World Peace Essays (Examples)

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Peace in Our Time Is it Possible

Words: 1613 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41352356

PLANET IS TO BECOME MORE PEACFUL IN MY LIFETIME -- HOW IS THIS MOST LIKELY TO COME ABOUT?

If the planet is to become more peaceful in my lifetime: How is this to come about?

Over the years, many types of solutions have been proposed to the problem of the constant state of war which has gripped humankind for so many years: solutions political, economic, and artistic in nature. All of these solutions to some degree have failed. This essay will briefly review some of these proposals and then suggest that these various solutions cannot be deployed in isolation. Peace must be brought about through a multifaceted effort, through both a shift in culture and creating supportive institutions that facilitate dialogue. To bring about world peace or at least to establish a more peaceful planet requires change at every level of society.

"When I was a young boy," writes Johan…… [Read More]

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WWI the Assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand

Words: 1553 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55010445

WWI

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife represented a culmination of several concurrent forces, all of which led to the outbreak of World War. The concurrent forces that led to World War One can be loosely grouped under the following categories: nationalism, imperialism, and militarism. Within each of these categories are ample sub-categories that can testify to the extent of forces that shaped the pre-war conditions throughout not just Europe but the entire world. World War One was a total war for many reasons: it involved serious civilian casualties on a horrific scale for all parties. The Great War also brought to light the impact of globalization on the global economy and political enterprise. Nationalism, imperialism, and militarism all played a part in shaping participation in World War One; the effects of which continue to reverberate.

As Marshall (2001) points out, "Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Italy were all…… [Read More]

References

Allan, T. (2003). The Causes of World War I. Chicago: Reed Elsevier.

Bosco, P., & Bosco, A. (2003). World War I. Infobase.

Heyman, N.M. (1997). World War I. Greenwood.

Marshall, S.L.A. (2001). World War I. New York: First Mariner.
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Peace or War in Homer

Words: 2107 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88344698



Is it a sign of inconsistency in Athena that at the end of the Odyssey she echoes the sentiment of Zeus and sues for peace whereas in Book 4 of the Iliad she is all too eager to ignore the sentiment of her father and manipulate the warriors into shedding more blood? Again -- not necessarily. While, were it up to Zeus he would gladly see men work out their problems in a peaceful way, and, if he can help it, only sends strife and war when men need to be punished. The relationship between war and peace is complicated by the fact that he is not the only god (even if he is king of the gods). The gods seem to have just as many quarrels and disagreements among themselves as men do on Earth -- a point Zeus knows quite well. That is the reason he presides over…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Homer. The Iliad. (Trans. By Richmond Lattimore). IL: University of Chicago Press,

1951. Print.

Homer. The Odyssey. (Trans. By Robert Fitzgerald). NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux,

1961. Print.
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WWII History Making Decades WWII-Present

Words: 2515 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66978809

Diversity -- with the exception of homophobia -- was beginning to be commonly accepted and praised. Technology -- such as the use of DNA in criminology and the introduction of the PC -- was becoming more prominent in the lives of everyday Americans. In the Cold War, President Gorbachev asked for openness and economic freedom, while President Reagan asked him to tear down the Berlin Wall, which he did. However, the discovery of AIDS had a far more profound impact on the American people than any of these events. In 1981, the first case of AIDS was reported in the United Kingdom, and this eventually caused quite a crisis in the U.S., as it was first noticed among gay men, and then in women and children as well. People became scared because they were not sure what was causing the disease. Research continued throughout the 1980s, but the fear caused…… [Read More]

References

Dove, R. (1999). Heroes & Icons: Rosa Parks. Retrieved August 12, 2009, from Time:

http://www.time.com/time/time100/heroes/profile/parks01.html

"Fascinating facts about the invention of the Internet by Vinton Cerf in 1973." (2007,

May 30). Retrieved August 12, 2009, from the Great Idea Finder:  http://www.ideafinder.com/history/inventions/internet.htm
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WWI and the Russian Revolution

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 24086671

The makers of the peace settlement hoped to reduce the possibility of future conflict by taking away Germany's army and controlling its political system. This proved impossible, and only provoked more violence in the long run, as Germans grew more sympathetic to fascism as a result.

Third, why did the United States Senate reject the Treaty of Versailles? What objections did they have to the treaty, especially to the League of Nations? Why was the United States not ready for peace through collective security?

The United States at the time was still isolationist in its philosophy. It had come to participate in the war fairly late, and had little appreciation about how bloody and terrible it had been, through the system of trench warfare, for the major participating European powers. The U.S. still believed the Atlantic Ocean could protect itself from most major European conflicts, and it had felt less…… [Read More]

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World War II in Europe

Words: 1427 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23478242



By attacking from the North, Hitler effectively bypassed France's only real defense against invasion. Within two weeks, Paris was under Nazi control, and still seething from the harsh terms of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles that ended World War I, Hitler demanded that the surrender terms be signed in the very same spot as the armistice that ended that war, and in the very same railroad car, which he had brought out from its museum display for that purpose3. Belgium had surrendered to Germany without firing a shot, effectively dooming France to Nazi occupation, and nearly sealing the fate of more than a quarter million British troops sent to support Britain's ally, France. Only a last-

3. Hayes & Faissler p.444 minute scramble saved the British from capture, at the port city of Dunkirk, where the British used thousands of ships, boats, and dinghies to rescue them all and ferry…… [Read More]

References

Commager, H.S., Miller, D.L. The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager (2002)

Hayes, C., Faissler, M. Modern Times: The French Revolution to the Present (1966)

Kowalick, T.M. The Western Tradition Transcripts (1989)

Lukacs, J. The Last European War (1976)
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Peace Agreements and International Intervention

Words: 3606 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65074896

Peace Agreements and International Intervention

A peace treaty is an agreement between two hostile parties, usually countries or governments, which formally ends a war or armed conflict. Treaties are often ratified in territories deemed neutral in the previous conflict and delegates from these neutral territories act as witnesses to the signatories. In the case of large conflicts between numerous parties there may be one global treaty covering all issues or separate treaties signed between each party. In more modern times, certain intractable conflict situations, especially those involving terrorism, may first be brought to cease-fire and are then dealt with via a peace process where a number of discrete steps are taken on each side to eventually reach the mutually desired goal of peace and the signing of a treaty. Some ceasefires, such as the one following the American Revolution, may last a number of years and follow a tortuous process.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Berdal, Mats and David M. Malone, eds. Greed and Grievance: Economic Agendas in Civil Wars. Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner, 2000.

Chomsky, Noam. "Peace Process' Prospects." July 27, 2000. June 27, 2005. .

Collier, Paul and Anke Hoeffler. "Greed and Grievance, Policy Research Paper 2355." World Bank Development Group. May 2000.

Fitzpatrick, Sheila. The Russian Revolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.
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Peace Keepers of the Northeast

Words: 2241 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 92147282

This dance was very powerful as it did scare the European people. They did not fully understand the reason behind the dance and the religion, but they were very clear as to what the apocalypse was and they wondered if the Indians were somehow summoning the end of the world. Not soon after this Ghost dance caused such a commotion, an Indian by the name of Handsome Lake who was a leader for the Seneca tribe brought a new message to the Iroquois people. His message was to end the drinking. The Iroquois people had began to drink a lot of alcohol that was often offered to them from the European people during the fur trade. Handsome Lake believed that many of the problems that the Iroquois people faced was related to the alcohol. Many of the Indian people were drunk when they were trying to handle problems of poverty…… [Read More]

WORKS CITED

Kehoe, Alice Beck. North American Indian Tribes, Chapter 5. 1992 Prentice Hall.

Biolsi, Thomas and Zimmerman, Larry. Indians and Anthropologists, Chapter 9. 1997 Prentice Hall.

Iroquois Website. Retrieved December 19, 2009 from http://www.iroquois.net/.
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WWII to the 60s the

Words: 1427 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99114644

Wilson, a student of public administration, favored more governmental regulation and action during a time when large monopolies still existed. He saw the role of public administration as "government in action; it is the executive, the operative, the most visible side of government, and is of course as old as government itself" (Wilson 235). The pendelum swung, though, and the government was blamed for many of the ills that caused the Great Depression. Franklin Roosevelt, despite being called draconian, knew that he had to launch programs that would have a quick effect upon the struggling economy; resulting the New Deal -- a complex, interlocking set of programs designed to produce jobs, economic recovery, and fiscal reform of banking and Wall Street -- exactly what was needed, it seems to turn the Titanic in a new direction (Badger). Then, of course, came the war, which stimulated the economy like nothing else,…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Badger, A. FDR - The First Hundred Days. New York: Macmillan, 2009.

Cooper, P. Public Law and Public Administration. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1988.

Fesler, J. "Public Administration and the Social Sciences: 1946-1969." Mosher, F. American Public Administration: Past, Present, Future. Washington, DC & Birmingham, AL: The University of Alabama Press, 1975. 97-142.

Halberstam, D. The Fifties. New York: Ballantine, 1994.
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Peace Justice and Reconciliation Following

Words: 1924 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67376544

Victims can participate in the proceedings, presenting their voices and concerns. They are invited, and it would be good for us if they present their concerns in court. They can also request compensation from those under investigation.

It will be a demanding process and there could be delays and setbacks. Our first trial was stayed two times. We had to appeal the genocide charges against President Al Bashir. So there will be fights in court. We will persist and do our part. We count on your support. But I want to be clear: we will not go further than these six individuals. We are helping Kenya to start, to break impunity. Kenyans will decide on their own way forward.

