Customer Centricity - Literature Review Thesis

Length: 20 pages Sources: 10 Subject: Business Type: Thesis Paper: #58933056 Related Topics: Customer Relationship Management, Theme Parks, Customer Service, Field Trip
Excerpt from Thesis :

Even customers who are satisfied with something do not always return to that specific business, especially if the business is somewhat out of the way or relatively inconvenient to get to (Jackson, Cunningham, & Cunningham, 1988).

Customer loyalty is generally thought to be achieved when a customer returns to buy something that they have bought before from the same company (Jackson, Cunningham, & Cunningham, 1988). There are many other ways to measure loyalty statistically, but it basically boils down to a customer returning to a business even though there are so many other choices available (Jackson, Cunningham, & Cunningham, 1988).

There are many ways to increase customer loyalty and it is significant to discuss some of them here (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). One of the best ways is to meet or exceed many of the service standards that others in the industry have established for customers (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). This is often a difficult thing to do but it is necessary if loyalty is to be kept (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). A customer's right to their privacy is also extremely significant to many people today with the higher number of credit card and identity thefts that seem to be taking place and the problems that some have with privacy on computers in carrying out transactions (Shafiroff & Shook, 1990).

If customers believe that all of the personal information they have provided to a specific business is being shared with everyone they will likely not do business with that specific organization or will not return to do business a second time (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). Customers who are assured of privacy and feel comfortable with a specific business will likely buy there again because they feel safe (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). Dealing with customers that have problems or difficulties is also another way to keep customer loyalty (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). Businesses should have a good method for customers who have complaints to call and have these complaints dealt with promptly and efficiently (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971).

Customers who feel they can contact the business and discuss problems that they are having are more likely to remain with that business because they feel that they are actually cared about by the people that work there (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). It is also significant to look at customer value and customer satisfaction (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971).

Most large businesses survey the customer base that they have to determine how satisfied a customer is with the business and the good or service that was bought (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). It is significant to look at these customers' opinions of how satisfied they are with a specific business, but most do not look at the values that they provide for their service based on what their competitors are providing (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971).

When this is analyzed and looked at along with customer satisfaction ratios it will help to indicate why some customers who appear to be satisfied with the business do not remain loyal to that specific business (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). Not every business completely understands what customer centricity programs are but they can be very powerful tools when used for relationship management (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971).

One of the main reasons that businesses feel that customer centricity is so significant is due to the fact that maintaining a relationship with the customer that they already have is often a great deal cheaper than acquiring more customers (Rackham, Honey, Colbert, Fields, Hinson, Morgran, Morris, Sugden, & Tribe, 1971). Many firms find that losing the customers that they have and the customers that are most profitable have very serious effects on their success of the specific organization is centered on customers or has some other focus (Williams, Spiro, & Fine, 1990).

The way that the organization works and whether its processes are designed to be centered around the customer (Williams, Spiro, & Fine, 1990).

The way that a specific organization is structured and whether the form that the firm has taken actually follows the function to meet the needs of the customer (Williams, Spiro, & Fine, 1990).

How the culture of the organization actually manifests itself and whether everyone who works with the firm listens to, thinks about, and responds appropriately to the customers that the firm already has (Williams, Spiro, & Fine, 1990).

There are ways to overcome these hurdles but they must be recognized before they can be overcome and then they must be studied in order to assure that the difficulties that are being faced in a specific company are corrected so that customers become the main focus (Williams, Spiro, & Fine, 1990). Direct intervention…

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography

Achrol, R. & Stern, L.W. (1988). Environmental Determinants of Decision Making Uncertainty in Marketing Channels. Journal of Marketing Research, 25: 36-50.

Assael, H. (1987). Consumer Behavior and Marketing Action. Third Edition, Boston, MA: PWS-Kent.

Bitran, G., and Hoech, J. (1990). The Humanization of Service: Respect at the Moment of Truth. Sloan Management Review, 31(4), 89-96.

