Utilitarianism Essays (Examples)

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Contemporary Moral Issues

Words: 1049 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 7778901

Utilitarianism

Contemporary moral issues-Utilitarianism

An immediate challenge of living that is linked not only to the quality of life but also to the nature of our experiences is decision making. Everyday individuals have decisions to make and many of these decisions are of a multidimensional nature. The complexity of decision making often paralyzes some individuals because of indecision. They are afraid of the consequences because the consequences are unclear and the path to clarity obscure. Philosophical positions attempt to assist in clarifying decision making through multiple approaches. In this paper I will demonstrate that the most useful philosophical approach to decision making for the individual is utilitarianism. Utilitarianism is superior to Kantianism and Virtue Theory because of its simplicity and the clarity it brings to the decision making process.

There are multiple utilitarian positions and these will be considered briefly at this point in the debate. The two most dominant…… [Read More]

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Rawls & Bernard Williams

Words: 2941 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 31741908

Utilitarianism

The author of this report is to offer a fairly extensive essay about three general questions relating to utilitarianism. The first question pertains to John awls and his deconstructions of utilitarianism and what came to be known as "the analogy." The second question pertains to the views of Peter Singer as stated and enumerated in Famine, Affluence and Morality. Last up will be Bernard Williams. Like awls, he generally viewed utilitarianism poorly and offers specific examples and explanations of why he did not agree with the subject. For all three questions, there will be a critique or criticism of the overall argument. While cases can be made for both utilitarianism and its opposite, there are some rather gaping holes in the logic that justifies utilitarianism and how it works.

Questions Answered

Of all of the ethical and moral philosophers out there, awls is certainly one of the more notorious…… [Read More]

References

Rawls, J. (1971). A theory of justice. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard

Singer, P. (1972). Famine, Affluence, and Morality. Philosophy and Public Affairs, 1(1).

Smart, J., & Williams, B. (1973). Utilitarianism; for and against. Cambridge [England:
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In Defense of Markets and Misers

Words: 821 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44618776

Utilitarianism in Defense of Markets and Misers by Candace Allen & Dwight Lee

Candace Allen and Dwight Lee's analysis of markets and misers in the American economy centers on how these two factors contribute beneficially for economy to become efficient. In the article, the authors discuss the background about how markets and misers have often been projected to society as inefficient factors that contribute insignificantly to the economy. This is because markets are considered as efficient only in profit-making, by providing commodities that are in demand, and optimally using these commodities to gain profit through surpluses. Misers, on the other hand, being frugal in economic, particularly monetary resources, does not contribute to economic growth at all by not spending any money and putting these money in the monetary supply of the society. These 'perceived' notions show the negative image given to markets (participants) and misers, who, because there are no…… [Read More]

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reflections and'summaries on ethical theories

Words: 1221 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33539473

Utilitarianism is a consequentialist ethical framework. The consequences of an action are more important than the motivations behind the action or the action itself. An action has "utility" if it serves the greatest good. The basic principle of utilitarianism is creating the greatest good for the greatest number of people, or the greatest happiness for the greatest number of people. The ethics of utilitarianism differ from ethical egoism in that the individual may make a sacrifice for the common good because it is the aggregate of happiness/goodness that matters, not maximizing individual happiness. Central to utilitarianism is the belief that all people are inherently equal and of equal consideration when making ethical decisions (p. 55). John Stuart Mill outlined the core tenets of utilitarianism, which became a fundamental component of Enlightenment political philosophy. Another utilitarian philosopher, Jeremy Bentham, proposed a happiness calculus that can be used to more rigorously apply…… [Read More]

Works Cited

MacKinnon, Barbara and Fiala, Andrew. Ethics. 8th edition. Cengage.
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Hard Times in His Novel Hard Times

Words: 3013 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51021164

Hard Times

In his novel Hard Times, Charles Dickens is not shy in confronting what he sees as the paramount social evils of his day, particularly when those evils come in the form of ostensibly beneficent social movements themselves. In particular, Dickens satirizes Jeremy Bentham's Utilitarianism through the characterization of Thomas Gradgrind and Josiah Bounderby as men of cold reason and hard facts, and uses the fates of the various characters to demonstrate the destructive potential of Utilitarian ethics when applied without a comprehensive, objective standard for determining good and bad. The city of Coketown represents the physical embodiment of the cruel, alien world produced by the enactment of Utilitarian policy, and contrasts with its creators expressed dedication to facts and reason. By considering the characterization of Gradgrind and Bounderby, the setting of Coketown, and the narrator's particular use of language throughout the novel alongside the philosophy of Utilitarianism as…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bentham, Jeremy. The principles of morals and legislation. Oxford: University of Oxford Press,

Dickens, Charles. Hard Times. London: Bradbury & Evans, 1854.