Doing justice for massive crimes is a long journey. Different countries have chosen different paths. South Africa is well-known for its truth commission, in Argentina we started prosecuting the top leaders…… [Read More]

Reference

Kofi Annan Foundation (2010). "Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation, Two Years On,

Where Are We?" Statement by Luis Moreno Ocampo, Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. http://kofiannanfoundation.org/newsroom/speeches/2010/12/kenya-national-dialogue-and-reconciliation-two-years-where-are-we-statemen
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Peace Strategy a Strategy for

Words: 1315 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79191687

At the time of its composition, Laird's proposal would be contextualized by the ongoing SALT conferences between the U.S. And Soviet Union designed to reduce each side's proclivity toward nuclear armament in a highly contentious setting. The result would be the re-assertion in Laird's strategy of American prioritization of its nuclear armament. As Laird would note, "we should make it clear to the Soviet Union that regardless of the outcome of SALT, our approach to strategic forces is designed to preserve our deterrent without question." (Laird, p. 10) This 'deterrent' would be the continued research, development and maintenance of its nuclear stockpile in the interests of demonstrating the latent power to respond to any Soviet nuclear action. As Laird reports, even under the terms of the uncomfortable negotiation with the Soviets over an Anti-Ballistics Missile treaty, it was the intention of the United States to remain girded by this stockpile.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Feickert, Andrew. Does the Army Need a Full-Spectrum Force or Specialized Units? Background and Issues for Congress, Congressional Research Service, 18 January 2008, http://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/natsec/RL34333.pdf

Laird, Melvin. "Strategy for Peace: National Security Strategy of Realistic Deterrence." Department of Defense. 6 November 1970.

Metternich, Ronald. "Security Force Assistance: Organization for the Long War." U.S. Army War College, 30 March 2010. http://www.dtic.mil/cgi-bin/GetTRDoc?Location=U2&doc=GetTRDoc.pdf&AD=ADA520009

Nagl, John a. "Institutionalizing Adaptation." Center for a New American Security, June 2007.
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World's Religions -- Social Duty

Words: 2195 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 52567584

As seen in the concept of rectification of names, people can build orderly and harmonious societies when they clearly understand the duties associated with each other of the basic relationships and strive to fulfill their duties to the best of their abilities. The father must rectify or live up to his title by providing for his son's educational and vocational training and teaching them virtue, etiquette and reverence in tradition and authority. (Slavicek, 2002:33)

Confucianism discusses social duty in terms of the family and how the individual's character in dealing with the community is shaped by the family. In the Confucian perspective, the family is the center of all values that the individual would learn and practice as the individual deals with other members of the community. This perspective shows a distinct Eastern philosophical leaning whereby the family is at the fulcrum in explaining the social duty of the person.…… [Read More]

References

Slavicek, L. (2002). Confucianism. San Diego, California: Lucent Books Inc.

Streissguth, T. (2002). Hinduism. San Diego, California: Lucent Books Inc.

Netzley, P. (2002). Buddhism. San Diego, California: Lucent Books Inc.

Weyer, R. (2003) Readings from Taoism. Mumbai India: Jaico Publishing.
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Is Peace Possible

Words: 1394 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 43940170

Peace Possible in the Modern World?

Is peace possible in the world as we know it today? One side of the human brain, if idealistic, might reply: "Certainly peace is possible, even perpetual peace, but it is possible only if visionary, bold and intelligent leadership emerges in key international places." The other side of the brain could well answer like this: "Are you kidding? There are too many terrorists, and too many greedy, power-crazed nationalist leaders pushing and shoving and developing weapons to ever expect a peaceful world." And meanwhile, what did some of the great thinkers and philosophers have to say about the prospects of peace?

THUCYDIDES: Thucydides, in writing about the Peloponnesian War, makes it clear that human nature tends to dictate how history plays itself out, and he does not blame the Gods or other forces for this war. Thucydides, who is a young man, and an…… [Read More]

Reference

Brown, Chris, Nardin, Terry, and Rengger, Nicholas. International Relations in Political

Thought: Texts from the Ancient Greeks to the First World War. Cambridge, UK:

Cambridge University Press, 2002.

Thucydides, "History of the Peloponnesian War," in International Relations in Political Thought: Texts from the Ancient Greeks to the First World War, ed. Chris Brown, Terry Nardin, Nicholas Rengger (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2002), 38.
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International Relations Theory and United Nations Peace

Words: 2630 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23279245

International Relations Theory and United Nations Peace:

International Relations (IR) field normally focuses on the study of how various state systems can be made to work more efficiently to improve the power of law, maintain order, manage interstate affairs peacefully, and lessen prospects of war. The word relation in this field is used to denote the inclusion of more than political affairs to aspects like conflict and peace. International relations field is closely linked administratively to political science departments (O'Connor, 2010). Actually, the field of international relations traces its origin from various subfields including international law, diplomatic history, and international economics. While it's still early to consider international relations as a sovereign field of study, it has broken from the analytical procedures of economics and law as well as the ongoing process of breaking from political science. Consequently, this field has become an important facet because of the conceptualizations of…… [Read More]

References:

Ahmed, S. Keating P. & Solinas, U (2007), 'Shaping the Future of UN Peace Operations: is there

A Doctrine In the House?' Cambridge Review of International Affairs, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 11-28, viewed 26 November 2011,

Cristol, J (n.d.), International Relations Theory, Oxford Bibliographies Online, viewed 26

November 2011, < http://www.oxfordbibliographiesonline.com/view/document/obo-9780199743292/obo-9780199743292-0039.xml;jsessionid=13BE65FA0ABD1A54057C83C4FD6FDB1C >
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War vs Peace How Efforts

Words: 651 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33754943



Peace, therefore, is dependent upon the power-play between capitalism, socialism, consumerism and communism -- and often they all overlap. The problem arises when domination rather diplomacy becomes a tactic of certain world powers. Rather than working with other nations at the expense of commercial or ideological interests, nations (like the U.S.) revert to underhanded scheming, acts of espionage, terrorism, and war, and militarism to undue rival nations' hegemony. The Middle East is a prime example for the way the West has gone about ending "terrorism" and restoring "peace." The idea that the U.S. is at all interested in peace is a complete farce. It is interested in nothing but profits.

Peace can be attained, however -- as Kennedy showed during the Cuban Missile Crisis. Roger Fisher, William Ury, and Bruce Patton all agree when they affirm that the best way to peace today is through negotiation and diplomacy. By putting…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Fisher, Roger, et al. "Getting to Yes." Approaches to Peace. [Barsh, David, ed.] UK:

Oxford University Press, 2010. Print.

Schweitzer, Christine, ed. Civilian Peacekeeping: A Barely Tapped Resource. Sozio-

Publishing, 2010. Print.
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International Peace and Terrorism

Words: 1562 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90456500

International Peace and Terrorism

What changes to existing legal regimes may reduce the incentive and make the law more effective in preserving peace?

Terrorist groups can be disrupted and destroyed through continuous and direct legal actions. The focus includes the use of national and international elements of power. Immediate focus should be on the terrorist organizations with global reach as well as terrorists or states sponsoring terrorism activities. There are attempts of gaining and using weapons of mass destruction or precursors. The law defends the national interests, the native people, and international goals. Achievements in this case are derived through identification and destruction of peace threats prior reaching national borders. While most governments continually strive towards enlisting international community support, they do not hesitate to act alone where necessary. The goals at stake include exercising their rights to self-defense through preemptive action against terrorists. The actions prevent them from inflicting…… [Read More]

references ultimately tie broader projects leading to generalized legal understandings, the goal is to have central strategies of disseminating such law.

Law promotes equity and respects for people. Law advocates treatment of all human beings as members of the family. Islam, Judaism, and Christianity share this value. Hinduism embraces divine spark for all human beings while Buddhism talks of the human race are having similar distinctions made by humankind from all other animal varieties. There are numerous species across board distinguishing their category based on fundamentalism. The teachings make emphasis on oneness in which people work towards common goals of perish together. International law plays a role in fostering cooperation. Law consists of sets of rules that ensured passive co-existence of nations. Today, the concept of world governance is moving towards active cooperation among all countries. The concerns about matters of human welfare, international travel, outer space, health, the environment, disaster relief, and transport, are addressed by international law. There is facilitation of the external and internal affairs for a given country.

In conclusion, international law promotes economic justice to equality practices. Law elevates conditions for impoverished nations as well as deprived world populations. Critics estimate that in the last five decades, there is more than four times the population of people dying in wars happening in the 20th century. Others die due to poor sanitation and hunger. Part of the underlying numbers did not have to die if their issues were subjected to relevant concentrated attention. The concept relates to the application of international law principles.
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Mideast Peace the Crucial Importance

Words: 1032 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95820032



Then of course we have the war in Iraq. This war has escalated out of control in terms of security and has in fact created a new training ground for terrorists. This is an alarming fact. As these conflicts increase and the more that that Western countries are seen to be implicated or perceived to be taking sides, so the threat of terrorism and terrorist attacks in foreign lands becomes a greater potential reality. The terrible events of 9/11 are a continual reminder or this fact.

Numerous commentators warn that unless a peaceful solution to the central conflicts in this region is found, the threat of terrorist attack in and outside the region will increase. It should be remembered that terrorist attacks in the West are usually motivated by perceptions of Western involvement in the Middle East. Whether these perceptions are correct or not is not the immediate issue. What…… [Read More]

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State of Human Rights in the Arab World

Words: 3599 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85324547

Human Rights in the Arab World

As stated by the "Universal Declaration of Human Rights" in the United Nations, Human rights has almost become one of the most important factors that decided the development of a country. To be able to promote economic growth and prosperity it is essential that a country controls its power of creativity and enterprise of its citizens, which would aid it to move into the global market in terms of trade, communication and investment systems.

