Young Goodman Brown Essays (Examples)

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Goodman Brown of Hawthorne's Young

Words: 312 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 28309486

Both Elisa Allen and Goodman Brown suggest that sexual tension might be at the root of their conflict.

Allen arguably deals with her pain more constructively than Brown does. Brown becomes bitter as a result of the conflict he perceives in his heart. Moreover, Brown fails to ground himself in reality. Questioning whether or not the forest vision was real, Brown neglects to contemplate its value even as a dream. Learning that he does have longings to break free from the social conventions tying him down to the rigid and conformist Puritan society would have helped Brown come to terms with the Faith he does genuinely seek. Elisa cries but deep down knows that a simple dinner out with her husband is as much freedom as she can have while still savoring the joy of…… [Read More]

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Symbbolism in Hawthorne's Young Goodman

Words: 1212 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35915928



hen first offered the snakelike staff, Young Goodman Brown refuses to accept it although his does later accept a new staff instead. This symbolizes his simultaneous fear of evil and his temptation to embrace it (Miller, 1991). The staff itself likely represents a tool of evil (Miller, 1991). Similarly, the way that Young Goodman Brown takes the first steps toward the evil ceremony also symbolizes the inevitability of the fall of human beings from goodness to evil when the choice is presented to them. In that regard, the flaming alter also symbolism a baptism of fire or formal entrance into the world of evil in much the same way that baptism represents the acceptance of God and all that is good and virtuous (Franklin, 1994).

Young Goodman Brown's response to encountering Goody Cloyse and realizing that she is already acquainted with the Devil is symbolic of his disappointment in realizing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Arvin, Newton. Hawthorne. Russell & Russell, 1961.

Fogle, Richard H. Hawthorne's Fiction: The Light and the Dark. University of Oklahoma Press, 1952.

Franklin, Benjamin V. "Goodman Brown and the Puritan Catechism." Esquire, Vol.

40 (1994): 67-88.
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Human Savagery in Young Goodman

Words: 1494 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15704850

Come devil! For thee is this world given..." This passage reflected Goodman's surrender to the wilderness, to the state of disorder that made him discover that he is weak and sinful. The presence of Faith in the first part of the story was also the only time that Goodman felt his strong faith in God. However, upon entering the wilderness, Faith his wife had not only disappeared, but Goodman's faith in God (and even himself) as well. Hawthorne made readers realize that human nature is in fact "naturally savage," and it is only fitting that Goodman's inherently savage nature would be discovered and uncovered (by him) in the wilderness.

Even towards the end of the story, Hawthorne continued to haunt his readers with the theme of wilderness inherent in the hearts and minds of humanity. Posing the question, "Had Goodman rown fell asleep in the forest, and only dreamed a…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Fitzgerald, S.F. E-text of "The Great Gatsby." Project Gutenberg of Australia Web site. Available at  http://www.gutenberg.net.au/0200041.txt .

Hawthorne, N. E-text of "Young Goodman Brown." Available at http://unx1.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Hawthorne/Goodman-Brown.htm.
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Assigned Readings

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 65022383

American Literature

Listen to Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God preached. Discuss in the discussion group.

Jonathan Edwards gives us a perfect example of the Calvinist beliefs of the Puritan settlers in early New England. Edwards studied theology at Yale University -- where today there is still a dormitory named after him -- but then became a noteworthy preacher in the Great Awakening, which exhorted an entire generation to renew their Christian faith. Edwards' skill in preaching lies in using literary imagery to get across abstract theological concepts. Calvinist theology believes in "total depravity" -- in other words, because of Adam and Eve eating the apple, human beings are fallen, and stained with "original sin." The most memorable image in Edwards' sermon -- the image of the spider being held over a fiery pit -- is meant to be a metaphor to enable the listener to imagine how…… [Read More]

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Relationship Between the Male Figures

Words: 1387 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 51784583

Male Figures

In works of fiction, the hero's journey will always be fraught with danger. He will not only have to overcome his own shortcomings, but will also encounter individuals who hope to impede his journey and prevent him from accomplishing his goals or individuals who will help them overcome their obstacles and succeed. Literature throughout history and literature that transcends cultures exhibit this same proclivity. Each component of the hero's journey, beginning with his quest, his initiation into the situation which will lead to his development, his separation from his origin, and finally his transformation at the end of the story is heavily dictated by the attention and communication he receives from the other male character. The stories "Young Goodman Brown," The Epic of Gilgamesh, Beowulf, and "The Legend of King Arthur" all show pairings of male characters, the protagonist and another male figure who either acts as an…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." 1854.

Hinds, Gareth. Beowulf. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick, 2007. Print.

"King Arthur, and the Legend of the Knights of the Round Table." N.p., n.d.

Sanders, N.K. The Epic of Gilgamesh: an English Version with an Introduction. New York, NY:
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Plot The Most Important Element

Words: 761 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48615606

1272).

