World War Ii Essays Examples

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WWII the United States Entered

Words: 1011 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 71170487

Gradually, though, the war effort eroded the practical and theoretical underpinnings of racism in the United States. The war stimulated the domestic economy, particularly in the industrial and manufacturing sectors. Jobs were opening up rapidly, and because so many white men were fighting the war, many black men were available to work. "For black workers World War II opened up opportunities that had never before existed," (O'Neil 1). The same was true for women, as the war left gaping holes in the labor market that needed to be filled in untraditional ways. At the same time as the war exposed American prejudice, "World War II gave many minority Americans -- and women of all races -- an economic and psychological boost." (Harris 1). The Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) was founded, and overall, the war "jump-started the civil rights movement" in the United States (Harris 1; "Identify the impact of World War II on minority groups in America. (U.S. History").

African-Americans might have been the largest aggregate non-white group in the United States, but the Second World War had a strong impact on other social and cultural groups including Asian-Americans, Native Americans, and Latin Americans. Native Americans fought in the…… [Read More]

Bibliography:
Harris, Michael. "How WWII Affected America's Minorities." Los Angeles Times. 13 June, 2000. Retrieved online:  http://articles.latimes.com/2000/jun/13/news/cl-40272 

"Identify the impact of World War II on minority groups in America." (U.S. History)." Retrieved online: http://share.ehs.uen.org/node/6217
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WWII History Making Decades WWII-Present

Words: 2515 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 66978809

Diversity -- with the exception of homophobia -- was beginning to be commonly accepted and praised. Technology -- such as the use of DNA in criminology and the introduction of the PC -- was becoming more prominent in the lives of everyday Americans. In the Cold War, President Gorbachev asked for openness and economic freedom, while President Reagan asked him to tear down the Berlin Wall, which he did. However, the discovery of AIDS had a far more profound impact on the American people than any of these events. In 1981, the first case of AIDS was reported in the United Kingdom, and this eventually caused quite a crisis in the U.S., as it was first noticed among gay men, and then in women and children as well. People became scared because they were not sure what was causing the disease. Research continued throughout the 1980s, but the fear caused by the disease led some to believe it could be transmitted by normal -- rather than sexual or blood-to-blood -- contact. In addition, the appearance of the disease in gay men made many accuse the gay community of the disease and lead to hatred and fear of both gays and…… [Read More]

Resources:
Dove, R. (1999). Heroes & Icons: Rosa Parks. Retrieved August 12, 2009, from Time:

http://www.time.com/time/time100/heroes/profile/parks01.html
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WWII Battle of Monte Cassino History Has

Words: 2237 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64322020

WWII: Battle of Monte Cassino

History has been known to repeat itself. Today in Iraq for example, United States and Allied troops are torn when drawing up plans to win the war in the holy land. The problems stem from their not being able to directly attack certain Muslim holy locations or shrines even though Iraqi insurgents are constantly utilizing these positions as sanctuaries and initiation points for waging battles against the allied forces or the new Iraqi government. During World War II, the Axis powers with Adolf Hitler and the Nazi army also attempted to use similar tactics to fend off attacks by Allied forces.

This report discusses the Battle of Monte Cassino and the pros and cons of the Allied Forces' actions during World War II. A historic shrine was completely destroyed by the events of the Allied forces during the Battle of Monte Cassino in the Italian campaign of 1943-1944. The battle was one of the major turning points against Adolf Hitler and should therefore be completely justified. Capturing Rome was as critical to the efforts of the Allied Forces as was the D-Day invasion because Italy represented the southern gateway to Berlin. Once engaged, Monte Cassino…… [Read More]

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World War Two Weaponry Like

Words: 364 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 61733332



Much of the credit for the successful defense of Britain was the result of the invention of round-based radar that enabled British Fighter Command to alert their interceptors of the approach of Nazi warplanes during the crucial Battle of Britain in

1940 (Bishop & McNab, 2007). By the end of the war, American fighters were equipped with the first air-to-ground missiles. Of course, of all the many inventions and developments in weaponry during the war, the most devastating and revolutionary was the atomic bomb developed by the U.S. that finally ended the war in the Pacific almost a year after victory in Europe (Ambrose, 2001).

References

Ambrose, S. (2001). The Good Fight: How World War II Was Won. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Bishop, C., McNab, C. (2007). Campaigns of World War II Day By Day. London, UK:

Amber Books.

Commager, H., Miller, D. (2002). The Story of World War II: Revised, Expanded & Updated from the Original Text by Henry Steele Commager. New York: Bantam

Books.