It has been noticed that the most talented members of the society are usually not granted their human rights and hence the political, social, and cultural developments of the society are being not in order due to human rights being violated. This gets us to realize that we need to follow human rights development not only to protect a single individual but the entire society on the whole.2 Wrong use…… [Read More]

References

Arzt, Donna E. "Religious Human Rights in Muslim States of the Middle East and North Africa" Retrieved from http://www.law.emory.edu/EILR/volumes/spring96/arzt.html Accessed on 03/04/3004

Bard, Mitchell G. "Myths & Facts Online: Human Rights in Arab Countries." Jewish Virtual Library. Retrieved from http://www.us-israel.org/jsource/myths/mf16.html Accessed on 03/04/3004

Gordon, Dick. "Human Rights in the Middle East." Retrieved from http://www.theconnection.org/shows/2002/04/20020424_a_main.asp Accessed on 03/04/3004

'Human Rights and Modern Arab States." Thinking Clearly. Retrieved from  http://www.habtoor.com/thinkingclearly/html/issue42.htm  Issue 42 / September 2001 Accessed on 03/04/3004
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What Led to World War 2

Words: 971 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23331537

Lloyd George from England, Woodrow Wilson from the U.S., Orlando from Italy, and Clemenceau from France held a meeting in 1919 to discuss the manner through which Germany was to be made to pay for the harm that had been brought about by World War 1. According to Woodrow Wilson, an agreement founded on his 14-point plan was the most appropriate way of bringing peace to Europe. However, Georges Clemenceau wanted payback. He wanted an assurance that Germany would never attempt to begin another war. Lloyd George welcomed Wilson's idea, however, realized that the British public welcomed Clemenceau's idea. He attempted to find some compromise amidst Clemenceau and Wilson (World War Two -- Causes). Germany was anticipating an agreement founded on Wilson's 14 points, and was not pleased with the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. Nonetheless, they had no option but to sign the treaty.

The League of Nations…… [Read More]

References

"Causes of World War 2 - What REALLY caused WW2?" World War Two History Guide -- WW2 Battle Guide. Web. 9 Oct 2015. .

"World War Two - Causes -- HistoryOnTheNet." From Ancient Times to the 20th Century -- HistoryOnTheNet. 14 Aug 2014. Web. 9 Oct 2015. .

"World War II: Causes and Outbreak." Infoplease: Encyclopedia, Almanac, Atlas, Biographies, Dictionary, Thesaurus. Free online reference, research & homework help.. Web. 9 Oct 2015.
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Outline of Policemen of the World Thesis

Words: 1830 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19021626

military, as exemplified in the two (2) real-Life international incidents that you have researched. Justify your response.

America is not merely a superpower -- the nation is also commonly known as the 'Policeman of the World', owing to its many interventions in resolving global issues. Time and again, the world has expected USA to intercede and play the role of mediator when issues crop up around the world. The world feels helpless when the nation hesitates or does not keep up to people's expectation while intervening. Two international incidents in which America opted for an unexpected course while simultaneously striving to keep from regular military action are the Libyan Revolution and Syrian Civil War. Other nations' reaction in the former case and the retention of America's position in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) serve to confirm the fact that USA is, indeed, the 'policeman' of the world.

Part 2…… [Read More]

References

Barna II., W. U.S. Military Intervention for Humanitarian Purposes: Exception to Policy or an Emerging Norm? Retrieved from http://www.hofstra.edu/pdf/library/ulra_military_intervention.pdf

Blanchard, C. N., Humud, C. E., & Nikitin, M. B. D (2015). Armed Conflict in Syria: Overview and U.S. Response. Retrieved from https://www.fas.org/sgp/crs/mideast/RL33487.pdf

Gulf War. Retrieved from http://www.saylor.org/site/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Gulf-War.pdf

Lindstrom, M. & Zetterlund, K. (2012).Setting the Stage for the Military Intervention in Libya: Decisions Made and Their Implications for the EU and NATO. Retrieved from www.foi.se/.../foir3498.pdf
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Second World War Left the

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36188101

In this sense, Stalin decided to extend his influence and to impose certain types of government in countries such as Poland, Hungry, or Romania. The same fate would have had Greece and Turkey as well, should the U.S. not have outlined the Truman Doctrine. It can be said that the doctrine itself was a reaction to the tendency of the soviets to extend their influence.

The Marshall Plan can be seen as the economic component of the Truman Doctrine. It was in fact a set of principles pointed out in 1947 at Harvard by Secretary of State George Marshall (American Rhetoric, 2008). This economic plan too was designed for cater for the economic needs of eastern countries as well, but seeing that the Russian side considered it to be the mere economic arm of the Truman Doctrine, it forced countries under its occupation to reject this reconstruction aid. In fact…… [Read More]

References

American Rhetoric. "The Marshall Plan 1947." American Rhetoric website. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008  http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/georgecmarshall.html 

The Avalon Project. "The Truman Doctrine." Yale University. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008 http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/trudoc.htm
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World War II World War II Was

Words: 760 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28636080

World War II. World War II was a turning point in world history, and brought together many allies to fight strong opponents for world domination. The War was supposed to be the "last" world war fought, but other conflicts since that time show the world is still a volatile and unsettled place, and it seems there will always be wars fought in this world.

World War II was fought on two major fronts -- Europe and Asia. There was also fighting in North Africa, and many Pacific Islands. The initial war began in 1939 when German dictator Adolph Hitler invaded Poland. England and France had pledged to support Poland as Hitler continued to take over countries in Europe, such as Austria and Czechoslovakia in the late 1930s. When Hitler invaded Poland,

France and England issued ultimatums to Germany which were ignored, and the war had officially begun, even though actual…… [Read More]

References

Boatner, Mark M. Biographical Dictionary of World War II. Novato, CA: Presidio Press, 1996.

Divine, Robert A., ed. Causes and Consequences of World War II. Chicago: Quadrangle Books, 1969.

Kitchen, Martin. A World in Flames: A Short History of the Second World War in Europe and Asia, 1939-1945. London: Longman, 1990.
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World War II Broke Out Russia Was

Words: 2569 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 38358365

World War II broke out, Russia was not prepared, nor did she manage to be the military threat she could have been, because the nation was weakened by lack of industrialization, the defeat by Japan in 1905, and a lack of support by the people for involvement in this new war. What seems clear is that Russia was not prepared when the war began and had to work to muster its army, provide war materials, and protect its own territory against the German advance. The fact that Germany was indeed stopped cold in Russia shows how well the Russians did their job, but the issue is why they did not do what they could before the war started given that the whole world could see war coming long before it reached Russia. More recently, though, the question of unpreparedness has been given a new look, and a new theory of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

McTaggart, Pat. "Winter Tempest in Stalingrad." World War II 12(4)(November 1997), 30-36.

Raack, R.C. "Stalin's Role in the Coming of World War II: Opening the Closet Door on a Key Chapter of Recent History." World Affairs 158(4)(1996), 198-211.

Taylor, a.J.P. The Origins of the Second World War. New York: Athenaeum, 1985.

Tucker, Robert C. Stalin in Power. New York: W.W. Norton, 1990.
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WWI & WW2 Comparing and

Words: 1852 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68215387

The U.S. emerged as a leading superpower and the sole nuclear power in the world, determined to play a leading role in international politics. The post-Second World War era saw the start of a prolonged Cold War in which the U.S. competed for political domination around the world with Soviet Communism until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. The Second World War also helped the country to overcome the economic depression of the 1930s as its wartime industrial production stimulated its economy.… [Read More]

References

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm

Dwyer, J.J. (2004). "The United States and World War I." Lew Rockwell.com. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/dwyer3.html

Keylor, William R. (2007). "World War I." Encyclopedia Encarta Online. On May 26, 2007 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569981/World_War_I.html
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World War I And Related

Words: 624 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62380097

All European nations suffered devastating postwar economic consequences, which further increased the reluctance to use military force to subdue Hitler. The United States enjoyed a postwar boom, given that none of the battles had been waged upon its own territories. But the Republican-dominated Senate refused to allow the U.S. To become a member of the League of Nations, and the absence of strong American leadership made the League ineffective as a peacekeeping force. Germany was also stripped of all of its colonies: the fact that many new nations were created in the redrawing of the map of Europe meant that many of the recently evolved national identities and infrastructures of new countries were quite fragile.

Although they were 'older' nations, Germany and Russia were particularly politically unstable, as a result of the conditions spawned by World War I. Despite its early exit from the War, Russia's economy was undergoing an…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"German Revolution." Spartacus Schoolnet. April 14, 2010.

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERrevolution.htm

"Wars and Battles, World War I." U.S. History. April 14, 2010.

 http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1334.html
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World War I And II

Words: 457 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66832139

David Fromkin's "A Peace to End All Peace." From the beginning, the review provides intriguing information, including the fact that the title relates to the ideal of "a war to end all wars." The ironic nature of this phrase has been the subject of discussion and occasional mirth for all the years after the war. I was delighted to find out the name of the originator of the term, British commander Archibald Wavell, since this is not something I knew before.

The review provides several pieces of interesting information, including the fact that the British, and particularly Kitchener, were largely ignorant about the social and cultural nature of the Middle East, making the British policy for this region largely ineffective at best and explosive at worst. Another piece of interesting information is the mistaken belief that a conspiracy was underway to undermine the position of the British in the Middle…… [Read More]

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World War I And Its Effect on

Words: 989 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51192383

World War I and its Effect on the Middle East

The Europeans who had already colonized much of the area with post-World War I now spread further into the Middle East claiming further portions such as Arabia, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Palestine. The Constantinople Agreement followed by many more including the Sykes Picot agreement over and again implemented covert agreements regarding lands that would go to each of the Allies. After the war, France received Lebanon and Syria (

) even though Syria herself preferred an American mandate (2), and Britain received land that included Palestine, Israel, Transjordan, and Iraq (3). The indigenous people themselves were never consulted regarding whom they wished to control them, and colonization, consequently, prompted Arabic nationalism.

Nationalism was, furthermore, created by the fact that the peace settlements imposed by the Allies after World War I broke up nation states and created others, confusing many who,…… [Read More]

Sources

Bloomberg.com. "U.S., U.K. Waged War on Iraq Because of Oil, Blair Adviser Says" Bloomberg.com, May 1, 2003

CBS.com. "Poll: Talk First, Fight Later." CBS.com, Jan. 24, 2003. Retrieved 1/17/2011.