Boyan, l. And Enright, R. (1992). High Performance Sales Training. New York: AMACOM Division of American Management Association.


Cite this Document:

"Customer Centricity - Literature Review" (2008, October 11) Retrieved September 16, 2021, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/customer-centricity-literature-review-27704

"Customer Centricity - Literature Review" 11 October 2008. Web.16 September. 2021. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/customer-centricity-literature-review-27704>

"Customer Centricity - Literature Review", 11 October 2008, Accessed.16 September. 2021,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/customer-centricity-literature-review-27704

Purpose of Paperdue.com

The documents we provide are to be used as a sample, template, outline, guideline in helping you write your own paper, not to be used for academic credit. All users must abide by our "Student Honor Code" or you will be restricted access to our website.

Related Documents
Customer Centric Culture - Organizing
Words: 3643 Length: 10 Pages Topic: Business Paper #: 564576

All those nice customer-friendly marketing techniques notwithstanding, White notes, customer-centered personalization can't work well without being linked with high-quality, high-visibility customer service. Even some of the most successful corporations, like IBM, apparently stumbled along for a time, totally failing to "get it" when it came to customer-centric strategies. According to the industry publication Chain Store Age, in the early 1990s, a customer-centric culture "was foreign to Big Blue" - and

Customer Retention Strategies Creating Exceptional Customer Service...
Words: 886 Length: 2 Pages Topic: Business Paper #: 7682721

Customer Retention Strategies Creating Exceptional Customer Service at Southwest Airlines Southwest Airlines continues to lead the airline industry in customer satisfaction because their business model puts customer satisfaction and maximizing customer experiences at its center. Their leadership of the industry on customer satisfaction measures has also been seen in the result of Consumer Reports studies as well (Consumer Reports, 2007). What sets this airline apart from others is the belief that customer

Business Resource Management Group Customer
Words: 2901 Length: 10 Pages Topic: Business Paper #: 99996440

Question 6: We have routine or regular measures of customer service. At a score of 3, which indicates that the company's senior management sees their performance as neutral on this specific question, indicating the consultancy has processes in place for routinely measuring customer service. Yet from the responses to earlier questions it is clear that there is a lack of commitment and a lack of urgency to using these routine or regular measures to quantify their

GE Healthcares Centricity EMR
Words: 1729 Length: 6 Pages Topic: Health Paper #: 34723609

CENTRICITY EMR Part 1 Product Profile (Features and Benefits) In essence, Centricity Practice Solution could be defined as “a comprehensive Electronic Medical Record (EMR), Practice Management, Population Health, and Analytics, and Connectivity solution designed to help you enhance the clinical, operational, and financial productivity of your ambulatory practice” (GE Health, 2019). A GE Healthcare EMR System, Centricity EMR could therefore be considered an integrated EHR/EMR system that could be used by healthcare institutions

Amazon.com a Strategic Assessment of Amazons' E-Strategies
Words: 4490 Length: 13 Pages Topic: Business Paper #: 63706555

Amazon.com A Strategic Assessment of Amazons' e-Strategies Amazon's remarkable ascent as one of the top online global retailers can be attributed to the foresight they had in creating a comprehensive distributed order management, Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP), Supply Chain Management (SCM) and e-commerce series of systems. The many other e-commerce sites that rose quickly with massive infusions of venture capital just as quick exited the market, flaming out due to a lack

Delta Airlines the Airline Industry
Words: 1442 Length: 4 Pages Topic: Business Paper #: 27940922

S. And other nations (O'Neal, Jacob, Farmer, Martin, 2007). As a result, there is much dissatisfaction specifically in the areas of pricing, price discounting and the configuration of schedules to get optimal pricing. It has been common in the past for customers to be charged up to $300 to $400 more fares for alleviating a one-stop fare when a nonstop fare into a non-hub city became available. Customers have complained