Ray, J.…… [Read More]

Sources:
Ambrose, S. (2001). The Good Fight: How World War II Was Won. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Bishop, C., McNab, C. (2007). Campaigns of World War II Day By Day. London, UK:
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WWII Without a Doubt the Expansionist Policies

Words: 399 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 96793550

WWII

Without a doubt, the expansionist policies of Germany, Italy and Japan and a direct attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor necessitated the need for America to enter World War II. However, the real question is not whether America should have entered World War II, but could it have prevented it from happening. As the world's new super power following World War I, America should have done more to restore stability to Western Europe, particularly Germany, a country saddled with huge reparation payments. And, the United States could have taken a more active role in the League of Nations to discourage aggression. Instead, America enjoyed the spoils of World War I and became isolationist in response to the Great Depression. Economic and political instability caused by World War I led the rise of fascism. The Nazi goals of reversing the Versailles Treaty and the establishment of a German Empire by means of war and conquest had to be stopped.

On the home front, Franklin D. Roosevelt conveyed the message that the efforts of civilians to support the war through personal sacrifice was as critical to winning the war as the efforts of the soldiers themselves, and that the civilian…… [Read More]

Works Cited:
'World War II." Wikipedia. Available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_War_II#Home_front (Accessed 3 May 2005).

"World War II.," Available: http://web.uccs.edu/history/student%20presentations/heidi/world_war_two.htm (Accessed 3 May 2005).
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WWII to the 60s the

Words: 1427 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 99114644

Wilson, a student of public administration, favored more governmental regulation and action during a time when large monopolies still existed. He saw the role of public administration as "government in action; it is the executive, the operative, the most visible side of government, and is of course as old as government itself" (Wilson 235). The pendelum swung, though, and the government was blamed for many of the ills that caused the Great Depression. Franklin Roosevelt, despite being called draconian, knew that he had to launch programs that would have a quick effect upon the struggling economy; resulting the New Deal -- a complex, interlocking set of programs designed to produce jobs, economic recovery, and fiscal reform of banking and Wall Street -- exactly what was needed, it seems to turn the Titanic in a new direction (Badger). Then, of course, came the war, which stimulated the economy like nothing else, but also created shortages and hardships. When the war was over, the social pressures were far different. There was a new level of expectation from the returning GIs, new technology that kept the world within one's living room, suburban growth, more technological jobs, and as the decades progressed Civil Rights,…… [Read More]

Resources:
Shepherd, G. "Fierce Compromise: The Administrative Procedure Act Emerges From New Deal Politics." Administrative and Regulatory Law News 22.2 (1997).

Wilson, W. Woodrow Wilson: The Essential Political Writings. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2005.

Wright, D. "A Century of the Intergovernmental Administrative State." Changler, R. A Centennial History of the American Administrative State. New York: Free Press, 1987. 219-60.
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WW2 for FDR the Second World War

Words: 425 Length: 1 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 49435703

WW2

For FDR, the Second World War served as a vital opportunity to revitalize the American economy after years of depression. Therefore, a large part of Roosevelt's justifications, ideas, and visions of the war centered on the economy. The war boosted employment levels, helped involve more women in the workforce, and propelled the industrial development of the nation. The war machine offered impetus for financial investments in industry as well as impetus for developing new technology. In fact, the war era led directly to the consumer culture that was to rise to the fore in the Truman years. Roosevelt had also promoted a bigger federal government even in the years prior to entering the war. The war gave the president the ultimate excuse to further his New Deal plans for greater federal powers.

The bombing of Pearl Harbor served as a convenient excuse to shed America's neutrality and enter into the war on the Allied side in December 1941. Roosevelt has been often accused of wanting to go to war far before the Japanese attack: Hamilton Fish, a Republican congressman who stood in direct opposition to Roosevelt's war polices, stated of the President, "He would have gotten us into the…… [Read More]

Sources:
Schultz, Stanley K. "World War Two: The Impact at Home." 1999 Ameircan History 102: Civil War to the Present. Online at < http://us.history.wisc.edu/hist102/lectures/lecture21.html>.
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WWI and WWII Sonar in Naval Warfare

Words: 4448 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19694347

Sonar Research and Naval Warfare: 1914-1954

During both World War I and World War II, there were a number of informational tactics used by the Navy in order to gain ground on enemy troops. One of those was sonar research, because it provided them with knowledge they would not have otherwise had (Hackmann, 1984). Sonar is not perfect, but a great deal of work has gone into it since its creation, and that has helped it to become a more valuable tool for Naval operations. Sonar is used for navigation, but also for communication and the detection of objects, primarily underwater (Urick, 1983). There are two types of sonar: passive and active. In active sonar, pings are sent out to search for other objects (Hackmann, 1984). Passive sonar does not send out a signal, but only listens for the pings and signals of others (Hackmann, 1984). Both have their place, and can be highly effective. Additionally, both were used by the Navy during WWI and WWII, in an effort to protect vessels from enemies and also locate enemy vessels that may become targets (Hackmann, 1984; Hackmann, 1986).

