Universal Healthcare Essays (Examples)

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Health Care Debate Over the

Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17337115

At which point, the overall costs of care will be passed on to the tax payer in the form of higher taxes. This leads to a decrease in the overall quality of care and it will not slow the price increases, as the government seeks to restrict access to these services. Then, when the program becomes broken (such as: what is happening to Social Security) removing or reforming the bureaucracy is nearly impossible. (Messerili, 2010)

A second argument that many critics make about universal health care is: it will stifle innovation. Whenever, the government is running any kind of program, they will place a large number of restrictions and regulations on the industry. When this takes place, you are causing some of the best and brightest minds to seek careers in other fields, as the restrictions from the government are too cumbersome. A good example of this would be: the…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Trends in Health Care Costs and Spending. (2006). Retrieved March 13, 2010 from Kaiser Foundation website:

http://www.kff.org/insurance/upload/7692_02.pdf

Andersen, R. (2007). Changing the U.S. Health Care System. Washington D.C: National Academy Press.

Gratzer, D. (2002). Better Medicine. Toronto, on: ECW Press.
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Universal Access to Health Care in U S

Words: 652 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89345197

universal access to health care in U.S. population

Ethical Issues in Global Health: orld Healthcare Organization a Fundamental Universal Health Care Enabling U.S. Population in Accessing Healthcare

The objective of this study is to examine ethical issues in global health care and specifically the orld Healthcare Organization as being a fundamental in universal health care enabling the U.S. population in accessing healthcare. The work of right (2004) relates that the United States, in a comparison of several indicators of health "ranks in or near last place among industrialized nations of the world." (p.2) In addition, the United States has one of the world's highest rates of child mortality with eight deaths per 1,000 children under the age of five reported in 2002 as well as one of the shortest life expectancy rates in the world. (right, 2004, paraphrased) hile the United States boasts the best in the world's choice of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Tanner, M. (2009) Universal Health Care Not Best Option. The Bulletin. Cato Institute. 23 Feb 2009. Retrieved from:  http://www.cato.org/publications/commentary/universal-health-care-not-best-option 

Wright DB (2004) Universal Access to Healthcare: Lessons from Sweden for the United States. 17 Nov 2004. Retrieved from: http://www.unc.edu/~wedavid/web/Comparative%20HC%20Systems%20Paper.pdf
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Healthcare Reform Review of Literature

Words: 6070 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45810582

(Menzel, 1990, p. 3) Fisher, Berwick, & Davis alude to the idea of integration in health care, with providers linking as well as creating networks of electronic medical records and other cost improvement tactics.

The United States and other nations over the last twenty or so years, have begun a sweeping change in health care delivery, regarding the manner in which health information is input, stored and accessed. Computer use in the medical industry has greatly increased over the last thirty years the culmination of this is fully networked electronic medical record keeping. (Berner, Detmer, & Simborg, 2005, p. 3) the electronic medical record trend began in the largest institutions first, as hospitals and large care organizations attempted to reduce waste and improve patient care, while the adoption has been much slower among physician's practices and smaller medical institutions. (Hillestad, et al., 2005, pp. 1103-1104) Prior to this time medical…… [Read More]

Resources, and Utilization
Kahnamoui, N. (2004). Electronic medical records. pp. 1-31.

Kant Patel, M.E. (2006). Health Care Politics and Policy in America. Armonk, NY: ME Sharp Inc.

Kumar, K., & Subramanian, R. (1998). Meeting the Expectations of Key Stakeholders: Stakeholder Management in the Health Care Industry. SAM Advanced Management Journal, 63 (2), 31-38.

LeGrand, J. (2009). Choice and competition in publicly funded health care. Health Economics, Policy and Law, 4, 479-488.
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Health Care Financing Delivery

Words: 774 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 84141615

WHO rates France as having the best healthcare ("World Health," 2000). In addition to universal healthcare, France also has non-profit supplementary providers, which means that the government subsidizes 70% of regular expenses but pays 100% of more expensive or long-term treatment plans (Sandier, Paris, & Polton, 2004). Money for subsidies comes from mandatory earnings contributions such as 5.25% salary, capital income, and gambling winnings (Sandier, 2004).

An argument that often arises is that people say they don't want the government deciding what medical procedures they can have. However, decisions regarding what procedures are covered by a particular health plan are made by the healthcare insurance companies, which are for-profit ("Insurance Verification," n.d.). Many people are denied treatment regardless of the illness. As already mentioned, some of the other nations with universal healthcare have supplementary plans in addition to the government plans that allow the patient more choice.

There are many…… [Read More]

References:

Carrasquillo, O., Himmelstein, DU.,Woodhandler, S., Bor, DH. (1999). A Reappraisal of Private Employers' Role in Providing Health Insurance. NEJM, 340(1), 109-114.

"Insurance Verification & Eligibility Services." (n.d.). Retrieved from  http://www.globaledgeusa.com/insurance_verification_eligibility_services/ 

Mahon, Mary. (2010, June 23). U.S. ranks last among 7 countries on health system performance. EurkAlert. Retrieved from  http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-06/cf-url062210.php 

Reid, T.R. (Producer). (2008, April 15). Frontline: Sick around the world [Television broadcast]. New York: Central Broadcasting Service.
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Health Care Program Past Current Future

Words: 2421 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52306007

Health Care Past, Current, And Future

The health of any nation should be a top priority for leaders and elected political representatives, but in the United States it took several centuries for the nation to begin to come to terms with providing health care for its citizens. This paper covers the gradual implementation of health care services and doctor training facilities in the U.S., and also covers the recent attempt by President Barack Obama to reform a chaotic, poor-functional and expensive health care system. Thesis: It is a scandal of massive proportions that a well-functioning, citizen-friendly universal health care system cannot be instituted in America, the world's most democratic superpower. Until the divisive and toxic political climate can be reformed, there is no chance of major reforms -- or for universal health care coverage -- in these United States.

Past Health Care Services -- Early America

Health care in colonial…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Daly, John. (2005). Professional Nursing: Concepts, Issues, and Challenges. New York:

Springer Publishing Company.

Gorsky, Martin. (2010). Good Health for America? History Today, 60(2), 1-6.

McCarthy, Robert L., and Schafermeyer, Kenneth W. (2007). Introduction to Health Care
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Health Care Options for Pregnant Women

Words: 1588 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 16562288

Healthcare for Pregnant Women Comparison: U.S., Switzerland and Canada

A Comparison of Healthcare Options Pregnant Women in United States, Canada and Switzerland

The healthcare systems in Western societies do not assume that a woman requires health information; however, collectively, it has become well recognized that good information is necessary to a pregnant woman, and that understanding the stages of pregnancy, labor, and delivery is important to good perinatal care (Crook, 1995). This paper provides a comparison of the healthcare options available to pregnant women according to their income and insurance resources in the United States, Canada and Switzerland. A comparison of the respective healthcare systems for these nations will be provided in the summary, and a critique of the United States healthcare system will be provided in the conclusion.

eview and Discussion

Healthcare Options -- United States. The U.S. spends a larger percentage of its GDP on healthcare than does…… [Read More]

References

Barnes, D. (January 10, 2002). Group Fights 'Enormous' Problem of Teen Pregnancy. The Washington Times, 8.