DeNovo, J. American Interests and Policies in the Middle East (University of Minnesota Press, 1963)

Gelvin, J. History of the Modern Middle East (Oxford University Press, 2005)
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Peace in the Middle East

Words: 579 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 97453946

Middle East Peace Talks

Many people view the Middle East as having been a powder keg for the last half-century. These difficulties started when other countries, such as Great Britain, made decisions in the region, including setting boundaries, that historically did not work out well. This has been the cause of strife in other areas of the world as well. However, rightly or wrongly, many Arabs in the Middle East view the strife as going back much further. They point to the start of difficulties at the Crusades of the middle ages. This points to a very significant and basic problem: history is written, and viewed, differently by different groups in the world. In the case of the Middle East, the issue is history -- whether it's the history of something that happened last week or events from the 12th century.

To solve this difficult problem, it is necessary for…… [Read More]

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Peace Treaty

Words: 664 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 17914213

Peace Treat between India and Pakistan:

The primary objective of the peace process is 1) to expand and intensify people to people contact, 2) broaden and consolidate the peace process by encouraging new associations as well as those groups who have been operating for enduring peace in South Asia for the preceding 58 years, and 3) give enhanced ethical, academic, community and cultural resources to assist in maintaining long-lasting peace.

The peace treaty should read:

Both governments should welcome and support the peace process by engaging in a composite dialogue between directed towards creating righteous and long-lasting peace in South Asia.

The ultimate settlement on issues, of Kashmir, international terrorism and nuclear weapons, between, both, India and Pakistan, ought to be founded on the Doctrine of Peaceful Co-Existence, that is, autonomous parity, non-violence, non-intrusion, mutual and shared advantage, and nonviolent co-existence

Both governments should agree that the ultimate settlement ought…… [Read More]

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Peace Without Victory 1861-1865 Author James M

Words: 940 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85999129

Peace without Victory, 1861-1865," author James M. McPherson discusses the American Civil War and the desire on both sides to achieve peace. Wars are far more easily begun than ended. The North was fighting in order to keep the Union together and to thwart further states from seceding. The South was fighting for what they believed to be their moral right: to govern according to their own ethics, including the right to own slaves. For the Civil War, the stakes were so high that neither side was willing to negotiate a peaceful conclusion until there was absolutely no recourse but to do so.

There were three stages of negotiation attempts during the Civil War. The first was foreign mediation, then unofficial contacts, and finally quasi-official conversations. From a foreign perspective, it was believed that the North had very little chance of restoring the United States of America into a single…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

McPherson, James M. "No Peace without Victory, 1861-1865." The American Historical

Review. 109:1. 2004. Web. Mar. 27.

http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ahr/109.1/mcpherson.html
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World War II Drew to a Close

Words: 2281 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3306350

World War II drew to a close, and the planet was forced to recalibrate in unprecedented proportions, the United States began its long emergence as the most expansive super-power that had yet been known. Its influence that would compete virulently with the post-war Soviet influence for half a century, has since disseminated into every facet of the geopolitical theatre. As such, American support can operate as the determining factor in the success of a national agenda. Likewise, American dissent can be the stifling roadblock that sets nations adrift in failure and, consequently, resentment. So it's important to acknowledge that a nation's complaint of American neglect is more than just the bitter rhetoric of the disenfranchised. The emphasis placed on American approval and volition is fairly justified when one considers the weight and implication of the U.S. stance on any given topic. And it's certainly fair to say that American intervention…… [Read More]

5. Maisel, David, The Founding Myths of Israel: Nationalism, Socialism, and the Making of the Jewish State, Princeton, NJ, Princeton University Press, 1998.

6. Rabinovich, Itamar, Waging Peace, New York, NY, Farrer, Straus and Giroux, 1999.

7. Smith, Charles D., Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict, New York, NY, St. Martin's Press, 2001
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Peace and Stability the Tokugawa Family Lost

Words: 1242 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96162627

peace and stability, the Tokugawa Family lost political power. Explain both the internal factors as well as the external factors that led to destabilized society. How did Western powers (including the United States) play a role in destabilizing Japan? Do you think the revolution that followed would have happened without Western involvement? Support your answer with evidence and concrete examples.

The Tokugawa family ruled Japan during a time of decisive peace and stability; however, the fall of this family was connected strongly to a range of internal and external factors. One external factor was the abrupt push of foreigners, foreign ideas and currency which was quite raucous to the traditional Japanese way of life and economic system. This factor was the impetus for why Emperor Komei engaged in the order to "Expel Barbarians." At this point western forces, including the United States, were a permanent issue that Japan had to…… [Read More]

5. What factors led to the war between the United States and Japan? Why did the Japanese leadership decide to attack U.S. forces in Hawai'i?

The war between the United States and Japan was the result of constrained relations over hundreds of years. Japan had long believed that powers in the west were a hostile force and felt that America viewed them as an inferior nation. Further stress was placed on their relationship as a result of the fact that the U.S. was not supportive of the expansion of Japan and that the country's stipulations and list of demands were not going to be met via diplomacy. Japan's notion that the U.S. felt superior was a major factor in the two nation's inability to reach a level of harmony or peace.

The attack on Pearl Harbor to the rest of the world looked like a complete surprise, when it reality it was the manifestation of years of tense relations and constrained recent events. For example, in the year before the attack, America has engaged in an embargo on Japan, stopping exports out of their nation as a result of their takeover of Indochina. Japan also signed a neutrality treaty with the Soviet Union, which America of course didn't like. During the summer of 1941, America, the UK and the Netherlands aligned to freeze Japanese assets because of Japan's occupation of southern Indochina. Japan continued to try to expand and the U.S. demanded that they withdraw from territories like China and Indochina. Meanwhile, Japan worked to get their oil embargo removed and started to covertly prepare for war. The Japanese military was indeed serious about this and they thus planned to infiltrate Burma, the Philippines and all other nations in this region in order to build a defensive perimeter in the central and southwest pacific: a warlike response was expected from the U.S. But they didn't anticipate a strong fight. Pearl Harbor was attacked because it was identified as the U.S. Fleet which could ruin all these military plans: thus a surprise attack by air was engaged in as a means of crippling the base.
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WWI When World War I

Words: 926 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 12021802

..the spirit of ruthless brutality will enter itn every fiber of our national life" (Johnson 643).

Staying out, states Tindall & Shi 948), was "more easily said than done, not least for Wilson himself. Americans might want to stay out of the war, but most of them cared which side won. Ironically, because there were so many first- or second-generation immigrants from Germany and Ireland, the leaning was toward the Central Powers. However, "old-line Americans" mostly of British descent were sympathetic to the Allies.

Yet actions were to occur that made the final decision. In 1915, the Germans sank the British Cunard liner Lusitania with 128 Americans on board. The Americans were outraged and sent letters to no avail. Then U-boats sank a number of American ships and finally, the press published a secret telegram from the German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmerman to the Mexican government proposing a German-Mexican offensive…… [Read More]

Books Cited

Johnson, Paul. History of the American People. New York: Harper Collins, 1997.

Tindall, George Brown and Shi, David. America. A Narrative History. New York:

Norton, 1984.

Zinn, Hoard. People's History of the United States. New York: Harper Collins, 1999.
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Worlds Depicted in Shakespeare's King

Words: 1124 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 58951819

As the king finally dies, Edgar speaks to him and Kent admonishes him, wishing to "let him pass" (V.iii.377). Kent understands that the tragedy s over now and King Lear can finally have the peace that he deserves. It should also be noted that in death, Lear also receives the justice he deserves as well. Edgar is still hanging onto the man and does not want him to die just yet but Kent sees the relief in death, noting, He hates him/That would upon the rack of this tough world/Stretch him out any longer" (V.iii.377-9). The two comment on how the king "endured so long" (V.iii.381) his painful life on earth. They knew what it was that the king realized in his final hours. His attitude toward family and material things had been reversed. The king taught them the meaning of value, which was exhibited in the previous scenes with…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Shakespeare, William. King Lear. New York: Washington Square Press. 1969.
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World War I On Politics

Words: 958 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22933742



With a profound sense of the solemn and even tragical character of the step I am taking and of the grave responsibilities which it involves, but in unhesitating obedience to what I deem my constitutional duty, I advise that the Congress declare the recent course of the Imperial German Government to be in fact nothing less than war against the Government and people of the United States....America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured. God helping her, she can do no other." (Woodrow Wilson's war message)

United States' entry bolstered the Allied forces and gave them extraordinary power over the German Imperial army. With America's entry into the war, things suddenly changed as we were was no longer spectators. The response from the public was however not overwhelming since it had been…… [Read More]

References

President Woodrow Wilson's War message" accessed online 14th April 2005:

http://bss.sfsu.edu/tygiel/Hist427/texts/wilswarmessage.html

John Bach McMaster. The United States in the World War: D. Appleton & Company. New York. 1918
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World Regional Geography

Words: 2680 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 29821841

Regional Geography

Why could Africa be considered on of the richest continents on Earth? Discuss some of sub-Saharan Africa's Assets. Then address why, despite these facts, the majority of African states remain poor. Be sure to include several factors relation to this region's unique physical geography, complex human geography, history.

The spectrum of environments which exist in Africa spans entire moisture and temperature gradients, from perhaps the most arid to among the well-watered places on earth, from the coolness of the Cape to the furnace that is the Sahara. This environmental diversity is mirrored in the proliferation of its fauna and flora, for Africa has seemingly every conceivable combination of climatological, geological, and pedological factors; the plant and animal communities have evolved over time to reflect this heterogeneity. Moreover, it is an ancient continent that has provided a cradle for a wide range of taxonomic groups, from among the very…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Chen-Young, et al. Transnationals of tourism in the Caribbean. London: Commonwealth Secretariat. 2001.

