Harry Potter and the Goblet Term Paper

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When gone about the wrong way, the whole thing backfires on those who were only trying to help.

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire also details the struggles of the classes, which is a universal lesson for humanity. There are the pure-blooded families in the wizarding world, who, for the most part, see themselves as superior to all those whose blood has been tainted. Right out of World War II, some of these pure-blooded families have become obsessed with purity of blood, to the extent that they are willing to murder any and all who aren't pure, as they are. and, just as Hitler was far from the Arian ideal he professed, the leader of these maniacal pure-blooded wizards is a half-blood himself.

Of course there are the exceptions to the rule, in Harry's world, just as there are in society in the real world. One pure-blooded family, the Weasleys, are looked down upon by the other pure-blooded families as they mix and mingle with those of impure blood. In fact, it's implied that the father of the family, Arthur Weasley, has been forced to stay at his lowly post within the government due to his support of those with impure blood.

This can definitely be compared with the society bluebloods of the real world, who intermarry and socialize with only the right people. This hierarchy, of elite members, secures their station in life, at birth, and snubs their noises at those below them.

Perhaps the most direct attack on a facet of society, in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, comes with a character by the name of Rita Skeeter. Rita Skeeter is a reporter for the popular wizarding news paper, the Daily Prophet. Skeeter's journalistic style is a direct jab at the biased media of today.

Skeeter begins by manipulating young Harry. She whisks him into a broom closet and begins to interview him. Instead of
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writing down exactly what Harry is telling her, she embellishes on everything he says, to the point that much of the article comes out being material that was never discussed and hadn't happened, but made it a much more interesting read.

In society today, we find this happening with the media all the time. They often twist and turn the words and actions of a person, to make the story much more juicy than it really is, all in the name of sales! and, rarely do they care who they hurt in the process. The juicier the story, the better.

When Harry refuses to be her 'Golden Boy', Skeeter turns on him. Where her first pieces spoke fondly of Harry, her later articles came close to downright slander. She is forbidden to come on school grounds, but like any hungry journalist finds ways around the ban. Skeeter quotes unscrupulous sources, and even resorts to plying one source with drink to try to get him to talk. When that doesn't work, she brings out the skeletons in that source's closet.

In the real world, the same thing happens day in and day out, in the media. One moment the media may love a person, the next their name is mud. Journalists will do whatever it takes to get the story, including manipulation, and if they can't get the information from a reliable source, then unreliable sources will just have to do. Rowling lashes out at these media hounds blatantly with her characterization of Skeeter and her lack of journalist ethics.

In the end, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is still a finely crafted children's novel. Rarely does a story come along that can immerse a reader in so much detail that they feel like this fantasy world could possibly exist. but, once one looks beyond the facade of fantasy, deeper messages begin to reveal themselves. Whether it is societal issues from the past or from the present, Rowling brings them to life through her fantastic tale.

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