The plot itself consists of a symbolic journey unto the Puritan heart of darkness, a place of communion with the devil himself, which, as it turns out, is only a dream. Nevertheless, the dream material clearly traumatizes Young Goodman Brown as much as if the evil trip into the forest, where in the dream, he even meets his wife Faith (" My Faith is gone!'" (p. 1269), he cries in despair, into the darkness, seizing one of his wife's symbolic pink ribbons from the branch of a tree) had happened to him in real life.

ithin his frightening dream, Young Goodman Brown, reluctant yet somehow determined, sets out, near sunset, on a journey into the forest, from which his new young wife with pretty pink ribbons in her hair, "My love and my Faith'" (p. 1264) tries in vain to keep him back. This is not just for purposes…… [Read More]

Work Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." The Norton Anthology of American Literature 1820-1865. Volume B. (Pkg. 1). Nina Baym et al. (Eds).

New York: Norton, 2003. 1263-1272.
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Good and Evil and Contradictions

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18584404

The "contradictory actions" will be strictly limited to the literal statements on the pages authored by Hawthorne in order to avoid evaluation by modern standards perhaps not shared by the Puritans this story discusses

c. Young Goodman Brown seems to come to the conclusion that everyone around him carries the taint of real or potential "sin" or "evil" (Hawthorne 7) which he tries to distance himself from.

3. Considering 2c the working conclusion the character Young Goodman Brown draws given the directly stated evidence that Brown spent the rest of his life "suspicious" and "gloomy" (Hawthorne 8) after the vision related in the story, without interpretation or assignment of value to those terms from modern standpoints,

a. Trying to prevent the Goody Cloyse from corrupting the young girl is not good or bad but inconsistent with a conclusion drawn by Young Goodman Brown (2.c. above)

i. If humans are inherently…… [Read More]

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Man of Good Nathaniel Hawthorne's Romance the

Words: 1251 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33035379

Man of Good?

Nathaniel Hawthorne's "romance," the short story "Young Goodman Brown," is a highly allegorical tale regarding the nature of evil and good. Even a cursory analysis of the title of the principle characters, Goodman Brown (who represents mankind or humanity) and his wife Faith (who represents faith in religious piety) indicates that they are representative of basic fundamental concepts that were at the heart of the Puritan religion that this tale is based upon. Therefore, the conclusion of this story, and the events leading up to it, is symbolic of more than the outcome of the aforementioned characters, but actually represents Hawthorne's view of mankind and its religious fervor. In providing this viewpoint, the author answers critical questions about the stem of evil (where it originates) as well as man's ability to stave it off or to submit to its dictates. A careful look at the diction and…… [Read More]

Reference

Madden, Frank. Exploring Literature. Harlow: Pearson Longman. 2003. Print.
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Hawthorne Author Nathaniel Hawthorne's Literary Works Constantly

Words: 1649 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 5701055

Hawthorne

Author Nathaniel Hawthorne's literary works constantly reference ideas of the supernatural and the religious ideas of the Puritans who colonized the United States. Of particular interest to Hawthorne is how these two things work together in that time period. Many of Nathaniel Hawthorne's works take place in Colonial times, a good century before the author himself was born. His own ancestors were active participants in Puritan society, even serving as judges during the Salem itch Trials. Scholars have argued that Hawthorne's work heavily features this time because of the guilt he felt over the actions of his relatives. Nathaniel Hawthorne used this historical setting to create moral points about Puritanical society and the hypocrisy of those times, as well as the continued hypocrisy of his own time period. This hypocrisy is linked back to the religious zealousness of the Puritan times where the beliefs of the church superseded all…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Poe, Edgar Allen. "The Minister's Black Veil." 1837.

Poe, Edgar Allen. "Rappaccini's Daughter."

Poe, Edgar Allen. "Young Goodman Brown." 1854.
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Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales Hawthorne's Writings Serve as

Words: 1737 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 85923900

Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales

Hawthorne's writings serve as a social commentary on the inherent dangers in blind acceptance of religious teachings.

There is ample scope to interpret all three stories of "Young Goodman Brown," "The Birthmark," and "Ethan Brand," as Hawthorne's commentary on the consequences of allowing religion to mar true recognition of goodness and beauty. All three stories highlight the fact that human kindness and faith are more important than obsession with religious teachings.

Although Hawthorne's writings have often been interpreted as being influenced by the author's Puritan heritage, there is equally a wide acknowledgement that Hawthorne left the interpretation of any moral lesson in his tales to the reader.

Hawthorne's contemporaries have, through their writings, shared several insights into Hawthorne's real-life personality and writings, which indicate that he was a keen observer of human nature and if anything, possessed a deep concern and compassion for the deeper psychology of…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baym, Nina. "The Tales of the Manse Period." Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales. Ed. James McIntosh. New York W.W. Norton and Company, 1987. 427-432.

Colacurcio, Michael J. "Visible Sanctity and Spectral Evidence: The Moral World of Hawthorne's Young Goodman Brown." Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales. Ed. James McIntosh. New York W.W. Norton and Company, 1987. 389-404.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. " Rappaccini's Daughter." Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales. Ed. James McIntosh. New York W.W. Norton and Company, 1987. 186-209.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "The Birthmark." Nathaniel Hawthorne's Tales. Ed. James McIntosh. New York W.W. Norton and Company, 1987. 118-131.
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Symbolism Explored in the Story

Words: 941 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41838219

This makes him question "heaven above him" (Hawthorne 594). hile he does decide to take a stand against what he sees in the forest, it is too late because what he has seen has already changed him. Faith's pink ribbon flickering is important because it represents his wife and his faith, which he has seemingly lost in one night. e read that that are simply "gone" (595). Goodman is radically transformed by what he believes took place in the forest and while it was something he thought he could handle and something he thought he wanted to know, he was deadly wrong but there was not way for him to go back and reverse events. Like Louise, he is changed but not in a good way.

