Cupid Eros and Osiris Giza  Term Paper

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However, even though their paintings, carvings and sculptures probably served a more functional purpose than otherwise, this does not mean that they didn't want to add aesthetic value to those things. In the case of this funerary sculpture, however, there is very little aesthetic value added to it, which makes one think that its purpose was purely functional and that it served a very specific purpose.

Eros, on the other hand, made out of terracotta was most likely created for a different usage than that of Osiris. Muratov (2011) states that terracotta figurines in Ancient Greece were used in houses as decorations or they sometimes served as "cult images in small house shrines; some of them functioned as charms to ward off evil." Sometimes they were brought to temples and were given as offerings to the gods, but sometimes they were put on graves as "cherished possessions of the deceased, as gifts, or as protective devices" (Muratov). In this way, we can see that the uses for statues and statuettes in Ancient Egypt and Ancient Greece were very different and they held different meanings. It should be noted, however, that it is likely, according to Muratov (2011) that the terracotta figurine was painted and the paint could have simply faded away over time. If the terracotta figurine were to have been painted, then it could be surmised that the figurine was meant to serve a more aesthetic purpose (as decoration on a shelf or as a gift) as opposed to a functional purpose.

In thinking about these statues' meanings, we also have to consider that Osiris was a god that was worshipped and taken very seriously in Ancient Egypt and he was believed to be the ruler of an entire realm (the dead). Eros, or Cupid, on the other hand, was a mythological character whose history changed from early to late accounts of him and he was often placed in narratives where he was depicted as being a very naughty little boy. His purpose in history seems to be more about entertaining as opposed to worshipping or idolizing. Looking at the way the two statues are depicted, as well, could give us a clue about their meaning and function. Osiris is depicted in a very dark color (which was common for male statues in Ancient Egypt; females were created in a lighter color), mummified, and in a very somber pose. Eros, on the other hand, is represented with wings, his hand on his hip -- a very rebellious sort of stance. Eros, in other artwork, is often holding a bow and arrow as well, which was the way in which he caused his trouble in the world.

Works Cited

Hamilton, Edith. Mythology. Back Bay Books, 1998. Print.

Lesko, Barbara S. The Great Goddesses of Egypt. University of Oklahoma Press, 1999.

Print.

Muratov, M.B. "Greek Terracotta Figurines with Articulated Limbs." The Metropolitan

Museum of Art. Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. 2011. Web.

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gtal/hd_gtal.htm

Museum of Fine Arts Boston. http://www.mfa.org. 2011. Web.

Pinch, Geraldine. Egyptian Mythology: A Guide to the Gods, Goddesses, and Traditions

of…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Hamilton, Edith. Mythology. Back Bay Books, 1998. Print.

Lesko, Barbara S. The Great Goddesses of Egypt. University of Oklahoma Press, 1999.

Print.

Muratov, M.B. "Greek Terracotta Figurines with Articulated Limbs." The Metropolitan

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