Narrative of the Captivity and Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Even though some of the Indians were kind to her, she never changes her mind about them, and never gives them the benefit of the doubt, even when they ransom her and keep their word about taking her home.

Mary's faith carried her through her ordeal, and helped after she returned to her husband, as well. Eventually, both her son and daughter were ransomed, and the family moved to Boston, since nothing was left of their home in Lancaster. She writes, "The Lord hath been exceeding good to us in our low estate, in that when we had neither house nor home, nor other necessaries, the Lord so moved the hearts of these and those towards us, that we wanted neither food, nor raiment for ourselves or ours" (Rowlandson). Strangers and friends helped the family get back on their feet, and eventually, they moved to Connecticut. Her story is one of courage, strength, and faith, and it was her faith that helped her survive, and helped her create a new life for herself when she returned to her husband and family.

In conclusion, Mary Rowlandson was a devout and strong woman who had a powerful will to survive, and who
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used her faith and strength to survive her captivity with the Indians. The elementary school Web site states, She was the first woman to have a book published in the United States, and her account of her capture went on to be a bestseller, one of the first in the nation, as well (Editors). Catherine Lavender of City University of New York notes, she never wrote another book, and she died in 1682, and the book was actually published after her death (Lavender). Mary Rowlandson was a remarkable woman, and her captivity helped show that the Indians could be reasonable at times, and they were not above bargaining with the white men. Her trials only helped her faith grow stronger, and her family grow closer together.

References

Canada, Mark. "Mary Rowlandson: Narrator of Captivity." University of North Carolina at Pembroke. 2002. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/markport/lit/amlit1/fall2002/04rowlan.htm

Editors. "About Mary Rowlandson." Mary Rowlandson Elementary School. 2008. 16 Feb. 2008. http://rowlandson.nrsd.net/aboutmary.php

Klekowski, Libby. "Mary Rowlandson - Captive in 1675/76." University of Massachusetts. 1997. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/conn.river/mary.html

Lavender, Catherine. "Mary Rowlandson." City University of New York. 2000. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/rowlandson.html

Rowlandson, Mary. "Narrative of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson." Gutenberg.org. 1998. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext97/crmmr10.txt

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Canada, Mark. "Mary Rowlandson: Narrator of Captivity." University of North Carolina at Pembroke. 2002. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.uncp.edu/home/canada/work/markport/lit/amlit1/fall2002/04rowlan.htm

Editors. "About Mary Rowlandson." Mary Rowlandson Elementary School. 2008. 16 Feb. 2008. http://rowlandson.nrsd.net/aboutmary.php

Klekowski, Libby. "Mary Rowlandson - Captive in 1675/76." University of Massachusetts. 1997. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/conn.river/mary.html

Lavender, Catherine. "Mary Rowlandson." City University of New York. 2000. 16 Feb. 2008. http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/rowlandson.html

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