Benoit, C., Carroll, D. & Millar, A. (2002). But Is It Good for Non-Urban Women's Health?

Regionalizing Maternity Care Services in British Columbia. The Canadian Review of Sociology and Anthropology, 39(4), 373.

Collins, C. & Williams, D.R. (1995). U.S. Socioeconomic and Racial Differences in Health:
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Health Care -- a Right

Words: 2910 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4306884

However, they contradict themselves trough supporting one's right to commit physician-assisted suicide, since this would virtually mean that the individual who is no longer willing to live is not provided with health care meant to prevent him or her from dying (Epstein, 1999, p. 1).

Among those opposed to the fact that health care is becoming increasingly better are those who are in their twenties and are obliged to work hard in order to pay for their own medical insurance and for that of the underprivileged (Bonner, 2010).

Contemporary health care is basically provided by groups forced to pay taxes in order for others to benefit out of the process. The fact that health care is a privilege and not a right was made obvious ever since the 1954 foundation of the Department of Health, Education, and elfare. The name contained the term welfare with the intention of highlighting how…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Bloche, M.G. ed., The Privatization of Health Care Reform: Legal and Regulatory Perspectives (New York: Oxford University Press, 2003)

Epstein, R.A. Mortal Peril: Our Inalienable Right to Health Care? (Cambridge, MA: Perseus Books, 1999)

Heirich, M. Rethinking Health Care: Innovation and Change in America (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1998)

Sanders, B. (2009). Retrieved from the Huffington Post Website:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rep-bernie-sanders/health-care-is-a-right-no_b_212770.html
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Health Care Privatization Unlike a

Words: 991 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8549070

Surgeons in Canada report that, for heart patients, the danger of dying on the waiting list now exceeds the danger of dying on the operating table. Emergency rooms there are so overcrowded that patients awaiting treatment frequently line the corridors. Not only is there a long wait for care, but care is frequently denied to patients who prognosis is poor. In ritain kidney dialysis is generally denied patients over the age of 55. At least 1,500 ritons die each year because of lack of dialysis.

Countries with national health care systems also lag far behind the U.S. In the availability of modern medical technology. In Canada, high-technology medicine is virtually unavailable. In addition to being biased against new medical technologies, national health care systems generally discriminate against nontraditional practitioners, such as naturopaths and chiropractors.

It is true that Canada spends only about nine percent of its GDP on health care,…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Financing National Health Insurance." (2003, February 4). Available:

 http://www.pnhp.org/nhibill/nhi_financing.html  (Accessed 9 Feb. 2005).

Health Care Policy Issues. Sept. 2004. Available:

 http://www.newsbatch.com/healthcare.htm  (Accessed 9 Feb. 2005).
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Health Care Reform One of the Major

Words: 1254 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39500787

Health Care eform:

One of the major topics that have had a long history in the United States is health care reforms, which has been characterized by huge debates. Following decades of failed attempts by various Democratic presidents, a new law was enacted by President Obama to overhaul the country's health care system. The enactment of this legislation came after a year of harsh partisan combat with the purpose of ensuring access to health care insurance for millions of Americans. In addition to being the most controversial topic, health care reform law was the largest single legislative accomplishment of President Obama. Notably, this legislation will cost America's government approximately $940 billion over the next decade based on an analysis by the Congressional Budget Office. The office has also estimated that the law will lessen federal deficit by about $138 billion during the same period and a further reduction of the…… [Read More]

References:

Cannon, M.F. (2010, March 1). The Best and Worst Health Care Reform Ideas. Retrieved December 15, 2011, from  http://dailycaller.com/2010/03/01/the-best-and-worst-health-care-reform-ideas/ 

Cohn, J. (2011, January 20). About that Whole "Replace" Thing & #8230; Retrieved December 15,

2011, from http://www.tnr.com/blog/jonathan-cohn/81821/about-whole-replace-thing

"Health Care Reform.." (2011, November 15). The New York Times. Retrieved December 15,
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Health Care Legislative Bill

Words: 1387 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5151645

Healthcare Legislative Bill

The expanded and improved Medicare for all Acts

The Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Act was introduced to the House of Representatives in 2009 and seeks to lobby for the implementation of a common single-payer health care system throughout the United States o0f America. The bill if enacted would require that all medical care costs be paid for automatically by the government instead of private insurances for the same. The move will significantly alter the role of private insurance companies as merely offering supplemental coverage especially when the kind of medical care sought is not all that essential (McCormick, 2009).

With the Expanded and mproved Medicare for All Bill, the country's national system will be paid for through taxes and the monies that will replace the regular insurance premiums. Proponents of the bill argue that by eliminating the need for private insurance companies in the national…… [Read More]

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Science, (2010), Insuring America's Health: Principles and Recommendations

The American Journal of Medical Practices, (2011), The Impact of single-payer Medicare

Program, New York
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Healthcare and Government There Are

Words: 339 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17502185

(Expenditure, 2012) This merciful act is taken because of a simple fact; these elderly are deemed too old to work. Americans younger than 65 have an expectation of work placed on them in order to receive medical care at 65.

The third issue of universal health care is the principle of hard work and earning your keep. In America, health care for the young is seen as a privilege, not a right. There are some who disagree with this, but America at large is skeptical of all forms of welfare and state controlled support. The problem for many is a philosophical challenge to the notion that poor unemployed workers deserve health care paid for by their hard working neighbors.

orks Cited

Centers for medicare and medicaid services. (2012). Retrieved from https://questions.cms.gov/

Expenditure patterns of older americans. (2012, February). Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&content_id=4992

Henry kaiser family foundation. (2012). Retrieved from http://healthreform.kff.org/federal-funds-tracker.aspx… [Read More]

Works Cited

Centers for medicare and medicaid services. (2012). Retrieved from https://questions.cms.gov/

Expenditure patterns of older americans. (2012, February). Retrieved from http://www.ebri.org/publications/ib/index.cfm?fa=ibDisp&content_id=4992

Henry kaiser family foundation. (2012). Retrieved from http://healthreform.kff.org/federal-funds-tracker.aspx
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Health Reform Health Care in

Words: 574 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49101946

The result is that a multilayered system which is inherently designed to maintain and improve our public health standards has instead become almost entirely designed by its profitability. The best opportunity we have for reversing this trend is the applying of pressure that only the federal government can bring to bear. Greater regulation of pricing, coverage and standards of care will shift the focus back to quality health outcomes rather than strict improvement of the bottom line at all costs.

- Is there a solution?

How can (or can't) public policy shape health care in the U.S. hat do you predict for the next year?

