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We have over 66 essays for "Truman Doctrine"

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Truman in Hypothetical Crisis as

Words: 5310 Length: 19 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 62428097

Kennedy recognizes the need to establish a bond with all the South American leaders, thereby isolating Chavez-Chavez politically as ineffective leader in South America. Kennedy perceived the Third orld in terms of the "national military establishment," and vulnerable to the manipulations of the Soviet Union (Schwab, Orrin, 1998, 1). Kennedy had already gone around with Cuba, and did not wish to repeat his mistakes in Venezuela, but he also had no intention of surrendering Venezuela to the Soviet Union in the way in which Cuba had been surrendered before him.

President Kennedy saw South American diplomacy as the route to turning Venezuela away from bonding with the Soviet Union. He recognized that he could not alienate the rest of South America from the United States, or that would drive them into the sphere of Venezuela's influence over them towards the Soviet Union.

Kennedy calls a meeting with Chavez-Chavez, in private,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brown, Seyom. Faces of Power. New York: Columbia University Press, 1994.  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100986354 

Clark, General Wesley K. Waging Modern War: Bosnia, Kosovo, and the Future of Combat. New York: Public Affairs, 2001. Questia. 15 Nov. 2008  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=100986356 .

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=65362550

DeConde, Alexander. A History of American Foreign Policy. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1963. Questia. 15 Nov. 2008  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=65362550 .
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Truman and McCarthy vs Communism

Words: 695 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 94646766

Anti-Communism

For those not familiar with the political spectrum, opposition to Communism as it existed over the 20th century may be a tad confusing or vexing. However, there is certainly rhyme or reason to who opposed Communism and on what grounds that opposition existed. Even if there has been a huge shift in terms of who is liberal and who is conservative over the years, most everyone in power was vocally anti-Communist in the days of Truman and Joe Mccarthy. However, the ways in which that did or did not manifest varied a bit from person to person. While some of the vocal opponents of Communism were on the same side of the political spectrum as the same, there was most certainly a difference and the anti-Communist activities of some, like Mccarthy, were not terribly productive.

Analysis

One thing that has to be said straight off the top is that…… [Read More]

References

Foner, E. (2014). Give me liberty! (1st ed.). New York: W.W. Norton & Co.
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Western Civilization the 1947 Truman

Words: 335 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 35727701

The 1956 Suez Canal Crisis caused an indirect confrontation when America's allies France, Britain, and Israel made an unsuccessful military attempt to take over the Suez Canal from the Soviet Union's ally Egypt. After the U.S.S.. threatened to become militarily involved in the crisis, the U.S. forced its allies to concede defeat.

The 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis occurred after the U.S. discovered that the U.S.S.. had secretly supplied Cuba with nuclear-armed missiles. This discovery was especially alarming because now the U.S.S.. could militarily subdue its rival by easily launching missiles against it. After a naval blockade around Cuba and intense negotiations the U.S.S.. was finally made to remove the missiles in exchange for the U.S. pledge not to overthrow Cuba's Communist regime.

eferences

The Cold War." (N.D) in the Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia Standard 2005 CD.… [Read More]

References

The Cold War." (N.D) in the Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia Standard 2005 CD.
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Kennedy Doctrine and the Cold War in

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 19816699

Kennedy Doctrine and the Cold War

In his inaugural address as the President of the United States on January 1961, John F. Kennedy (popularly called "JFK") delivered a message that directly discussed the United States' official stance regarding its move to implement a foreign policy waging a "cold war" against Communist forces that have been gaining popularity in Asia, South America, and parts of the Middle East during this period. his U.S. foreign policy, popularly called the containment policy against Communism, was the pretext from which the eventual Cold War between Democratic and Communist forces escalated until the 1970s. During this period, JFK was assigned the task of continuing the American legacy of democracy and liberty by promoting a campaign of international alliance and cooperation against the Communist forces. At this point, Communist forces were gaining ground in South America, increasing the threat to both American soil and the country's…… [Read More]

These words communicate the message that the support poor nations might be receiving from the Communist forces such as Russia/Soviet Union (one of the stronger forces promoting Communism worldwide during this time), can be met and equaled by the United States, without sacrificing their liberties and human rights. JFK reiterated that human rights are given by the "hand of God," and not from the "generosity of the state," which characterized the complete control of the state/government under the Communist/Socialist society (Kennedy 1961). The doctrine ended with a reminder to United States allies to cooperate and join forces with the American government in its fight for democracy and freedom, as well as the containment of Communism worldwide. He presented a challenge to the American government's ally nations in "defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger," signaling the serious threat that Communism presented to the U.S. during JFK's term (Kennedy 1961). With its direct reference against Communism and its political and military forces in South America and neighboring countries of the United States, the doctrine had indeed solidified the country's fight against Communism -- albeit diplomatically and without the threat of weapons. It was hoped that the United States could prevent the Cold War with the U.S.S.R. from requiring military action and thankfully the war ended without either side having to fire a single shot.

Analysis of the U.S. government's containment policy during JFK's term as president was, in hindsight, shown to be geo-politically and economically-motivated. Leffler's (1984) explication of the United States' containment policy against Communist nations such as the Soviet Union was mainly a response to protecting U.S. interests in South American nations. During JFK's term, the U.S. had numerous interests in the region, which the author called the country's "strategic sphere," having established an "overseas base, air transit rights" that were beneficial to U.S. national security (Leffler 1984,-page 348). With Communism influencing nations in the South American region, the U.S. stood to lose all these strategic benefits, increasing the risk of its security from a geopolitical standpoint. A similar assessment was developed by Naji and Jawan (2011), who contended that what motivated the U.S. government to contain Communism in the Middle Eastern was not so much about the principles of democracy and freedom, but to protect its economic interests in the oil-rich region, as most of the oil companies are either owned, operated, or supported by U.S. companies (page 206-7). The imperative thing for the government was in keeping control of valuable resources and ensuring that these same resources remained out of the hands of the enemies of the American government.

Considering the effects that the containment policy contributed to international politics and the world order during JFK's time, it can be said that the policy made nations rethink about the world order and status quo as it stood
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Second World War Left the

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36188101

In this sense, Stalin decided to extend his influence and to impose certain types of government in countries such as Poland, Hungry, or omania. The same fate would have had Greece and Turkey as well, should the U.S. not have outlined the Truman Doctrine. It can be said that the doctrine itself was a reaction to the tendency of the soviets to extend their influence.

The Marshall Plan can be seen as the economic component of the Truman Doctrine. It was in fact a set of principles pointed out in 1947 at Harvard by Secretary of State George Marshall (American hetoric, 2008). This economic plan too was designed for cater for the economic needs of eastern countries as well, but seeing that the ussian side considered it to be the mere economic arm of the Truman Doctrine, it forced countries under its occupation to reject this reconstruction aid. In fact…… [Read More]

References

American Rhetoric. "The Marshall Plan 1947." American Rhetoric website. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008 http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/georgecmarshall.html

The Avalon Project. "The Truman Doctrine." Yale University. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008  http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/trudoc.htm
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Contemporary History

Words: 755 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 83499985

marked the history of the world represents the Cold War. It has often been considered as one of the most interesting and at the same time mysterious conflicts in modern history because it did not incur any face-to-face conflict between the two sides, the U.S. And the U.S.S.. However, the conflicts that took place on the sphere of influence determined the way in which the Cold War eventually ended, with the demise of the U.S.S.. And the victory of Western democracies. The historical episode from 1947 (the year of the Truman Doctrine) to 1989-91 (the fall of the Berlin Wall in Eastern Germany and the demise of the U.S.S.. (1989-91) that international theory experts define as the Cold War is however extremely significant for the way in which the aftermath defined the world as we know it today. There are several reasons for this consideration.

Firstly, it must be pointed…… [Read More]

References

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1995.

The Avalon Project. "The Truman Doctrine." The Yale Law School. N.d. Available at  http://avalon.law.yale.edu/20th_century/trudoc.asp
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Contemporary History

Words: 3249 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 55406124

influential factor in the evolution of the international world of politics following the end of World War II was the interrelationship between the United States and the Soviet Union. The conflictive positions between the two states influenced both the evolution of highly dominant states as well as minor governments. The world divided into two military fronts, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) -- 1949, and the Warsaw Pact in 1955. The international relations were dominated by tensions between the East and the West that shaped a conflict of ideological, political, and strategic manner but not military. This bilateral contention has since come to be known as the Cold War. This image of non-conventional warfare was unfamiliar decades of years ago when massacres and slaughterous mayhem was the representative picture of battlefields that most would have associated wars with up until the emergence and unfolding of the Cold War. In 2013,…… [Read More]

Reference List

Arnold, J.R., & Wiener, R. (Eds.). (2012). Cold War: The essential reference guide. Santa Barbara, California, Denver, Colorado, Oxford, England: ABC -- CLIO.

