Volpone Essays (Examples)

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Ben Jonson Intertextualities The Influence

Words: 22973 Length: 80 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70168505

" James a.S. McPeek

further blames Jonson for this corruption: "No one can read this dainty song to Celia without feeling that Jonson is indecorous in putting it in the mouth of such a thoroughgoing scoundrel as Volpone."

Shelburne

asserts that the usual view of Jonson's use of the Catullan poem is distorted by an insufficient understanding of Catullus' carmina, which comes from critics' willingness to adhere to a conventional -- yet incorrect and incomplete -- reading of the love poem. hen Jonson created his adaptation of carmina 5, there was only one other complete translation in English of a poem by Catullus. That translation is believed to have been Sir Philip Sidney's rendering of poem 70 in Certain Sonnets, however, it was not published until 1598.

This means that Jonson's knowledge of the poem must have come from the Latin text printed in C. Val. Catulli, Albii, Tibulli, Sex.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alghieri, Dante Inferno. 1982. Trans. Allen Mandelbaum. New York: Bantam Dell, 2004.

Print.

Allen, Graham. Intertextuality. Routledge; First Edition, 2000. Print.

Baker, Christopher. & Harp, Richard. "Jonson' Volpone and Dante." Comparative
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Disguise Costume and Role Playing in Ben

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45228358

Disguise, Costume, And Role Playing in Ben Jonson's Volpone

Ben Jonson's Volpone, first performed in London in 1605, was a highly successful play centering on the theme of greed. Volpone is particularly notable for Jonson's characters' use of disguise, costume and role playing both to advance the action of the story and to visually express Jonson's ethical beliefs to educate his audience. By writing in the satiric comedic style, the author offered a classic example of his own philosophy that the poet should fulfill a moral function in society. The delightful satire of Volpone clearly exhibits the traits common in all of Jonson's drama: the style and setting are simple and clean; the verse is fast-paced and full of life and humor; the writer's point-of-view is expressed without being either didactic or overly lyrical. In addition to the words the characters speak, the physical garb and personalities they don at…… [Read More]

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Literature Poetry

Words: 1192 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 72206274

ERASED BEFORE YOU TURN IT IN!!!

Volpone by Ben Jonson

Act I, Scene 1, Lines 30-39: This is at the start of the play when we learn about what kind of man Volpone is. This particular passage, being spoken by him, is referring to his money -- he is speaking of how he enjoys the chase of the money more than the actually having it. The play is centered on how Volpone is faking a fatal illness that has caused some greedy people to become "butt-kissers" in order to become his sole heir. Again, it is more fun for Volpone to play tricks on people. In this particular passage he is referring to how he gets his money -- he doesn't actually work for it, nor does he share it, nor does he keep it in a public bank. Mosca is his servant, whom has joined him in his trickery.…… [Read More]

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Mark Twain Huck Finn

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67020206

Huckleberry Finn

Suspense: Find examples of suspense in chapter 24-30. What do these events cause a reader to feel anxious for Huck? Is he ever in real danger?

Suspense is maintained throughout the Wilks scam by wondering whether the increasing inventions of the King and the Duke will still enable them to maintain their con game, and then whether the mounting threat of mob violence will claim their lives, or even possibly Huck's. If there is a moment when Huck may face real danger, it is when the mob forms to demand justice.

As a reader, do you feel anxious for the Duke or the king? Why or why not?

The Duke's and king's situation in these chapters is precarious. The Wilks scam seems unlikely to pan out and brings out the worst in them both -- Huck says their behavior makes him "ashamed of the human race." But the…… [Read More]

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Universally Accepted as One of the World's

Words: 2036 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 13997941

Universally accepted as one of the world's foremost epics, John Milton's Paradise Lost traces the history of the world from a Christian perspective. (Milton, 1667) The narrative of the poem largely deals with falling and how desires -- God, Satan, Jesus, Adam and Eve's -- lead to it. The book is about mankind's fall -- Original Sin -- Adam and Eve's disobedience of God. There are other instances of falling in the plot too. First, Satan's fall from God's graces, as related to Adam and Eve by the angel Raphael, represents the past in the Universe's creation. The second instance -- the present (in the narrative) -- is the Adam and Eve's eating of the Forbidden Fruit. The third instance represents the future. Michael, as he readies to escort Adam and Eve out of Paradise, presents to them the various falls of man until Jesus comes to rescue by dying…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bendz, Fredrik. Proof That There Is No God. 1998. Fredrik Bendz. Available. December 27, 2002.  http://www.update.uu.se/~fbendz/nogod/no_god.htm 

Milton, John. Paradise Lost. The Poetical Works of John Milton. Vol. I and II. Boston R.H. Hinkley Company, 1667.

Wigglesworth, Michael. Day of Doom. The Poems of Michael Wigglesworth. Ed. Roland Basco. New York: University Press of America, 1662.

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