Public policy absolutely has the capacity to bring improvement to a highly dysfunctional system. The Affordable Care Act and many of its related sub-initiatives such as the Readmissions Reduction Program are indicative of this opportunity. Indeed, the continuing pressure upon hospitals to focus on producing…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Krueger, a. (2013). As ACA Implementation Continues, Consumer Health Care Cost Growth Has Slowed. Whitehouse.gov.
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Healthcare Program Review Tactics

Words: 573 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73321825

Healthcare Plan eview

The author of this report is to answer three general questions relating to healthcare program evaluation. The first question asks the author of this report to examine the overall purpose of healthcare program evaluation. The second question asks the author to identify at least five different types of common healthcare program evaluation techniques. Finally, one of those methods in particular will be selected and there will be a drilling down into more detail on that single type. While the purpose and method of operations is quite similar with all program evaluation types, there are some subtle to major differences from type to type.

At its core, the purpose of healthcare program evaluation is to analyze and improve the operations and performance of a healthcare program based on a systematic and full review of what is going right, what is going wrong and what needs to be changed.…… [Read More]

References

Fink, A. (1992, October 15). Formats:. National Center for Biotechnology Information.

Retrieved September 16, 2014, from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/

PMC1336469/?page=1

MUSC. (2014, September 16). Program Evaluation 101. Program Evaluation 101. Retrieved
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Healthcare Crisis US Health Care

Words: 1617 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87102656

Universal healthcare is the only saving formula for this nation, which is doomed in a health care crisis of unprecedented proportions. There is a urgent need to transform healthcare from its present state of commercialism towards the humanitarian approach which guarantees 'healthcare for all' independent of their social or financial circumstances. A shared and collective responsibility of healthcare management is the only viable formula for America. It is high time we learn from Canada, UK and other European nations and restructure the current broken state of our healthcare. The successful passing of the USNHC act (H.R. 676) is the only way for America to wake up from its healthcare nightmare. Will the powerful insurance industry hold its ground yet again and resist this awakening leaving all the citizens doomed? This is an important question for all the citizens of our country.

ibliography

1) Science Daily, 'American Values lamed for U.S.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1) Science Daily, 'American Values Blamed for U.S. Healthcare Crisis',

Accessed May 11, 2009, Available at, http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/12/081204160558.htm

2) Laura K. Altom, BS, MSIII and Larry R. Churchill, PhD, Ann Geddes Stahlman

'Pay, Pride, and Public Purpose: Why America's Doctors Should Support
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Health Care Reform Through the

Words: 2167 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13494733

Not only do these practices discourage preventative care and monitoring, they also diminish the quality of the good that insured individuals are buying from the health insurance companies. Insured individuals are paying for insurance and paying for most of their healthcare costs in addition because of the exorbitant deductibles. PPACA's prohibition of these practices ultimately forces health care companies to raise the bar and give health insurance customers more value for money.

Public-Private Partnerships Prevent ureaucratization of Health Care

There are widespread misconceptions that the PPACA will provide health insurance through some government-run bureaucracy. Actually, PPACA is built on close cooperation between health insurance companies and the government. Under PPACA, the government does not operate hospitals nor does it provide medical insurance to individuals. Actually, it requires individuals to carry some form of private health insurance or suffer a penalty. The only time the government becomes involved is when an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Public Law 111 -- 148. Available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/PLAW-111publ148/pdf/PLAW-111publ148.pdf

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act - Summary. http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z-d111:HR03590:@@@L&summ2=m&summary

"An Analysis of Health Insurance Premiums Under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,

Letter to the Honorable Evan Bayh." Congressional Budget Office. Douglas W. Elmendorf. November 18, 2009. Available at http://cbo.gov/ftpdocs/107xx/doc10781/11-30-Premiums.pdf.
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Healthcare Poverty Health Care Reform

Words: 3343 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63584903

As a result, millions of Americans remain unable to bear the heavy financial toll of medical expenses. Indeed, the problem of a lack of insurance for many is related to the problem of the cost of healthcare. So confirms the article by Consumer Reports (CR) (2008), which finds that "health-insurance premiums have grown faster than inflation or workers' earnings over the past decade, in parallel with the equally rapid rise in overall health costs. Industry spending on administrative and marketing costs, plus profits, consumes 12% of private-insurance premiums." (CR, 1) This reiterates the case that the undue imposition of costs by the healthcare industry -- a reflection of a free-market industry with little to no regulatory oversight -- has negatively impacted the accessibility and quality of healthcare for many of the poorest users.

Moreover, these users are most vulnerable to the long-term economic damages provoked by unexpected healthcare costs. So…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Bureau of Labor Education (BLE). (2001). The U.S. Health Care System: Best in the World, or Just the Most Expensive? The University of Maine.

Childress, M. (2010). Poverty is on the Upswing, but Metric is Out of Date. The Washington Independent.

Cockerham, W.C. (2004). Medical Sociology and Sociological Theory. The Backwell Companion to Medical Sociology.

Consumer Reports (CR). (2008). High Health Care Costs. Consumer Reports Health.org.
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Health Canadian Health Care the

Words: 1345 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14236067



In 2004, a Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care was announced, primarily intended to improve access to medical services, decrease wait times, and update medical equipment and ensure accurate reporting and enhance public health promotion and prevention programs. Shortly thereafter, the Canadian Supreme Court affirmed the nation's health care philosophy and the immediate need to implement further improvements envisioned by the ambitious 2004 plan in striking down a Quebec law that had prohibited private medical insurance for covered services:

The evidence in this case shows that delays in the public health care system are widespread and that in some serious cases, patients die as a result of waiting lists for public health care...In sum, the prohibition on obtaining private health insurance is not constitutional where the public system fails to deliver reasonable services."

According to legal experts, the decision could "open the door to a wave of lawsuits challenging the…… [Read More]

References

Canadian Medical Association Journal.

1939 September; 41(3):

Chaoulli v. Quebec: Judgments of the Supreme Court of Canada Accessed, September 2, 2007, at http://scc.lexum.umontreal.ca/en/index.html

Kraus, C. (2005) Canada's Supreme Court Chips Away at National Health Care.
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Health Care Insurance

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 4274184

Health Care Finance

Greenwald engages in a discussion comparing the U.S. health care system to, well, other health care systems. An interesting methodological fault is that Greenwald cherry-picks his examples. In one paragraph, he compares the U.S. with Canada, in other the UK, and in another Spain. he problem, methodologically, is that he can cherry-pick data from whatever country best suits his argument. What this means, in terms of interpretation, is that Greenwald's findings need to be taken with a grain of salt. As an example, Greenwald notes higher wait times in three countries for urgent coronary artery bypass. Nobody likes high wait times, but Greenwald's U.S. figure doesn't factor in the uninsured, whose wait time is infinity. hey just die. he issue many have with the U.S. system is not that performance is poor; it is that performance is only good when you can afford it.

his cuts to…… [Read More]