2. Richard Wiffin, William Phettipace, Anas Todkill; Imagining Distance: Spanish Explorers in America. Early American Literature, Vol. 25, 1990.

3. Stephen Zunes; The United States and the Western Sahara Peace Process. Middle East Policy, Vol. 5, 1998.
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World on the Turtle's Back

Words: 740 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73315112

Creation Myth: How the Sun and the Moon Came Into Being

Once upon a time, the entire world was in darkness. There were human inhabitants of the earth, but they could hardly see but a few feet in front of their hands. They had been born of the dark clay of the earth and the breath of the creator god but they had no language, no arts, and spent all their days looking for food in the darkness. Of course, they could not plant anything so the best they could do was forage for roots and insects in the never-ending night.

The creator god had long passed into nothingness, but his sons remained in the cave in the sky that had been his former home, playing with a great fiery ball which they passed back and forth between the two of them. Sometimes they would show the ball to the…… [Read More]

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Peace and Revolution in Chile

Words: 1562 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 63113889

Salvador Allende

In what ways was Salvador Allende's "democratic road to socialism" in Chile distinct from Mexican and Cuban revolutionary movements? In what ways was it similar? Does it seem as though a democratic alternative to political coup d'etat is a workable and useful one? Why or why not?

Salvador Guillermo Allende Gossens, or just Salador Allende for short, was the first of the South American leader to institute a Marxist form of socialism, who came to power through a democratic election. Although the election that brought Allende to power was virtually a three-way tie, the Chilean Congress eventually named him as president through a run-off process. This victory was substantial for Allende's life and he had tried on three previous occasions to win the presidency. At the time, the Chilean government had several left-leaning government factions, with some more radical than others. This movement mirrored many other movements found…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Gale Group. (N.d.). Salvador Allende Gossens Facts. Retrieved from Your Dictionary: http://biography.yourdictionary.com/salvador-allende-gossens

Guevara, C. (2005 (Originally Printed in 1965)). Socialism and man in Cuba. The Che Reader.

Harris, R. (1999). A Tale of Two Chileans: Pinochet and Allende. Chilean Supporters Abroad.

Sweig, J. (2009). Inside the Cuban Revolution: Fidel Castro and the Urban Underground. Boston: Harvard University Press.
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Nationalism Before World War I

Words: 1489 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85302243

World War I

Causes and Consequences of World War I

World War 1

(Causes, America's Contribution to the War, Role of President Woodrow Wilson, Treaty of Versailles Failure)

The First World War (1914-1918) or the Great War was fought between the Allies and the Central Powers. The Allies included 27 countries of which Russia, the United States of America, France, Japan and Britain are the most prominent. The Central Powers consisted of Turkey, Germany, Bulgaria and Austria-Hungary as the chief combatants. It is the greatest and most atrocious war brawled till date.

Causes

There were a number of causes that initiated the brutality of World War I Major causes include imperialism, nationalism, materialism and alliance systems. However, the immediate cause of the beginning of the War was the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the Royal Prince of Hungary and Bohemia. As he was killed by a Serbian nationalist in June…… [Read More]

References

America in the Great War. (2000). Retrieved from  http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/snpwwi1.htm 

Wilson, Woodrow. (2009). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Retrieved April 15, 2011, from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117053275

World war one - causes. (2011, 01, 02). Retrieved from http://www.historyonthenet.com/WW1/causes.htm

World War I. (2009). The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. Retrieved April 15, 2011, from http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=117053630
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American and German Perspective in WWI

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 73554165

World War I

The First World War began in the summer of 1914 with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. The conflict lasted through late 1918, concluding with the treaty of Versailles. The war to end all wars, as it was commonly known, was dominated by trench warfare. Due to numerous advances in defense technology and a lack of tactical advances, both the Allied Nations and the Central Powers, were stymied by a lack of military advances. Early victories in France, by the German army, and in Serbia by the Austrian/Hungarian forces proved to be less than decisive, due to miscommunication between the two Central powers.

Not only was this the First war between so many great world powers, additionally this was the first war to be affected by, and ultimately fought, not only on the battle field but also in the press rooms. Due to expansion in…… [Read More]

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Impact of WWI

Words: 975 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 39166867

World War I

The Causes and How America Joined the War

The events that led to the causes of the first world war had its roots in the Balkans in late July 1914 and there are causes including political, territorial, and economic conflicts among the great European powers in the four decades leading up to the war. Militarism, a complex web of alliances, imperialism and nationalism were some of the other causes that led up to the First World War.

The root for the Second World War lay in the peace accords and the punishments that were meted out to the Germans after the First World War and the sense of humiliation and economic debacle following the end of the First World War.

The animosity between the Americans and the Germans started with the sinking of the Lusitania as she made her maiden voyage from Liverpool to New York in…… [Read More]

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Zionist Influence in World War I

Words: 1903 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 77380740

WWI: The Forces of Nationalism, Imperialism and Militarism

The forces of nationalism, imperialism and militarism irrevocably led to World War I in several ways. Germany had become an industrialized nation, vying for economic power and rivaling the power of Britain (Gilbert, 1994). Germany had also defeated France in the prior century in the Franco-Prussian War and taken the territories of Alsace and Lorraine. France wanted them back (Bradberry, 2012). Russia also had a grievance with Germany: it wanted the Bosporous Straights that were "controlled by Germany through her alliance with the Ottoman Empire" (Bradberry, 2012, p. 42). The only way for each of these countries to get what they wanted from Germany was to go to war: their alliance gave them the opportunity to attack Germany on all fronts, and Germany's support for the Austria-Hungary attack on Serbia (in retaliation for the Serbian assassination of Archduke Ferdinand) gave the Triple…… [Read More]

References

Balfour Declaration. (1917). Knesset. Retrieved from https://www.knesset.gov.il/lexicon/eng/BalfourDeclaration_eng.htm

Bradberry, B. (2012). The Myth of German Villainy. IN: Authorhouse.

Gilbert, M. (1994). The First World War. NY: Henry Holt and Company.

Lloyd-George, D. (1939). Memoirs of the Peace Conference. CT: Yale University
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What Led to World War 1 And How Did it End for Different Nations

Words: 1449 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2248747

WW1

RUSSIA

In 1917 Russia suffered two revolutions, which resulted in a drastic change of leadership. Tsarist Russia became Lenin's Soviet Russia and the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was signed shortly thereafter in March 1918 with Germany. The treaty gave Germany much: over a million square millions and 60 million people -- a third of Russia's population -- were annexed. Russia lost railroads, factories, the majority of its coal and iron -- but Germany was in no position to immediately profit from the treaty. The Western Front was calling. Russia gained some peace from the treaty, and could now focus on its internal problems resulting from the recent overthrow and the war effort. Leading up to the treaty, Imperial Russia had suffered devastating casualties and food shortages. The Bolsheviks called for an end to the war on the Eastern Front, and Germany supported this call, allowing Lenin himself to return to…… [Read More]

Reference List

Grebler, L. (1940). The Cost of the World War to Germany and Austria-Hungary. Yale Keynes, J.M. (1920). The Economic Consequences of the Peace. NY: Harcourt Brace.

Stone, O., Kuznick, P. (2012). The Untold History of the United States. NY: Gallery

Books.
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History World War II

Words: 1685 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34052508

World War II, which took place from 1939-1945, was waged by the Allied Nations as a struggle for freedom against the evil and totalitarian regimes that existed in Germany, Italy and Japan.

Leaders of the War

There were several leaders that made decisions that contributed to the start and end of WWII. Adolf Hitler, who became the leader of Germany during the Great Depression, is blamed for WWII. He raised German spirits by telling them of a better future and a better Germany. But in reality, he gave them a war. Hitler planned to expand Germany by taking Austria, Poland, and many other countries. He believed that German people were superior to the rest of the world and wanted everyone to prove this. (Keegan)

Before Hitler, the spirit and nationalism of the German people was very low, but he was able to get the German people to take pride in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Keegan, John. The Second World War. Penguin Books, 1989.

Allen, Thomas. World War II: The Encyclopedia of the War Years, 1941-1945. Random House, Inc., 1996.

A.J.P. Taylor, The Origins of the Second World War. Atheneum, 1983.

John Keegan. The Face of Battle. Penguin Books, 1987.
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Reconstructing the Occurrence of the WW1 and the Great Depression

Words: 1506 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61541414

World War I and the Great Depression

World War I

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand on 28 June 1914 sparked the occurrence of the First World War. A Serbian nationalist called Gavrilo Princip murdered him as the heir apparent to the throne of Austria. However, other underlying factors that contributed to the rivalry between the Great Powers include the system of alliances, nationalism, domestic political factors, militarism, the Eastern question (The Balkans), and the crises before 1914. The main powers of Europe before 1914 were: (i) the Triple Alliance of Germany, Austria-Hungary and Italy (1882) and (ii) the Triple Entente of Britain, Russia and France (1907). In nature, the alliances were defensive, and this implied that major political disputes inevitably would lead to large and not small conflicts. Nationalism looked at eager people across the world who wanted to let the rest of the world know how strong and…… [Read More]

References

Giangreco, D. M. & Griffin, R. E. (1988). Airbridge to Berlin -- The Berlin Crisis of 1948, Its Origins and Aftermath. Background on Conflict with USSR.

Hiebert, Ray, and Roselyn Hiebert. (1970). The Stock Market Crash, 1929. New York, NY: Franklin Watts.

McElvaine, R. S. (1993). The Great Depression: America, 1929-1941. New York, NY: Times Books.