Symbolism is significant to each story as well. In "The Story of an Hour," the house and the window are important to Louise's development…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1981.

Chopin, Kate. "The Story of an Hour." The Heath Anthology of American Literature. Lauter, Paul, ed. Lexington D.C. Heath and Company. 1990.
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Comparing 3 Nathaniel Hawthorne Short Stories

Words: 1565 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21904134

Nathaniel Hawthorne

The Different Manifestations of Evil in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Short Stories ("the Minister's lack Veil," "Young Goodman rown," and "My Kinsman, Major Molineux")

Nathaniel Hawthorne, American writer of 19th century American literature, has become well-known for his thought-provoking stories about the lives of Americans during its early history, at the time where there exists a rigid and conservative society motivated by the teachings of Christianity. With his acclaimed novel, "The Scarlet Letter," Hawthorne is also given credit for his literary expertise in writing short stories, which will become the focus of this paper.

Discussing the works of Hawthorne, namely, "The Minister's lack Veil," "Young Goodman rown," and "My Kinsman, Major Molineux," there emerges a dominant theme among these literary works. Each story carries with a message that talks about humanity's fight against evil in pursuit of goodness. However, what differs these stories from each other is the way he…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Hawthorne, N. (1831). "My Kinsman, Major Molineux." Available at:  http://www.eldritchpress.org/nh/mm.html .

____. (1837). "The Minister's Black Veil." Available at:  http://www.eldritchpress.org/nh/mbv.html .

____. "Young Goodman Brown." Available at: http://unx1.shsu.edu/~eng_wpf/authors/Hawthorne/Goodman-Brown.htm.

Maus, D. (2002). The Devils in the details: the role of evil in the short fiction of Nikolai Gogol and Nathaniel Hawthorne. Papers on Language and Literature, Vol. 38, Issue 1.
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New England Stories Tradition in Two New

Words: 921 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 90644976

New England Stories

Tradition in Two New England Stories and in Today

Both "A New England Nun" by Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman and "Young Goodman Brown" by Nathaniel Hawthorne are tales of distinct New England traditions. While "A New England Nun" portrays the marrying customs of old New England, "Young Goodman Brown" depicts the spiritual customs of Puritan New England. But such is not to say that every Puritan was going to midnight meetings with the Devil -- the tale is an allegorical representation of every man's dual nature; nor is Freeman suggesting anything more than that Louisa Ellis prefers her life the way she has grown accustomed to having it -- nice and pretty and free of dirt. Though Goodman Brown and Louisa Ellis are both affected by the traditions of their New England surroundings, both are able to transcend them: Louisa Ellis through the happy chance hearing of…… [Read More]

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John Updike and Nathaniel Hawthorne

Words: 1596 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 40415704

John Updike & Nathaniel Hawthorne

John Updike and Nathaniel Hawthorne are two of the most well-known writers to have contributed to the body of American Literature. Updike, the more recent writer of the two, has been considered one of America's most prestigious writers, often honored by collegiate bodies and authoritative figures. Likewise, Nathaniel Hawthorne in his time was recognized and respected, having come from a background commanding some respect. Both authors however, during their life struggled with negative issues; Updike for example struggled with separation and health problems that plagued him since he was a child. Hawthorne struggled with his ancestry who embodied a rigid Puritanical belief system, and also struggled with the poverty of his family that he was never quite able to overcome during his lifetime.

The works of both Updike and Hawthorne tend to have some autobiographical notes. Each author draws from experiences within their own lives.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Jalic, LLC. "Nathaniel Hawthorne." Jalic, LLC. (2004). {Online} Available:



De Bellis, Jack. "The John Updike Encyclopedia." Greenwood Press, Westport: 2000.

Farr, J. "Haunted Hawthorne." The Wilson Quarterly, Vol. 28, winter 2004.
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Truth and Consequences in Chopin's

Words: 933 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95450882

The pink ribbon fluttering before him is significant because it represents Faith, his wife and faith, his religion - both of which are "gone" (Hawthorne) at this point. He is changed by what he believes is truth and he can trust no one anymore. It is difficult enough that the man looses his faith but he also comes to look upon his faith with disdain. His appreciation for all that once held dear is ruined by what he might or might not have seen in the forest. The Sabbath, once a holy day, is infected to the point that Goodman cannot listen to hymns because an "anthem of sin rushed loudly upon his ear and drowned all the blessed strain" (Hawthorne). Everything and everyone is dirty and, unfortunately, there is no relief for Goodman.

It is important to note that while Goodman never knows the absolute truth about what his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Chopin, Kate. "The Story of an Hour." Virginia Commonwealth University. Information Retrieved November 9, 2008. http://www.vcu.edu/engweb/webtexts/hour/

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Literature Network Online. "Young Goodman Brown." Information Retrieved November 9, 2008.  http://www.online-literature.com/hawthorne/ 158
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Nathaniel Hawthorne Was an Eighteenth Century American

Words: 1853 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78509998

Nathaniel Hawthorne was an Eighteenth Century American author who through his works explored the subject of human sin, punishment and guilt. In fact, themes of pride, guilt, sin, punishment and evil is evident in all of his works, and the wrongs committed by his ancestors played a particular dominant force in Hawthorne's literary career, such as his most famous piece, "The Scarlet Letter" (Nathaniel Pp). Hawthorne and other writers of the time, Ralph aldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Herman Melville, looked to the Puritan origins of American history and Puritan styles of rhetoric to create a distinctive American literary voice (Nathaniel Pp).

