Relationship Between Structure and Tradition Within Catholicism Term Paper

  • Length: 4 pages
  • Subject: Mythology - Religion
  • Type: Term Paper
  • Paper: #44200542

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Structure and Tradition within Catholicism

The concept of Scripture in Catholicism

There was not for all time, a Bible. But when was the time that was 'before scripture', before there was a Bible? Without a doubt, in the foggy olden days of the human race, prior to Abraham, prior to the origins of Israel: then there was as thus far no holy scripture. However, when we say 'before scripture', we are talking of the instance of the Bible itself. In what we describe 'biblical times', or in a good deal of them, there was as yet no Bible (John, 2000).

The people of the Bible were, as we at the present see it, occupied in the procedure out of which our Bible in the end would materialize, however, they themselves had no Bible: at that occasion, evidently, the Bible as we recognize it was not at that time there (John, 2000).

A scripture, in the intellect of a previously presented, definite and bordered, written conduct for the religion, did not yet subsist. In the time of (say) the prophet Isaiah there was as yet no such scripture, as well as, he by no means talks of there being one. St. Paul came to consider that Jesus was alive, as well as was Lord, however, not for the reason that he had read, with reference to it in any written Gospel (John, 2000).

It is disreputable that there is, in the earlier phases of Christianity, modest or no application to the written records that we at this time know as the Gospels, or even to such preceding written sources as might have gone into the creation of them. Yet if such written sources subsisted, the reality that so little declaration is made of them, so little appeal made to them, gives the impression to reveal that they had no fairly central or crucial purpose in the religion: the religion could survive and develop devoid of them (John, 2000).

Consequently the era of the Bible was an era when the Bible was not yet there. It is sardonic that we utilize the expression 'biblical studies' to select our effort on this period. The faith of the men of the Bible, Biblical faith, was not in its individual character a scriptural religion. Faith and religion, contained by the Bible, were not faith and religion distinct and determined by a Bible (John, 2000).

Only afterwards, after scripture had been shaped and bordered, after the Bible had come to be professed as an absolute, complete, and enclosed unit, did it turn out to be natural or indeed likely to see and to classify Christianity as a scriptural religion, a religion the form of which was determined and restricted by a written and printed holy book (John, 2000).

A lot of conventional doctrines of scripture, on the other hand, take their exit from the circumstances where the Bible is already absolute, definite, identified and recognized. The Bible is understood to be previously there, it is already separated from other writings. This is so in both Catholic and Protestant principles but it is predominantly obvious in Catholicism for the reason that in it the role and the authority of scripture are more plainly isolated and more piercingly defined as exclusively necessary (David, 1999).

Traditional doctrines -- and most definitely in Catholic principle -- were from the start predicated upon the survival of scripture as an absolute, as a compilation bordered and definite. The canon of scripture, i.e. The catalog which defined which volumes position within the scripture and, by elimination, which books were not inside it, was seen as absolute, restricted and monotonous; as well as the qualities of scripture, its stimulation, its stipulation, its satisfactoriness, its eloquence and so on, were applied in a relatively level method to all fractions of the Bible (David, 1999).

In Catholic orthodoxy scripture was taken to be the vital principle for faith, as well as, especially, it was taken to be the vital source for principle: thus principle was characterized as if it is resultant from scripture, so that in the total scheme of understanding scripture had a place antecedent to doctrine. Doctrine, to be compelling, ought to be seen to obtain from scripture. Faith was obligated to…

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