Parrish, M. E. (1992). Anxious Decades: America in Prosperity and Depression, 1920-1941. New York, NY: W.W. Norton.
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Innovations in the WWII

Words: 1735 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 79414055

WWII

If there is a period that will always be remembered in the history of the 20th century, it is the Second World War. Although it was blamed for deaths of hundreds of thousands, it is also a period that stimulated technological advancement and prepared the world for the social changes that ensued after the war. Some of the most notable social changes include the termination of European colonial rule in some countries. It is also the period that marked heightened civil rights movements in the U.S.A. and the emergence of women's movements. The programs that set the pace of the exploration of outer space also started in this period. The warring groups involved a split on the axis of Nazi Germany, imperial Japan, Fascist Italy and some relatively smaller allies versus the allied group that involved Britain along with the commonwealth nations, the Soviet Union, and USA[footnoteRef:1]. The allies…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Diffen - Compare Anything. Diffen. Discern. Decide. World War I vs. World War II - Difference and Comparison -- Diffen. Accessed January 28, 2016, from http://www.diffen.com/difference/World_War_I_vs_World_War_II

"The European Theater in WWII: The Eastern Front, Western Front & Fight for North Africa." Study.com. Accessed January 28, 2016. http://study.com/academy/lesson/the-european-theater-in-world-war-ii-the-eastern-front-western-front-and-fight-for-north-africa.html.

"The European Theater." World War 2 History Info. Accessed January 28, 2016. http://www.worldwar2history.info/Europe/.

"World War II." History Net. Accessed January 28, 2016. http://www.historynet.com/world-war-ii.
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Causes and Effects of World War I

Words: 1489 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10394223

1st World War (WWI) was a global scale military conflict, which erupted in 1914. Virtually, the whole of Europe was involved as well as countries and kingdoms from other regions of the globe (Strachan 9). It should however be noted that the countries that engaged in this war entered the said war at different times and joined different alliances. Essentially, the war was between two alliances - the Central Powers and the Allies. In addition to these two sides, there was a neutral group of nations that remained neutral to the war. However, some of the said groups later on started taking sides. The Allies according to Kelly consisted of Great Britain, Belgium, Ireland, Serbia, Montenegro, Russia, as well as France and they were later joined by some neutral nations including Romania, Greece, Italy, and Portugal. On the other hand, the Central Powers alliance included the Ottoman Empire and Bulgaria…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Collins, F. Ross. World War One. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2008. Print.

Howard, Michael. The First World War. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2003. Print.

Kelly, Martin. Top 5 Causes of World War 1. 5 January, 2013. Web. 27 Sept. 2013.

*****. Consequences of World War I.17 march, 2005.Web. 27 Sept. 2013.
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Remaking the World After the

Words: 1282 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 86648473

264) the result was chaos and no idea of how peace would realistically be achieved. Sharp writes that the statements of President Wilson in the 1918 speeches were the bases of the peace settlement, which was eventually made. (Sharp, 2006, paraphrased)

The primary decision making body of the gathering in Paris is reported by Sharp to have been the 'Council of Ten' which was comprised by the French, Italian and Great Britain prime ministers and the U.S. president including the respective ministers of foreign affairs and two delegates from Japan. Sharp reports that the 'Council of Four' including Lloyd George, Clemenceau, Wilson and Vittorio Orlando formed the critical decision making body. It is reported that it took the promises of Lloyd George and Wilson to assure the full support of the British and U.S. forces were Germany to attack France again to convince Clemenceau to demonstrate more flexibility. A decision…… [Read More]

References

Alan Sharp,(2006) Peacemaking after World War I, in G. Martel (ed.), Companion to Europe 1900-1945, Blackwell, Oxford, 2006, pp. 261-75.

David a. Andelman, a Shattered Peace: Versailles and the Price We Pay Today, New Jersey, John Wiley and Sons, 2008, pp. 1-3, 4, 6, 9, 10-11, 13-14.

Margaret Macmillan, (2005) Making War, Making Peace: Versailles, 1919 Queen's Quarterly, vol. 112, No. 1, 2005, pp. 8-18.
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U S Involvement in World War I &

Words: 994 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91788876

U.S. Involvement in World War I & II:

There are several historical details of America's involvement in the First and Second world wars and the critical role that this country played in the two wars. Studies on these historical events have mainly focused on examining the involvement of the United States in the wars, the results of the engagement, and its impact on the country's position nationally and globally. America's involvement in the two wars had a crucial impact on the development of the nation to its current state both from the home front and internationally.

America's Involvement in World War I:

America's entrance and involvement in the First World War occurred on 6th April 1917, breaking the nation's long isolation tradition. The nation had embraced a policy of isolation and neutrality when war was declared in Europe in 1914. This policy seemed to be the most appropriate approach since…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

"45. America in the First World War." U.S. History: Pre-Columbian to the New Millennium. U.S. History - Independence Hall Association in Philadelphia. Web. 21 May 2012. < http://www.ushistory.org/us/45.asp >.

"World War II Guide: Bibliographical Essay." Digital History. The University of Houston. Web. 21 May 2012. .
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Causes of World War One

Words: 1893 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56235563

Wilson was one of the massive supporters of this League of Nations as he felt it would help in being responsible in preventing subsequent wars. One major aspect of the treaty of Paris in 1919 was that it contained the Treaty of Versailles, one which has a major goal of disciplining Germany and forcing a sense of punishment and finality of Germany. For instance, Germany lost many colonies and investments in lieu of this treaty and their ability to forge a military was crippled and limited to a fraction of its original size; the German air force was also similarly crippled. Germany was also further bankrupt in the reparations that it was ordered to pay -- the equivalent of $132 billion gold marks. These intense punishments were a major aspect of the treaty and were something that did cause a deadlock at certain points in the negotiating process (MacMillan, 195).…… [Read More]

References

Afflerbach, H. (2007). An Improbable War?: The Outbreak of World War I and European Political. New York: Berghahn Books.

Louis, W. (2006). Ends of British Imperialism. New York: I.B.Tauris.

MacMillan, M. (2007). Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World. New York: Random House Publishers.

MacMillan, M. (2009). The War that Ended Peace. New York: Random House Publishers.
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Perfect Peace & the Lover

Words: 2187 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71824029

.. [and after they removed the bandages from his face] I saw a fearful sight...It wasn't him. I knew it. A few minutes later his breathing stopped" (The Lover 23). She still had not searched the upper floor, but the emotion of her search, the suffering of the men on those awful wards, was too much, and so she "left the building."

Dafi describes that when a math teacher is killed in the war, students were suffering over the loss, but, "it's impossible to be only sorry, but we really were stunned and shocked because we remembered him living and standing beside the blackboard not so long ago, writing out the exercises with endless patience...[and though many students went to sleep because of how boring he was] in the middle of all this drowsiness, in the cloud of chalk dust flying around the blackboard, the formulas used to penetrate. And…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Oz, Amos. A Perfect Peace. Orlando, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985.

Yehoshua, Abraham B. The Lover. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1977.
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American History War and Peace

Words: 876 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71210415

As was the nature of the Cold War, the United States responded by quashing new governments that were likely to lead to communism, even where this constituted an undemocratic or even brutal instituted government (Kort 80).

Democratically elected officials from Brazil, Guyana, and Uruguay were overthrown by internal revolutionaries who were funded and trained by American forces (Parenti 44). These and other leaders and governments in Latin America were targeted by American forced as having communist leanings. Foreign policy followed, with more than two decades of the Cold War focusing not only on the major publicized events of Korea and the Soviet Union, but on many small, third world countries. These small nations were poised to become players in the larger Cold War struggle depending on where their allegiance and governments ended up after declaring their independence. With the Soviet Union attempting to exert force and pressure on the United…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Eisenhower, Dwight D. Inaugural Address. Washington, D.C. 20 Jan. 1953.

Geertz, Clifford. "What Was the Third World Revolution?" Dissent 52.1 (2005): 35-45.

Freidel, Frank. Roosevelt. New York: Little Brown and Company, 1990.

Kort, Michael G. The Cold War. Brookfield, CT: Millbrook Press, 1994.
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Protestant Ref Imperialism and WWI

Words: 1290 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 34222582

92). Pope Innocent X lamented the procedure, of course -- for it served to subvert the truths which the Roman Church strove to propagate.

Thus, the modern world was built not upon the majesty of kings and religion, but upon treaties and revolutionary ideals. The philosophical fruit of Protestantism would spring up in the age of Romantic/Enlightenment doctrine, which would produce the American and French Revolutions. "Liberty, equality, fraternity" would be the modern world's ethos -- in theory. However, capitalist ethics would undermine the romantic ideology. Imperialism -- for gold, God, and glory at the end of the medieval world -- would be based, in the modern world, upon sheer greed (as a principle). America defined this principle well with the notion of "manifest destiny," which by the end of the 19th century was expanded beyond the American frontier to encompass the whole globe.

The new Imperialism of America (and…… [Read More]

Reference List

Elliot, J.H. (2009). Spain, Europe and the Wider World: 1500-1800. Yale Universtiy

Press.

Haaren, J. (1904). Famous Men of the Middle Ages. New York, NY: American Book

Company.
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History War and Peace in

Words: 1381 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9109352



Another explanation and reason of the necessity of war in Ancient Rome is economical.

There are several different perspectives on this. First of all, the Roman society was essentially a society using extensively slave labor as the most important form of labor in existence. This basically ranged from constructions to simple chores around the house and often to farming as well, entertainment of its citizens and in other battles. A society relying so much on slaves for its own economic benefits could only necessarily force wars and battles in order to constantly keep a thorough supply of slaves available for work.

Indeed, in general, the population of a nation that had been defeated in battle would have either perished in the fights or would have been enslaved. Enslavement meant not only work in the city of Rome (or elsewhere in the empire), but also the possibility of being sold in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Millar, Fergus. Emperors, Frontiers and Foreign Relations, 31 BC to AD 378.

2. Harris, William. War and Imperialism in Republican Rome. Clarendon Press. Oxford Millar, Fergus. Emperors, Frontiers and Foreign Relations, 31 BC to AD 378.

Harris, William. War and Imperialism in Republican Rome. Clarendon Press. Oxford
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Origins of the Second World War by

Words: 1433 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 60923884

Origins of the Second World War, by A.J.P. Taylor. Specifically, it will critically analyze the book, its theme, and the author's methods.