Bentham 2.

Bentham 2.
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Middlemarch Text and John Stuart

Words: 1235 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 20426322

In this case, Mary would have acted precisely as she did, that is, pursuing her personal happiness and acting according to a pattern she had established before, that of being virtuous and always acting morally. In this case, the decision is plain and easy to take: Mary has to be virtuous so as to satisfy her own moral demands and ensure her emotional and spiritual comfort. Thus, she acts according to her pre-established set of rules.

Thus, Mary acts primarily, as she herself argues, so as not to 'soil' the beginning of her life. She feels that taking the money would save the old man because his own happiness and personal interest would be in giving the money away to anyone else besides his family: "I will not let the close of your life soil the beginning of mine. I will not touch your iron chest or your will."(Eliot, 411)…… [Read More]

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Philosophy and Morality Instructions the Exam Consists

Words: 2703 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10011484

Philosophy and Morality

INSTRUCTIONS The exam consists essays. Please essays document. Please plagiarize. Be paraphrase verbatim language authors putting quotation marks. You document sources, -text citation ( footnotes) a reference page.

Philosophy

John Arthur's "Morality, Religion, and Conscience,"

A concern on the relationship between morality and religion is an ancient argument that continues in philosophy in the present times. The argument is mainly on whether morality emanates from an institution or religious background. Theologians in their numbers provide unwavering support the argument that a unifying absolute force or God provides universal moral guidance. The importance of observing morality and religion as independent on one another but related in some way has been argued by other philosophers (Lyons 479). John Arthur argues that morality and religion are not interlocking in relevant manners. Arthur argues that morality in independent from religion and religion does not influence moral action. It is his contention…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arthur, J. "Morality, Religion, and Conscience." In Morality and Moral Controversies: Readings in Moral, Social, and Political Philosophy. Ed. edition, by John Arthur. Seventh. Upper Saddle River, N.J.:: Pearson Prentice Hall:, 2005. Print.

Hare, R.M. Moral Thinking: Its Levels, Method and Point. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1981. Print.

Lyons, William. "Conscience - an Essay in Moral Psychology." Philosophy 84.330 (2009): 477-94. Print.

Merle, Jean-Christophe. "A Kantian Critique of Kant's Theory of Punishment." Law and Philosophy 19.3 (2000): 311-38. Print.
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Ethics Compare the Similarities and Differences Between

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50513784

Ethics

Compare the similarities and differences between virtue theory, utilitarianism and deontological ethics

In the study of ethics, there are a number of theories that are designed to influence how someone is reacting to various events that are occurring in their lives. This is designed to create a series of standards that will affect the way they are reacting with the world around them and other people. Depending upon the approach, this will impact their behavior and beliefs. ("Virtue Ethics," 2012)

A description of the differences in how each theory addresses ethics and morality

The virtue theory is when there is a focus on the character of the individual in determining their behavior. This is accomplished by looking at the actions that are taken by the person and how their beliefs are influencing their thinking. There are several key questions that are asked during this process to include:

Who am…… [Read More]

References

Deontological Ethics. (2007). Stanford University. Retrieved from:   http://plato.stanford.edu /entries/ethics-deontological/ 

Utilitarianism. (2009). CSUS. Retrieved from:  http://www.csus.edu/indiv/g/gaskilld/ethics/utilitarianism%20notes.htm 

Virtue Ethics. (2012). BBC. Retrieved from:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/ethics/introduction/virtue.shtml
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Corporate Governance and Ethical Responsibility

Words: 1923 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49853608

" Thus this principle is founded on an individual's ability to predict a given action's consequences. On predicting such consequences, an individual is supposed to choose the course of action which would in the end benefit the greatest number of people. In such a case, the choice selected would be considered ethically correct. For instance, if one innocent person has to be killed so as to save the entire human race, then it would be ethically right to kill such a person from a utilitarian point-of-view. An application of this principle in our scenario seems somewhat straightforward. To determine the right course of action in this case, the question to be asked is; of all the alternative courses of action at Dr. Doight's disposal, which course of action would benefit the greatest number of people? In my opinion, seeking to ensure that the situation is brought under control no matter…… [Read More]

References

Bredeson, D. (2011). Applied Business Ethics: A Skills-Based Approach. Mason, OH: Cengage Learning.