This paper seeks to provide information about sonar and how it was used…… [Read More]

Bibliography:
Abbatiello, J. (2005). Anti-submarine warfare in World War I: British Naval aviation and the defeat of the U-boats. NY: Routledge.

Adamthwaite, A.P. (1992). The making of the Second World War. New York: Routledge.
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Second World War Left the

Words: 1037 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 36188101

In this sense, Stalin decided to extend his influence and to impose certain types of government in countries such as Poland, Hungry, or Romania. The same fate would have had Greece and Turkey as well, should the U.S. not have outlined the Truman Doctrine. It can be said that the doctrine itself was a reaction to the tendency of the soviets to extend their influence.

The Marshall Plan can be seen as the economic component of the Truman Doctrine. It was in fact a set of principles pointed out in 1947 at Harvard by Secretary of State George Marshall (American Rhetoric, 2008). This economic plan too was designed for cater for the economic needs of eastern countries as well, but seeing that the Russian side considered it to be the mere economic arm of the Truman Doctrine, it forced countries under its occupation to reject this reconstruction aid. In fact the financial support would have enabled states to come out of the recession they were facing after the war taking into account that Eastern Europe had been an important battle field in the entire confrontation. However, the adherence to such a plan also included the adoption of certain capitalist economic…… [Read More]

Sources:
American Rhetoric. "The Marshall Plan 1947." American Rhetoric website. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008  http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/georgecmarshall.html 

The Avalon Project. "The Truman Doctrine." Yale University. 2008. 30 Jan. 2008 http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/trudoc.htm
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WWI & WW2 Comparing and

Words: 1852 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 68215387

The U.S. emerged as a leading superpower and the sole nuclear power in the world, determined to play a leading role in international politics. The post-Second World War era saw the start of a prolonged Cold War in which the U.S. competed for political domination around the world with Soviet Communism until the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. The Second World War also helped the country to overcome the economic depression of the 1930s as its wartime industrial production stimulated its economy.

References

Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm

Dwyer, J.J. (2004). "The United States and World War I." Lew Rockwell.com. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.lewrockwell.com/orig3/dwyer3.html

Keylor, William R. (2007). "World War I." Encyclopedia Encarta Online. On May 26, 2007 at http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761569981/World_War_I.html

Steiner, Z. (2001). 2 the Treaty of Versailles Revisited. In the Paris Peace Conference, 1919: Peace without Victory? (pp. 13-33). New York: Palgrave.

WWI was fought between the Allied Powers (the U.K., France, Belgium, Serbia, Montenegro, Japan, Italy, Russian Empire and the U.S.) and the Central Powers (the Empires of Germany and Austria-Hungary, the Ottoman…… [Read More]

References:
Arima, Y. (2003). "The Way to Pearl Harbor: U.S. Vs. Japan." ICE Case Studies:

Number 118, December, 2003. Retrieved on May 26, 2007 at http://www.american.edu/TED/ice/japan-oil.htm
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WWI WWII or Nazi

Words: 928 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 75308216

Nazi Germany

Nazi Propaganda and the Spread of Fascism

World War II was precipitated by the rise of fascism throughout Europe. As the mores of socialism began to take root in many parts of the continent, fascism emerged as a powerful counterpoint. For nations like Italy, Spain and Germany, the consequences of a sustained and devastating recession would be a coalescing of support behind strong, self-proclaimed and authoritarian leaders. Certainly, most notorious among them would be Adolph Hitler, whose Nazi party would first occupy Austria and Germany before ultimately pursuing a more global agenda. However, for our discussion, the primary interest is the degree of success that the Nazi party had in ultimately penetrating Germany with its values, ideals and policies. As the discussion here will show, propaganda would play a central role in the ability of the Nazi party to garner support and generate the impassioned loyalty of the German people.

In particular, our attention is drawn to an image that is estimated to be from around 1930, depicting Hitler in a manner that at once glorifies the Nazi leader and displays the core tenets of fascism. The image, which can be found at the following link, shows the…… [Read More]

Bibliography:
German Propaganda Archive. (2013). Es Lebe Deutschland. Bytwerk.com.