Feng L., & Ruizhuang, Z. (2006). The typologies of realism. Chinese Journal of International Politics, 1(1), 109-134. doi: 10.1093/cjip/pol006.

Hurst, S. (2005). Cold War U.S. foreign policy: Key perspectives. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press Ltd.

Jones, H. (1989). A new kind of war?: America's global strategy and the Truman Doctrine in Greece. Oxford, New York, Toronto, Delhi, Bombay, Calcutta, Madras, Karachi, Kuala Lampur, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, Nairobi, Dar es Salaam, Cape Town, Melbourne, Auckland, Berlin, Ibadan: Oxford University Press.
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Dred Scott V Sanford Decision

Words: 1724 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 96985795



3. In February 1946, the U.. Treasury asked the U.. Embassy in Moscow why the oviet Union was not supporting the newly created World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Kennan wrote the response to these questions, but included a broader base.

4. Initially, the intended audience was the American government, but when the document was published in Foreign Affairs, the audience became the academic and interested public, along with a way to get the message to the populace about the actual motives of the U...R.

5. Kennan was far from being reactionary. He left out specifics on oviet aggression, but was writing based on the actions that he actually observed after World War II, and the signals he received from his diplomatic contacts within the oviet government.

6. The Kennan document, along with the Truman Doctrine, are seen as the basic documents that established U.. foreign policy towards the…… [Read More]

Sources of Soviet Conduct is also known as the "X Article," written by George Kennan who was the Deputy Mission Chief in the Soviet Union between 1944-46. Kennan wrote the article as a telegram, and it was published in Foreign Affairs magazine in July 1947.

2. Kennan's analysis of the Soviet Union states that they do not see the possibility of long-term peaceful coexistence with the capitalist world. Their aim is to advance the socialist cause, and capitalism was a menace to socialism. The U.S.S.R. would continue to build up its client states, and would use controllable Marxists within the capitalistic world as its allies. Further, Soviet aggression was not really aligned with the viewpoints of the Russian people or with the economic reality of the modern world, but more in historic Russian paranoia and xenophobia.

3. In February 1946, the U.S. Treasury asked the U.S. Embassy in Moscow why the Soviet Union was not supporting the newly created World Bank and the International Monetary Fund. Kennan wrote the response to these questions, but included a broader base.

4. Initially, the intended audience was the American government, but when the document was published in Foreign Affairs, the audience became the academic and interested public, along with a way to get the message to the populace about the actual motives of the U.S.S.R.

5. Kennan was far from being reactionary. He left out specifics on Soviet aggression, but was writing based on the actions that he actually observed after World War II, and the signals he received from his diplomatic contacts within the Soviet government.
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Cold War After the End

Words: 1009 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3329396

In fact, many people believe it was the final factor that led to disintegration of Soviet/U.S. relations, and directly led to the failure of the Moscow Conference of foreign ministers in March 1947. The conference had been convened in an attempt for the two powers to come to an agreement about situations in Europe, including whether or not to unify the German state, but with its failure, relations between the two countries became even more strained.

The Marshall Plan followed the Truman Doctrine in 1947, and was an attempt to boost the European economy after the war. Historian Whitcomb writes, "The Marshall Plan was conceived as a 'counter-offensive' to Moscow's moves in Eastern Europe and as a reaction to Stalin's decision, registered at the Moscow Conference, to rebuff all gestures of compromise looking toward settlement of the problems dividing Europe" (Whitcomb 84). It was an attempt to rebuild Europe instead…… [Read More]

References

Powaski, Ronald E. The Cold War: The United States and the Soviet Union, 1917-1991. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

Whitcomb, Roger S. The Cold War in Retrospect: The Formative Years. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1998.
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Seeds of the Cold War

Words: 1368 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 70341826

Strangely, America's role as policeman in Europe actually led to its becoming involved in military conflicts in Southeast Asia. Although the U.S. did not fight the Soviet Union directly in Korea or Vietnam, both conflicts were due to the U.S.'s policy of defeating the spread of Communism no matter where it might occur. Fears of escalation during both the Korean and Vietnam conflicts caused the U.S. To adopt a military strategy that favored limited warfare (Brodie).

The Cold ar had a tremendous impact on the growth of the United States as an industrial and world military power. America's presence throughout the world militarily and the dependence of estern Europe and Japan on the American economy for the sustenance of their own economies caused America's political and economic influence to expanded substantially. Beginning with the Berlin airlift (Reeves) where the United States provided food and other vital items to est Berliners…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Brodie, Bernard. War and Politics. New York: Macmillan Co., 1973.

Comstock, Douglas A. "NASA's Legacy of Technology Transfer and Prospects for Future Benefits." AIAA Space Conference & Exposition. Long Beach, CA: American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2007. 1-9.

Cox, M. "The Cold War as a system." Critique (1986): 17-82.

Lieber, Keir A. "The Rise of U.S. Nuclear Primacy." Foreign Affairs (2006): 42-67.
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Evolution of U S Foreign Policy

Words: 400 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39888462

Evolution of U.S. oreign Policy under Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon towards the Soviet Union

oreign Policy towards the Soviet Union under Presidents Truman through to Nixon (1945-1974) was characterized by the "Cold War" -- a period of heightened tension between the two 'super powers' of the world. Even while being constrained by the compulsions of the 'Cold War,' the relations between the two countries gradually evolved into a less hostile association under successive U.S. Presidents in this period.

Harry Truman who became the U.S. President towards the end of World War II was the architect of the policy of containment of the Communism, led by the Soviet Union, around the world enshrined in the 'Truman Doctrine.' He was also instrumental in establishing a strong Western alliance called NATO in Europe that checked Soviet designs beyond Eastern Europe. Eisenhower continued with his predecessors' policy of "containment" without direct…… [Read More]

Foreign Policy towards the Soviet Union under Presidents Truman through to Nixon (1945-1974) was characterized by the "Cold War" -- a period of heightened tension between the two 'super powers' of the world. Even while being constrained by the compulsions of the 'Cold War,' the relations between the two countries gradually evolved into a less hostile association under successive U.S. Presidents in this period.

Harry Truman who became the U.S. President towards the end of World War II was the architect of the policy of containment of the Communism, led by the Soviet Union, around the world enshrined in the 'Truman Doctrine.' He was also instrumental in establishing a strong Western alliance called NATO in Europe that checked Soviet designs beyond Eastern Europe. Eisenhower continued with his predecessors' policy of "containment" without direct confrontation with the Soviet Union. While he extended U.S. aid and protection to South Vietnam to prevent it from being over-run by the Communists, he did not intervene when the U.S.S.R. crushed an uprising in Hungary in 1956 to avoid a nuclear confrontation. President Kennedy displayed great courage to force the Soviet Union from deploying nuclear weapons in Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1961 but later signed a limited nuclear test ban treaty with the U.S.S.R., which cooled down the Cold War temperature somewhat. President Johnson, though bogged down by the escalating Vietnam War, sought to improve relations with the Soviet Union and managed to attain its co-operation in containing the 1967 Arab-Israeli War. Finally, Nixon pursued a policy of detente (based on "realist" rather than "moral" principles) in the 1970s and developed more cordial relations with the Soviet Union. This resulted in signing of important anti-ballistic missile (ABM) and SALT treaties between the two super-powers and lowered the Cold War tensions.

As we saw in this essay, the relations between the U.S. And the U.S.S.R. were by no means static in the post World War II period until the mid-seventies. Although involved in an intense ideological struggle during the Cold War, they managed to avoid direct confrontation and even improved their relations. This was owed in no small measure to the wise foreign policy of the U.S. presidents from Truman down to Nixon.
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Cold War the Heightened Tension

Words: 1786 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 34908440

S. administration after Truman's adopted Kennan's policy of 'containment' or its variation as a cornerstone of their foreign policy right until the eventual collapse of Communism in 1989. ("Kennan and Containment" n.d.)

eferences

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- an International History. New York: Oxford University Press

George F. Kennan on the Web" (2005). History Politics and Future. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/2496/future/kennan.html

Historian Walter Lefeber on Truman's Soviet Policy." (2000). PBS Online. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/truman/filmmore/it_1.html

Kennan and Containment." (n.d.) Bureau of Public Affairs: U.S. Department of State. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/cwr/17601.htm

Legvold, . (2005). "Cold War." Article in Encyclopedia Encarta Online. etrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569374/Cold_War.html#p11

While the U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty and capitalism, the U.S.S.. was committed to the spread of the communist revolution among the 'down-trodden' masses of the world

The USS had…… [Read More]

References

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- an International History. New York: Oxford University Press

George F. Kennan on the Web" (2005). History Politics and Future. Retrieved on May 28, 2005 at http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/2496/future/kennan.html

Historian Walter Lefeber on Truman's Soviet Policy." (2000). PBS Online. Retrieved on May 28, 2005 at  http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/truman/filmmore/it_1.html 

Kennan and Containment." (n.d.) Bureau of Public Affairs: U.S. Department of State. Retrieved on May 28, 2005 at  http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/cwr/17601.htm
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Rise of China Case Study

Words: 2059 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 30150474

rise of China in terms of its economy and military capability and in relation to the United States of America's national interest. Thou many have viewed this to be a threat to the U.S., but it isn't so, particularly to its' national interest with respect to China.