Ferrell, O.C., Fraedrich, J. & Ferrell, L. (2008). Business Ethics: Ethical Decision Making and Cases (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning.

Freeman, R.E. (2010). Strategic Management: A Stakeholder Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Lozano, J.M. (2002). Ethics and Organizations: Understanding Business Ethics as a Learning Process. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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Business Ethics an Ethical Issue Refers to

Words: 1848 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14483260

Business Ethics

An ethical issue refers to a situation whereby an organization is required to choose amongst alternatives that must be evaluated as either wrong or right. For example, an ethical issue arises when a business company opts to make as much profit while pollution the environment, the dilemma here being the regulation and social consequences. The company management may opt to bribing the regulation implementing organization as long as they continue making short-term profits before the law catches up with them, by then they may be forced to attire with the rule or shut down but they will have made as much finances than when they may have started and the consequences on the social life will have reached the stage where it affects their health and made the environment unbearable. The principle of autonomy; which requires individuals to be left on their own independence to conduct their activities,…… [Read More]

References

Andrew, J. (2008). Utilitarianism and deontology theories. New York: John and sons ltd.

Ferrell, O.C., & Fraedrich, J. (2012). Business Ethics: Ethical Decision Making & Cases. Salt Lake: Cengage Learning.

Joanne, B. (2010). Ethics and Business success. Mexico: Greenwood press.

John, K., & Berlyn, M. (2009). Assessing the effectiveness of decision making models. Normative and rationale models, 15 (14), 319-325.
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Same Sex Marriage Has Been

Words: 1027 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38588672

S. citizens. This is a popular argument offered by the same sex marriage movement and it is one that is compelling.

For many years homosexuality was considered illegal behavior in most jurisdictions in the United States but most such statutes have been abolished and so gays and lesbians are now full citizens who have the right to expect full rights of citizenship. This means that whatever one's ethical or moral standards might be does not mean that such standards must be expressed in the laws. Many Americans object morally and ethically to the display of pornography; the publishing of songs with colorful lyrics; and, suggestive books and magazines but each of these examples is protected by the First Amendment and the rights of gays and lesbians to marry should enjoy the same protection.

The proponents of virtue ethics are not alone in their support of same sex marriage. Followers of…… [Read More]

References

Corvino, J. (1999). Same Sex: Debating the Ethics, Science, and Culture of Homosexuality (Studies in Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefiedl Publishers.

Koppelman, A. (2001). On the Moral Foundations of Legal Expressivism. Maryland Law Review, 777-784.

Lewin, E. (2004). Does Marriage have a future? Journal of Marriage and Family, 1000-1006.

Is Gay/Lesbian Marriage Ethical
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Morality When Morality and Ethical

Words: 1162 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5097740

This moral sense is often bigger and more powerful than us. Some people could call it psychological effect, others might term it differently but the fact remains that if we are doing something wrong, this moral sense would keep nagging us to the point that we would no longer be able to enjoy what we are doing and might eventually starting harming ourselves.

In order to protect ourselves from such negative consequences, its best to make a decision that is free of guilt. In this way, we can enjoy the fruits of our success and live a more happy life in general. This is really what is in our best interest though we might fail to see it at first.

It also pays to study the offer from an objective viewpoint. If someone else were offered this job: what would you suggest? Would you allow the person to take the…… [Read More]

References

Richard Garrett, the GOLDEN RULE. Presented to the Starr King School for the Ministry, University of California at Berkeley April 12, 2002

Mill, John Stuart. Excerpts from "Utilitarianism" in Philosophical Problems, an annotated anthology by Laurence BonJour and Ann Baker, editors, Pearson education (2005)

Mill, p. 590
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Morality and the Claims of

Words: 2428 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83278473



Moreover, caring for her mother, the other option, would surely: a) create a feeling of being "unfulfilled" which brings with it depression and resentfulness; b) leave her with nothing to look forward to but the dark day when her mother actually passes away; and c) realize after a short time that she is not "a Mother Teresa" and that her live would be diminished (Stuart, 25).