Hawthorne was born in Salem, Massachusetts in 1803. His father, who died when Nathaniel was four years old, was a sea captain and direct descendent of John Hathorne, one of the judges in the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692 (Nathaniel Pp). Growing up in seclusion with his…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." Modern Library Edition.

Random House, Inc. New York. 1937; pp 1033-1042. http://etext.lib.virginia.edu/etcbin/browse-mixed-new?id=HawYoun&tag=public&images=images/modeng&data=/texts/english/modeng/parsed

Donoghue, Denis. "Hawthorne and Sin." Christianity and Literature. January 1

2003; Pp. http://www.highbeam.com/library/doc3.asp?docid=1G1:102905746
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Extend the Lines if Necessary Without Being

Words: 1493 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 42510981

extend the lines, if necessary, without being wordy.

Three specific instances of irony in "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been" are:

a) ____The title: no one ever asks Connie these questions.

b) ____Connie is the one preyed upon in this tale, but she invites in this demonic provocation.

c) Arnold Friend's remark about holding her so tight she won't try to get away because it will be impossible, is an ironic remark as it represents much of the symbolism at work throughout the story.

In "Young Goodman Brown," a) Brown represents ____The easily corruptible human.

b) the forest represents ____The practice of evil.

c) the peeling, cacophonous sounds represent ____Temptation

3. Explain the mother's attitude towards Emily in "I Stand Here Ironing"; what specific EVIDENCE supports your position? ____The mother's attitude towards Emily in the story is one of distance, rather than motherly attention. She regards Emily as…… [Read More]

References

Hawthorne, N. (2012). Young Goodman Browne. New York: Start Publishing .

Joyce, J. (2010). Dubliners. London: Cricket Books.

Marquez, G. (1993). The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World. New York: Paulinas.

Oates, J. (1994). Where are You Going? Where have you been? Trenton: Rutgers University Press.
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Duality of Character in Nathaniel Hawthorne and

Words: 744 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 48750022

Duality of Character in Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allan Poe

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's short story, "Young Goodman Brown," and in Edgar Allan Poe's story, "The House of Usher," there are main characters who have several characteristics in common. The main character in Hawthorne's story possesses a duality of character and undergoes a life-changing experience. The title character in Poe's story has a similar duality of character; he, too, undergoes a transformational experience that may be seen as representing duality of character as well. Both stories have a dreamlike quality that adds to the atmosphere of the story; it also leads the reader to question whether the events have actually occurred, or if they were somehow the products of a hallucination or dream state, perhaps even supernatural in nature.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's story, "Young Goodman Brown," the title character is a young, newly married Christian man who lives in Salem, Massachusetts…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Harmon, William, and Holman, Hugh. A Handbook to Literature, Eleventh Edition. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: 2009. Print.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." In Literature: Reading Fiction, Poetry,

Drama, and the Essay, Second Edition, ed. Robert DiYanni. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1990. 93-102. Print.

Poe, Edgar Allan. "The House of Usher." Retrieved electronically on July 23, 2012 from . Web.
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Allegorical Components in Rip Van

Words: 630 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 22720245

He might have received his wish but that wish cost him 20 years.

In "Young Goodman Brown," Hawthorne allows us to look at the frail nature of man through Brown's curious nature. He wants to know what is happening in the woods and does not stop to think of the unintended consequences. He does not know what to think when he stumbles upon the scene in the forest. The sight of respectable citizens partaking in a satanic ritual makes Brown feel "overburdened with the heavy sickness of his heart" (Hawthorne 594). He looses faith in man and, subsequently, faith in God, wondering if there was a "heaven above him" (594). He vows to "stand firm against the devil" (294) despite everything but the knowledge of his wife in the forest proves to be more than he can bear. Hawthorne utilizes the aspect of change to demonstrate the fragile human psyche.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. "Young Goodman Brown." The Norton Anthology of Short Fiction. Ed.

R.V. Cassill. New York W.W. Norton and Company. 1981. pp. 589-99.

Irving, Washington. "Rip Van Winkle." The Complete Tales of Washington Irving. Ed.

Charles Neider. New York: Doubleday & Company, 1999. pp. 1-16.
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Fiction Setting Is One of

Words: 708 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 47557754



In Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado," the setting is of a very different nature, but also concerns life, death, and the irony that often accompanies the interaction between the two. The main character and first-person narrator, Montresor, leads Fortunato to his grave for an unnamed trespass. Under the pretence of wanting his expertise regarding a cask of amontillado, Montresor leads his friend into the recesses of an extensive vault, which also serves as a grave for a centuries-old family. The story is filled with increasingly grim descriptions of damp darkness and "piled bones" belonging to the generations of Montresor's family. The increasing darkness then correlates with the theme of Fortunato's impending doom. At the final turn, Montresor traps him in a crypt and seals him inside. The darkness can then serve to indicate the darkness of Montresor's action as well as the horror of Fortunato's final doom.

