Depression Treatment Modalities Among the Term Paper

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Discussion

Depression can have profound and devastating effects on individuals, including the elderly. Since the elderly population is continually aging, it is important that factors involved in treatment interventions for depression among the elderly be investigated to its fullest extent. The purpose of this study is to illuminate the effectiveness of different treatment modalities among the elderly and the influence that personality traits have on outcomes. This proposal aimed to ask two major questions: a) what kind of treatment intervention works best to reduce depressive symptoms among the elderly - antidepressants, psychotherapy, or a combination of the two? And b) what effects do personality traits have on the effectiveness of treatments for depression in the elderly? It is hypothesized that combination therapy will prove to be the most effective treatment intervention, and that autonomous personality traits will be associated with more positive treatment outcomes than dependent personality traits.

A limitation of this study is that factors outside the treatment environment, such as family or social support, are not taken into account in this study. These external factors may also play an influential role in the outcomes of treatment interventions. Further research beyond the scope of this study could include a longitudinal study that would look at whether personality traits affect treatment outcomes for longer periods after the completion of therapeutic interventions. The results of this proposed study will indicate where clinicians could potentially focus in order to develop or improve effective treatment interventions for depression among the elderly population.

Reference

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Sources Used in Document:

Reference

Burvill, P., Hall, W., Stampfer, H., Emmerson, P. (a99a). The prognosis of depression in old age. British Journal of Psychiatry, 158, 64-71.

Coyne, J. (1998). Persistently poor outcomes of undetected major depression in primary care. General Hospital Psychiatry, 20, 12-20.

Greenburg, P., Stiglin, L., Finkelstein, S., Berndt, E. (1993). The economic burden of depression in 1990. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 54, 405-18.

Hirschfeld, R., Shea, M. (1992). Personality. In E.S. Paykel (Ed.), Handbook of Effective disorders. New York: Guilford.

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