Despite of the fact that currently the relationship that exists between the U.S. And China is not as good as compared to the one that exited with the Bush administration, both countries have to work jointly in matters where they both have common interest. The research recommends that the U.S. foreign policy towards China be one that's aimed at seeking cooperation between both countries which will at the end be able to secure U.S. national interest with respect to China (Walt, 1998, p 41).

U.S. national interest in China

eferring to reports published by the Commission on America's National Interests; the reports indicate…… [Read More]

References

Bergsten, F.C, Freeman C, Lardy, N., Mitchell, D, J (2008). China's Rise: Challenges and opportunities Washington, D.C.: Peterson Institute for international Economics, pp256

Hassedt, P.G. (2004).Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy NY:132 west,31st street. Chapter one

Lampton D.M.(2008). The Three Faces of Chinese Power: Might, Money and Minds Berkeley: University of California Press .pp 361

Ross. R. Feng, Z. (2008)China's Ascent: Power, Security and the future of international politics, NY:Cornell University Press. pp 336
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Vietnam Conflict

Words: 2292 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 81975977

More often than not, the plan of containment has been used to describe U.S. foreign policy. It is equally frequently traced back to the achievements of President Truman with regard to the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

In 1950, there was a shift in foreign U.S. policy after President Truman moved from passive to active containment by signing the top-secret policy plan NSC-68. It took a much more drastic approach towards the spread of Communism, which according to the new twist, claimed that Russia was en route for the domination of the world. It should be noted however that the doctrine had some major weaknesses and was repeatedly subject to contradictory interpretations. This may have led several other presidents and policy makers to toy with it at will. It could also very well explain some of the many long involvements of the U.S. In diverse wars and…… [Read More]

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7 Michael O'Malley, "The Vietnam War and the Tragedy of Containment."

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American History War and Peace

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 71210415

As was the nature of the Cold ar, the United States responded by quashing new governments that were likely to lead to communism, even where this constituted an undemocratic or even brutal instituted government (Kort 80).

Democratically elected officials from Brazil, Guyana, and Uruguay were overthrown by internal revolutionaries who were funded and trained by American forces (Parenti 44). These and other leaders and governments in Latin America were targeted by American forced as having communist leanings. Foreign policy followed, with more than two decades of the Cold ar focusing not only on the major publicized events of Korea and the Soviet Union, but on many small, third world countries. These small nations were poised to become players in the larger Cold ar struggle depending on where their allegiance and governments ended up after declaring their independence. ith the Soviet Union attempting to exert force and pressure on the United…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Eisenhower, Dwight D. Inaugural Address. Washington, D.C. 20 Jan. 1953.

Geertz, Clifford. "What Was the Third World Revolution?" Dissent 52.1 (2005): 35-45.

Freidel, Frank. Roosevelt. New York: Little Brown and Company, 1990.

Kort, Michael G. The Cold War. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press, 1994.
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Culture Behind Americans at War

Words: 5158 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 82646531

American Way of War

The history of the American Way of War is a transitional one, as Weigley shows in his landmark work of the same name. The strategy of war went from, under Washington, a small scale, elude and survive set of tactics practiced by what seem today to be relatively "quaint" militias, to -- in the 20th century -- a full-scale operation known as "total war." True, "total war" was not a concept invented by the Americans in the 20th century. The North eventually practiced "total war" against the Confederates when Sherman's campaign left utter destruction of civilian territory in its wake. The ancient Romans practiced it when, under the direction of Cato, they destroyed Carthage because its mere existence, they felt, posed a threat to their prosperity. In the 20th century, however, "total war" received an enormous boost of technical support when the inventors of the atom…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Butler, Smedley. War is a Racket. LA: Feral House, 2003.

Chollet, Derek and James Goldgeier. America Between the Wars. NY: Public Affairs,

2009.

Debs, Eugene. "Anti-War Speech," 16 June 1918. Web.
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Strategic Value of Nuclear Weapons

Words: 2365 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 16285953



Nuclear weapons became a tool of American policy that goes far beyond protection of national interests, for American national interests depend on the propagation of American ideals. The United States is, in the words of Harold Lasswell, a "garrison state;" a crusading nation that seeks to combat all enemies real and imagined and to remake the world in its own image. (Flint 86-87) Under the new doctrine, nuclear strategy becomes a means of enforcing an ideology - all dissent, or supposed dissent, is rooted out through the threat of ultimate and complete destruction. Terrorism is made the defining characteristic of immorality. States that support terrorism become the ultimate evildoers. The Bush Administration redefined international relations in terms of an axis of good led by the United States and its allies, and an axis of evil consisting preeminently of Iraq, Iran, and North Korea and their terrorist associates. Alone among these…… [Read More]

References

Botti, Timothy J. Ace in the Hole: Why the United States Did Not Use Nuclear Weapons in the Cold War, 1945 to 1965. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1996.

Flint, Colin, ed. The Geography of War and Peace: From Death Camps to Diplomats. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

Hilsman, Roger. From Nuclear Military Strategy to a World without War: A History and a Proposal. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 1999.

Hirschbein, Ron. Massing the Tropes: The Metaphorical Construction of American Nuclear Strategy. Westport, CT: Praeger Security International, 2005.
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Origins of Cold War

Words: 4564 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 40509353



As a matter of fact, by the end of 1980s, Soviet Union ran on these very principles.

Kennan criticized the possibilities that Soviets may be involved in invading the pro-Soviet countries with their mind sets and weaken them even if they do not form a higher level of apprehension for them.

Pro-ussian countries will be weakened through a designed framework to tackle the mindsets of the people following western ideologies.

Fights will be sparked in the countries where both countries have western ideologies

Soviet policies will be a negative framework destructive in nature, clearing their path with whatever that comes onto them that they don't like (ussell, 2000).

Kennan was afraid that communism will overshadow the governments of the West but that never happened. At least not to the extent that it was feared by Kennan. Britain and mostly America was afraid of the way communist were taking over and…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, David L., Trapped by Success, New York: Columbia University Press, (1991), p. xi.

Bennett, Edward M., Franklin D. Roosevelt and the. Search for Security: American-Soviet Relations, 1933 -- 1939, Wilmington, Delaware: Scholarly Resources, (1985), p. 24.

Brinkley, D., Dean Acheson: The Cold War Years, 1953 -- 71, New Haven: Yale University Press, (1994), p. 76.

Eisele, A., George Kennan Speaks Out About Iraq, History News Network, (2002), Accessed 24-11-11 from  http://hnn.us/articles/997.html
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Why Did the United States Went to War in Korea

Words: 2312 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 57878412

Korean War, just like most other wars in history did not occur in a vacuum. It started because of the North Korean attack on the South Koreans with the belief that they would be able to win the war and communize the whole Korean peninsula (Chang, 2010). The confidence of North Koreans in their ability to win the fight against the South was not based on hope, but on the intense confidence that it will be an easy victory for the North Korean forces in the war (Chang, 2010). As a matter of fact, the North Korean forces were far more superior to the forces of the South in every category of the fighting abilities and capabilities (Chang, 2010). They were well armed with very heavy weapons and equipment the Soviet Union supplied, adequately trained by the cautious guidance of Soviet military education and training personnel, vastly reinforced with the…… [Read More]

References

Boose, Donald W. (1995). Portentous Sideshow: The Korean Occupation Decision. Volume 5, Number 4. Winter 1995-96. Parameters. U.S. Army War College Quarterly. pp. 112-29. OCLC 227845188.

Creative Commons Attribution. (n.d.). Korean War. Retrieved from:  http://saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Korean-War.pdf 

Devine, Robert A.; Breen, T. H.; Frederickson, George M.; liams, R. Hal; Gross, Adriela J.; Brands, H.W. (2007). America Past and Present 8th Ed. Volume II: Since 1865. Pearson Longman. pp. 819-21. ISBN 0-321-44661-5.

Doug Bandow. (2010). The Role and Responsibilities of the United States in the Korean War: Critical Foreign Policy Decisions by the Truman and Eisenhower Administrations. International Journal of Korean Studies. Vol. XIV, No. 2.
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U S Foreign Affairs Since 1898

Words: 3090 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 8617183

President Johnson became even more fearful of a communist take-over.