This cuts to the heart of the difference between the U.S. And other industrialized countries. The trade-off between quality of care and universal care exists in any nation. The trade-off that other countries have made is that they have chosen universal care, even when there are times when service standards are lower. In the U.S., there has never been a strong collective motivation to make that trade-off. There are reasons for this, and they are more social that medical. While some have argued that lobbyists are the issue, I disagree with that assessment, because most other nations adopted universal health care long before lobbyists took over the U.S. government. The lack of universal health care in the U.S., therefore, is more related to social factors. The erosion of the manufacturing base has in turn eroded the sort of jobs where working class Americans can get health insurance; replace such jobs with part-time retail and the number of insured will decrease. Further, at-risk groups such as the poor, African-Americans, Native Americans and the disabled are disproportionally uninsured (Link & Phelan, 1996). There is a certain lack of concern with the well-being of these groups that has resulted in a lack of desire to provide insurance for them. It's kind of the elephant in the room -- while Canada and Europe were developing universal health care, a lot of parts of the United States were having trouble wrapping their head around desegregation in schools. We should not be so naive as to think this mentality does not play a role in public opposition to universal health care. As well, health care costs were manageable and for most, the system has worked reasonably well. This means there was no impetus for change -- only recently with the explosion of health care costs has there been concern about paying for health insurance even from the middle class.

Costs

There are a number of reasons why health care costs are lower in other nations. Greenwald notes that American health care facilities are more likely to invest in the most modern equipment. I wish he did not cherry-pick his supporting evidence ("seniors in Miami in the last six months of their lives receive the best care anywhere in the world") because this is a fairly demonstrable reality. At the top end, the U.S. health care system is usually better than in other countries. The fault Greenwald has is not following through and asking why this is. He is correct in pointing out that the best care can and should cost more. But facilities invest so heavily for two key
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Health Care Disparity in Maryland

Words: 18449 Length: 67 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96057578



Chapter II: Review of the Literature in Chapter II, the researcher explores information accessed from researched Web sites; articles; books; newspaper excerpts; etc., relevant to considerations of the disparity in access to health care services between rural and urban residence in Maryland and the impact of the lack of financial resources. The researcher initially accessed and reviewed more than 35 credible sources to narrow down the ones noted in the reference section in this study. The literature review chapter presents a sampling of literature to support the research questions this study addresses.

Chapter III: Methods and Results Throughout Chapter III, the researcher proffers information the utilized to address contemporary concerns/challenges/consequences relating to determining the information used in this investigation. This chapter also presents the overall methods and techniques the researcher implemented to conduct this study. Considerations for the methodology chapter include data/information the researcher uses; identifying it as primary and/or…… [Read More]

Potter, S. (2002) Doing Postgraduate Research. London: Sage.

Qualitative research: Approaches, methods, and rigour, (2008, Nov. 7). Microsoft PowerPoint Qualitative Research AdvC08 RS.PPT. Retrieved March 10, 2009 from www.unimaas.nl/bestand.asp?id=11629

Wolvovsky, Jay. (2008). Health disparities: Impact on Business and Economics Summit. Maryland's healthcare at a glance. The Heart of Community Health Baltimore Medical Syste. Retrieved March 10, 2009 at http://dhmh.maryland.gov/hd/pdf/2008/oct08/Jay_Wolvovsky.pdf
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Healthcare and Medicine in the

Words: 2981 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8445117

The issue of grey and black markets often arose as a result of the shortages of experienced health care personnel. The system could not adapt to a flexible environment as it was led by rigid official procedures and the mentality of the people who controlled it was commanding, their vision short-sighted and hardly beneficial in such a situation (Barr and Mark, 1996).

The breaking up of Soviet Union which brought crippling economic and political problems to the countries also aggravated the health care situation making it reach an all-time low. The collapse of the health care system ran by the government led to the belief that turning towards a market economy or more capitalistic notions and perceptions would have been a better idea. The competition in the private sector would have had improved efficiency and averted an inevitable collapse of the health care system in the Soviet Union. This transformation,…… [Read More]

References

Balabanova, D., Haerpfer, C., McKee, M., Pomerleau, J., Rose, R. (2004). Health service utilization in the former Soviet Union: evidence from eight countries. Health Services Research

Barr, D.A. And Mark G. (1996). The Current State of Health Care in the Former Soviet Union: Implications for Health Care Policy and Reform. American Journal of Public Health. 86, 3.

Lewis, M. (2002). Informal Health Payments in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union: Issues, Trends and Policy Implications. In Funding Health Care, European Observatory on Health Care Systems Series, edited by E. Mossialos, a. Dixon, J. Figueras, and J. Kutzin, pp. 184-205. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Mikesell, J.L. And Mullins, D.R. (2001), Reforming Budget Systems in Countries of the Former Soviet Union. Public Administration Review. 61. 5.
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Healthcare Intro of the Representative

Words: 940 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34588361

In addition, Senator Collins led the fight to restore critical f funding to Medicare for home health care so that elderly citizens and disabled can receive needed care in their own homes ("Biography")."

Obviously the senator encourages the funding of both Medicaid and Medicare as she has fought to ensure that both are funded correctly. Collins was also a supporter of the stimulus package that improves healthcare information technology.

As it pertains to abortions Susan Collins is also pro-choice and believes in stem cell research. She is adamant about the right of a woman to choose just as Senator Kennedy. She also voted no on prohibiting HHS grants to organization who perform abortions. She has also been a proponent of expanding stem cell research.

In both the present and the past Collins has worked to ensure that healthcare coverage is affordable. From the bill that she coauthored with Senator Kennedy…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Biography. Official Website of Senator Susan Collins. Retrieved June 20, 2009 from; http://collins.senate.gov/public/continue.cfm?FuseAction=AboutSenatorCollins.Biography&CFID=1388899&CFTOKEN=51070689

Fritze, J. Moderates in Congress feel health care push. Retrieved June 20, 2009 from; http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/story?id=7789528&page=1

Funding for Biomedical Research at Maine Medical Center. Retrieved June 20, 2009 from;  http://senatorcollins.blogspot.com/2009/06/funding-for-biomedial-research-at-maine.html 

Healthcare. Official Website of Edward Kennedy. Retrieved June 20, 2009 from; http://kennedy.senate.gov/issues_and_agenda/issue.cfm?id=dad5db98-20db-4e85-9b73-7a16c4eac15f
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Healthcare in the United States

Words: 1084 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97921602

Universal healthcare would benefit a large segment of the population, and it should be implemented as quickly as possible to ensure the nation's health and to save money.

There are some clear arguments against universal healthcare. One of the most well-known and cited is the idea that the Federal Government is not capable of efficiently managing healthcare, and they cite the problems with the Veteran's Hospitals and Medicare as a very real example of that mismanagement and inability to control costs and other aspects of universal healthcare. Many government agencies are indeed inefficient, understaffed, and mismanaged, so care must be taken to ensure this does not happen with any agency managing universal healthcare. There should be strict controls and measures in place to ensure the agency is managed efficiently and provides the best results, and there should be measures in place to ensure the quality and delivery of healthcare services,…… [Read More]

References

Chua, K-P. "Arguments and Counterarguments About Universal Health Care." American Medical Student Association. 2006. 7 July 2008. http://www.amsa.org/uhc/uhc_counterarguments.pdf

Canadian Healthcare System Fact Sheet." American Medical Student Association. 2006. 7 July 2008. http://www.amsa.org/studytours/CHS_FactSheet.pdf

Emanuel, E., & Fuchs, V.R.. Solved! It Covers Everyone. Washington Monthly, (2005, June) 37, 20+.