In Hawthorne's story,…… [Read More]

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Hawthorne's Rejection of Puritan Values

Words: 1337 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68867437

"

Mather 22)

Hawthorne clearly stepped away from the Puritan ethic by consistently alluding to the existence of the earthly supernatural. Though this was a fear of the Puritans, clearly it was associated with Satan and possession of the living. In Hawthorne's works the supernatural was associated with less grand sources, such as those seen in Young Goodman Brown. (Hoeltje 39-40) Hawthorne allows his characters to explore concepts that would have been those deemed heretical within the Puritan settings of the works.

In The Birth-Mark, Hawthorne associates the active expulsion of character traits of humanity clearly results in the death of the whole.

The line of divergence in "The Birth Mark" is indicated by its name. e all have our birth-marks, -- traits of character, which may be temporarily suppressed, or relegated to the background, but which cannot be eradicated and are certain to reappear at unguarded moments, or on…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel." The Columbia Encyclopedia. 6th ed. 2004.

Emmett, Paul J. "Narrative Suppression: Sin, Secrecy and Subjectivity in "The Minister's Black Veil." Journal of Evolutionary Psychology 25.1-2 (2004): 101+. Questia. 16 Jan. 2005 http://www.questia.com/.

Gartner, Matthew. "The Scarlet Letter' and the Book of Esther: Scriptural Letter and Narrative Life." Studies in American Fiction 23.2 (1995): 131+. Questia. 16 Jan. 2005 http://www.questia.com/.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter. London: J.M. Dent, 1906.
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Instructor Teaching the Course You

Words: 315 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3819862

Also, it does not really fit very well with the rest of the syllabus. The other stories on the syllabus have three-dimensional characters that show a mix of good and bad characteristics, and face moral dilemmas. But the 'good man' of the title is suddenly confronted with a vision of hypocrisy, of the good people of the town showing their evil side. He does not come to this encounter with any soul-searching, or because he has done something particularly extraordinary, in terms of the story's plot. The story is heavy-handed and does not make much of a 'case' for the effective use of symbolism or the use of stories with clearly moral tales. Most people in the class have already encountered fables and morality tales in their other reading, even as children, and the more complex modernist works are a better spur towards better writing and…… [Read More]

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American Romanticism the Period Known

Words: 625 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 15174544

In Irving's case, he expanded on his background of writing historical works, with his satirical approach individual and distinctive. This developed the genre partly by introducing satire as an effective element. At the same time, it also showed that literature could be expanded to suit any style.

Edgar Allan Poe is the third writer who contributed significantly to the development of American Romanticism. Poe added an element of horror and wrote short stories that were both disturbing and haunting. One of the interesting things about Poe is that the effectiveness of his stories did not rely only on the storyline. For example, the short story "The Fall of the House of Usher" is the narrator's account of his visit to a haunted house and his encounters with the strange brother and sister that live there. In this case, it is not the actual storyline that makes the story effective. Instead,…… [Read More]

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Compare and Contrast the Concept

Words: 816 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 50704952

nature in American literature, from earliest writings to the Civil War period. It is my purpose to outline the connection between spirituality, freedom and nature and explain how American writers have chosen to reflect and interpret these themes in relation to their historical realities.

At the beginning of the colonization process there were two congruent depictions of nature. Initially, the tribes comprising The Iroquois League lived in close contact with nature and believed in the importance of maintaining a harmonious relationship with it. In this respect, the Iroquois Constitution imposes a devout display of gratitude to all by-human elements of the world before the opening of any council. On the other hand, the early explorers and founders of the United States perceived an immense natural potential in the country. In this sense, Thomas Hariot describes the New World as a land of wealth, his words and images aimed both at…… [Read More]

References

Barna, Mark. (2001, May) Our Romance with Nature. The World and I, Vol.16, No.5

Webb, J. Echoes of Paine: Tracing the Age of Reason through the Writings of Emerson (2006). ATQ (The American Transcendental Quarterly), Vol. 20, No.3

Whicher, G.F. (1945) Walden Revisited: A Centennial Tribute to Henry David Thoreau. Chicago: Packard
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Collective Perception Art Is One Facet of

Words: 924 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19278219

collective perception, art is one facet of life that is governed more by individual thought and emotional predisposition than by institutional prejudices. It should seem a natural disposition of the artist to look within himself for expression, rather than to the very established conventions from which he may seek to provide asylum. Likewise, it strikes a chord of logic to us that an artist makes his primary appeal to his own imagination, rather than to millennia of intellectual rules. This, however, is a new perspective as compared to the age of humanity. From Enlightenment through the mid eighteenth century, classical rules intended to preserve the integrity and exclusivity of artistic expression were the prime determinant in the nature of societal artistic output. However, a surge in the population of the bourgeoisie, an overall expansion in the international middle class, opened up the possibility for artistry without the condition of aristocracy.…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. Buell, Lawrence. New England literary culture from revolution through renaissance. 1986. PS243.B84 1986.

2. Gravil, Richard. Romantic dialogues: Anglo-American continuities, 1776-1862. 2000. PS159.E5 G73 2000.

3. Hertz, Robert. "English and American Romanticism." Personalist 46 (1965), 81-92. AP2.P46.
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Hawthorne Literary Symbolism and Hawthorne's

Words: 993 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 18679823

The only material similarity between Prynne's scarlet "badge" and Faith's pink ribbons is that both are made of cloth and adorn some type of clothing, i.e., Faith's ribbons are part of her cap while Prynne's "badge" is sewn into her dress as needlework.