In 1964, when two American ships were attacked by the North Vietnamese in the Gulf of Tonkin "the American Senate gave Johnson the power to give armed support to assist any country requesting help in defense of its freedom," effectively beginning the Vietnam War without a formal declaration of war (BBC 2009). The wide-scale bombing of the North in 'Operation olling Thunder' began in February 1965. By March 1965, the first American ground troops had landed in South Vietnam and by December 1965, there were 150,000 servicemen stationed in the country (BBC 2009).

ichard Nixon was elected to the presidency in 1968, promising a policy of Vietnamization or the taking-over of the war against the North by native Vietnamese troops. However, it would be four more years before substantial withdrawals of American servicemen occurred. Nixon also supported dictators in Laos…… [Read More]

References

An overview of the crisis. (1997). The Cuban Missile Crisis. Crisis Center. Thinkquest.

Retrieved January 1, 2009 at http://library.thinkquest.org/11046/days/index.html

The Berlin Airlift. (2010). Cold War Museum. Retrieved January 1, 2009 at  http://www.coldwar.org/articles/40s/berlin_airlift.asp 

Chang, Laurence & Peter Kornbluh. (1998). A national security archive documents reader.
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Cold War Begin The Beginning

Words: 2033 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 36620482

Nuclear confrontation between the two superpowers was profoundly frightening, not just for those who would have borne the full brunt of any nuclear exchange... But for the international community as a whole. Quite literally, the prospect of nuclear war constituted a threat of truly global dimensions. (O'Neil A. 2004)

There are many other important aspects that mark the beginning of the Cold War Era. One was the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or NATO in 1949. NATO as a joint military group was created to "... defend against Soviet forces in Europe." (Cold War) The first members of NATO were Belgium, Britain, Canada, Denmark, France, Iceland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Portugal, and the United States. (Cold War) A similar organization was formed by the Soviet Union and its east European allies known as the Warsaw Pact. This also serves to emphasize the entrenchment of the Cold War into…… [Read More]

References

Cold War. Retrieved June 3, 2006, at  http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/ops/cold_war.htm 

Harry S, Truman and the War Scare of 1948. Retrieved June 3, 2006, at http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/USAtrumanD.htm

McGowan M. (2005) American society is in dire need of a wake-up call: Award Would Honor Veterans Who Fought for Freedom against Iron Curtain. Retrieved June 3, 2006, at  http://www.globalsecurity.org/org/news/2005/050713-veteran-award.htm 

O'Neil A. (2004) Keeping the contemporary threat environment in perspective. Retrieved June 4, 2006, at  http://www.australianreview.net/digest/2004/05/oneil.html
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Gi Bill Do It Provided Health Care

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Book Review Paper #: 61051895

GI Bill do?

It provided health care to wounded veterans of World War II.

It allowed American veterans of World War II to go to college free and to obtain low-interest mortgages.

It gave American veterans a pension so that they would not have to work.

It permitted the families of servicemen killed in the war to receive compensation.

It made all veterans exempt from taxation.

How did the United States respond to the Soviet blockade of West Berlin in 1948?

It used an airlift to resupply West Berlin.

It threatened to launch a preemptive nuclear war.

It allowed West Berlin to become part of East Germany.

It permitted the Soviet Union to participate in the government of West Berlin.

It exchanged the right to West Berlin for access to Prague.

President Harry Truman developed the Truman Doctrine in 1947 because he wanted to give European countries economic assistance.

rebuild…… [Read More]

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European in Both the Spanish

Words: 1999 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 23852597

After the statement of the Truman Doctrine in 1947, both Greece and Turkey were provided with aid to counter the Soviet threat.

When the war ended, circumstances in Greece were unfavorable to the maintenance of civil peace:

EAM was in control of nearly all Greece. Its leaders numbered many excellent liberals, the most eminent being Professor Svolos, a Socialist; but the Communists were clearly dominant. The returning Greek army was under the control of rabid, uncompromising monarchist officers... Had the issue of Greek sovereignty been left to these two Greek forces, there is no doubt of the outcome. The ineffectiveness of the returned Greek monarchist army was shown when, at the end of 1944, civil war broke out in Greece. ELAS surrounded the monarchist army and immobilized it from the outset.

However, they were not left to their own devices, and instead they were influenced by outside forces from ritain…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Anderson, Paul, "Why Did the Spanish Civil War Start in July 1936?" History Review 48(2004), 36-40.

Bolloten, Burnett. The Spanish Revolution: The Left and the Struggle for Power during the Civil War. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: University of North Carolina Press, 1979.

Kousoulas, Dimitrios G. The Price of Freedom: Greece in World Affairs, 1939?1953. Syracuse, New York: Syracuse University Press, 1953.

Smith, Howard K. The State of Europe. New York: Knopf, 1949.
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U S Intelligence by Seeking an

Words: 2050 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 74091545

In 1953, Congress amended the National Security Act to provide for the appointment of a Deputy Director of the CIA by the President with Senate's advice and consent. Commissioned officers of the armed forces, active or retired, could not occupy the top two positions at the same time (CIA).

Intelligence Reform Needed

Countless reorganizations of the intelligence community since the end of the Cold War have not produced satisfactory results (Harris 2002). U.S. intelligence counterterrorist programs have certainly made record achievements, such as the thwarting of planned attacks on New York's Lincoln and Holland tunnels in 1993 and against airports on the West Coast in the eve of the millennium. ut reforms are quite needed. The first is to provide warning. The most difficult task of the intelligence officer is to provide warning. The intelligence community also needs a more risk-taking and failure-tolerant management approach. Safeguarding national security means putting…… [Read More]

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BBC. Bush Pledge Over U.S. Intelligence. BBC News: British Broadcasting Company,

2009. Retrieved on May 29, 2009 from  http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4396457.stm 

CIA. History of the CIA. Central Intelligence Agency, 2007. Retrieved on May 30, 2009cia.html"  http://www.cia.gov/kids-page/6-12th - grade/operation-history/history-of-the-cia.html

Harris, James W. The Path to Intelligence Reform: "Changes in the Intelligence Craft
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Policy of Containment After World

Words: 427 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 87995523

The Soviets desire to establish their "sphere of influence" in Eastern Europe and disagreement with the U.S. over the fate of Germany was another reason. The U.S. retaliated by issuing the Truman Doctrine in 1947 that authorized U.S. aid to anti-Communist forces in countries threatened by Communists. The Soviet testing of the atomic bomb in 1949 and its tacit approval of a North Korean attack on South Korea that led to the Korean War further soured relations between the two nations. The Vietnam War in which the U.S. intervened militarily to prevent a Communist take-over of the country was another area of conflict between the U.S. And the Soviet Union. (Bell, 2001)

eferences

Containment." (2006). Nuclear Files.org: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. etrieved on November 18, 2006 at http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-containment.htm

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- An International History. London: Oxford University Press Inc.

The U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty…… [Read More]

References

Containment." (2006). Nuclear Files.org: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Retrieved on November 18, 2006 at  http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-containment.htm 

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- An International History. London: Oxford University Press Inc.

The U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty and capitalism, while the U.S.S.R. was the first Marxist state committed to a command economy and the spread of the communist revolution around the world
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European Union Member States Relations With Their Overseas Territories

Words: 17554 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 16781713

political framework of EU and OCT

European Union (EU) and Overseas Countries and Territories (OCTs) are in association with each other via a system which is based on the provisions of part IV of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU (TFEU), consisting of detailed rules and measures which are laid down in the document issued on 27th November 2001 title Oversees Association Decision. The expiry date of this association decision is 31st December 2013. Stress has been laid down by the European Council in its conclusions issued on 22nd December 2009 that the relationship between OCT and EU should continuously be updated in order to reflect latest developments not only in EU and OCT but thorough out the world. The commission has also been encouraged to make revisions to the Overseas Association Decision and present it in front of the council prior to July 2012 (Hill et al.,…… [Read More]

References

Agnew John, "Geopolitics re-vision world politics," Routledge Taylor & Francies Group, pp 1-5

Alan Taylor, American Colonies: New York: Viking, 2001, pp. 57 -- 8.

Baldwin, David. Ed. Neo-Realism And Neoliberalism: The Contemporary Debate, New York: Columbia University Press, 1993.

Balzacq, T. (Ed.). Understanding securitization theory. The design and evolution of security problems. Oxon: Routledge, 2010.
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US as an International Peace-Keeping Force

Words: 1328 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39908156

U.S. ole as 'Policemen of the World'

Thesis and Outline Draft

Introduction and Thesis

currently holds the most important and influential role in international politics and represents a decisive player in all recent international conflicts. This role takes the form of political and military interventions, international and bilateral engagements as well as multilateral brokerage of peace talks. The basic principles of such an approach are the fostering of peaceful, democratic, and secure international environment. At the same time though, it must be pointed out that the entire international community does not always support such actions and often it has been said that the United States acts as the "policeman of the world" (Kissinger, 1995). It must be stressed that the current approach the United States have on foreign policy has not changed since the end of the Civil War and has guided the U.S. In military and political interventions in…… [Read More]

References

Calvocoressi, P. (1987) World politics since 1945. New York: Longman.