Orient, Jane. Fractured Healthcare: Americans Are Told That We Need 'Universal Healthcare.' The New American 8 Jan. 2007: 10+.
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Health Care Reform Has Been

Words: 1375 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79622410



Despite of the receipt of federal funding to assist in the set-up of an insurance exchange program, the Minnesota legislature is not cooperating with the Governor Drayton's plans to design a program. Instead, in a classic example of partisan politics, the legislature is going forward with its own plans to design an exchange program. In doing so, the legislature is placing the State of Minnesota in a position of possibly losing the grant provided by the federal government. According to the grant provisions, the state must show it can operate an effective exchange program by the end of calendar year 2012 or the federal government under the terms of ACA will impose a one size fits all exchange on the state. Even the state's most conservative political groups oppose this happening and advocate that the state's executive and legislative branches cooperate in formulating an acceptable state exchange program.

The effect…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Berkel, Jessica Van. "HCMC fights back against Pawlenty's GAMC Cuts." 3 December 2009. Minnesota Daily .  http://www.mndaily.com/2009/12/03/hcmc-fights-back-against-pawlenty%E2%80%99s-gmac-cuts . 7 April 2012.

Gray, Virginia. "Incrementing Toward Nowhere: Universal Health Care Coveragein the States." Publius (2010): 82-113.

Harrington, Scott E. "The Health Insurance Reform Debate." The Journal of Risk and Insurance (2010): 5-38.

Minnesota Department of Human Services. "General Assistance Medical Care." 11 September 2011. http://www.dhs.state.mn.us/main/idcplg?IdcService=GET_DYNAMIC_CONVERSION&RevisionSelectionMethod=LatestReleased&Redirected=true&dDocName=id_006257. 7 April 2012.
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Health Care in the United States Has

Words: 1344 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51512155

health care in the United States has been the source of heated debate for a number of years. Although the publicity surrounding the issue has been considerable and made to look like it is a recent problem facing the nation, the problem, in reality, has been on the horizon for nearly a century. During President Woodrow Wilson's administration, efforts were unsuccessfully made to pass national legislation regarding the delivery of health care in the United States and the issue has appeared periodically on the national agenda ever since (Lepore, 2009). Finally, on March 23, 2010, among massive controversy, the Affordable Care Act, through the massive efforts of the Obama administration, became law.

Despite the passing of the Affordable Care Act, health care in the United States remains dismal for a large percentage of American citizens. Although there were a number of significant provisions in the Act that took effect nearly…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, R.M. (2001). Improving Access to Care in America. Los Angeles: University of California.

Boehm, G. (2005). Debunking Medical Malpractice Myths: Unraveling the False Premises behind Tort Reform. Yale Journal of Health Policy Law & Ethics, 357-369.

Lepore, J. (2009, December 7). Preexisting Condition. The New Yorker .

Shi, L. (2003). Delivering Health Care in America: A Systems Approach (3rd Edition). Burlington, VT: Jones & Bartlett Publishers.
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Health Care ACA

Words: 1845 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46626425

ACA

The Affordable Care Act works on the premise that all Americans should have access to health care insurance. Because this is provided through insurance companies, the system is only enforceable under certain conditions. One of the key tenets of health care reform is the idea that those with pre-existing conditions cannot be denied insurance coverage. This group of people has long had problems getting insurance, and insurance companies spend tens of millions to invent pre-existing conditions that would then be used to deny coverage. Even insurance commissioners have been known to take offensive and absurd stances on pre-existing conditions, arguing that insurance companies should not have to take customers with such conditions because the person is to blame for their pre-existing condition (Ferguson, 2013). With attitudes like this from people connected to the insurance industry, the only way that the Obama Administration was going to achieve universal health care…… [Read More]

References

Ferguson, D. (2013). Georgia insurance commissioner: It's your fault if you have a pre-existing commission. Raw Story Retrieved December 6, 2013 from http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2013/12/05/georgia-insurance-commissioner-its-your-fault-if-you-have-a-pre-existing-condition/

Klein, E. (2012). Unpopular mandate. The New Yorker. Retrieved December 6, 2013 from http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/06/25/120625fa_fact_klein

Kliff, S. (2013). Washington State provides case study on effects of health care reform. Washington Post. Retrieved December 6, 2013 from http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2012-06-16/national/35461636_1_individual-mandate-health-insurance-insurance-reforms

AARP. (2013). For people 65+. American Association of Retired People. Retrieved December 6, 2013 from  http://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/health/healthcare_reform/2013-07/aca-factsheet-for-65-aarp.pdf
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Health Care Reform Legislation

Words: 716 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88595361

Quality of Care: Healthcare eform

Health care reform legislation is expected to reduce health care spending by $590 billion over 10 years and lower premiums by nearly $2,000 per family by slowing the annual growth rate in national health expenditures. Discuss how this savings will be accomplished and what potential sacrifices in health care delivery may be experienced. Is the figure of $590 billion when calculated over a ten-year period really a significant savings?

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was designed to make healthcare more accessible to a wider array of Americans and also more equitable in its method of delivery. Some of its provisions included requiring all adults (with some hardship exemptions) to have healthcare or pay a penalty. The hope was that expanding the risk pool of young, healthy insured who might otherwise forgo coverage would support the costs of some of the other provisions of the bill,…… [Read More]

References

Carroll, A. (2014). Why increasing access to healthcare does not save money. The New York

Times. Retrieved from:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/15/upshot/why-improving-access-to-health-care-does-not-save-money.html?_r=0&abt=0002&abg=0

Keefe, C. (2014). I'm an Obama supporter. But Obamacare has hurt my family. The Washington
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Socialized Healthcare Is Right for America

Words: 3288 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 26937451

Universal Healthcare

Universal Health are for America:

How a Socialist Model an Work in a Democratic ountry

The possibility of a universal health care system in the United States seems distant at times. Yet as more and more youths graduate college, and as more and more adults lose positions they have held for decades, one finds oneself wishing that the United States would at least secure this basic right for such individuals, many of whom have few prospects for immediate hire and remain without health insurance coverage. The political situation often does not match social reality, especially with respect to universal health care.

Though President Obama has taken measures to ensure that the health care system is at least reformed a little, the path to a future vote for universal health care remains long and arduous. Sadly, few can envision a socialist model of healthcare working in America, and content…… [Read More]

Conclusions

The health care debates should not focus around political ideologies or other political issues. Instead, our nation's leaders ought to realize that obtaining medical services should not be privilege and this is exactly what private corporations have made it now. Instead, this should be a right, that each American can have, and each American should exercise his or her democratic right and be able to bring this to fruition by campaigning for it alongside other supports. This paper has given a history of the health care system in the United States, and has provided alternatives and possibilities of implementing these alternatives in order to make this country a better place for all.

