Stream of Consciousness in Faulkner's Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

During this expose into Stupen's relationship with Miss Coldfield's past, is where the heavy introduction of the "stream of consciousness" tactic comes forth.

This model permeates the entire Faulkner work, however it is extremely prevalent within the first several chapters. Indeed, Faulkner sets up the integration of this model by the use of Quentin's "consciousness" throughout the description of Miss Coldfield's past. Quentin, incorporates Miss Coldfield's "historic narrative" with his own perceived notions of Southern culture and relates, the presentation of Thomas Stupen's interaction with individuals as an explanation for the entire culture of the South and more importantly, Quentin's "conscious" thoughts express a linkage that the South lost the war because of men like Stupen, men who had shrewd and calculating natures but lacked compassion and therefore drew the ire and wrath of God, therein preventing the South from attaining victory (Burton, 2006).

As the novel progresses through the remaining chapters and Quentin speaks to other individuals who are part of the Coldfield narrative, it becomes clear to Quentin that Miss Coldfield's narrative discourse is not simply a rendering of incidences from her past but rather a social commentary on the role certain individuals played in crafting the environment in the South. Quentin, indeed finds himself dealing with larger questions and broader issues within the context of the novel. There are instances when he is discussing parts of the narrative with his father, Mr. Compson (Blotner, 2006).

Mr. Compson deviates from the narrative and tells the story from an outside perspective as it relates to the experiences Miss Coldfield had during her youth on the Stupen plantation. During this expository session with his father, the reader
Parts of this Document are Hidden
Click Here to View Entire Document
is introduced to Quentin's "consciousness" as he attempts to reconcile the experiences of Miss Coldfield's youth with the type of man Thomas Stupen appears to be- in deed the reader is brought into the fore when Quentin's own thoughts turn to equating Mr. Stupen with having a level of supernatural evil; one that is devoid of all logic, rational and compassion (Blotner, 2006).

Conclusion

Faulkner's use of the "Stream of Consciousness" technique is the driving model behind the expression of specific thoughts and ideas throughout his novel. The main character, Quentin, uses this predictive model to comprehend not only Miss Coldfield's youthful experiences but also to reconcile, with himself at least, the larger issues of societal interaction, race, morality and power and their proper role within Southern culture. Faulkner introduces the reader to Quentin's "consciousness" and uses it to convey Quentin's thoughts and emotions to the reader rather than making Quentin appear one dimensional, as narrative dialogue on the page but rather, Quentin appears more alive to the reader, the reader can partake in Quentin's inner-most private thoughts through interacting with this "consciousness." Faulkner's attempt at creating a deeper relationship through specific uses of "stream of consciousness" provides a matrix for a deeper understanding of the issues Quentin has to deal with as the novel progresses.

Works Cited

Anshen, David. "Faulkner's Common Folk." The Mississippi Quarterly 61 (2008): 1103-1109. Print.

Blottner, Joseph. "Opus Two." National Review 14 June 1999: 97. Print.

Burton, Stacy. "Temporality and Narrative." Comparative Literature 48 (2006): 1356-1367. Print.

Cagle, Jeremey. "More Than a Snapshot: Allen Tate's Ironic Historical Consciousness in the Fathers." The Mississippi Quarterly 59 (2005): 77-85. Print.

Spillers, Hortense. "Topographical Topics: Faulknerian Space." The Mississippi Quarterly 57…

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Anshen, David. "Faulkner's Common Folk." The Mississippi Quarterly 61 (2008): 1103-1109. Print.

Blottner, Joseph. "Opus Two." National Review 14 June 1999: 97. Print.

Burton, Stacy. "Temporality and Narrative." Comparative Literature 48 (2006): 1356-1367. Print.

Cagle, Jeremey. "More Than a Snapshot: Allen Tate's Ironic Historical Consciousness in the Fathers." The Mississippi Quarterly 59 (2005): 77-85. Print.

Cite This Essay:

"Stream Of Consciousness In Faulkner's" (2010, November 08) Retrieved October 30, 2020, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/stream-of-consciousness-in-faulkner-7013

"Stream Of Consciousness In Faulkner's" 08 November 2010. Web.30 October. 2020. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/stream-of-consciousness-in-faulkner-7013>

"Stream Of Consciousness In Faulkner's", 08 November 2010, Accessed.30 October. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/stream-of-consciousness-in-faulkner-7013