hat does Stuart believe is the right choice for Alice? Stuart asserts that the virtue that carries the most weight in this instance is having Alice care for her mother. Giving up her career for her mother would outweigh the "…virtues of perseverance, love of truth…and self-knowledge" should she decide to go forward with her dissertation (26).

hat Stuart also mentions -- and this is a prime reason for this writer to believe Alice should find a competent person to be a caregiver for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hill, T.E.. "Assessing Moral Rules: Utilitarian and Kantian Perspectives." Philosophical Issues,

15(1), (2005): 158-178

Mautner, Thomas. "Act-Utilitarianism." The Penguin Dictionary of Philosophy. Retrieved June 12, 2013, from  http://utilitarianism.org . 2008.

Rivera, Lisa. "Sacrifices, Aspirations and Morality: Williams Reconsidered." Ethical Theory and Moral Practice. 10.1 (2007): 69-87.
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Barry Friedman Details the Ethical

Words: 2159 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 14270846

But if it wishes to stand by the stated principles of its founding and the message it attaches to its history, than profiling cannot be allowed to exist.

4) Deontological ethical systems "guide and assess our choices of what we ought to do," as opposed to suggesting what types of people we should be (Stanford, 2007). Another important distinction of deontological viewpoints is their emphasis on the motives and intentions behind an act in regards to that act's ethicality, as opposed to the consequences of that act. One narrow form of deontological ethics is moral absolutism, propagated by such thinkers as Immanuel Kant (Stanford, 2007). According to his view, acts are either moral or immoral in all situations, without any regard to the consequences (Stanford, 2007). Not all deontological viewpoints are this extreme, however it provides the clearest example of the deontological view. According to deontological ethics, acting in a…… [Read More]

References

Fauchon, C. (2004). "Counterpoint: the case against profiling." International social review, Fall-Winter 2004.

Friedman, Barry. (2004). "Policy point-counterpoint: profiling at airports." International social review, Fall-Winter 2004.

Reddick, S. (2004). "Point: the case for profiling." International social review, Fall-Winter 2004.

Stanford. (2007). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Accessed 22 February 2009.  http://plato.stanford.edu
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Ethical Theories the Three Basic Ethical Theories

Words: 2729 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 8101894

Ethical Theories

The three basic ethical theories share a number of similarities, because they each attempt to describe and explicate the ethical decisions made by humans as well as the logic (or illogic) that is used to inform any particular behavior. Utilitarianism offers what is perhaps the most sound ethical theory due to the way it chooses for itself the goal of its efforts, but it is hampered by disagreement regarding the precise execution of the theory. A deontological theory of ethics may be useful for formulating general rules regarding proper behavior, and as such is popular is the workplace, but these rules are not universally applicable and in some cases can actually lead to unethical behavior if followed without fail. Finally, while virtues-based ethics purports to offer individuals instruction for the cultivation of ideal behavioral traits, by definition it cannot offer a universal ethical norm, as it is based…… [Read More]

References

Begley, A.M. (2005). Practising virtue: A challenge to the view that a virtue centred approach to ethics lacks practical content. Nursing Ethics, 12(6), 622-37.

Broad, C. (1930). Five types of ethical theory. New York: Routledge.

Darwall (Ed.). (2003). Virtue ethics. Malden: Blackwell Publishing.

DeConinck, J.B., & Lewis, W.F. (1997). The influence of deontological and teleological considerations and ethical climate on sales managers intentions to reward or punish sales force behavior. Journal of Business Ethics, 16(5), 497-506.
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Criminal Justice Policy Practice Determine Morality Higher

Words: 2487 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88567007

Criminal Justice Policy Practice Determine Morality

Higher Than Utilitarianism

The passing and reformation of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act, also known as the so-called "crack law," is one of the most controversial pieces of legislation to be considered within the criminal justice system and its policy during the past two years. There are several aspects of this legal mandate that present a plethora of interesting situations and questions in regards to the morality of this particular issue, which has been at the forefront of mass media outlets ever since there were significant amendments passed to it in 2010. Interestingly enough, a fair amount of those changes may be attributed to the notion of morality revolving around this legal code, which was largely responsible for the rapid and prolonged imprisonment of minorities -- particularly African-Americans and Latino offenders. One of the most efficacious means of determining whether such a law may be…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bentham, Jeremy. "Offenses Against One's Self: Paederasty Part 1." Journal of Homosexuality. Volume 3 (4). 389-406. 1978. Print.