A universal, even socialized health care system in the United States should not mean that this country is compromising any of its values; instead it should make note of the fact that such a system, tailored to fit this country as mentioned above, would enable all to have a better way of life and perhaps an even longer life. In order to attain this we must fight as Americans for a basic right. Such statements as "Nearly 50 million Americans are currently without health insurance, and many with insurance are still struggling to pay their medical bills" or "The United States spends an estimated $2 trillion annually on healthcare expenses, more than any other industrialized country" should not be statements that we can utter. This country is great, and has been able to reform everything in its history, and health care should be no different. [21: "Should the U.S. have Universal Health Care?"(2011). Opposing Views. Retrieved July 4, 2011, < http://www.opposingviews.com/questions/should-the-us-have-universal-healthcare >.] [22: Johnson, T. "Health Care Costs and U.S. Competitiveness." (2010). CFR.org. Retrieved June 4, 2011, < http://www.cfr.org/health-science-and-technology/healthcare-costs-us-competitiveness/p13325 >.]
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Presidential Candidates and Healthcare

Words: 343 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33329571

Finally, the wealthy would be paying a higher percentage.

Response to Answer 2

Indeed, Hillary Clinton's proposal is ambitious but amounts to little more than sitting on the fence. Instead of proposing a comprehensive plan for true universal health care, she suggests a convoluted system of tax credits. Income tax forms are complex enough; few citizens can navigate their way through their pages without hiring an expert, and only those who are well-off enough can afford to do so. Hillary's plan only improves slightly on an outworn system. Instead, we need to entirely revamp the concept of health care and change the way Americans view socialized medicine. Whether or not Hillary Clinton was involved in nefarious scandals, she should devise a health care plan that more closely resembles those used successfully in many other countries: taxes fund a federally-funded health care system that completely removes private insurance companies and strips…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Institutions Are Seeking New

Words: 792 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2633007



Cost is one of the primary issues -- it is cheaper to go to an RN than a doctor, and walk-in clinics have lower overhead costs than physician's offices, which is of great concern to uninsured or minimally insured patients. ait time is another concern -- clinics provide immediate treatment, patients do not have to wait for appointments for a brief, routine procedure, which insured patients may balk at if they merely wish to get a routine culture for strep throat. Using the Internet to access information about insurance and care results in lowered administrative costs for providers, less need for phone operators to provide advice, and results in additional speed for the consumer, in accessing records.

For a patient without insurance, ordering drugs online and not having to pay for a 'live' consult may be more cost-efficient, despite the higher costs of the drugs. Healthcare companies' desire to make…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Kantor, Aileen. (Dec 1991). "New role for nurses." Business & Health. Retrieved 23 Jul

2007 at http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0903/is_n13_v9/ai_11673858

Wal-Mart to expand walk-in clinics in stores." (24 Apr 2007). AP Wire. Retrieved 23 Jul

2007 at MSN. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/18292564
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Healthcare Issues With the Provision

Words: 1180 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96629310

In their move from a completely government-paid and -- operated healthcare system to a fees-based approach, the Chinese have greatly improved the efficiency, availability, and efficacy of their healthcare system (Wan & Wan 2010). This suggests that a combination of perspectives, rather than the market or single-payer perspectives that form so many healthcare systems, is most effective.

There are also, of course, healthcare systems that have developed in the same period as those mentioned above, but with far more negative results. The South African healthcare system, though effective in combating certain specific conditions, has many of the same failings as the United States' system, only on to a far more apparent degree. A lack of organization and responsiveness, exacerbated by an attempt to exert highly politicized and highly centralized control over healthcare provision, has plagued South African efforts to combat AIDS and many other problems the country -- and the…… [Read More]

References

Offredy, M. (2008). "The health of a nation: perspectives from Cuba's national health system." Quality in primary care 16(4), pp. 269-77

Sewankambo, N. & Katamba, A. (2009). "Health systems in Africa: learning from South Africa." The lancet 374(9694), pp. 957-9.

Squires, A. (2009). "U.S. Healthcare reform: A comparative book review." Nursing ethics 16(5), pp. 673-5.

Wan, Y. & Wan, Y. (2010). "Achievement of equity and universal access in China's health service: A commentary on the historical reform perspective from the UK National Health Service." Global public health 5(1), pp. 15-27.
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Healthcare Hadley Jack John Holahan Teresa Coughlin

Words: 636 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 27285173

Healthcare

Hadley, Jack, John Holahan, Teresa Coughlin, & Dawn Miller. (2008). Covering the uninsured in 2008: Current costs, sources of payment, and incremental costs. Health Affairs, Web

Exclusive, 399-415.

According to Hadley (et al. 2008), "the cost of expanding coverage to the 16% of Americans who are uninsured would add 5% to national health spending" (Hadley 2008: 399). This cost is considerable, yet the cost of allowing the status quo to remain is far greater. In the article, "Covering the uninsured" the authors use quantitative analysis to determine how much care uninsured persons currently receive, how much of it remains uncompensated because of an inability to pay, and how much more coverage would be consumed if all Americans did have health insurance (Hadley 2008: 399). Their data encompasses interviews of 102,000 people who were part of the Medical Expenditure Panel Surveys; data from government budgets and health care providers; surveys…… [Read More]

Reference

Hadley, Jack, John Holahan, Teresa Coughlin, & Dawn Miller. (2008). Covering the uninsured in 2008: Current costs, sources of payment, and incremental costs. Health Affairs, Web

Exclusive, 399-415.
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Healthcare Government Regulations the Role of Government

Words: 2113 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46728609

Healthcare Government egulations

The role of government regulatory agencies and government regulations in general is particularly important in health care. The reasons for this are many, but the most important of those reasons is that health care delivery is a special case with regard to consumer use, as to some degree all individuals have the right to safe and ethical treatment and treatment that above all else does no harm. Government regulatory agencies and government regulations therefore become a sort of watch dog for healthcare, attempting to make sure that treatment to all patients is safe, ethical and equitable. Government regulatory agencies are especially keen on identifying universal barriers to health care by establishing public insurance, rules and regulations as well as funding and also attempting to eradicate some of the health care disparities that exist today. To do so they have created and regulate many pieces of legislation that…… [Read More]

Resources

By the Numbers. (2011). Modern Healthcare, 41(27), 9.

Prial, D. (2007, July 18). A painful prescription. Record, The (Hackensack, NJ).