Federal News Service (2013) "America is not the world's policeman: Text of Barack Obama's speech on Syria," Associated Press, available online at  http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/america-is-not-the-world-s-policeman-text-of-barack-obama-s-speech-on-syria-417077 

Kissinger, H. (1995) Diplomacy. London: Simon & Schuster.

Shahshahani, A. And Corina Mullin (2012) "The legacy of U.S. intervention and the Tunisian revolution: promises and challenges one year on," Interface: a journal for and about social movements, Volume 4 (1): 67 -- 101, available online at  http://www.interfacejournal.net/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Interface-4-1-Shahshahani-and-Mullin.pdf
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U S & Vietnam War President

Words: 586 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15733339

freedom. The South Vietnamese anti-communist leaders were dictators, not democrats, and had been allied with the wildly unpopular French, then with the Americans. In contrast, the National Liberation Front (NLF) or 'Viet Cong' (as it was called by the Americans) had deep, longstanding support in the Vietnamese countryside. American military decision-makers proved unable to process this fact, given that they viewed Vietnam through its own biases, not through the eyes of the Vietnamese.

The method of America's military entry into Vietnam was also disastrous: Eisenhower and Kennedy's gradual increase of American advisors and military support enabled the public to ignore the gradual escalation, as well as America's political alliance with the unpopular anticommunist, South Vietnamese leader Ngo Dinh Diem (who was ultimately assassinated). The American public also did not understand the situation in Vietnam as a compelling national security interest -- it was just a far-off land in the eyes…… [Read More]

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Cold War Economic Fear Caused by Two

Words: 348 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 39033200

Cold War

Economic fear caused by two vastly different ideologies, communism and capitalism, was a major factor promoting America's distrust of Russia and the subsequent Cold War. The spread of communism was viewed as a threat to American businesses who already felt vulnerable because of the Great Depression in the 1930s. Things came to a head after Stalin publicly emphasized capitalist ill-will and hostility by claiming that capitalism harbored elements of general crisis and armed conflict. As a result, Truman became irate and adopted a tougher line instead of continued compromise, prompting the United States not to recognize Rumania and ulgaria, to insist on internalization of waterways such as the Kiel Canal, the Rhine-Danube and the lack Sea Straits, to try to control Japan and the Pacific, and to attempt to create a strong central government in China and Korea.

The Americans were also threatened by what it perceived to…… [Read More]

Bibliography

'The Cold War." Available: http://mars.wnec.edu/~grempel/courses/wc2/lectures/coldwar.html (Accessed 24 Apr. 2005).

"The Cold War: Causes." Available: http://thc.worldarcstudio.com/classroom_20040211_JB/gcse/cold_war.htm (Accessed 24 Apr. 2005).

"The Cold War." Available: http://mars.wnec.edu/~grempel/courses/wc2/lectures/coldwar.html (Accessed 24 Apr. 2005).

"The Cold War: Causes." Available: http://thc.worldarcstudio.com/classroom_20040211_JB/gcse/cold_war.htm (Accessed 24 Apr. 2005).
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Internet in Response to the

Words: 3019 Length: 11 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 61803821

This lead was accomplished through a partnership nearly a half-century old among government, industry and academia. I member of that partnership was the National Science Foundation (NSF). As Strawn noted, early on, scientists and engineers at American universities began to join the young APANet, as they worked on basic research funded primarily by the NSF. Acknowledging this, the NSF began supporting national supercomputing centers, in the mid-1980s, as a means of giving American scientists, engineers, and students greater access to high-performance computing that was state of the art, and developed Computer Science Network (CSNET).

Creation of these national supercomputer centers by NSF was critical to the development of the Internet. To further enhance U.S. scientists' access to these centers, NSF established the NSFNET national backbone network that connected the NSF supercomputing centers to U.S. universities. NSF also promoted the creation of regional networks to connect colleges and universities to the…… [Read More]

References

Bellis, M. Inventors of the Modern Computer. 2007. About.com. November 7, 2007  http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa091598.htm .

Brief History of the Internet. 10 Dec 2003. Internet Society. November 7, 2007  http://www.isoc.org/internet/history/brief.shtml .

Cold War. 2003. National Park Service. November 7, 2007  http://www.nps.gov/archive/elro/glossary/cold-war.htm .

DARPA Over the Years. 27 Oct 2003. DARPA. November 7, 2007  http://www.darpa.mil/body/overtheyears.html .
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Policy Was the Open Door

Words: 1503 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 80252845

com. 2007. February 26, 2007. http://www.answers.com/topic/open-door-policy-1

Stueck, illiam hitney. The Road to Confrontation: American Policy toward China and Korea, 1947-1950. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981.

Tsou, Tang. America's Failure in China, 1941-50. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1963.

The facility of most-favored-nation was later extended by the Chinese to other foreign powers as well.

Although most countries did not formally agree with the "Open Door Policy," John Hay went on to unilaterally declare that they had endorsed the policy.

This consisted of an oil embargo and freezing of Japanese assets in the months preceding the Pearl Harbor attacks

The Americans had also misjudged the ideological commitment of the Chinese communists and over-estimated the pro-American among the Chinese masses, believing that any Chinese government (even a Communist one) would remain friendly with the Americans. Such misplaced optimism continues to be the Achilles heel of the U.S. foreign office:…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Open Door Policy." Encyclopedia of American Foreign Policy: Answers.com. 2007. February 26, 2007.  http://www.answers.com/topic/open-door-policy-1 

Stueck, William Whitney. The Road to Confrontation: American Policy toward China and Korea, 1947-1950. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1981.

Tsou, Tang. America's Failure in China, 1941-50. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1963.

The facility of most-favored-nation was later extended by the Chinese to other foreign powers as well.
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Marshall Plan and Its Results

Words: 2005 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62870344

The military dictatorship simply favored specific economic interests, notably large tourist enterprises, urban real estate and construction, and shipowners. The basic weaknesses of the Greek economy, including social inequities and the lack of competitiveness in the country's new manufacturing sector, remained untreated. They would resurface in acute form with the world economic crisis of the early 1970s (Postwar ecovery (http://greece.russiansabroad.com/country_page.aspx?page=146)."

The initial reaction by Greek politicians was not to accept the aid by the United States as they believed it would make the United States hold to much power over the nation, but it was not long before the political powers realized if they did not take part in the plan they may find themselves at the mercy of communist advances so they accepted the plan and its benefits.

CONCLUSION

The Marshall Plan was a plan designed by George Marshall and was intended to help the devastated nations in Europe…… [Read More]

References

Marshall Plan

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Plan 

THE MARSHALL PLAN (1947)

http://usinfo.state.gov/usa/infousa/facts/democrac/57.htm
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Lessons From Vietnam the Concept of Cross-Cultural

Words: 1210 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74973510

Lessons From Vietnam

The concept of cross-cultural capability is a relatively new area of study in the academic world, even though we have known for years that a number of issues might have been better resolved with a greater understanding and sensitive towards other cultures. The term itself applies to human behavior in a number of dimensions -- psychologically, sociologically, certainly political, and cultural. This phenomenon of cultural misunderstanding was quite apparent in the post-World War II conflicts, particularly that of the regional conflicts in Vietnam post-1950 (Killick, 1999).

Many of the diplomatic and cultural issues surrounding the Vietnam Conflict were a result of a Cold War mentality. The Cold War, not really a war, but more a preparation for conflict, was the tensions between the U.S.S.. And Allies (Warsaw Pact) and the U.S. And Allies (NATO). One side held that America was economically and militarily aggressive after World War…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

The Vietnam War. (2006). The History Channel. Retrieved from:  http://www.history.com  / topics/vietnam-war

Belmonte, L. (2010). Selling the American Way -- U.S. Propaganda and the Cold War. Pittsburg, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Damms, Richard, (2001), The Eisenhower Presidency, 1953-1961, New York: Longman.

Davidson, P. (1991), Vietnam At War: The History, 1946-1975. New York: Norton.
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Post War Iraq a Paradox in the Making Legitimacy vs Legality

Words: 14187 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57694954

Post War Iraq: A Paradox in the Making: Legitimacy vs. legality

The regulations pertaining to the application of force in International Law has transformed greatly from the culmination of the Second World War, and again in the new circumstances confronting the world in the aftermath of the end of the Cold War. Novel establishments have been formed, old ones have withered away and an equally enormous quantity of intellectual writing has studied this, which is debatably the most significant sphere of international law. Any discussion on the lawful use of armed force ought to start with the United Nations Charter. The Charter redefined understanding of the legitimacy of the application of force by outlining situations under which it is allowed.1

The guiding theory of the Charter is affirmed in its Preamble that armed forces should not be used except in the general interest. Article 2(4) of the Charter preserves this…… [Read More]

References

Bailey, Sydney D. Four Arab-Israeli Wars and the Peace Process. Palgrave: Macmillan, 1990

Barber, Benjamin. Fear's Empire: War, Terrorism and Democracy. W.W. Norton and Company, 2003

Barton, F.D; Crocker, B. Winning the Peace in Iraq. Washington Quarterly Volume: 26, Number: 2. Spring 2003, pp. 7-22.

