Life Long Learners One of Essay

Excerpt from Essay :



Parts of the theory are individual but coherent. The microsystem is the smallest layer in the sense that it is closest to the child and contains all the structures of which the child has regular contact. It includes the relationships and structures that the child uses to define their surroundings (family, school, and neighborhood). The interactions in this layer are primary modifiers, but are continually impacted by other layers. The mesosystem is the rather amorphous way that Microsystems morph and interact with another -- connections between events and organizations. The exosystem is the larger social system in which the child does not directly interact but has a profound effect on the Microsystems (positive and negative effects, etc.). The macrosystem, or the outermost layer in the child's environment consists of laws, customs, values, and norms -- all of which the child is expected to assimilate prior to becoming part of that specific culture. Finally, the chronosystem or time development, is relative to the child's experiences within the structure of the "when" -- and the manner in which time affects culture and society -- both historically and practically (events and structures) (Paquette and Ryan, 2008).

Again, using the ecological model, the impact of moving through learning cycles clearly changes based on the position one is in the overall system. For instance, as individuals age, whether they are teachers or doctors, their worldview changes. With that change in worldview, then, comes the realization that many of the facts they thought they knew, or that may have been imparted in their classes, patients, or as parents, might need a bit of "tweaking." The power of our ability as humans to evolve intellectually and emotionally, though, is related to our ability to include a
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changing worldview into the craft of learning and teaching (Schoenfeld, 2002).

Also taking the ecological approach further, if explanations from the external world (outer realm of Bronfenbrenner's model) towards in inner world, students of all ages can construct and contrast alternative conceptual structures knowing that some are true, some are false, and some are both, depending on the circumstances. Indeed, this ability to take holistic ideas and move "through" a paradigm constitutes a very successful way of dealing with lifelong learning and, in turn, respects the learners ability to make up their own minds while continuing to develop rational, evidenced-based, learning skills (Chinn and Samarpungavan, 2001).

Conclusion - the idea of Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory is that it is not only nested, not only multidimensional, but relevant to both the time and place of development. Thus, a child born in 16th Century France might have a different development scale, rate, and cognitive cycle than a child born in Southern California in 1980. Each system contains roles, norms, rules, and actions that are interrelated and shape development -- with the final external series, Time "Chronos," guiding them all. The interaction between systems and the external and internal links that make up culture is easily seen via Figure 2, and is a summation of Bronfenbrenner's total paradigm (Source: groups.apu.edu/practicaltheo/courses.htm)

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The Ecology of Human Development. Harvard University

Press.

Chinn, C. And a. Samarapungavan. (2001). "Distinguishing Between Understanding

And Belief." Theory into Practice. 40 (4): 235-42.

Johnson-Laird, P. (2009). How We Reason. Oxford University Press.

Schoenfeld, a. (2002). "How Can We Examine the Connections Between Teachers'

World Views and Their Educational Practices?" Issues in Education. 8 (2): 217-28.

"Theories of Behavior." (2008). KidDevelopment. Cited in:

http://www.kiddevelopment.com

Siegleman, C. And E.Rider. (2002). Life Span Human Development. Wadsworth Publishing.

"Urie Bronfenbrenner," (September 26, 2005). Cornell University News. Cited in:

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Sept05/Bronfenbrenner.ssl.html

Zull, J. (2002). The Art…

Sources Used in Documents:

REFERENCES and WORKS CONSULTED

Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979). The Ecology of Human Development. Harvard University

Press.

Chinn, C. And a. Samarapungavan. (2001). "Distinguishing Between Understanding

And Belief." Theory into Practice. 40 (4): 235-42.

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