Rothstein, M.A. (2011). Currents in Contemporary Bioethics. Journal Of Law, Medicine & Ethics, 39(1), 91-95. doi:10.1111/j.1748-720X.2011.00553.x

Webster, P. (2011). Value of e-prescribing questioned. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal, 183(14), 1575.
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Healthcare Policies

Words: 1952 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86833684

Health Policies Medicare

hen everyone in our country finally starts to reach the age of 65 years of age or older, then every person will become eligible for Medicare. It is clear that there are some elderly that are having minimum health concerns while others recurrently are dealing with medical issues for which they will have to seek out treatment by the doctor. However, research is starting to display that there are at least five top conditions that are enhancing on medical and drug spending. It is obvious that Heart disease circumstances are the number one medical issue that the those that are considered elderly are facing and that is becoming very costly to them. Most are unaware that the second one is the disease cancer and it could be internal or external for various elderly patients. Other issues such as joint ailments a lot of the times can cost…… [Read More]

Work Cited:

Wenzlow, Audra T., et al. "Effects of a Discharge Planning Program on Medicaid Coverage of State Prisoners with Serious Mental Illness." Psychiatric Services 62.1 (2011): 73-8.

Sommers, Benjamin D. "Loss of Health Insurance among Non-Elderly Adults in Medicaid." Journal of General Internal Medicine 24.1 (2009): 1-7.

Verdier, James, and Allison Barrett. "How Medicaid Agencies Administer Mental Health Services: Results from a 50-State Survey." Psychiatric Services 59.10 (2008): 1203-6.

Harman, Jeffrey S., Allyson G. Hall, and Jianyi Zhang. "Changes in Health Care use and Costs After a Break in Medicaid Coverage among Persons with Depression." Psychiatric Services 58.1 (2007): 49-54.
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Health Care Industry the State

Words: 1114 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99313436



Even though the overall life expectancy in the U.S. has increased to the age of 78, the relative ranking has fallen in relation to the rest of the world, with the U.S. now 38th out of 195 countries, behind most of Western Europe.

These rankings may reflect the combination of a shortage of public health education, lack of daily exercise, poor nutrition, and the uninsured not seeking medical help.

The results seem inevitable: the vast amount of money being spent on health care in the U.S. is plainly not buying better health care for the population. In a privatized insurance system where individual resources determine availability to obtain health care, then access to care will be prejudiced by income difference.

Positive Outcomes with Earlier Detection

There is some positive news. Cancer survival rates are considerably higher in the U.S. than the UK, presumably a result of a health care system…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Donohue, Tom. "U.S. Health Care -- Strengths and Weaknesses." 12 Feb 2008 . Chamber Post. 2 May 2009 .

"Health Insurance Cost." 2008. The National Coalition on Health Care. 2009 2 May .

Journal Compilation. "Is healthcare in the United States too big to fail?" Clinical Practice (2008): 62, 12, 1827 -- 1830.

Uretsky, Samuel D. "Healthcare in the United States ." 10 Jan 2005 . MedHunters. 2009 2 May .
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Healthcare Health Care Research Health

Words: 1017 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86002963

Canada is even further behind in its access to high tech equipment, including machines used for MRI's and CAT scans. This shortage of equipment affects wait time for diagnostic tests, which in some provinces can run well over three months (Beaudan, 2002).

According to Michael Decter, chair of the national board of Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Canadian health care system is dazed but he still believes that modernized public healthcare is the answer. "e do well on life expectancy and immunization of children compared to the U.S.," he says, noting that the United States spends 40% more on healthcare than Canada does (Beaudan, 2002).

Americans who go to Canada for cheap flu shots often come away impressed at how Canada offers free and first class medical care to everyone. But hospital administrators will tell a different story about having to cut staff for lack of funds or about…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Beaudan, Eric. "Canadian model of healthcare ails." Christian Science Monitor. 28 Aug. 2002: 1.

David, Guy. "The Convergence between for-Profit and Nonprofit Hospitals in the United

States." (2005). The Wharton School of Business University of Pennsylvania. 13 April 2009

http://www.aeaweb.org/annual_mtg_papers/2006/0106_0800_0204.pdf
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Healthcare Access the Health of Any Single

Words: 564 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51186709

Healthcare Access

The health of any single person is the most important and most limiting factor about that person's ability to complete physical tasks and live a useful and purposeful life. Healthcare is a term that is widely used but never discussed in how it can best be accessed. The purpose of this essay is to identify and describe a useful plan that helps solve the dilemma of people acquiring a proper and useful source of healthcare. The ethical component of the situation will also be introduced to help demonstrate how practical this plan can be.

To many, healthcare is often associated with doctors, nurses, hospitals, drugs and surgery. It seems that more people are sick or are diseased with some sort of affliction than ever before. Tanner (2008) made the point that "a closer look shows that nearly all health care systems worldwide are wrestling with problems of rising…… [Read More]

References

Cohen, J. (2008). Does Preventive Care Save Money? The New England Journal Of Medicine, 14 Feb 2008. Retrieved from http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp0708558

Lowes, C. (2011). Reviewing Medical Ethics. Philosophy International Journal Of Health, 12 June 2012.

Tanner, M. (2008). The Grass is Not Always Greener: A Look at National Health Care Systems Around the World. CATO Institute, 18 Mar 2008. Retrieved from http://www.cato.org/publications/policy-analysis/grass-is-not-always-greener-look- national-health-care-systems-around-world
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Healthcare -- Legal Issues Religion

Words: 2158 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 11354839

While it may not be just to hold an organization liable, absolutely, for every instance of employee negligence, there is a rationale for imposing such liability in many cases. For example, many types of industries entail potential danger to others that are inherent to the industry.

Individual workers are not likely to be capable of compensating victims of their negligence, but the employer benefits and profits financially by engaging in the particular industry. Therefore, the employer should not necessarily escape liability for compensating all harm caused by their activities, regardless of fault in particular instances.

10.A nurse is responsible for making an inquiry if there is uncertainty about the accuracy of a physician's medication order in a patient's record. Explain the process a nurse should use to evaluate whether or not to make an inquiry into the accuracy of the physician's medication order.

Like other highly trained professionals, experienced nurses…… [Read More]

References

Abrams, N., Buckner, M.D. (1989) Medical Ethics: A Clinical Textbook and Reference for the Health Care Professionals. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

Caplan, a.L., Engelhardt, H.T., McCartney, J.J. Eds. (1981) Concepts of Health and Disease: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley

Starr, P. (1984) the Social Transformation of American Medicine.

New York: Basic Books
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Healthcare Meeting in a Recent

Words: 418 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 82429961

It appears the dangers of a commercialized healthcare system have demonstrated that this beastly practice of profiting off the sick is not good for the society at many different level it contains.

Healthcare discussions of this matter do not belong in a committee that is dedicated to commercial purposes. Medicare and Medicaid were successful in the past in spite of the many governmental forces that played a role in their existence, but like all things these are old and obsolete ways of dealing with this current crisis of confusion.