Bijl, Nick van der. Nine Battles to Stanley. Pen and Sword Books, 1999
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Interventionism From the Perspective of Realism vs

Words: 13409 Length: 44 Pages Document Type: Case Study Paper #: 80916514

interventionism from the perspective of realism vs. idealism. Realism is defined in relationship to states national interests whereas idealism is defined in relation to the UNs Responsibility to Protect doctrine -- a doctrine heavily influenced by Western rhetoric over the past decade. By addressing the question of interventionism from this standpoint, by way of a case study of Libya and Syria, a picture of the realistic implications of "humanitarian intervention" becomes clear. Idealistically, humanitarian interventionism is a process that stops atrocities and establishes peace and prosperity. Realistically, interventionism allows Western businesses to reap the spoils of destabilization -- as has been seen in Libya with the Libyan oil fields being claimed by Western oil companies -- and as is being seen in Syria, with the threat of invasion bound to have detrimental effects on the construction of a new pipeline that bypasses the Turkey-Israel pipeline. Syria also presents itself as…… [Read More]

'Violent chaos': Libya in deep crisis 2 years since rebels took over', 2013, RT, 26 Aug.

Available from . [24 Aug 2013].

Weiner, T 2008, Legacy of Ashes, Anchor Books, NY.
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The Morality of Dropping Atomic Bomb on Japan

Words: 1054 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65804828

Anscombe and Truman’s Decision to Drop the Bomb
As G.E.M. Anscombe notes in his essay criticizing Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the intention was “to kill the innocent as a means to an end” (3)—the end being the unconditional surrender of the Japanese and the termination of WWII in terms favorable to the West. The question of whether those means were moral meets with another question: whether the desired end of the West could have been achieved by any other means. Anscombe points out that Truman’s policy to make war on the innocent stood out in stark contrast to his earlier policy of ensuring that “civil populations would not be attacked” (1). With the war almost at an end, Truman decided to show the full force of American military might and detonate two atomic bombs over Japan. The act was merciless and oriented towards…… [Read More]

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Killing Zone Critical Discussion of

Words: 631 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 78080799



The second motive behind the internationalist actions was a desire for control. This is especially seen in Kennedy's reaction to Guatemala. By the mid-1960's, Guatemala had finally begun creating an independent government. hat's more, the people even wanted to have an open election. However, Kennedy caught wind of a threat by the former dictator Arevalo, who planned to re-enter the country and run in the election. Instead of trusting the people to elect the right leader, Kennedy reacted in fear and used American military and intelligence to rig the election in favor of a civilian leader (Rabe 56) and a military independent of that government.

The third motive, and one that is rarely considered, behind the assaults on Latin America was imperialism. Prior to the cold war, America kept its own boundaries safe and nothing else. It only went to war when absolutely necessary and did not concern itself with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Cottam, Martha. Images and Intervention: U.S. Policies in Latin America. University of Pittsurgh Press, 1994.

Holden, Robert H. & Zolov, Eric. Latin America and the United States: A Documentary History. Oxford University Press, 2000.
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U S Foreign Policy and the

Words: 956 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 42976300

8 billion. The Occupation authorities also helped the Japanese government overcome postwar economic chaos, especially rampant inflation, by balancing the government budget, raising taxes and imposing price and wage freezes, and resuming limited foreign trade" (Kesselman et al., 203). The U.S. aid not only helped to rebuild the country, but also ensured that Japan was stable enough so that renegade seedlings of Communism or comparable institutions didn't suddenly flourish. The United States should sue this wise historical strategy that it deftly employed to help the economies of poorer nations in the Middle East. hen people are living in poverty, this makes them ripe breeding grounds for terrorism to build and people to be brainwashed by doctrines which vilify the est. Furthermore the United States should invest money in developing educational programs in the Middle East, so that the citizens there can actually envision a real future for themselves, without having…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bryne, P.J. The Chinese Revolution: The Triumph of Communism. Minneapolis: Compass Point

Books, 2007.

Kesselman, M., Krieger, J. And Joseph, W. Introduction to Comparative Politics. Boston:

Wadsworth Learnign, 2013.
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Joint Staff Officer Within the Structure of

Words: 839 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29984267

Joint Staff Officer

Within the structure of the military, there are a group of trained officers and personnel that have the responsibility for the administrative, operational and logistical needs of the unit. These officers are a direct liaison to the commander and, for reasons of logistics and efficiency, focus on many of the day-to-day issues that the organization requires.

Staff Officers are essential to military operation by supporting the policies and procedures of the military organization as well as acting as a knowledge base for individual commanders. Ideally, an experienced Staff Officer performs seven major functions: 1) ecoming an expert on the commander's policies and aiding in their implementation; 2) Acting as a knowledge base in keeping the commander informed; 3) Assisting or developing organizational plans; 4) Acting in a strategic manner by drafting tentative plans that anticipate future requirements; 5) Actively translating plans into orders and moving down the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barlow., J. From Hot War to Cold. (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press), 2009.

Carpenter. S. The Joint Officer: A Professional Specialist. Joint Force Quarterly. 63 (4Q): 2011. Retrieved from:  http://www.ndu.edu/press/lib/images/jfq-63/JFQ63_125-131_Carpenter.pdf 

Donnelly, W. Professionalism and the Officer Personnel Management System. Military Review., May-June 2013, p. 16. Retrieved from:

 http://usacac.army.mil/CAC2/MilitaryReview/ Archives/English/MilitaryReview_20130630_art006.pdf" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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How the Past Shapes the Present

Words: 2025 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79089138

Worth Remembering

The past is not something that stays in the past. It reaches out and extends forward into the present; it shapes and instructs us, warns and interests us. Sometimes we return to it in order to judge it anew or attempt to reconstruct it in a way that allows it to make more sense. Sometimes new information is uncovered from the past that puts a new perspective on things. Sometimes the past can be impactful on the course of events still occurring in the present. In short, there is no wall or barrier between the present and the past. The two mix and mingle and inform one another. Therefore, everything about the past is relevant in 2016. This paper will examine 8 articles that deal with specific incidences in the past that I find to be particularly meaningful today.

History teaches us to pay attention -- to be…… [Read More]

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Foreign Policy of President Reagan

Words: 5099 Length: 16 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 83090795

Foreign Policy of President eagan

Before the disastrous Vietnam War, the U.S. held an undisputed dominant position worldwide, recognized locally as well as by other nations. The nation's historic actions towards defending freedom, by restraining the fascist faction during the Second World War, followed by organizing a large free-state coalition for combating communism, were supported by profound and sweeping domestic consensus. This consensus was destroyed by America's decision to wage war on Vietnam. Despite the rationale being the protection of free peoples battling communism, the Vietnam War resulted in caustic doubt and destabilizing discord among Americans. This suspicion and discord incited and guided by people opposed to the war, rather than the enemy's weaponry and zeal, explains America's failure, above every other factor. The U.S. had to battle internal resistance more than resistance from the Vietnamese adversary, and resulted in a self-inflicted defeat (Brenes 2015; LAISON 2013). Extremely serious repercussions…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, Martin. 1990. Revolution: The Reagan Legacy, Stanford, CA: Hoover Institution Press.

Armstrong, Scott and Peter Grier. 1986. Strategic Defense Initiative: Splendid Defense or Pipe Dream, New York: Foreign Policy Association.

Arquilla, John. 2006. The Reagan Imprint: Ideas in American Foreign Policy from the Collapse of Communism to the War on Terror, Chicago: Ivan R. Dee.

Baucom, Donald R. 1992. The Origins of SDI, 1944-1983, Lawrence, Kans.: University Press of Kansas.
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Challenging the Beijing Consensus China Foreign Policy in the 21st Century

Words: 24240 Length: 60 Pages Document Type: Dissertation or Thesis complete Paper #: 17194104

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Structure of Chinese Foreign Policy

The "Chinese Model" of Investment

The "Beijing Consensus" as a Competing Framework

Operational Views

The U.S.-China (Beijing consensus) Trade Agreement and Beijing Consensus

Trading with the Enemy Act

Export Control Act.

Mutual Defense Assistance Control Act

Category B

Category C

The 1974 Trade Act.