The reader is first introduced to Prynne's "badge" in Chapter Two of the Scarlet Letter when she emerges from jail -- "On the breast of her gown, in fine red cloth, surrounded with an elaborate embroidery and fantastic flourishes of gold thread, appeared the letter a." Upon being led to her "place of punishment" for committing adultery with Arthur Dimmesdale, all eyes are immediately drawn to the scarlet "A" which "had the effect of a spell, taking (Hester) out of the ordinary relations with humanity and enclosing her in a sphere by herself" (ell, 163-164). Obviously, this scarlet emblem upon Hester's dress seems to emit a life…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Bell, Millicent, Ed. Nathaniel Hawthorne: Collected Novels and Short Stories. New York: The Library of America, 1983.

Richardson, Robert D., Jr. "Ralph Waldo Emerson." Dictionary of Literary Biography. Vol. 59: "American Literary Critics and Scholars, 1800-1850." Ed. John W. Rathburn. Farmington Hills, MI: Gale Research, Inc., 1987, 108-129.
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Colonial and Post Colonial Literature

Words: 778 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70658585

Post Colonial Literature

Historical literature is filled with examples of pre- and post-colonialist paradigms. Within each of these models, however, there is a certain part of a larger story that can only be told in the larger view of the historical process. One of the grand themes that help us wade through that process is that of the dehumanization of the individual. For whatever psychotically reasons, humans seem to have the need to change others into less than human in order to subjugate them economically, intellectually, or culturally. We might even think of the process of imperialism as practiced by the European powers as dehumanization of culture and society; begun at the micro level and then evolving into the macro. This dehumanization was particularly exemplified by the manner in which indigenous cultures were decimated, how families were torn apart and scattered all over the Empire, and the manner in which…… [Read More]

REFERENCES

Achebe, C.Things Fall Apart. New York: Anchor Books, 1994, Print.

Conrad, J. Heart of Darkness. Web. Plain Label Books. 2009. Retrieved from: googlebooks.

Hawthorne, N. Young Goodman Brown. Boston, MA: Wildside Press, 2006.

Scott, A. "Apocalypse Now Redux (2001). The New York Times. 2001, Web.
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Mark Leyner's Postmodernism

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 83307558

Mark Leyner

Hey-I know this looks long, but it's about 1200 words without the two long quotations from the book.

So it's actually the right length according to the assignment, but you might want to mention that to the instructor.

A selection from Mark Leyner's 1995 work Tooth Imprints on a Corn Dog is included by the editors of the Norton Anthology Postmodern American Fiction, although Leyner himself claims in a note in the anthology that his "work isn't animated by a desire to be experimental or post-modernist or aesthetically subversive or even 'innovative' -- it is animated by a desire to craft a kind of writing that is at every single moment exhilarating for the reader, where each phrase, each sentence is an event." (Geyh, Leebron, & Levy 242). As a result the entirety of Tooth Imprints on a Corn Dog holds up as a kind of aesthetic whole…… [Read More]

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Assigned Readings

Words: 1284 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 35584738

Thomas Paine was an earlier conqueror of the special association that was formed between America and France. His part in this association was initiated with his responsibility of the post of American Congress Secretary of Foreign Affairs where he continually used dialogue to make relations between the two better. He retained this post throughout the American evolution. Paine, however, is better noted for his works written throughout the American and French evolutions Eras. In his writings, Paine offered spirited protection of accepted autonomy, human rights, and the republican government. Both Common Sense (1776) ights of Man (1791-1792) stick out as the most broadly read political areas from the era. Paine's distinctive global thought also can serve as the building blocks for liberal cosmopolitanism in worldwide relations. His unrelenting faith in aspects of democratization, free trade, and respect for human rights being the factors that cut back worldwide conflict stands among…… [Read More]

References

Fruchtman, Jack, Jr. "Thomas Paine and the Religion of Nature." Johns Hopkins University Press . 1993.

Fruchtman, Jack, Jr. "Thomas Paine: Apostle of Freedom." Four Walls Eight Windows. 1994.

Keane, John. "Tom Paine: A Political Life." Little, Brown. 1995.
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Jewish Couple in Ernest Gaines's

Words: 580 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64023018



"Well, I'll be. No wonder that tooth still killing him. I going one way and he pulling the other. oy,

don't you know any Catholic prayers?

"I know 'Hail Mary,'" I say.

"Then you better start saying it" (p. 1849).

esides Monsieur ayonne, the other clearly-identified Christian character in the story is the preacher James and his mother observe inside the dentist's waiting room. When an educated-looking young man challenges the preacher's blind faith, encouraging him instead to "Question everything. Every star, every stripe, every word ever spoken. Everything'" (p. 1855), soon afterward, the preacher becomes so uncontrollably angry at the young man that he walks over and hits the young man in the face, to which the non-believing young man says, ironically "You forgot the other cheek" (p. 1856). The preacher, clearly missing the irony, then hits the young man on the other side of his face, and then…… [Read More]

Besides Monsieur Bayonne, the other clearly-identified Christian character in the story is the preacher James and his mother observe inside the dentist's waiting room. When an educated-looking young man challenges the preacher's blind faith, encouraging him instead to "Question everything. Every star, every stripe, every word ever spoken. Everything'" (p. 1855), soon afterward, the preacher becomes so uncontrollably angry at the young man that he walks over and hits the young man in the face, to which the non-believing young man says, ironically "You forgot the other cheek" (p. 1856). The preacher, clearly missing the irony, then hits the young man on the other side of his face, and then stomps out of the room.

