References

Psych Guides. (2015). Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. Retrieved from http://www.psychguides.com/guides/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-treatment-program-options/

Sasson, Y., Zohar, J., Chopra, M., Hendler, T. (1997). Epidemiology of obsessive, compulsive disorder: A world view. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 12(12): 7-10.

Wexler, E. (2013). Clinical neurologists: behavioral management of inherited neurodegenerative disease. Neurologic Clinics, 31(4): 1121-1144.
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Community Outreach Program Volunteer Domestic Violence Shelter

Words: 1192 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98026605

male entering a domestic violence/battered women's shelter, I was not immediately made to feel welcome. No one embraced me warmly, and more than a few faces revealed not a little bit of suspicion as to what my motives were for being there. However, I was given the opportunity to explain myself. After I registered, received my guest pass, and received a short tour with one of the volunteers, I was able to share why I wanted to observe the shelter for a few hours as a component of this school assignment. I told the volunteer assigned to me that I was no stranger to abuse, as I witnessed my mother being abused by men she trusted. Sharing my story with the women at the shelter helped them to trust and understand me. After a short while, the people in the shelter opened up and warmed up to me.

The shelter…… [Read More]

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The Affect Rehabilitation Programs to Help Inmates Upon Release

Words: 3558 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 80786205

Gangs in Prisons in the United States and the Affect Rehabilitation Programs to Help Inmates Upon Release

Prison Gangs are one of the most challenging entities that have to be tackled by the authorities. Their growing influence in the prison setting concerns not just the inside of the prisons, but also the outside world, as when they are released, the members continue causing problems for the society. A lot of rehabilitation programs have been formed in order to provide guidance and a fresh start to the inmates who are released, which helps them overcome their criminal life and lead a normal one. This paper discusses the phenomenon and existence of criminal gangs and how the rehabilitation programs affect them after their release.

Introduction

According to Lyman (1989), a prison gang is a criminal entity made up of special group of chosen prisoners that is governed with some sort of code…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fleisher, M., & Decker, S. (2001). An Overview of the Challenge of Prison Gangs. Corrections Management Quarterly, 1-9.

Gilligan, J. (2012, December 10). Punishment Fails. Rehabilitation Works. Retrieved from New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/roomfordebate/2012/12/18/prison-could-be-productive/punishment-fails-rehabilitation-works

Lyman, M.D. (1989). Gangland. Springfield, IL: Charles C Thomas.

Miceli, V. (2009). Analyzing the Effectiveness of Rehabilitation Programs. Senior Honors Project, 1.
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Family Social Work and Therapy

Words: 1530 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13799151

Vingnettes

Psychology of marriage and family systems

Vignette Three

Considering the text reading assignments, what do you see going on with Phillip and his family?

Given that Phillip was born to a mother who abused alcohol in the past, it is possible that there are physical issues which are affecting his performance in school. Phillip should be screened for learning disabilities and other issues which could inhibit his progress. Phillip is also struggling with issues which make him 'different' from his peers, including the poverty of his household, the fact that he is being shipped from one home to another as the result of his parents' divorce, and the fact that he might receive negative attention because of his mother's LBGT status as well as the fact he is a Native American.

If Phillip is being sexually molested, however, this could be another source of his withdrawal and anxiety, given…… [Read More]

References

Lubell K.M., Lofton T, Singer H.H. (2008). Promoting healthy parenting practices across cultural groups: A CDC Research Brief. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; 2008.

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/images/DVP/Healthy_Parenting_RIB_a.pdf

Lucero, S. (2007). Working with Indian families and child substance abuse challenges. NRC4

Tribes. Retrieved from:  http://www.nrc4tribes.org/files/Urban%20Indian%20guide.pdf