A philosophical mindset, absent from this meeting, that included individual responsibility and preventative efforts to maintain health should be emphasized from leaders. Safety can never be guaranteed, neither can good health, so to offer such promises of universal coverage is over-idealistic if not criminally negligent. Like the answer to most problems, the solutions are local and come from within communities and…… [Read More]

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Healthcare Standards There Are Three Parts Part

Words: 712 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21943086

Healthcare Standards

there are three parts. PAT A EQUIES 4 DIFFEENT ANSWES

Standard: ICD-10-PCS

"ICD-10-PCS is intended to replace ICD-9 volume 3 for facility reporting of inpatient procedures….ICD-10-PCS is a totally new coding system designed to better accommodate the rapidly changing world of procedures. The code system was developed in the 1990s, but use of the continually updated codes will start almost 20 years later." (Dimick 2011). This new standard is supposed to be more accurate and reflective of current healthcare realities than standards of the past, but it is uncertain if in its implementation this promise will be realized.

Current status of implementation

This standard has yet to be fully implemented. "On October 1, 2013, healthcare providers must begin reporting HIPAA claims using the ICD-10 counterparts to the current ICD-9 code sets" and full implementation will be a 20-year process (Dimick 2011).

Three major issues related to implementation status…… [Read More]

References

About ASC X12. (2013). ASC X12. Retrieved:  http://www.x12.org/about/index.cfm 

Dimick, Chris. (2011). Learning and using ICD-10-PCS. Journal of AHIMA. Retrieved:

 http://journal.ahima.org/2011/02/09/learning-and-using-icd-10-pcs/ 

Health Level 7 International. (2013). HL7. Retrieved:  http://www.hl7.org/implement/index.cfm
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Healthcare Cultural Influences on Provision

Words: 1692 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14673386



The heated nature of the current political debate in the United States upon the subject of healthcare is testimony to the idea that far less than economic numbers, cultural wars govern how healthcare is perceived and administrated. All nations face the problem of cost containment of an increasingly expensive healthcare system. People are living longer, and the nations of the developed world have populations with a far higher median age than in the past. Medical technology is also more expensive. Thus, some form of 'rationing' (as politically unpalatable as the world may be) is required, either based upon need, or based upon who can pay. The United States stresses that individuals can 'choose' to have healthcare or not, and implicit in this assumption is that individuals who can 'merit' better jobs that provide healthcare are making one choice, while Americans who work several jobs that do not offer healthcare --…… [Read More]

References

Anderson, G .F. & J.P. Poullier. (1999).Health spending, access, and outcomes: trends in industrialized countries. Health Affairs, 18(3):178-192

Creese, Andrew. (1994). Global trends in health care reform. World Health Forum. 15.

Sanders, Jeffrey. Financing global health systems. Current issues facing global health systems.
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Healthcare Addressing the Issue of

Words: 8204 Length: 30 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34819035

Stated to be barriers in the current environment and responsible for the reporting that is inadequate in relation to medical errors are:

Lack of a common understanding about errors among health care professionals

Physicians generally think of errors as individual that resulted from patient morbidity or mortality.

Physicians report errors in medical records that have in turn been ignored by researchers.

Interestingly errors in medication occur in almost 1 of every 5 doses provided to patients in hospitals. It was stated by Kaushal, et al., (2001) that "the rate of medication errors per 100 admission was 55 in pediatric inpatients. Using their figure, we estimated that the sensitivity of using a keyword search on explicit error reports to detect medication errors in inpatients is about 0.7%. They also reported the 37.4% of medication errors were caused by wrong dose or frequency, which is not far away from our result of…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Discussion Paper on Adverse Event and Error Reporting In Healthcare: Institute for Safe Medication Practices Jan 24, 2000

Patient Safety/Medical Errors Online at the Premiere Inc. page located at: http://www.premierinc.com/all/safety/resources/patient_safety/downloads/patient_safety_policy_position_2001.doc

Medstat / Shortell, S. Assessing the Impact of Continuous Quality Improvement on Clinical Practice: What It Will Take to Accelerate Progress.

Health Policy Monitor (2001) A Publication of the Council of State Governments Vol. 6, No. 1 Winter/Spring 2001 PO18-0101
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Health Care Systems Management as

Words: 9550 Length: 35 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 98461776

The infant mortality rate is of 8.97 deaths per 1,000 live births. This rate places Kuwait on the 160th position on the chart of the CIA. The adult prevalence rate of HIV / AIDS is of 0.1 per cent.

In terms of economy, Kuwait is a relatively open, small and wealthy economy. It relies extensively on oil exports -- petroleum exports for instance account for 95 per cent of the total export revenues as well as for 95 per cent of the federal income. The Kuwaiti representatives have recently set the goal of increasing the oil production per day. Currently, Kuwait is facing the pressures of the internationalized economic crisis -- which however, due to recent economic surpluses in Kuwait, affects the economy to a lower extent.

Simultaneously with the increase in oil production, the Kuwaiti authorities are also focusing on diversifying the economic activities in the sense of supporting…… [Read More]

References:

Agency, Kuwait News. "Blair's "Kuwait Vision." 15 March 2010. Zawya.com. .

Al-Ansari, H. And S. AL-Enezi. "Health Sciences Libraries in Kuwait." Bulletin of the Medical Library Association 89.3 (2001): 287-93.

Al-Awadhi, Olusi, Al-Saeid, Moussa, et.al. "Incidence of Musculoskeletal Pain in Adult Kuwaitis." Annals of Saudi Medicine 25.6 (2005): 459=62.

Al-Baho, A. "Resident's Guide to the Curriculum for Training in Family Medicine." December 2008. Kuwait Institute for Medical Specialization. .
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Healthcare for Women Health Care

Words: 1442 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29507577

As a woman enters her geriatric years, many unique problems are also faced. Her post-menopausal period leaves a woman with increased risk of osteoporosis, and hormone-replacement therapy may need to be considered or dismissed depending upon the needs and wellness of the individual women. Additionally, increased risk for obesity begins nearly at the adolescent period, when women's hormone loads change and often activity of childhood decreases. The incidence of obesity and overweight among women perpetually increases with every year of life. ("Overweight, Obesity Threaten U.S.," 2002, p. 8)Obesity and overweight, as one of the most significant conditions associated with several chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease, increased risk of stroke and hypertension should be developed as a lifespan issue, as the needs of intervention and prevention change as women age and go through various stages of life.

While women have functional characteristics that require specialized health care,…… [Read More]

References

Blackwell, Daria, 2002. Women in the Healthcare Industry Reaching for the Top. Medical Marketing & Media, Dec2002, Vol. 37 Issue 12, p44, 8p.

Fleming, Carl, 2004. Healthcare Access: Conflicts of Interest Presented by Managed Care Icu Bedside Rationing and Their Impact on Minorities and Women. Georgetown Journal of Gender & the Law, Spring2004, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p663-676.

Heyman, B., & Henriksen, M. (2001). Risk, Age and Pregnancy: A Case Study of Prenatal Genetic Screening and Testing / . New York: Palgrave.

Lueck, T.L., & Chang, H. (2002). Tribune's 'WomanNews' Gives Voice to Women's Issues. Newspaper Research Journal, 23(1), 59.