The Operational Consequences of Chinese Foreign Policy

The World Views and China (Beijing consensus)

Expatriates

The Managerial Practices

Self Sufficiency of China (Beijing consensus)

China and western world: A comparison

The China (Beijing consensus)'s Policy of Trading Specialized Goods

Chapter 5

The versions of China (Beijing consensus)'s trade development

The China (Beijing consensus) Theory of Power Transition

eferences

Foreign Policy of China (Beijing consensus)

Chapter 1

Abbreviations

ACD arms control and disarmament

ACDA Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

ADB Asian Development Bank

ADF Asian Development Fund

APEC Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

AF ASEAN [Association of Southeast…… [Read More]

References

Barnett, A.D. (1977). China (Beijing consensus) and the Major Powers in East Asia. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=34158088 

Boorman, H.L., Eckstein, A., Mosely, P.E., & Schwartz, B. (1957). Moscow-Peking Axis: Strengths and Strains (1st ed.). New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=53424557 

Sardesai, D.R. (1974). Chapter 6 India: A Balancer Power?. In Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power, Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.) (pp. 94-104). New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691923 

Chawla, S., Gurtov, M., & Marsot, A. (Eds.). (1974). Southeast Asia under the New Balance of Power. New York: Praeger. Retrieved September 10, 2011, from Questia database:  http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=14691822
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Yates V United States 354

Words: 2153 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 72541408

In my judgment, the statutory provisions on which these prosecutions are based, abridge freedom of speech, press and assembly in violation of the 1st Amendment" ("Black, J, Concurring in Part").

Hence, the Yates decision was a precursor of the things to come. In 1964, the Court declared in the New York Times v. Sullivan that public officials could not recover civil damages for libel unless they prove the libel was committed intentionally or with malice and held that making seditious libel a crime conflicted with the central meaning of the First Amendment ("Fighting ords"). In New York Times v. United States (1971) the Court prevented the federal government from exercising "prior restraint" to stop a newspaper from printing information about the Vietnam ar that it wanted to withhold from the public. In Brandenburg v. Ohio (1969) it ruled that advocacy of violence or revolution may be prohibited only if it…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Adoption and Common Law Background." Find Law for Professionals: Freedom of Expression -- Speech and Press. 2008. April 17, 2008.  http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/data/constitution/amendment01/06.html#1 

Black, J, Concurring in Part: Supreme Court of the United States -- Yates v United States." Cornell University Law School. 1957. April 17, 2008.  http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0354_0298_ZX.html 

Fighting words." Indiana University Newsroom. November 17, 2004. April 17, 2008.  http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/1725.html 

Opinion of the Court: Supreme Court of the United States -- Yates v United States." Cornell University Law School. 1957. April 17, 2008.  http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/historics/USSC_CR_0354_0298_ZO.html
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Presumption Often Promulgated by Scholars

Words: 4661 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43906482

They goal for globalization is to increase material wealth and the distribution of goods and services through a more international division of labor and then, in turn, a process in which regional cultures integrate through communication, transportation and trade. The overall theory is that if countries are tied together cooperatively economically, they will not have needed to become political enemies (Smith 2007). Notice the continuum here -- globalization, like modernization, is a process, but a process that insists movement from A to B. is not only desirable, but necessary to become part of the Global Club. hile this is primarily an economic determinant, nothing exists in a vacuum. Therefore, economics drive technological, social, cultural, political, and even biological factors. And, with this exchange of paradigms, there is transnational circulation of ideas, languages, popular culture, and communication through acculturation. Typically, we see the movement of globalization moving into the developing world…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Achebe, C 2000, Home and Exile, Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK.

Adams, W 2006, The Future of Sustainability: Re-THinking Environment and Development in the 21st Century, viewed December 2011, http://cmsdata.iucn.org/downloads/iucn_future_of_sustanability.pdf

Aristotle VII, 'Politics', pp. 1339a 29-30.

Bartlovich, C, Mannur, A (eds.) 2001, Marxism, Modernity and Post-Colonial Studies, Cambridge University Press, New York.
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Dangerous Mismanagement

Words: 6133 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 99577375

Intelligence Failures

In an ever increasingly complex governmental infrastructure, the importance of communication, mission and strategy are of the utmost importance. The Department of Defense (DOD) and all of its law enforcement agencies are in a pervasive struggle to attain both accurate and actionable intelligence in order to perform their duties to the best of their capabilities and intentions.

The purpose of this research paper is to explore the failure of the intelligence process due to extraneous levels of bureaucratic organization. This essay will attempt to explain the many failures of the Department of Defense law enforcement entities as a result of this type of organization.

In order to understand this argument, this essay will first look at the problem itself and try to identify the root cause of these failures. Past failures of intelligence gathering will be examined to help contextualize the argument and give credence to the idea…… [Read More]

References

Chesney, R. (2011). Military-Intelligence Convergence and the Law of Title 10/Title 50 Debate. J. Nat'l Sec. L. & Pol'y, 5, 539.

Clapper, J. (2011). How 9/11 Transformed the Intelligence Community. The Wall Street Journal 7 Sep 2011. Retrieved from  http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424053111904537404576554430822300352 

Foust, J. (2013). Throwing the Intelligence Community Under the Bus. Beacon Journal 29 Oct 2013. Retrieved from http://www.beaconreader.com/joshua-foust/throwing-the-intelligence-community-under-the-bus

Gusterson, H. (2011). Atomic Escapism? American Scientist, Jan -- Feb 2011. Retrieved from  http://www.americanscientist.org/bookshelf/pub/atomic-escapism
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Western Civilization Reformation Martin Luther

Words: 457 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79237181

They felt that they Church was getting richer and the poor were getting poorer. And as a result, there were no great protests when the King broke away from the Church, because many felt that Henry would ease up on taking money from them. Henry knew of the Catholic Church's unpopularity and used this to his advantage (Truman, 2009).

Christian Humanism played a large role in the development of the English Reformation as it also did with Calvinism, which emphasized the rule of God over all things (Belief system within Christianity: Calvinism, 2004). Both of these were very similar to the ideas Lutheranism, in which each individual was seen as responsible for their own fate. There were several other heretic groups that were persecuted by the Roman Catholic Church for their beliefs; these were the aldenses and the Albigenses. These were a couple of groups of Christians who would not…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"About Martin Luther." 2003. PBS. 24 April 2009



"Belief system within Christianity: Calvinism." 2004. Religious Tolerance.org. 24 April 2009

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Ad to Present the Civil

Words: 3003 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 24463986

S. responded to the Great Depression by electing FDR, who brought out his Alphabet Programs which were supposed to put the nation back to work with public works projects. When that failed to restore the economy, the world elected to start with a new war: WWII. Germany had been buried by the Western powers following WWI -- and now the country threatened to assert itself once more. Russia was in the middle of its own revolution: Stalin was liquidating the kulaks and rounding others up and shipping them off to the Gulag. That did not help Russia's economy any more than FDR's Alphabet program -- but it did not matter: war was on the horizon. Japan was being strangled by Western powers: the American military-industrial-congressional complex essentially forced Japan to attack -- and then sat back and let it happen when Japan finally decided to bomb Pearl Harbor. Thus, America…… [Read More]

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Oppose Capital Punishment

Words: 2154 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79163927

Capital Punishment: A Capital Offense in Today's Easily Misguided orld

The debate surrounding the usage of capital punishment in the modern era has raged for generations. hile there have always been arguments for the positive aspects of capital punishment, today's world is less optimistic about the death penalty -- and with good reason. The death penalty affects more than just the convicted, it affects all of society. In order to show why capital punishment should be avoided, it is helpful to draw lessons from history, literature, and psychology.

The historical case for capital punishment has long been made. Capital punishment has existed in every major society in one form or another throughout the centuries. As Michael Kronenwetter states, in every society "all punishment is based on the same simple proposition: There must be a penalty for wrongdoing" (1). Kronenwetter is correct in asserting as much: all major societies have had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arriens, Jan, ed. Welcome to Hell: Letters and Writings from Death Row. UK: UPNE,

2005. Print.

Bacon, Francis. "Of Goodness and Goodness of Nature." Essays of Francis Bacon (The

Harvard Classics), 1909. Web.
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Moral Legal Political and Practical

Words: 9721 Length: 22 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 27501741

The line of legitimacy, separating socially approvable use of force from violence, cannot be effectively drawn without an agreement on what constitutes the optimum amount of force necessary to maintain social order and to protect human rights against encroachment. A society subscribing to infinite morality which condemns all use of force as immoral is doomed no less than a society accepting the absolute pragmatism of tyrants. "

As Oleg Zinam proposes, these two extreme social attitudes to morality are equally unprofitable to the societies that adopt them. The attitude of absolute pragmatism can easily lead to the acceptance of political assassinations, as long as such acts may help the final political purpose. An example of absolute pragmatism can be the regime initiated by Hitler, who ordered the extermination of all Jews in an attempt to "purify" the human race by excluding anyone who did not fill in the Arian ideal.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ben-Yehuda, Nachman. 1997. Political Assassination Events as a Cross- Cultural form of Alternative Justice.