THE ORIGINS OF THE SECOND WORLD WAR

Author of "The Origins of the Second World War," A.J.P. Taylor, was a noted British historian who wrote widely on European and world politics, policies, and history. His views were often unorthodox and controversial. "Taylor practiced a legitimate revisionism that is found in every field of history. Similar revisionists included Daniel J. Goldhagen who has argued that a deep-rooted anti-Semitism in Germany caused the Holocaust, not just Hitler and the Nazi party" (Schoenherr). He wrote numerous books and publications, including "The Struggle for Mastery in Europe 1848-1918," and "English History 1914-1945." He also worked as a broadcaster for the BBC. He was primarily interested in English and German history, but wrote extensively on a variety of historic and political subjects. Taylor…… [Read More]

References

Schoenherr, Steve. "The Taylor Thesis." University of San Diego. 18 July 2001. 17 Feb. 2003. http://history.sandiego.edu/gen/WW2Timeline/Taylorthesis.html

Taylor, A.J.P. The Origins of the Second World War. New York: Touchstone, 1996.
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What Led to the US Entry to World War 1

Words: 1876 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 10732355

United States entry into world war.

Taking nations from more than half the globe as partakers and victims, the first war broke out, 1914-1918, and that is known as World War 1 or the First World War. Until the World War II broke out, it was widely known as the war which had broken out which had the capacity to put an end to all wars, and commonly it was known as The Great War. In fact multiple factors produced the First World War. An International anarchy was seen all over Europe. On the eve of the World War I there were 25 sovereign states in Europe, each desiring to act on its own individual conscience. None of them was ready to submit to the interference or will of the other, as each of them held its pride high, thinking if they accepted the advice of any other state, their…… [Read More]

References

Bass, Herbert J., "America's Entry Into World War I." Chicago; Holt, Rinehart And Winston, 1964, p.14-17

Andrea, Alfred J., and Overfield, James H., "The Human Record." Boston; Houghton Mifflin Company, 1994, p.63-66

Pope, Stephen, and Wheal, Elizabeth-Anne, "The Dictionary of The First World War" New York; St. Marten's Press, 1995, p.24-27

Venzon, Anne Cipriano, "The United States in the First World War" New York; Garland Publishing, Inc., 1995, p.56-59
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Soviet WWII Soviet Policy Leading

Words: 2876 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40659937



The explanation that the Non-Aggression Pact was an agreement in which Hitler ultimately exploited Stalin may not necessarily be accurate. There is even the supposition that Stalin was deeply hurt on a personal level by Hitler's betrayal. But in reality, the Pact was sufficient to prevent the Soviet Union and Germany from coming into conflict until almost a full two years later. These were two years during which Hitler needed to focus his efforts on facing the British and French while strengthening Germany's key alliances with Japan and Italy.

Likewise, the Soviets benefited in the intervening time both by reaching gradual armistice with the Japanese and by enjoying the full extent of the Pact's guarantees to unchecked Soviet reclamation of the Baltic States, and its share of Poland. Though "Nazi Germany occupied the remainder of Poland when it invaded the Soviet Union in June 1941," the Soviet foothold in Poland…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Halsall, P. trans. (1997). Modern History Sourcebook: The Molotov-Ribbentrop

Pact, 1939. Modern History Sourcebook. Online at http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/1939pact.html>

Holocaust Memorial Museum. (2005). Invasion of Poland, Fall 1939. Holocaust Encyclopedia. Online at http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?ModuleId=10005070>

Roberts, G. (2001). From Non-Aggression Treaty to War: Documenting Nazi Soviet Relations, 1939-41 Geoffrey Roberts Explains the Fateful Sequence of Events from the Nazi-Soviet Pact to Hitler's Invasion of the U.S.S.R. History
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Stefan Zweig's Book the World

Words: 1822 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83031297

His death by suicide is not hard to understand, in fact if one reads very carefully between the lines of the last pages of his book, he is a depressed man without a country. He used words like "tortured heart" and "tormenting clairvoyance" (419); those allusions give hints.

QUESTION FOUR: My personal reflections tend to revolve around Zweig's movements and Zweig's thoughts in the years leading up to the takeover of Austria, as he could clearly see the Jewish community - and all of Europe - was in for a very rough ride. I reflect on what I believe I might have done had I been in his shoes. Surely I would have tried to spirit my aging mother out of Austria before it was too late. Also, I would have gone to America and tried to convince the political leaders and members of the media that Europe was about…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Zweig, Stefan. 1943. The World of Yesterday: An Autobiography by Stefan Zweig. Lincoln:
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Bipolar World the Bipolar Concept

Words: 1248 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66454389

The crisis facing Soviet society as the union disintegrated came from several sources, but the economic problems, the growing crime rate, the inter-ethnic violence, and the political struggles all derived from the deep crisis rising questions about the legitimacy of Soviet political institutions and the identity of the Soviet people. Gorbachev brought about many changes in Soviet politics and society. The development of this national policy came as the Soviet Union spent more and more on defense and security while people had to wait in long lines for staples. The political regime began trying to reform the economic structure in the 1980s in the era of perestroika. Ronald Grigor Suny notes that official policies in the mid-1980s began to shift priorities in response to a perceived need, and at the time, socio-cultural demands by the people were being answered and were increasing the size of sections of the budget for…… [Read More]

Works Cited

May, Elaine Tyler. Homeward Bound. New York: Basic Books, 1988.

Newhouse, John. War and Peace in the Nuclear Age. New York: Vintage Books, 1988.

Suny, Ronald Grigory. The Making of the Georgian Nation. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1994.

Smith, Graham. The Post-Soviet State. London: Arnold, 1999.
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How the Industrial Revolution Changed the World Economy

Words: 2713 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49391644

Industrial Revolution Changed the World Economy?

The Industrial Revolution that started in Great Britain in the latter part of eighteenth century is considered by some historians to be the most significant transformation in the economic environment of human civilization after the Agricultural Revolution. While there is no disagreement on the view that the 'revolution' had a great effect on the world economy and transformed the lives of a large number of people, its effect was by no means uniform. While it rapidly took roots in certain parts of the world, e.g., in Great Britain to start with, followed by certain countries of Western Europe, and the United States, large parts of the world -- in particular Africa -- remained untouched by it. In this paper I shall discuss the causes of the industrial revolution; identify the countries that were most affected by it and why; explain the effect of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ashton, T.S. The Industrial Revolution, 1760-1830. Oxford University Press: Oxford,1997

China" Article in Encyclopedia Encarta, 2003

Industrial Revolution." MSN Encarta Online. 2004. June 4, 2004. http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761577952/Industrial_Revolution.html

Rodney, Walter. How Europe Underdeveloped Africa. Washington D.C.: Howard University Press, 1981
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How the US Became a World Power

Words: 750 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35120453

U.S. As a World Power

The United States became a world power between 1890 and 1974 through the winning of World Wars and through economic growth and stability. By 1890, the U.S. economy was the best in the world, and American industry was producing double what Britain was. During that time, though, the U.S. was not strong militaristically or diplomatically, as these were areas on which it needed to work. In the meantime, the U.S. was focused on its industry and on helping poorer nations that were considered "backward" at the time and that were struggling in an effort to grow and develop into countries with stronger economies that were better able to help take care of their citizens. While the U.S. was engaged in humanitarian efforts at home and around the world, it also began to develop more on a diplomatic level. This was needed as the tensions that…… [Read More]

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Brutal Peace Chapter Seven Chapter

Words: 674 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 375752

But despite the rhetorical agreement amongst all of the occupying Allied powers, de-Nazification in Eastern vs. Western Germany had a very different character. Soviets were less interested in prosecuting war criminals and more interested in eliminating all individuals and aspects of culture deemed counterrevolutionary (Mazower 238). Destroying German capitalism and private ownership of agriculture was the priority, not feeding the hungry or finding former Nazis. However, Western de-Nazification was hardly superior -- it was done on a case-by-case basis, did not exclude former Nazis from public life, and most Germans believed that lower-level officials were prosecuted, while those really responsible for war crimes were set free in the American zone (Mazower 239). Interestingly enough, the French were probably the most successful in their de-Nazification efforts, given that they focused on German youth, and changing German culture more than former Nazis (Mazower 240).

Massive financial outlays, meager social changes, and "back-pedaling"…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Mazower, Mark. Dark Continent. New York: Vintage, 2000.
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Causes of World War I

Words: 2738 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 46041458

WWI was also the first time that toxins such as mustard gas were used and this created panic and death in many different countries, significantly raising the death toll from the war and also making it more difficult for the country to stay organized and on-track when it came to supporting the troops that were fighting (Marston, 1981).

Italy was another of the allies that joined up to retaliate against Germany. If it were not for the issue with the Balkans, it is likely that WWI would have never taken place, but other countries objected so strongly to the way that Germany handled the problem that they felt they must become involved. When Italy had finally been pushed far enough, it "decided to retaliate" and officially joined the war (Marston, 1981).

For Italy, going into the war meant protecting itself and its allies. It had generally enjoyed a good relationship…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Americanization (1925). Dept. Veterans of Foreign Wars of U.S., America: Great crises in our history told by its makers.

Barnes, Harry Elmer. (1970). The genesis of the world war: an introduction to the problem of war guilt. Howard Fertig, Inc.

Marston, F.S. (1981). The peace conference of 1919: organization and procedure Greenwood Press, 1981.

Rothberg, Gunter E., Moltke, Schlieffen (1986). The Doctrine of Strategic Envelopment. In Makers of modern strategy from Machiavelli to the nuclear age. Peter Paret ed.
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Shape and to Create Our Modern World

Words: 1799 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35724750

shape and to create our modern world?