History Learning Site (HLS). (2012). Propaganda in Nazi Germany. Historylearningsite.co.uk.
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World War 2 Until the Modern Time in the U S

Words: 1206 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 1800489

U.S. Economy Since World War II

economy is the largest in the world but has the most unequal distribution of wealth among all the developed countries of the world. The major reason for this inequality is that since the Second World War most U.S. governments have tended to favor the wealthy and the corporate sector while formulating their economic policies. Such "rich friendly" policies have become more pronounced since the early 1980s and continue to this day to the detriment of the society and the economy. This essay gives an overview of the post-World War II U.S. economy and outlines the ways in which various U.S. administrations have enacted policies favoring the corporate sector and the wealthy.

Background

The 18th century British economist Adam Smith advocated the benefits of a Laissez faire economy in his The Wealth of Nations (1776) by proclaiming that a "free economy" in which every individual pursues his own good, works for the benefit of everyone. These principles of a capitalist economy were adopted by almost all Western countries including the United States following the Industrial Revolution. The 19th century United States thus saw the rise of the "robber barons" -- an era in which industrial…… [Read More]

References:
'Eisenhower, Dwight David." Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2004. December 17, 2004.

http://encarta.msn.com/encyclopedia_761554032_2/Eisenhower.html
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World War 2 Until the Modern Time in the U S

Words: 1514 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 33221396

discrimination in U.S.

There are people still alive today who remember Jim Crow laws. Half a century ago, segregation of drinking fountains, public restrooms, public buses, and public schools was still legal. Fifty years ago blacks in many states could not make a living except to work in jobs that resembled slavery in their wages and work conditions. The Civil Rights movement ostensibly changed everything. Yet decades of political correctness and affirmative action have all but glossed over the deeply rooted problems of racism and other forms of injustice evident in the daily lives of many Americans. African-Americans are also not the only minority group to suffer from systematic discrimination. Half of all Americans -- black, white, rich poor -- experience daily discrimination at home and in the workplace. Less than a hundred years ago, women could not even vote. Suffrage created twice as many voters and like the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s, feminism promised to change the outlook for American women in general. Yet females still earn less money than their male counterparts and as a result many women of all colors live in poverty. Innumerable legal measures, from Brown v. Board of Education to Roe v.…… [Read More]

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WWII History

Words: 1470 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 64637358

Cornlius Ryan, one of the finest writers of the history of World War II, was born in Dublin in 192. He worked as a correspondent from 1941 to 1945 and covered stories of the battles in Europe for Reuters and the London Daily Telegraph and in the final months of the Pacific campaign.

The first book written, published in 1959, was The Longest Day, that sold four million copies in twenty -seven editions and later in 1962 a film was made on it. However, it is said that The Longest Day was originally published in 1959 and since then it ahs reprinted several times.

Furthermore, another book was published in 1966 The Last Battle, while in 1974, he finished his third book A Bridge Too Far, though at the same time he was undergoing treatment for cancer that killed him in 1976.

Moreover, he was the author was a native of Ireland who later became an Air Force pilot and war reporter covering the D-Day landings as well as the advance of General Patton's Third Army across France and Germany. He published books, plays, screenplays, magazine pieces, and radio and TV scripts.

Background and Overview of the Book

The Longest…… [Read More]

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Changes in WWII

Words: 1752 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 67033905

WW2 Momentum Shift 1942-1944

WWII

One of the events that rocked the world and consequently shaped the world was the WWII that commenced effectively in 1939 and ended in 1945. It is however worth noting that some of the conflicts that eventually ended up in the culmination of the WWII started much earlier. The WWII parse involved majority of the nations, including the powerful nations at that time taking sides and aligning themselves and their military and diplomatic allegiance to either the Allies or the Axis, each side forming their combined forces. The commanding forces in the Allies were France, Great Britain, Soviet Union, United States and to some little extent China (Rodye-Smith J., 2014). One the other side of the divide the Axis were Italy, Germany and Japan. This war was largely seen as a continuation of the WWI bearing the 20 years of unresolved disputes that emanated from WWI came back to haunt the same nations there after. The war culminated in the death of between 40 million people to 50 million from direct or indirect contacts with the firepower in the battle field. This paper will hence concentrate more on the later years of the WWII where…… [Read More]

References:
Rodye-Smith J., (2014). World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/648813/World-War-II

Rogole J.A., (2002). The Strategic Bombing Campaign against Germany during World War II. Retrieved July 26, 2014 from http://www.google.co.ke/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=10&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CGoQFjAJ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fetd.lsu.edu%2Fdocs%2Favailable%2Fetd-0413102-132317%2Funrestricted%2FRigole_thesis.pdf&ei=rnTVU7T2HOHj4QTl6YCwCA&usg=AFQjCNGr0G5t3esuMHkyG6efcmsHwe2lVg&sig2=f4uVuDX2XSnYn89JcB0wYA&bvm=bv.71778758,d.bGE