International Journal of Comparative Sociology, Vol.38: 25-30.

Feliks, Gross. 1974. The Revolutionary Party. Essays in the Sociology of Politics. Westport: Greenwood

Press.
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Women and Gender Bias the

Words: 13238 Length: 42 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 41373850

Under these circumstances, an ethical dilemma is born. Should society control its development or leave it to chance? And in the case that it should control it, which categories should it help?

If the person in the above mentioned example is helped, we could assume that in a certain way, the person who was not helped because he or she already disposed of the necessary means, the latter one might be considered as having been subject to reverse discrimination. Yet we ought to look at the picture from an utilitarian point-of-view. Under these circumstances we might state that society as an overall system has more benefits from helping the categories which are in bigger need of help (for example the ones mentioned in the principles of affirmative action).

ut what are the exact principles of affirmative action: let us take a look at them and analyze them. Title VI, section…… [Read More]

Bibliography:

"Access, equity and diversity, American association for affirmative action," Retrieved October 27, 2010 from  http://www.affirmativeaction.org/resources.html 

Anderson, TH. The pursuit of fairness: a history of affirmative action, Oxford University Press, 2005

"Affirmative action" in Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Retrieved October 27, 2010 from  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/affirmative-action/ 

"Affirmative action- pros and cons, the origins of, legal treatment of, political and social debates, the future" in Encyclopedia. Jrank. Org., Retrieved October 25, 2010 from  http://encyclopedia.jrank.org/articles/pages/5916/Affirmative-Action.html
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Second Reconstructions One of the Most Dramatic

Words: 6309 Length: 14 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52783284

Second Reconstructions

One of the most dramatic consequences of the Civil ar and Reconstruction was that the South was effectively driven from national power for roughly six decades. Southerners no longer claimed the presidency, wielded much power on the Supreme Court, or made their influence strongly felt in Congress But beginning in the 1930s, the South was able to flex more and more political muscle, and by the 1970s some began to think that American politics and political culture were becoming 'southernized'.u How did this happen and what difference did it make to the development of the South and the United States?

Under segregation most blacks in the U.S. still lived in the South and were employed as sharecroppers, laborers and domestic servants, but the system of segregation and discrimination was also found everywhere in other sections of the country. Certainly virtually nothing was done for civil rights during the…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Brinkley, Allen. American History: A Survey, 14th Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2012.

Foner, Eric. Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War. Oxford University Press, 1995.

Foner, Eric. Forever Free: The Story of Emancipation and Reconstruction. NY: Knopf, 2005.

Gold, S.D. The Civil Rights Act of 1964. Marshall Cavendish, 2010.
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Herbert Hoover

Words: 4508 Length: 15 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 29389765

Herbert Hoover

When Herbert Hoover became president in 1929, the foundations of economic stability were already beginning to crumble. The demand for mass produced items had peaked, and new areas of spending that would recover the downturn were leveling off. Investors were not hurrying to build new areas of growth since market creation was troublesome. Hoover, or the Great Engineer as he called himself, had many plans for large studies of social trends and corresponding services for child welfare, housing, recreation, education and public health. In fact, he came into office pledging "a chicken in every pot and a car in every garage" and "a final triumph over poverty." In his view, the marriage of private enterprise with science and technology would end poverty and welcome in a new humane social order. However, it did not take long before Hoover found that his attention would be diverted toward much more…… [Read More]

Barbara Polikoff. Herbert C. Hoover. (Ada, OK: Garrett, 1990), 92.

Alonzo Hamby, 33.

Ellis Hawley essay in Herbert Hoover and the Crisis of American Capitalism. (Rochester, VT: Schenkman, 1973), 117.
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Analyzing American Foreign Policy

Words: 621 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96480983

American Foreign Policy

The Policy of Containment post World War II

According to Bernstein (2002), in the post-World War era until the disintegration of Soviet Union in 1989-91, formulation of the foreign policy of U.S. was based on the plan of containment. United States continued following the policy of containment even in the 21st century to deal with countries with communist governments like Cuba, North Korea and China. Generally, containment means American endeavours to curtail spread of communism in the world through military, political and economic channels. Furthermore, this concept emerged after Second World War dynamics of global power and the concerns of U.S. leadership to avoid going into one more global war.

. In the view of Schoon (2011), primarily the concept of containment gained strategic importance and momentum after the author of the doctrine, George F. Kennan, a dominant foreign service officer in 1947 and further a regarded…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Bernstein, B. J. (2002). Containment. 2nd ed. Vol. 1.New York, 345-364.Retrieved December 13, 2015, from World History in Context:  http://ic.galegroup.com 

Pieper, M. A. (2012). Containment and the Cold War: Reexaming the Doctrine of Containment as a Grand Strategy Driving U.S. Cold War Interventions. Retrieved December 13, 2015, from Student Pulse4(08):  http://www.studentpulse.com 

Schoon, S. (2011, July 26). Cold War Containment: the role of the military. Retrieved December 13, 2015, from E-International Relations: www.e-ir.info
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William J Donovan and the

Words: 4625 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15468295

Y. National Guard, which had been conducting a vigorous recruiting campaign (Troy 24). According to this author, "The Sixty-ninth was drafted into the Regular Army and was proud to be selected New York's representative in the newly formed Forty-second Division, the 'Rainbow Division,' where it was redesignated the 165th Regiment" (Troy 24). These events as much as any other were responsible for providing Donovan with both the experience as well as the recognition that would help propel him into future leadership positions. In this regard, Troy reports that, "It remained 'the old Sixty-ninth,' however, and for the better part of his twenty-two months of service Donovan was the commander of its First Battalion. It was in that capacity, a lieutenant colonel, that he saw combat, was several times wounded, and demonstrated such outstanding qualities of leadership and moral courage that he emerged from the war with 'more medals than any…… [Read More]

Works Cited

About Us. (2007). Central Intelligence Agency. [Online]. Available:  https://www.cia.gov/about-cia/index.html .

Donovan, William J. Preface to the Ultimate Weapon, Oleg Anisimov, Chicago: Regnery Publishing, Inc., 1953.

Ford, Corey. Donovan of OSS. Boston: Little, Brown, 1970.

Heidekinq, Jurgen, Christof Mauch and Marc Frey. American Intelligence and the German Resistance to Hitler: A Documentary History. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1996.
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Capote the Recent Film Capote

Words: 2999 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79083346

Capote was always clearly a film meant to appeal to a more educated and selective audience, and finding that audience is not as easy as for the major releases. Traditional methods of promotion and marketing are still widely used, but television has become the centerpiece of every campaign, with the advertising blitz in the week or so before a film opens being the determining factor in the success or failure of the effort. Much marketing effort today goes into developing ancillary markets and product tie-ins of various sorts, all to help recoup expenses and, if a film is very successful, to cash in to an even greater degree. Capote also advertised on television, but not with the sort of budget that would be available for a major studio release. Marketing a film like Capote on television would have been very difficult a few years ago when the primary outlet used…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ancaster Film Fest Surveys (Winter/Spring 2006).  http://www.ancasterfilmfest.ca/Survey3.html .

Box Office Mojo (2006). November 14, 2006.  http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=capote.htm .

Capote." The Hollywood Reporter (12 Sept 2005). November 13, 2006.  http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/hr/search/article_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1001096151 .

Capote,' Hoffman, Witherspoon cop top critic nods" The New Zealand Herald (9 Jan 2006),. November 13, 2006.  http://www.nzherald.co.nz/event/story.cfm?c_id=1500860&ObjectID=10362949 .
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East Asia Shaping the Course

Words: 1791 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85797551

There were many unsuccessful attempts to transition to examples put forth by other countries particularly in the west that received both acceptance and rejection. Some efforts proved fruitful but many were fought against by the intellectuals as those at the lowest end of the socioeconomic structure had no voice. The transition in East Asia has reached a level of plateau; however, national identity and unification continue to be a goal that East Asia strives to maintain.

ibliography

Duiker, W., and Spielvogel, J. The Essential World History. oston, MA: Wadsworth,

Cengage Learning, 2011.

McNelly, Theodore. Induced revolution: The policy and process of constitutional reform in occupied Japan, in Democratizing Japan, pp / 76-106.

Rhoads, Murphey. East Asia: A New History. Pearson Longman, 2004.

Shillony, en-Ami. Politics and culture in wartime Japan. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 1991.

Sommerville, Donald. The complete illustrated history of World War Two: An authoritative account of the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Duiker, W., and Spielvogel, J. The Essential World History. Boston, MA: Wadsworth,

Cengage Learning, 2011.

McNelly, Theodore. Induced revolution: The policy and process of constitutional reform in occupied Japan, in Democratizing Japan, pp / 76-106.

Rhoads, Murphey. East Asia: A New History. Pearson Longman, 2004.