The modern world was shaped by a range of events and powerful people. One of the first most influential people was Clovis. Clovis was the founder of the Merovingian dynasty of Frankish kings, and one who defeated the Roman rule in Gaul along with defeating a range of Germanic people, creating the kingdom that is known as France nowadays. Most notably, it was this ruler's conversion to Christianity which had a profound impact on the nation for years to come. Charles Martel might not be as famous as other rulers, but he had a significant impact on the development of the modern world in that he was able to stop the advance of the Moors into his land. Charles the Great is remembered more profoundly throughout time in that he was the leader of numerous holy wars against a variety of non-Christian groups.…… [Read More]

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Women in World War II the Second

Words: 620 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 88689603

Women in World War II

The Second World War was fought on many fronted. The activities that took place both in the battlefield and outside showed a number of suffering and inhumanity. It will go down in human history that more than six million Jews were killed in a single war. In this war, women were not left behind as they also took an active role in the practice. There eight most notable women who came forth to fight for their side of the battle line. The following study focuses on the similarities and differences of Therese Bonney, May Craig, and Janet Flanner and their contributions during the war.

Comparison

Each of the three women made significant contributions towards the fight during the Second World War. Therese Bonney was a highly educated woman having studied at Harvard among other institutions. She was a career photographer (Wagner, 2011). During the war,…… [Read More]

References

Wagner, L. (2011). Women war correspondents of World War II. New York: Greenwood Press.
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Policy of Containment After World

Words: 427 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87995523

The Soviets desire to establish their "sphere of influence" in Eastern Europe and disagreement with the U.S. over the fate of Germany was another reason. The U.S. retaliated by issuing the Truman Doctrine in 1947 that authorized U.S. aid to anti-Communist forces in countries threatened by Communists. The Soviet testing of the atomic bomb in 1949 and its tacit approval of a North Korean attack on South Korea that led to the Korean War further soured relations between the two nations. The Vietnam War in which the U.S. intervened militarily to prevent a Communist take-over of the country was another area of conflict between the U.S. And the Soviet Union. (Bell, 2001)… [Read More]

References

Containment." (2006). Nuclear Files.org: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation. Retrieved on November 18, 2006 at  http://www.nuclearfiles.org/menu/key-issues/nuclear-weapons/history/cold-war/strategy/strategy-containment.htm 

Bell, P.M.H. (2001). The World since 1945 -- An International History. London: Oxford University Press Inc.

The U.S. represented democracy, individual liberty and capitalism, while the U.S.S.R. was the first Marxist state committed to a command economy and the spread of the communist revolution around the world
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Conferences After WWII Enter Stage

Words: 1960 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 9275416



Truman: I am not a fan of compromise on this issue, Harry. But we have to prepare that we may need it. Stalin was instrumental in winning this war, and he's powerful enough that we cannot simply dictate our terms to him. I know the risk that compromise brings, and that there will be people who will suffer more under him than if they were free nations, or under our control, but we cannot cure every ill in this world.

Byrnes: Mr. President, with all due respect, and you know that in my role I fully understand the implications of compromise, but in this situation I think that Communism is just as big an evil as fascism. Even if Stalin allows these countries to remain independent, his idea of a buffer zone is a Communist buffer zone. He'll put his own people in place. The populations in those countries will…… [Read More]

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Governments the World Is a

Words: 2151 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99433775

There was also an opportunity cost to the availability of such goods. There was an explosion of American companies selling American products and to an unwelcome public. It was difficult for the Russian people to accept quickly. Their pace of life was not the same as America's and yet they were expected to adjust very quickly. The economic reform took a down turn when the Russian people did not catch onto a lot of these American products. As a result consumer spending went down and many companies failed in their ventures. Another factor to this failure is found in the quick need for the new Russia to do away with the old Russia' state owned companies by introducing privatization. This concept was hard for the Russian businessperson to grasp. "For both cultural and ideological reasons, the attitude toward private business in the Soviet Union could hardly be described as friendly"…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Dornberg, John. The New Germans: Thirty Years After. New York: MacMillan

Publishing Co., 1976.

Goldman, Marshall I. Lost Opportunity: Why Economic Reforms in Russia Have

Not Worked. New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 1994.
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Balkan War Led to WWI

Words: 808 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 44364193

Balkan War that led to World War I

There were several factors of the Balkan Crisis of 1914 that led to World War I. Generally, the European Crisis of 1914 is blamed on the "Great Power statesmen for their shortsightedness, incompetence, or failure to act in a timely or effective way to keep the peace" (Sowards 2001). However, it is important to consider the players involved in the conflict between the two states in the original Sarajevo crisis, Austria-Hungary and Serbia. Early in the crisis, when the Austrian, Hungarians, and Serbs made important decisions, "they consistently avoided compromise and risked war" (Sowards 2001). Two months passed between the murder of Franz Ferdinand and the "coming of the general war...plenty of time for calculation, caution and decision" (Sowards 2001). However, there were several successive events that took place during those two months.

On June 28, 1914, Gavrilo Princip, a nineteen-year-old student…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Duffy, Michael. "How It Began: The Causes of World War One." First World War.Com.

April 2002. http://athene.mit.csu.edu.au/~mrahma06/how%20it%20began.htm.(accessed 01-21-2003).

Sowards, Steven W. "Twenty-Five Lectures on Modern Balkan History." March 2, 2001. http://www.lib.msu.edu/sowards/balkan/lect15.htm.(accessed 01-21-2003).

Who started World War I?" February 6, 2002. http://history.acusd.edu/gen/classes/diplo177/warstart.html.(accessed 01-21-2003).
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Oslo Peace Accords Impact on

Words: 3734 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66452397

Much like the announced plans by President-elect Barack Obama to launch the most massive public works program since World War II by investing in the nation's highways and bridges, the same approach was used by the newly installed Israeli government to stimulate the economy. This approach, though, was considered a comprise approach since there were vastly differing views on what issues should be made priorities following the Oslo Peace Accords (Alterman 141). According to this author, "The shift of priorities was visible on the ground within a year or two: major highways and interchanges, long-neglected by the Likud governments, were upgraded. Environmental projects received public funds. Even the long-neglected rail system received a boost, which though modest was nevertheless its largest since pre-State British Mandate times" (Alterman 141). Despite this shift in priorities over the years, Israeli expansion and Palestinian statehood remain at the forefront of the ongoing and convoluted…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Alterman, Rachelle. Planning in the Face of Crisis: Land Use, Housing and Mass Immigration in Israel. London: Routledge, 2002.

Bird, Eugene. (1998, March). "With Oslo Accords in Shambles, a President Who Let it Happen Feels Shackled by Both Old and New Mistakes." Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, Special Report 15-16.

Details of the Oslo Peace Accords. (2008). Palestine Facts. [Online]. Available: http://Palestinefacts.org/pf_1991to_now_oslo_accords.php.

Dunsky, Marda. (2001). "Missing: The Bias Implicit in the Absent." Arab Studies Quarterly, 23(3), 1.
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Sources of Personal Peace

Words: 1440 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18701262

English Literature

Where and With Whom I Find Peace

It is very important for each individual to have and know a sense of peace during his/her life. Over the course of this paper, I will explain the places where I find peace and with which people I find peace in my life. There will be four areas of discussion in this paper. One place where I find place is in my church, or overall, with my relationship with my concept of God. I also find peace with my family. I, like many people, find peace with friends, especially during times of vacation and leisure. Finally, I find peace in the exercise and use of my imagination. A sense of peace is necessary for many reasons, especially in this modern world. Each person needs a way to unwind, relax, and reflect. The world can be very harsh and can make a…… [Read More]

References:

Preserve Articles. "Brief notes on Social Motives from psychological point-of-view." 2013, Preserve Articles, Web, Available from:  http://www.preservearticles.com/201104165507/brief-notes-on-social-motives-from-psychological-point-of-view.html . 2014 March 04.
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Zionism on the Peace Process

Words: 3968 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 89525035



Another tragic page of Jewish history is tragic period of Holocaust. There's no need to explain those terrible times and German crimes - these facts are well-known but I have to mention that Jewish Zionists managed organizing resistance to the Nazi regime and also they gained success cooperating with British, Soviet and American governments which agreed and let Jews create their state after the war. "Among the few European Jews who escaped the Holocaust were Zionists who emigrated to Palestine" (Shmuel; Reinharz, Jehuda Zionism and Religion Among, p.122). They were happy to leave Europe that was their real homeland but after Hitler's crimes they got sure that having own state, which would protect its citizens, is the best way out from international violence and anger directed against Jewish nation.

1948 was a turning point of Jewish history. At last Jewish nation created an own state on their historical land -…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Slater, Jerome Can Zionism be Reconciled with Justice for the Palestinians Article Tikkun July 2003

2. Zuncs, Stephen Defending Zionism in a Time of Occupation and Oppression Article Tikkun p.54 April 2004

3. Starobin, Paul Rethinking Zionism Article National Journal p.1240 April 24, 2004

4. Hazony, Yoram the Zionism Idea and its Enemies Article Commentary may 96, Vol. 101, Issue 5 p.30
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How to Achieve Peace in the Middle East

Words: 1305 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71990385

achieving peace in the Middle East. The writer explores the problems between Israel and Palestine and looks at possible solutions. There were five sources used to complete this paper.

The dispute between Palestine and Israel is long standing and difficult. Each side believes that it is in the right and both sides accuse various nations including the United States of taking sides against them. "Palestinians want an independent state with its capital in East Jerusalem - but hardliner Sharon will accept only small Palestinian territories and no Israeli withdrawal from East Jerusalem."

The conflict began in 1917 at the time Britain conquered Palestine. It was during World War II. It was called the Jewish homeland. During the United Nations talks of 1947 a plan was designed that divided the land between the Jews and the Arabs. That plan called for the founding of the State of Israel about a year…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Special Report: After the war is over - Israel and Palestine; Israel and Palestine

Date: 04/13/2002; Publication: The Economist; Author:

Profile: Propaganda from Israel and Palestine

Date: 10/17/2000; Publication: All Things Considered (NPR); Author: NOAH ADAMS