Within these examples of Christianity, Monsieur Bayonne reveals his narrow-minded conviction that the only prayers God answers are Catholic prayers, and the preacher reveals not only narrow-mindedness, but brutality as well, and, by association, how easily challenged his religious convictions truly are. The narrator, eight-year-old James, says nothing positive about either of these men, and their actions speak for themselves. However, James does say to himself, about the well-dressed student who challenges the preacher in the waiting room, "When I grow up I want to be just like him. I want clothes like that and I want keep a book with me too" (p. 1857).

Within this story, Gaines's characterizations of Monsieur Bayonne and the preacher point out that one can be both a believing Christian and either narrow-minded, a hypocrite, or
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Nathaniel Hawthorne the Objective of This Work

Words: 2831 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 87693031

Nathaniel Hawthorne

The objective of this work is to examine Nathaniel Hawthorne's works and to conduct a comparison of the life of Hawthorne to his short stories and to examine how his life and his works paralleled one another.

The life of Nathaniel Hawthorne many times was played out in his stories as his life events and experiences bled forth into his works demonstrating the struggles that the writer faced within himself and his own life. unning through the threads of the stories of Hawthorne is the theme of Puritanism and this is clearly perceived as one reads the stories of Hawthorne entitled "The Scarlet Letter," "The Minister's Black Veil and "The Birthmark." In order to understand Hawthorne's view it is necessary that one understand what Puritanism is, believes, and represents.

Puritanism

Puritanism was first presented in the works of William Tyndale (1495-1536) as well as in the work of…… [Read More]

References

Hawthorne, Nathaniel (1999) The Minister's Black Veil: Boston: Ticknor and Fields 1850. Retrieved from http://eldred.ne.mediaone.net/nh/sl23.html

Hawthorne, Nathaniel (1999) The Scarlet Letter: Boston: Ticknor and Fields 1850, Retrieved from: http://eldred.ne.mediaone.net/nh/sl23.html

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. (1999) The Scarlet Letter: A Romance. Boston: Ticknor and Fields, 1850.Retrieved from: http://eldred.ne.mediaone.net/nh/sl23.html

Rummel, C. (1996) Puritanism in Nathaniel Hawthorne's Short Stories. 25 7 1996. American Short Stories. Retrieved from:  http://bronski.net/works/hawthorne.html
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Nathaniel Hawthorne's Beliefs Concerning Ethics Morality and

Words: 1388 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 78424141

Nathaniel Hawthorne's beliefs concerning ethics, morality, and guilt as made evident in one of these stories. Consider how beliefs affect characterization, setting, plotting, and theme.

In the story of Rappaccini's daughter, the narrator becomes infatuated with a young woman whose life literally has become poisoned, because of her father's influence. Unlike a conventional Christian system of morality, as is typical of most of the author's other tales, the girl is being 'punished' for no real crime, other than being born the daughter of a mad scientist. The European setting is also atypical of the author. It takes place in exotic Italy, where the fantastical narrative seems more appropriate than Puritan New England.

The title character's father is a botanist who has created a beautiful garden, but because of his extensive scientific knowledge, he has hubristically attempted to transcend the laws of nature. He has created a girl whom literally has…… [Read More]

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Instructor Teaching the Course You

Words: 353 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 70435759

It also is striking in the way that it uses dialogue and silence to create the relationship between the man and the girl, rather than description. However, the details of the story, like the types of drinks the couple have together and the luggage stickers on their suitcases tell a tale and characterize them just as much as long passages of dialogue or narrative.

A also enjoyed "Cathedral," another story told in simple, minimalistic style about everyday encounters and people. Raymond Carver tackles the issue of dealing with someone who is disabled through the voice of an unlikeable narrator yet the husband and the blind man at the end of the story reach a kind of connection and transcendence together, simply watching a television program about cathedrals. In the most unlikely way, people are still capable of being good -- an uplifting message, even in a sad story where people…… [Read More]

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Hawthorne Tale Rappaccini's Daughter Hawthorne's

Words: 395 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 69380361

The beauty of Rappaccini's garden vies with that of the paradisiacal beauty. The greatest difference between the two however is that Rappaccini's scientific quest for knowledge is barren and loveless. Nature, as created by God, is filled with the divine love of its creator and this particular quality cannot be copied by the hand of man. The story is pivoted on the love story between Beatrice, Rappaccini's daughter who is imbued with the poison of the garden, and a young man Giovanni Guasconti. Their infatuation turns into hatred though because of the poisonous curse of the garden. Beatrice however is redeemed when she dies in the end, wishing she had known true love and not just the artificial splendor of the garden: "Though my body be nourished with poison, my spirit is God's creature, and craves love as its daily food."(Hawthorne, 67) Thus, the failed romance between the two lovers…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hawthorne, Nathaniel. Collected Stories. New York: Penguin, 1979.
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Setting of a Story Can Reveal Important