Benthan, Jeremy. An Introduction To The Principles Of Morals And Legislation. Oxford: Clarendon Press.

Kosman, Maxwell Alie Halpern. "Falling Through The Crack: How Courts Have Struggled to Apply The Crack Amendment To "Nominal Career" And "Plea Bargain" Defendants." Michigan Law Review. Volume 109. 785-812. 2011. Web. http://www.michiganlawreview.org/assets/pdfs/109/5/kosman.pdf

Hartley, Richard., Maddan, Sean., Spahn, Cassia. "Prosecutorial Discretion: An Examination of Substantial Assistance Departures in Federal Crack-Cocaine and Powder-Cocaine Cases." Volume 23. Issue 3 382-407. 2007. Web. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07418820701485379
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Ethical Theories in Nursing

Words: 4777 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 74406948

Nursing Ethical Theories

Ethical Theories in Nursing

Significance of Moral in Nursing

Deontology vs. Utilitarianism

Deontology

Utilitarianism

Justice Ethics vs. Care Ethics

Justice Ethics

Care Ethics

ights Ethics

Conflict of ights

Ethical Theories in Nursing

Moral philosophy has moved from addressing Plato's question of what makes the good person, to Kant's query as to the right thing to do, to Buber's concern with relationship. Whether referring to business ethics' interest in relationships between corporations and consumers; legal ethics' focus on relationships among the legal system, clients, and society; or nursing ethics' consideration of the relationship between patient and nurse; ethics and morality are conceptualized and actualized on the playing field of relationship.

The nature of nursing as a moral endeavor is an assumption embedded in any philosophical or theoretical consideration of the discipline and practice of nursing. An the goal of nursing is a moral one, namely, the good of…… [Read More]

References

Bandman, E.L., & Bandman, B.(1995). Nursing ethics through the lifespan (3rd ed.). Stamford, CT: Appleton & Lange

Buber, M.(1965). Between man and man (R.G. Smith & M.Friedman, Trans). New York: Macmillan. (Original work published 1947).

Carper, B. (1979). The ethics of caring. Advances in Nursing Science, 1(3), 11-19

Cooper, M.C. (1991). Principle-oriented ethics and the ethic of care: A creative tension. Advances in Nursing Science, 14(2), 22-31.
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Ethical Theories Ethics Is an

Words: 1982 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10100387

These are ethics that know no cultural bounds. hat is perceived as ethical in one society as well as any other is an example of a natural law. These are typically based on the human desire for equality as well as the desire to do good ("hat is Natural Law?"). Furthermore, natural rights evolve legally from natural laws often. They also often see an intertwining of religious beliefs, although they can also be expressed as more an intertwining of moral beliefs that are then supported by religion. The primary weakness of natural law theory is that it is sometimes difficult to determine if a belief is truly universal, or simply cultural.

Virtue Ethics:

Virtue ethics determines whether an action is right or wrong by the virtue of the action.

Virtue ethics is currently one of three major approaches in normative ethics. It may, initially, be identified as the one that…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"Kant's Moral Philosophy." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. N.p., 23 Feb. 2004. Web. 9 Feb. 2011. .

MacKinnon, Barbara. Ethics: theory and contemporary issues. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1995. Print.

"Virtue Ethics." Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. N.p., 18 July 2007. Web. 9 Feb. 2011. .

"What is Ethical Relativism?" Philosophy - AllAboutPhilosophy.org. N.p., 2011. Web. 9 Feb. 2011. .
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Philosophy in the Scenario George

Words: 1071 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23780662

e., it removes subjectivity as a vantage point). It is also hard to tell how much unhappiness is created and how to weigh it against the happiness that is created (e.g., how much George would hate his job?, how much suffering will the warmonger go through because he did not get this job?). Further, quantification of happiness or suffering becomes a real issue when trying to determine things on a macro scale. For example, does the tiniest amount of world happiness outweigh a huge amount of individual suffering? How much world happiness is necessary if not?

Second, utilitarianism relies on the outcomes of the actions in order to determine morality. If war breaks out and all of the United States is whipped out because George begrudgingly did his job, dragging his feet the whole time, then his action to take the job was wrong. He would have caused the devastation…… [Read More]

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Business Ethics How Important Is an Individual's

Words: 3263 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46623316

Business Ethics

How important is an individual's privacy in the workplace? Is an individual's privacy in the workplace the most important consideration to be taken into account? hat constitutes privacy in a workplace environment? Do the goals and the mission of the organization supersede an individual's desire to protect his or her privacy? Is it ethical for an employer to collect and disperse personal information from employees without their knowledge? How does the philosophy of utilitarianism play into this issue? This paper delves into those questions and provides supporting information for the resolution of this issue.

After careful review of the textbook for this course, after reviewing additional scholarly resources and taking into consideration a utilitarian approach to this issue -- and after researching the Australian laws regarding workplace privacy -- this paper takes the position that an individual's privacy is indeed vitally important (and must by law be protected)…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Doyle, Carolyn, and Bagaric, Mirko. (2005). Privacy Law in Australia. Annandale, AU:

Federation Press.

Fair Work Ombudsman. (2011). Best Practice Guide / Workplace Privacy. Retrieved September

25, 2012, from http://www.fairwork.gov.au.
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Ethical and Legal Aspects of

Words: 2640 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72101523

Mudra did not act according to this principle when he ignored the warning signs of Daniel's condition.

The best course of action would therefore have been a focus on beneficence/non-maleficence rather than upon respect for autonomy. Daniel's age is also an important factor. Concomitantly with his condition, Daniel's immaturity and a desire to "prove" his independence to his parents, could have contributed to his death. When treating such young persons, it is perhaps advisable to place emphasis upon non-maleficence rather than respect for autonomy. In terms of these two principles, it would be acceptable for the parents to complain.

In terms of scope, the final principle, justice, is not as applicable to Daniel's case itself as it is to his parents. The parents feel aggrieved by the practitioner's lack of in-depth knowledge and action regarding Daniel's condition. They are seeking justice for themselves, but it is too late for such…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Stone, J. (2002) an ethical framework for complementary and alternative therapists.

Routledge.

Applebe, G. & Wingfield, J. (1997) Applebe's Pharmacy law and ethics. The Pharmaceutical Press

Gillon, R. & Lloyd, a. (eds.) (1993). Principles of health care ethics. Wiley.
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Concept of Justice

Words: 1024 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46608346

Justice is a concept that has attracted the use of various terms by several philosophers in efforts to explain it. Based on the accounts of various philosophers, justice is a term that means equitable, fair, and suitable treatment depending on what is owed or due to individuals. Justice is an important concept in the criminal justice system and the modern society because it is applied in cases where people are owed burdens or benefits since their respective conditions are harmed by another individual's acts. The concept of justice has also been explained by various theories, which contain principles that are used in the application of justice.

Explanation of the Theory of Justice

The theory of justice is a concept that is centered on the enforcement of two essential principles of justice that would contribute to a just and morally upright society. John awls introduced the theory of justice as fairness…… [Read More]

References

Beauchamp, T.L. & Childress, J.F. (2001). Justice. In Principles of Biomedical Ethics (5th ed., Chapter 6, 225-239) Oxford University Press. Retrieved from  http://compbio.ucdenver.edu/hunter/cpbs7605/Beauchamp-Childress.pdf 

Garrett, J. (2005, August 24). Rawls' Mature Theory of Social Justice. Retrieved from Western

Kentucky University website:  http://people.wku.edu/jan.garrett/ethics/matrawls.htm 

Harborne, B. & Sage, C. (2010, March). Security and Justice Overview. Retrieved September 25,
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Identification You Have Been Given

Words: 2981 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58729326

Please see "Stake Holder: The Taliban" for more information regarding virtue ethics.

The farmers who are growing poppy plants have a logical stake in this moral dilemma as well. If their crops are destroyed they will have no alternative but to join the Taliban to help settle their debts. They are in a precarious position where they are often forced to grow poppies because they are a very lucrative and traditional cash crop. Their history and culture will be severely affected if their livelihood is destroyed as well. If they functioned as utilitarians, the farmers would look for another alternative to growing poppies or perhaps request a government subsidy since their poppy production kills millions worldwide who abuse their drugs. The farmers likely do not have access to this information however, which makes their position even harder to justify.

Stakeholder:

The Afghan People

Utilitarianism- Principle. See "Stakeholder: The United States…… [Read More]