Words: 1219 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 57204372

setting of a story can reveal important things about the narrative's larger meaning, because the setting implies certain things about the characters, context, and themes that would otherwise remain implicit or undiscussed. In their short stories "The Lottery" and "The Rocking-Horse inner," Shirley Jackson and DH Lawrence use particular settings in order to comment on the political and socio-economic status of their characters without inserting any explicitly political or socio-economic discussion into the narrative. In the case of "The Lottery," the setting transforms the story from a one of simple horror to a more nuanced critique of American society, and particularly its dedication to arbitrary, destructive beliefs. Lawrence's "The Rocking-Horse inner" makes a similar point, but in this case the setting serves to implicitly critique the consumerism encouraged by capitalist hegemony in England. Comparing and contrasting these two settings allows one to better understand how each story makes an identifiable…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Jackson, Shirley. The Lottery and Other Stories. New York: Farrar, Strauss, and Giroux, 2005.

Lawrence, DH Selected Short Stories. Toronto: Dover Publications, 1993.
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Socially Reactive Depression in African American Adolescents

Words: 2973 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 95785604

Depression in African-American Adolescents

Etiology of Depression

Mental illnesses like depression can be very difficult to diagnose or to recognize: There is no serum to test for when looking for depression. In some real if rather vague way, mental health is simply the absence of mental disorders. And in the reverse we define mental illness as the absence of mental health. The circularity of this definition is certainly confusing, but it reflects the real confusion over the range of what may be considered to be mentally "normal." This vagueness as to definition does not mean that the problem of mental illness and especially depression is not real: Indeed, the difficulty of identifying those with mental illness and so of providing prompt and appropriate treatment to them makes the need to do so more effectively all the more important (Grob, 1991, p. 13). The need to identify mental illness in -…… [Read More]

References

Achenbach, T. etal. (22 December 2002). "Ten-year comparisons of problems and competencies for national samples of youth: self, parent, and teacher reports. J of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

Boyer, C. (2003). Interview.

Crawford, I. etal. "The influence of dual-identity development on the psychosocial functioning of African-American gay and bisexual men." J. Of Sex Research 39 (3): 179-189.

Donnel, A. etal. (2001, Oct. 1). "Psychological reactance: Factor structure and internal consistency of the questionnaire for the measurement of psychological reactance." Journal of Social Psychology 141 (5): 679-687.
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Technological History of Jazz in

Words: 1575 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 62474668



This were then replaced with larger big band orchestras as technology allowed such large groups to be clearly recorded, "As the swing era began, shorts were made of many of the top orchestras," (Yanow 2). Big band orchestras began showing up in all the major Hollywood productions. They featured pre-recorded songs where the musicians lip singed. It is interesting to have such a crucial period on film. The Swing Era "was fortunately captured for feature films and short subjects at the time it was all happening," (Behlmer 1). Big bands became incredibly popular in feature films during the 1930s and 40s. Benny Goodman, "The King of Swing," had a movie- Hollywood Hotel in 1937 "the full orchestra plays an abbreviated version of that quintessential Swing Era arrangement of 'Sing, Sing, Sing' in the film," (Behlmer 1). From big Hollywood productions came popularity on the small screen. As televisions became the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Behlmer, Rudy. "Big Bands in the Movies." Turner Classic Movies. 2009. Retrieved 16 Nov 2009 at http://www.tcm.com/thismonth/article/?cid=199314

Gridley, Mark C. Jazz Styles: History and Analysis. 9th ed. Prentice Hall. 2006.

History Link, "The Jazz Singer, the First Successful Feature Film with Sound, Debuts in Seattle at the Blue Mouse on December 30, 1927." The Free Online Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15 Nov 2009 at http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&file_id=2485

Schoenherr, Steven E. "Recording Technology History." San Diego University. 2005. Retrieved 16 Nov 2009 at http://history.sandiego.edu/GEN/recording/notes.html#origins
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Charlie Parker

Words: 8078 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 59674313

Charlie Parker

Music:

The music of United States changed significantly during the twentieth century, and each generation went on to develop its own music. These were all immensely popular, had strong rhythmic touch and were very different from the earlier forms which existed. These were used for dancing or just for the purpose of listening. When the twentieth century started it was the time for a variety called Ragtime. After the end of the First World War, Jazz had its origin and it influenced all other forms till it was affected by the stock market crash in 1929. This period was called the roaring twenties. Then it was time for a new form to emerge and this was in the music of the ig ands and led at different stages by Duke Ellington, Fletcher Henderson, Jimmie Lunceford, Glen Gray and Chick Webb in the beginning. They were then followed by…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Weinstock, Len. "The Big Band Era, Or How America Came Out Of the Great Depression and Went On To Win World War II, 1991" Retrieved at  http://www.redhotjazz.com/bigbandessay.html . Accessed on 03/08/2004

Azinhais, Joao "The King of Jazz" Retrieved at  http://www.redhotjazz.com/whitemanarticle.html . Accessed on 03/08/2004

Weinstock, Len. "The origins of Jazz" Retrieved at  http://www.redhotjazz.com/originsarticle.html . Accessed on 03/08/2004

Slave Songs of the United States" A. Simpson & Co. Retrieved at  http://docsouth.unc.edu/church/allen/allen.html . Accessed on 03/08/2004